EE Student Information

EE Student Information, Spring Quarter 19-20: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

Updates will be posted on this page, as well as emailed to the EE student mail list.

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As always, use your best judgement and consider your own and others' well-being at all times.

News

professor Hector Garcia-Molina
December 2019

Professor Hector Garcia-Molina is fondly remembered by the EE and CS departments. Hector was a truly remarkable, caring man who has touched us in so many ways.

In addition to his professorial duties, Hector enthusiastically assisted our department with commencement photos, taking wonderful portraits of graduates and their families.

Hector's enthusiasm, kindness and generous teaching spirit continues with his students and colleagues.

 

Read more about Hector's legacy: please visit The Stanford Daily and The Stanford News article.

 

Hector helping Marsha Dillon, Mary K. McMahon, and the photographer to fine tune camera settings before the department's 2018 commencement.

professor Jelena Vučković
December 2019

Congratulations to Professor Jelena Vučković! She has been awarded the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) A F Harvey Engineering Research Prize. She will develop an on-chip integrated pulsed laser, which will revolutionize photonic technology and the applications that require these lasers, such as medicine, optical communications, quantum computing and self-driving cars.

Currently Ti:sapph lasers are bulky, expensive, table-top lasers, which can be limiting to applications such as LIDAR and microscopy. Jelena and her team are aiming to create a miniature version, which would have a total volume smaller than a cubic centimeter. This would have a major impact on photonic technology and society, by decreasing the cost and footprint of such lasers.

The new miniature lasers could also be applied to and used in several applications, such as miniaturized and inexpensive sensors in self-driving cars, which would make such LIDAR systems accessible to everyone; to pump quantum light sources for secure quantum communications where eavesdropping can be detected; and as compact sources for brain microscopy and imaging.

Jelena said: "I am tremendously honored to receive the A F Harvey Prize from the IET, and to be selected among the shortlisted group of very distinguished scientists. This prize will be used to support my lab's work on implementation of miniaturized and inexpensive ultrafast lasers – the greatest challenge of integrated photonics, which could revolutionize many applications, from self-driving cars, to neuroscience and to quantum technologies."

Sir John O'Reilly, Chair of the IET's Selection Committee for the Prize, said: "Professor Jelena Vuckovic's pioneering work on inverse photonic design is transforming our approach to the design and realization of new high-performance integrated systems - with wide-ranging applications in communications, lidar, quantum systems and the like. She and her team at Stanford have developed inverse methods that cut the design time dramatically, thereby opening new vistas and radically different approaches to realization of elements not previously conceived. Finally, we see in prospect photonics realizing its untapped potential, helping us to 'engineer a better world'."

The IET's A F Harvey Research Prize, worth £350,000, is named after Dr A F Harvey who bequeathed a generous sum of money to the IET for a trust fund to be set up in his name for the furtherance of scientific research into the fields of Radar and Microwaves; Lasers and Optoelectronics; Medical Engineering.

Jelena will present a prize lecture on her research at IET London: Savoy Place on 16 March 2020.

 

Please join us in recognizing Jelena for her extraordinary research!

 

Excerpted from IET Press Release, "Electrical engineer awarded £350,000 research grant to create revolutionary miniature on-chip laser," Dec. 9, 2019.

 

professor Jelena Vučković
December 2019

Professor Jelena Vučković and team recently published "4H-silicon-carbide-on-insulator for integrated quantum and nonlinear photonics" in Nature Photonics.

Photonic chips could become the basis for light-based quantum computers that could, in theory, break codes and solve certain types of problems beyond the capabilities of any electronic computer.

In recent months Jelena has created a prototype photonic chip made of diamond. Now, however, in experiments described in Nature Photonics, she and her team demonstrate how to make a light-based chip from a material nearly as hard as diamond but far less exotic — silicon carbide.

"These are early stage but promising results with a material that is already familiar to industry," Jelena said.

Commonly used in brake pad linings, silicon carbide is a tough material that has carved out a new niche in electronics, where it is used to make chips for high-voltage, high-heat applications, such as electric car power supplies, that are too extreme for ordinary silicon chips.

Like most chip-making materials, silicon carbide is a crystal — a group of specific atoms arranged in a consistent lattice. In a silicon carbide crystal, every silicon atom is joined to four carbon atoms to form a strong, three-dimensional lattice. The stability of this lattice helps makes silicon carbide useful for high-heat applications, whether that involves dealing with friction in brake pad linings or high currents flowing through chips.

Daniil Lukin (EE PhD candidate), Constantin Dory (EE PhD candidate) and Melissa Guidry (AP PhD candidate) led the effort to make this crystal useful as a photonic chip. They removed silicon atoms at strategic locations throughout the lattice. Each vacancy in the lattice created a subatomic trap that captured a single electron from one of the surrounding carbon atoms. To make the light-based chip work, the researchers sent a stream of photons through the lattice. Whenever a photon struck a trapped electron, the collision between those two particles sent a photon spinning off at a particular energy level, or what scientists call a quantum. Interactions between photons and electrons create what scientists call a qubit, or quantum bit. A qubit is roughly analogous to the transistor in an electronic chip — the fundamental unit that makes the system work.

Many hurdles must still be overcome before photonic chips made of silicon carbide, or diamond for that matter, might become useful as the building blocks for a quantum computing system. "Hype tends to get ahead of science," Vuckovic says. But within the next five years or so, she envisions using photonic chips to send data via quantum light through fiber optic cables, making such communications more secure by making it possible to detect efforts to tap into the flow of information.

As the director of Q-FARM — short for Quantum Fundamentals, Architecture and Machines — Jelena is helping to bring together researchers from Stanford and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to solve the nitty-gritty hardware and software challenges necessary to make quantum technology a reality.

"We're trying to take small, practical steps," she says, "while we try to push beyond the limits of our current understanding and discover new platforms for quantum technologies."

Excerpted from Stanford Engineering's "Can we develop computer chips that run on light?" December 2, 2019. 

 

Related Links 

 

 

 

November 2019

Congratulations to Joe Little for his promotion to IT Technical Manager of the Electrical Engineering Department.

Joe will manage Electrical Engineering's IT team as they create and maintain our research computing and network infrastructure, keep our computing environment secure, and provide support and guidance to faculty, staff and students on computing and networking resources. Joe joined EE's Computer Systems Lab in 1996 during the Internet's infancy, and has continued to make significant contributions to both department and university computing as a systems architect, analyst and software developer.

Please join us in congratulating him on his promotion!

 

Joe was recognized earlier in 2019 for his 25 years of service at Stanford. Read more

professor Gordon Wetzstein
November 2019

Congratulations to Professor Gordon Wetzstein! He has been awarded the 2020 SPIE Early Career Achievement Award – Academic Focus – in recognition of outstanding contributions to computational imaging and display technologies. The SPIE Early Career Achievement Award recognizes significant and innovative technical contributions in the engineering or scientific fields of relevance to SPIE.

"Gordon's core research interests lie in computational imaging and photography, i.e. at the intersection of several disciplines including optics, image processing, computer vision, photography, and human perception," notes Professor Wolfgang Heidrich, the director of the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology's Visual Computing Center. "This is an emerging research area that promises to revolutionize both photography and display technologies, as well as other applications of optics through the introduction of computation, thereby enabling more robust, less expensive, and more portable optical devices. Even more importantly, it allows for completely new imaging modalities that have not been possible so far. Gordon has a clear and articulate vision of research in Computational Photography and Displays — in fact he is probably the first to really define Computational Displays as a separate sub-area with similar but distinct challenges from Computational Photography — and has been extremely active providing leadership to the community. He is an emerging star."

Please join us in congratulating Gordon for his tremendous contributions!


 

Excerpted from SPIE.org "Gordon Wetzstein: The 2020 SPIE Early Career Achievement Award – Academic Focus

SPIE.org press release "SPIE, the International Society for Optics and Photonics, Announces Its 2020 Society Awards"

 

EE Prof. H.S.- Philip Wong
October 2019

Professor H.S. Philip Wong has been awarded the IEEE Electron Devices Society J.J. Ebers Award. This is the society's highest honor recognizing outstanding technical contributions to the field of electron devices that have made a lasting impact.

The award will be presented to Philip at the 2019 International Electron Devices Meeting in December. The Jewell James Ebers Award was established in 1971 with the intention to foster progress in electron devices and to commemorate the life activities of Jewell James Ebers, whose distinguished contributions, particularly in the transistor art, shaped the understanding and technology of electron devices.

Philip is the Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Professor in the School of Engineering. He is professor of Electrical Engineering and affiliate faculty of Bio-X, Precourt Institute for Energy, and Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute. Philip's present research covers a broad range of topics including carbon electronics, 2D layered materials, wireless implantable biosensors, directed self-assembly, nanoelectromechanical relays, device modeling, brain-inspired computing, and non-volatile memory devices such as phase change memory and metal oxide resistance change memory.

Please join us in congratulating Philip on this well-deserved honor!

 

Related News

image of emeritus prof Stephen E Harris
September 2019

Emeritus Professor Stephen E. Harris, the Kenneth and Barbara Oshman Professor in the School of Engineering, has been awarded the 2020 Willis E. Lamb Award for Laser Science and Quantum Optics. He will receive the award at the 2020 Physics of Quantum Electronics (PQE) Golden Jubilee - the 50th year of the annual meeting.

Stephen joined our faculty after completing his PhD (and MS) in Electrical Engineering at Stanford. He is known for his contributions to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)– a technique for eliminating the effect of a medium on a propagating beam of electromagnetic radiation. Additionally, he is known for his collaboration with others, producing results in many areas, including lasers, quantum electronics, atomic physics, and nonlinear optics.

Stephen E. Harris is part of Stanford's Ginzton Lab, Q-FARM, and emeritus professor of Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics.

 

Please join us in recognizing Stephen for his tremendous contributions to a variety of scientific fields!

Photo of Professor Stephen E. Harris, date unknown. source: SALLIE, Stanford's Image Exchange.

 

 

image of professor Tsachy Weissman
September 2019

The Stanford Compression Forum (SCF), recently completed its inaugural summer internship program, alliteratively named – STEM to SHTEM (Science, Humanities, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics). Professor Tsachy Weisman and the Compression Forum hosted 44 high school students for internships that ranged from 5 to 9 weeks this summer. 

"The internship is a great opportunity for students to experience engineering research in a new light. Working in groups, students from all kinds of backgrounds had the chance to not only research exciting questions at the intersection of different fields, but also learn from their peers unique ways to approach these questions," reports internship coordinator and graduate student Cindy Nguyen. "This early exposure to research helps break down barriers to entry for a lot of underrepresented students and will, hopefully, trickle down into their decisions in becoming the next generation of engineers, doctors, and scientists."

Although, the internship was unpaid, it provided exposure to research, transcending traditional disciplinary boundaries. Students were grouped into eleven projects that spanned 9 topic areas. Topic areas included DNA compression, Facial HAAC, Nanopore Technology, Discrete Cube Mathematics, Olfactory in VR, Artificial Olfaction Measurement, Decision Making in Games, Computer Assisted Image Reconstruction, and Audio File Compression.


Additional information about the Stanford Compression Forum: compression.stanford.edu/summer-internships-high-school-students; for inquiries on the 2019 projects and groups: scf_high_school_internship@stanford.edu


Excerpts from 2019 interns:

"I applied to this internship with the intent on working on something related to the genetics field (which I love), and I never expected to learn how to use Python in the process. If it weren't for this internship I probably wouldn't have ever put myself in a situation where I would have to learn how [to] code. I'm happy to say that although it can be challenging at times, I'm extremely grateful for having been given this opportunity to learn about Python and how to use it."

"This internship introduced me to some amazing people and mentors. This project taught me things like advanced programming, communication skills, and developed my interest in computer science and electrical engineering."

"I had a wonderful experience with this internship! My mentor is not only amazing at what he does – but he is also very funny. I enjoy spending time with my group because whenever one of us makes a small discovery, we all get excited."

"This internship has allowed me to learn so much from basic compression to coding with python. I am glad I was able to participate."

Photo: 2019 STEM to SHTEM interns, faculty, and graduate students. Professor Tsachy Weissman, second from right, an internship coordinator and grad student Cindy Nguyen, third from right.

image of EE professor Eric Pop
August 2019

EE Professor Eric Pop's research was recently published in Science Advances.

Research in the Pop Lab has shown that a few layers of 2D materials can provide the same insulation as a sheet of glass 100 times thicker. "Thinner heat shields will enable engineers to make electronic devices even more compact than those we have today. We're looking at the heat in electronic devices in an entirely new way," reports Pop.

Detecting thermal vibrations
Thinking about heat as a form of sound inspired the Pop Lab researchers to borrow some principles from the physical world. "We adapted that idea by creating an insulator that used several layers of atomically thin materials instead of a thick mass of glass," said lead author Sam Vaziri, Electrical Engineering postdoc.

The team used up to four different compounds: graphene, molybdenum diselenide, molybdenum disulfide and tungsten diselenide – each three atoms thick – to create a four-layered insulator just 10 atoms deep. Despite its thinness, the insulator is effective because the atomic heat vibrations are dampened and lose much of their energy as they pass through each layer.

"As engineers, we know quite a lot about how to control electricity, and we're getting better with light, but we're just starting to understand how to manipulate the high-frequency sound that manifests itself as heat at the atomic scale," Pop said.


 

Related Links:

This research was supported by the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility, the Stanford Nano Shared Facilities, the National Science Foundation, the Semiconductor Research Corporation, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the Stanford SystemX Alliance, the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, the Stanford Graduate Fellowship program and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. (ANI)

EE Staff Award Winners! Beverly, John, Chet, Edwin and Denise
August 2019

Congratulations to Beverly Davis, John DeSilva, Chet Frost, Edwin Mendoza, and Denise Murphy.

They are recognized as outstanding staff for their extraordinary work! Each were nominated by peers, faculty and/or students for professionalism that went above and beyond their everyday roles. Staff gift card recipients make profound and positive impact in our department's everyday work and academic environment. Please join us in congratulating each of them!

Nominations may be submitted at any time. There are no restrictions on the quantity, persons, or groups that you can nominate. Submitters are asked to include a citation of how the group or person went above and beyond. The submitter can choose to remain anonymous. Nominate a deserving colleague today.

Please join us in congratulating Beverly, John, Chet, Edwin, and Denise.
Excerpts from their nominations follow.

Beverly Davis, Faculty Administrator, EE

  • Beverly is incredibly kind and supportive. She helps to everyone feel welcome and productive!
  • She has helped make my student experience more enjoyable.

John DeSilva, Systems & Network Manager, EE

  • He always gives the right amount of guidance— John helps get me set in the right direction, with enough freedom to explore and learn.
  • John's reliability is unparalleled.

Chet Frost, Administrative Associate, EE

  • As part of SEES Committee (and beyond!), Chet is always willing to help and can covers a multitude of needs.
  • He is resourceful and efficient –– always adding to the enthusiastic spirit of an event.

Edwin Mendoza, Faculty & Staff Affairs Administrator, EE

  • Edwin adds a great deal of brightness to staff each day with his positive and fun personality.
  • His effort to welcome EE visitors and help them navigate Stanford is exceptional.

Denise Murphy, Faculty Affairs and Staffing Manager, EE

  • Denise always goes above and beyond - she treats absolutely everyone with the utmost care.
  • She is a tremendous resource for staff and faculty!

Through generosity of the School of Engineering (SoE), we are ale to continue the Staff Gift Card Bonus Program. Each year SoE provides several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond their role. Staff are chosen from nominations received from faculty, students, and staff. Past nominations are also eligible for future months.

Please nominate a deserving staff person or group today! Each recipient receives a $50 Visa card. Nominations can be made at any time.

Stanford EE staff are amazing!

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February 2014

Three staff members each received a $50 Visa card in recognition of their extraordinary efforts as part of the department’s 2014 Staff Gift Card Bonus Program. The EE department received several nominations in January, and nominations from 2013 were also considered.

Following are January’s gift card recipients and some of the comments from their nominators:

Ann Guerra, Faculty Administrator

  • “She is very kind to students and always enthusiastic to help students… every time we need emergent help, she is willing to give us a hand.”
  • “Ann helps anyone who goes to her for help with anything, sometimes when it’s beyond her duty.” 

Teresa Nguyen, Student Accounting Associate

  • “She stays on top of our many, many student financial issues, is an extremely reliable source of information and is super friendly.”
  • “Teresa’s cheerful disposition, her determination, and her professionalism seem to go above and beyond what is simply required.”

Helen Niu, Faculty Administrator

  • “Helen is always a pleasure to work with.”
  • “She goes the extra mile in her dealings with me, which is very much appreciated.”

The School of Engineering once again gave the EE department several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond. More people will be recognized next month, and past nominations will still be eligible for future months. EE faculty, staff and students are welcome to nominate a deserving staff person by visitinghttps://gradapps.stanford.edu/NotableStaff/nomination/create.

Ann Guerra  Teresa Nguyen  Helen Niu

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