News

Linvill (left) and Gibbons (right) with first silicon device, circa 1955
July 2018

March 2018 marked the Inaugural John G. Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology. Founded by Professor Emeritus James Gibbons and Professor H.S.- Philip Wong, the intention of the Linvill Seminar is to encourage the exploration of future trajectories for electrical engineering.

John Linvill was a revered figure at Stanford as much for his self-effacing and unpretentious style as for his engineering foresight and his commitment to the entrepreneurial spirit. Linvill helped launch Stanford on a trajectory that would ensure Stanford's continuing leadership in electronics engineering for decades to come. These lectures have been created to help us explore our paths going forward, and to honor John Linvill's enormous legacy as both a faculty member and a department chairman, whose commitment to excellence at Stanford continues to be a model for us all.

Featured speaker, Professor and President Emeritus John L. Hennessy, presented "The End of the Road for General Purpose Processors & the Future of Computing". The inaugural Linvill presentation is available through the video below.

 

Abstract of "The End of the Road for General Purpose Processors & the Future of Computing" – After 40 years of remarkable progress in VLSI microprocessors, a variety of factors are combining to lead to a much slower rate of performance growth in the future. These limitations arise from three different areas: IC technology, architectural limitations, and changing applications and usage. The end of Dennard scaling and the slowdown in Moore's Law will require more efficient architectural approaches than we have relied on to date. Although progress on general-purpose processors may hit an asymptote, domain specific architectures may be one attractive path for important classes of problems.

Read more about John Linvill

Visit Stanford EE's YouTube Channel

Yilong Geng (EE PhD candidate) presenting at NSDI '18
July 2018

Interdisciplinary research between professor Balaji Prabhakar, his team, and Google has produced a software clock synchronization system that can track time down to 100 billionths of a second.

The paper, presented at NSDI '18, describes a nanosecond-level clock synchronization that can be an enabler of a new spectrum of timing- and delay-critical applications in data centers.

The current, popular clock synchronization algorithm, NTP, can only achieve millisecond-level accuracy. Current solutions for achieving a synchronization accuracy of 10s-100s of nanoseconds require specially designed hardware throughout the network for combatting random network delays and component noise or to exploit clock synchronization inherent in Ethernet standards for the PHY.

The research team presents HUYGENS, named for the Dutch physicist Christiaan Huygens, who invented the pendulum clock in 1656. HUYGENS is a software clock synchronization system that uses a synchronization network and leverages three key ideas. First, coded probes identify and reject impure probe data—data captured by probes which suffer queuing delays, random jitter, and NIC timestamp noise. HUYGENS then processes the purified data with Support Vector Machines, a widely-used and powerful classifier, to accurately estimate one-way propagation times and achieve clock synchronization to within 100 nanoseconds. Finally, HUYGENS exploits a natural network effect—the idea that a group of pair-wise synchronized clocks must be transitively synchronized— to detect and correct synchronization errors even further.

The importance of technical advances in measuring time was underscored by European regulations that went into effect in January and that require financial institutions to synchronize time-stamped trades with microsecond accuracy.

Being able to trade at the nanosecond level is vital to Nasdaq. Two years ago, it debuted the Nasdaq Financial Framework, a software system that it has envisioned eventually trading everything from stocks and bonds to fish and car-sharing rides.

The new synchronization system will make it possible for Nasdaq to offer "pop-up" electronic markets on short notice anywhere in the world, Mr. Prabhakar said. He cited the World Cup as a hypothetical example of a short-term electronic marketplace.

"There are tickets needed, housing, people will need transportation," he said. "Think of an electronic market almost like a massive flea market hosted by Nasdaq software."

The HUYGENS team is Yilong Geng (EE PhD candidate), Shiyu Liu (EE PhD candidate), and Zi Yin (EE PhD candidate), Ashish Naik (Google Inc.) EE professors Balaji Prabhakar and Mendel Rosenblum, and Amin Vahdat (Google Inc.)

 

Related Links (excerpted from)

July 2018

Congratulations to professors Jon Fan and Juan Rivas-Davila! Two of their researchers won the 2018 NASA iTech Forum. The event is a collaborative effort between NASA and the U.S. Department (DOE) of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) to find and foster innovative solutions for critical energy challenges on Earth and in space.

The winning project was presented by Grayson Zulauf and Thaibao (Peter) Phan. Both are PhD candidates. Their collaborative project is developing technology for wireless charging of electric vehicles on Earth, and eventually, Mars. The researchers received invaluable feedback from NASA and DOE's ARPA-E leaders, as well as experts in the field of advanced energy technology.

"NASA is proud to provide a platform for innovators that exposes them to a cadre of industry experts who will be instrumental in the development of their technologies," said Kira Blackwell, NASA iTech program executive for STMD. "NASA's chief technologists and the U.S. Department of Energy's leading subject matter experts provided the teams with a better understanding of requirements for potential infusion of their technologies within a space environment."

Judges selected the top three innovations based on criteria including technical viability, the likely impact on future space exploration, benefits to humanity and commercialization potential. The teams representing the top three entries selected at the end of the forum received a trophy during the recognition ceremony on June 14.

"Our mission at ARPA-E is to change what's possible. We've been delighted to collaborate with NASA for the iTech challenge, to highlight and empower the people driving energy innovation across our country," said Conner Prochaska, senior advisor and chief of staff for ARPA-E. "We look forward to future collaborative opportunities with NASA so, together, we can continue to cultivate the next generation of energy technologies for Americans on the ground and in space."

"It was an honor for Citi to host 'Energy-Tech' thought leaders -- policy makers, academics, scientists, investors and innovators -- for NASA iTech challenge," said Jay Collins, vice chairman of Corporate and Investment Banking at Citi. "We were proud to work with NASA on such an important effort to move energy technology out of the lab and into scalnble solutions for the Moon, Mars and the planet Earth. Congratulations to the winners, whose technological leadership and entrepreneurialism made us all proud."

The top three winners of NASA iTech's 2018 Energy Cycle are listed in alphabetical order:

  • iFeather, Boulder, Colorado. In-situ Fabrication of Extraterrestrial Aerogels for Transparency, Heat, and Energy Regulation (iFEATHER) for Habitat, Aeronautic and Space Vessel, and Space Suit Applications. Focus area: Innovative Power Management and Distribution
  • Stanford University - Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford, California. Two C: Transportation Electrification through Ubiquitous Wireless Charging. Focus area: Innovative Power Management and Distribution
  • WBGlobalSemi, Inc., Lakewood Ranch, Florida. Commercializing High Power Silicon Carbide (SiC) Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs) and Power Modules for Power Management and Distributed Power Applications. Focus area: Innovative Power Management and Distribution

 

Grayson Zulauf (third from left) is an EE PhD candidate. He is a researcher in the SUPERLab, directed by Professor Juan Rivas-Davila. the Fan Lab is directed by professor Jonathan Fan.

 

 

Congratulations Jon, Juan, Grayson and Peter!

July 2018

Professor Dwight G. Nishimura has received the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) Gold Medal. This is the highest award of the ISMRM society.

His citation reads, "For pioneering innovations in angiography, fast imaging pulse sequences, image reconstruction, and MR education.

Dwight was honored at an award ceremony during the Joint Annual Meeting ISMRM–ESMRMB held in Paris, France in June. The award presentation listed highlighted his contributions, including

  • Theme of coronary MR angiography
  • Spiral imaging
  • Tagging sequences
  • Spectral-spatial excitations
  • Non-contrast MRA

A professor of Electrical Engineering, Dwight is the Addie and Al Macovski Professor in the School of Engineering.

 

Please join us in congratulating Dwight for this well-deserved award!

June 2018

Samsung Professor in the School of Engineering and Chair of Electrical Engineering, Stephen Boyd opened the department's 123rd commencement on Sunday, June 17.

Welcoming families and friends, Stephen acknowledged their support and sacrifice and wished everyone a very happy Father's Day. A catered picnic lunch was available and refreshments were available after the awarding of diplomas.


The 2018 Design Award Recipients 

Professor Bob Dutton awarded six undergraduate students with the Student Design Project Awards. The capstone projects coalesce curriculum and allow students to innovate in novel ways.

  • Penelope Anema
  • Noa Glaser
  • Sarah Pao Radzihovsky
  • Kirill Safin
  • Anjali Majumdar
  • Samuel Stewart Johnson

2018 Centennial Teaching Assistant Award Recipients

Teaching Assistants and Course Assistants who excel in teaching are recognized by students and faculty. The centennial Award recognizes tremendous service and dedication in providing excellent classroom instruction. 

  • Sanghyeon Park
  • Rahul Trivedi 

2018 James F. Gibbons Award for Outstanding Student Teaching
The James F. Gibbons Award for Outstanding Student Teaching Award highlights students who have been nominated by faculty and peers for their extraordinary service as teaching assistants. We are deeply appreciative of the commitment to learning and sharing that our students display.

  • Alex Bertrand
  • Job Nalianya
  • Pin Pin Tea-mangkornpan

2018 Ford Scholar Award
Students that are eligible for this award must have both a high GPA within the School of Engineering and also actively pursuing an advanced degree. Four undergraudate students are recognized this year, two of them are EE students.

  • Theo Diamandis
  • Logan Spear

Terman Award
The Terman Award is presented to the top 5% of each senior class in the School of Engineering. We are pleased that 5 of our undergraduates received this recognition for their outstanding work.

  • Theo Diamandis
  • Logan Spear
  • Richard Mu
  • Georgia Murray
  • Akshay Rajagopal


Faculty awards included the 2017-18 Tau Beta Pi (TBP) Teaching Honor Roll and the Chair's Award for Outstanding Contributions to Undergraduate Education. The TBP Honor Roll recognizes engineering instructors for excellent teaching, commitment to students, and great mentoring.

Tau Beta Pi Teaching Honor Roll

  • Joe Kahn
  • Dwight Nishimura

Chair's Award for Outstanding Contributions to Undergraduate Education
Professor Roger Howe teaches one of our very popular undergraduate courses, "An Introduction to Making." He, his co-instructors, and the teaching staff lead a few hundred students in building a variety of interesting devices. Please join us in congratulating Roger!

  • Roger Howe


The 2018 Student Speaker was Richard Mu (B.S. '18). He fondly recalled late nights with fellow students in Packard, Gates, Allen, Huang, and Clark. He thanked staff, advisors, insructors, mentors, family and friends who nurture and make countless sacrifices of support. 

"The single name on a diploma belies the community that must come together for each one of us to graduate. On behalf of the class of 2018, thank you to everyone that has supported us on our journey through Stanford and for supporting us on the adventures to come. And until machine learning tells us otherwise, wear sunscreen. Thank you."  –Richard Mu (EE B.S. '18)


Congratulations to each and every one of the 2018 Electrical Engineering graduates!

Dr. Andrea Goldsmith wins 2019 IEEE Sumner Award
June 2018

Professor Andrea Goldsmith has been awarded the 2019 Eric E. Sumner Award. Andrea is the Stephen Harris professor in the School of Engineering.

Professor Goldsmith's research is focused on the design, analysis, and fundamental performance limits of wireless systems and networks, as well as the application of communications and signal processing to biology and neuroscience.

Her IEEE citation reads "For contributions to the fundamental understanding and innovation in adaptive and multiple antenna techniques for wireless communication networks."

 

The IEEE Eric E. Sumner Award was established by the IEEE Board of Directors in 1995.

It is named in honor of 1991 IEEE President Eric E. Sumner, who retired as Vice President, Operations Planning, AT&T Bell Laboratories after a long and distinguished career.

Please join us in congratulating Andrea for this well-deserved award!

Related news:

June 2018

The Electrical Engineering staff recognized this month for their outstanding effort are Julia Gillespie, Lauren Harris, Meo Kittiwanich, and Rachel Pham.

Each received nominations from peers, faculty and/or students who included descriptions of the staff member's professionalism that goes above and beyond their everyday roles. Staff gift card recipients make profound and positive impact in the department's everyday work and academic environment. Nomination link.

Please join us in acknowledging Julia, Lauren, Meo, and Rachel's extraordinary work!

 

Modified excerpts from their nominations follow.

Julia Gillespie, Faculty Administrator

  • "Julia puts a lot of thought and care into everything she does."
  • Our entire group has benefited from Julia's can-do spirit and competence.

Lauren Harris, Program Assistant

  • "She has done outstanding work this entire year – from leading a new grad student forum to producing visual designs."
  • Lauren always goes above and beyond!

Meo Kittiwanich, Degree Progress Officer

  • Meo is resourceful, and able to coordinate several tasks simultaneously.
  • "She works very well with students, helping them navigate program requirements with kindness and warmth."

Rachel Pham, Academic Affairs & Programs Administrator

  • Rachel is always on top of her work.
  • "She is creative and efficient and finds ways to improve work process for everyone's ease."

 

Please join us in congratulating them for their outstanding work!

The Staff Gift Card Bonus Program is sponsored by the School of Engineering. Each year, the EE department receives several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond their role. Each month, staff are chosen from nominations received from faculty, students, and staff. Past nominations are eligible for future months.

Nominate a deserving staff person or group today – nominate individuals or groups that have made a profound improvement in your daily work life. Each recipient receives a $50 Visa card. Nominations can be made at any time.

 

June 2018

Professor of Electrical Engineering Ayfer Ozgur has won the 2018 Okawa Foundation Research Grant. The Research Grant Presentation Ceremony will occur in San Francisco in September.

The mission of the Okawa Foundation is promotion and development in the field of Information and Communications Technology through awards and research grants as well as efforts to nurture researchers, engineers, and providers. It also seeks to promote diversity and ubiquitousness of human communication and thereby contribute to the peace and prosperity of humankind.

 

Please join us in congratulating Ayfer for this well-deserved award!

 

Read more about the Okawa Foundation: www.okawa-foundation.or.jp/en/outline/index.html

June 2018

The 2018 University Rover Challenge (URC) took place in at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) in Utah, May 31 - June 2. Thirty-six teams from 10 countries participated in the annual event. Both graduate and undergraduate students make up the teams.

This is the first year that the Stanford Robotics Club has participated in the competition. The Stanford MARS Rover Team placed 34th, and is already making plans for the 2019 competition.

The URC required completion of the same tasks as in previous years: Sample Cache Task, Extreme Retrieval and Delivery Task, Equipment Servicing Task, and the Autonomous Traversal Task. Teams and their rovers were additionally challenged with harder versions of several tasks. The most exciting task of 2018 proved to be the Equipment Servicing Task, which featured a custom lander designed and built by a URC sponsor. Rovers were required to load a canister into the lander, and conduct a series of complex procedures required to "launch" this lander from Mars back to Earth.

The 2018 Stanford Robotics Mars Rover Team members are:

  • Shi Tuck - Sophomore in EE - Electrical systems
  • Christina (Tina) Li - Sophomore in CS - Drive Mechanical
  • Claire Huang - Sophomore in CS - Arm Mechanical
  • Michal Adamkiewicz - Sophomore in EE - Team Lead
  • Neil Movva - Junior in EE - Electrical systems
  • Freddy Dopfel - Graduate Student in MS&E
  • Julia Thompson - Freshmen in Chemistry and Mathematics - Science Analysis
  • Chandler Watson - Freshmen in CS - Team Lead
  • Thariq Ridha - Freshmen in CS - Drive Mechanical
  • Nick Lai - Sophomore in CS - Science Analysis
  • Marion Lepert - Senior in ME - Arm Mechanical
  • Rachel Gardner - Sophomore in CS - Software
  • Peter Maldonado - Freshmen in CS - Software
  • Victoria Tsai - Sophomore in CS - Software
  • Thomas White - Sophomore in AA - Drive Mechanical
  • Chaitanya Asawa - Senior in CS - Software

Congratulations to all the Mars Rover teams! 

Additional information

Stanford Robotics Club: roboticsclub.stanford.edu
University Rover Challenge (URC): urc.marssociety.org 

 

(Excerpted from http://urc.marssociety.org/home/urc-news/universityroverchallengetitlereturnstopoland)

June 2018


A paper by Emeritus Professor Thomas Kailath and co-authors is included in the top 10 notable papers from the last 50 years of papers published in the journal "Linear Algebra and its Application (LAA)." LAA is published by Elsevier and was the first journal devoted to linear algebra.

Along with Thomas Kailath (Electrical Engineering), three more Stanford faculty have papers included in the notable papers list. Including Richard W. Cottle (Management Science and Engineering), George B. Dantzig (Operations Research and Computer Science), and G.H. Golub (Computer Science).

Please join us in congratulating Thomas Kailath along with all of the authors on their extraordinary contributions!

 

All of the notable papers are free to access, and are hosted in the Elsevier Mathematics Open Archive. The 10 notable papers are:

Complementary pivot theory of mathematical programming, Volume 1, Issue 1, January 1968, Pages 103-125, Richard W. Cottle, George B. Dantzig

On the Eneström-Kakeya theorem and its sharpness, Volume 28, December 1979, Pages 5-16, N. Anderson, E.B. Saff, R.S. Varga

A new look at the Lanczos algorithm for solving symmetric systems of linear equations, Volume 29, February 1980, Pages 323-346, B.N. Parlett

A generalization of the Eckart-Young-Mirsky matrix approximation theorem, Volumes 88–89, April 1987, Pages 317-327, G.H. Golub, Alan Hoffman, G.W. Stewart

Linear complexity parallel algorithms for linear systems of equations with recursive structure, Volumes 88–89, April 1987, Pages 271-315, I. Gohberg, T. Kailath, I. Koltracht, P. Lancaster

Scalings of matrices which have prespecified row sums and column sums via optimization, Volumes 114–115, March–April 1989, Pages 737-764, Uriel G. Rothblum, Hans Schneider

Pencils of complex and real symmetric and skew matrices, Volume 147, March 1991, Pages 323-371, Robert C. Thompson

Riemannian geometry and matrix geometric means, Volume 413, Issues 2–3, 1 March 2006, Pages 594-618, Rajendra Bhatia, John Holbrook

A constructive version of the Boyle–Handelman theorem on the spectra of nonnegative matrices, Volume 436, Issue 6, 15 March 2012, Pages 1701-1709, Thomas J. Laffey

Perron–Frobenius theorem for nonnegative multilinear forms and extensions, Volume 438, Issue 2, 15 January 2013, Pages 738-749, S. Friedland, S. Gaubert, L. Han

 

Additional Links:

Pages

January

No content classified for this term

February

February 2014

Three staff members each received a $50 Visa card in recognition of their extraordinary efforts as part of the department’s 2014 Staff Gift Card Bonus Program. The EE department received several nominations in January, and nominations from 2013 were also considered.

Following are January’s gift card recipients and some of the comments from their nominators:

Ann Guerra, Faculty Administrator

  • “She is very kind to students and always enthusiastic to help students… every time we need emergent help, she is willing to give us a hand.”
  • “Ann helps anyone who goes to her for help with anything, sometimes when it’s beyond her duty.” 

Teresa Nguyen, Student Accounting Associate

  • “She stays on top of our many, many student financial issues, is an extremely reliable source of information and is super friendly.”
  • “Teresa’s cheerful disposition, her determination, and her professionalism seem to go above and beyond what is simply required.”

Helen Niu, Faculty Administrator

  • “Helen is always a pleasure to work with.”
  • “She goes the extra mile in her dealings with me, which is very much appreciated.”

The School of Engineering once again gave the EE department several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond. More people will be recognized next month, and past nominations will still be eligible for future months. EE faculty, staff and students are welcome to nominate a deserving staff person by visitinghttps://gradapps.stanford.edu/NotableStaff/nomination/create.

Ann Guerra  Teresa Nguyen  Helen Niu

Pages

March

No content classified for this term

April

No content classified for this term

May

No content classified for this term

June

No content classified for this term

July

No content classified for this term

August

No content classified for this term

September

No content classified for this term

October

No content classified for this term

November

No content classified for this term

December

No content classified for this term

Story

No content classified for this term

Stanford

No content classified for this term

Test

No content classified for this term

Subscribe to RSS - News