EE Student Information

EE Student Information, Spring Quarter 19-20: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

Updates will be posted on this page, as well as emailed to the EE student mail list.

Please see Stanford University Health Alerts for course and travel updates.

As always, use your best judgement and consider your own and others' well-being at all times.

News

professor Srabanti Chowdhury
February 2020

Professor Srabanti Chowdhury has been selected as a 2020 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in Physics. The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation has selected 126 outstanding researchers across eight fields as recipients of the 2020 Sloan Research Fellowships.

Awarded annually since 1955, the fellowships honor scholars in the U.S. and Canada whose creativity, leadership, and independent research achievements make them some of the most promising researchers working today. A full list of the 2020 Fellows cohort is available at https://sloan.org/fellowships/2020-Fellows.

"To receive a Sloan Research Fellowship is to be told by your fellow scientists that you stand out among your peers," says Adam F. Falk, president of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. "A Sloan Research Fellow is someone whose drive, creativity, and insight makes them a researcher to watch."

Open to scholars in eight scientific and technical fields—chemistry, computer science, economics, mathematics, computational and evolutionary molecular biology, neuroscience, ocean sciences, and physics—the Sloan Research Fellowships are awarded in close coordination with the scientific community. Candidates must be nominated by their fellow scientists and winners are selected by independent panels of senior scholars on the basis of a candidate's research accomplishments, creativity, and potential to become a leader in his or her field.

 

Congratulations to Srabanti for this outstanding achievement!

 

RELATED

Srabanti Chowdhury awarded the Gabilan Faculty Fellowship

professor John Duchi
February 2020
Professor John Duchi has been award the inaugural SIAM Activity Group on Optimization Early Career Prize (SIAG/OPT Early Career Prize). The prize was established in 2018 and is awarded every three years to an outstanding early career researcher in the field of optimization for distinguished contributions to the field in the six calendar years prior to the award year.

John Duchi’s citation reads, "The selection committee wishes to recognize you for your deep and important contributions to convex, nonconvex, and stochastic optimization as well as to the statistical foundations of optimization methods for data science.”


John’s research areas span statistical learning, optimization, information theory, and computation. Please join us in acknowledging John for this special achievement.
 
 

RELATED

February 2020

2019 was the Department of Electrical Engineering's 125th anniversary

To mark this unique occasion, we invited distinguished faculty and alumni speakers to share their perspectives on the past, present, and future Stanford Electrical Engineering Department.

Their video presentations are available on the department's YouTube channel, or by clicking any of the title links below.

We invite you to share your memory, anecdote, or reflection in 125 words or less - ee.stanford.edu/EE125-share.

Read what others have shared about their EE journey - ee.stanford.edu/EE125.

 

Timeline of Stanford EE History (shown below in desktop and mobile view) – ee.stanford.edu/about/history

a few of our amazing staff!
January 2020

Congratulations to Chet Frost, Jim McVittie, Rieko Sasaki, and Suzanne Sims. They received several nominations from appreciative faculty, staff and students, praising their commitment that goes above and beyond the ordinary! Excerpts from the nominations are below.

The staff gift card recipients make profound and positive impact in our department's everyday work and academic environment.
Please join us in congratulating each of them.


 

Chet Frost, Faculty Administrator, Electrical Engineering

  • "Chet is efficient, upbeat, easy to work with, patient, pleasant, and an excellent problem solver!"
  • His attitude towards handling both his regular and any excess work, is beyond outstanding.

Jim McVittie, Senior Scientist, Electrical Engineering

  • He is a miracle worker when it comes to maintaining and fixing tools– our lab would not run without him!
  • Jim is a one-man maintenance machine! His contributions to Allen labs and SNF is unparalleled.

Rieko Sasaki, Faculty Administrator, Electrical Engineering

  • She is a great asset to our team!
  • Rieko has generously cleaned up many projects that others left unfinished, and she handles it all with a positive, genuinely helpful attitude.

Suzanne Sims, Faculty Administrator, Electrical Engineering

  • Whenever she has an opportunity to organize and/or optimize, she does – and always to the benefit of everyone.
  • Suzanne is extremely supportive, and a valuable resource to the department.

The Staff Gift Card Bonus Program is sponsored by the School of Engineering. Each year, the EE department receives several gift cards to distribute to staff members who have been recognized for going above and beyond their role. Staff are chosen from nominations received from faculty, students, and staff. Past nominations are eligible for future months.

Consider nominating a deserving staff person, or group, today. Each recipient receives a $50 Visa card. Nominations can be made at any time.

Nominations may be submitted at any time. There are no restrictions on the quantity, persons or groups that you can nominate. Submitters are asked to include a citation of how the group or person went above and beyond. The submitter can choose to remain anonymous. Nominate a deserving colleague today.

PROF MENDEL ROSENBLUM
January 2020

Congratulations to Professor Mendel Rosenblum. He has been elected to the 2019 Class of National Academy of Inventors (NAI) Fellows.

The NAI Fellows Program highlights academic inventors who have demonstrated a spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society. Election to NAI Fellow is the highest professional distinction accorded solely to academic inventors. To date, NAI Fellows hold more than 41,500 issued U.S. patents, which have generated over 11,000 licensed technologies and companies, and created more than 36 million jobs. In addition, over $1.6 trillion in revenue has been generated based on NAI Fellow discoveries.

"Congratulations to the 2019 class of NAI Fellows," said Laura A. Peter, Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Deputy Director at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). "It is a privilege to welcome these exceptionally-qualified individuals to this prestigious organization. I am certain their accomplishments will inspire the next generation of invention pioneers."

Mendel's research interests include system software, distributed systems, and computer architecture. He has published research in the area of disk storage management, computer simulation techniques, scalable operating system structure, virtualization computer security, and mobility.

Please join us in congratulating Mendel for this wonderful distinction!


 

Excerpted from National Academy of Inventors, Press Release, December 2019. 

Related  Links

 

January 2020

A team led by professor Jelena Vučković explained how they carved a nanoscale channel out of silicon, sealed it in a vacuum and sent electrons through this cavity while pulses of infrared light – to which silicon is as transparent as glass is to visible light – were transmitted by the channel walls to speed the electrons along. Their research is published in the January 3 issue of Science. The accelerator-on-a-chip demonstrated in Science is just a prototype, but Vučković said its design and fabrication techniques can be scaled up to deliver particle beams accelerated enough to perform cutting-edge experiments in chemistry, materials science and biological discovery that don't require the power of a massive accelerator.

"The largest accelerators are like powerful telescopes. There are only a few in the world and scientists must come to places like SLAC to use them," Vučković said. "We want to miniaturize accelerator technology in a way that makes it a more accessible research tool."

Team members liken their approach to the way that computing evolved from the mainframe to the smaller but still useful PC. Accelerator-on-a-chip technology could also lead to new cancer radiation therapies, said physicist Robert Byer, a co-author of the Science paper. Again, it's a matter of size. Today, medical X-ray machines fill a room and deliver a beam of radiation that's tough to focus on tumors, requiring patients to wear lead shields to minimize collateral damage.

"In this paper we begin to show how it might be possible to deliver electron beam radiation directly to a tumor, leaving healthy tissue unaffected," said Byer, who leads the Accelerator on a Chip International Program, or ACHIP, a broader effort of which this current research is a part.

The researchers want to accelerate electrons to 94 percent of the speed of light, or 1 million electron volts (1MeV), to create a particle flow powerful enough for research or medical purposes. This prototype chip provides only a single stage of acceleration, and the electron flow would have to pass through around 1,000 of these stages to achieve 1MeV. But that's not as daunting at it may seem, said Vučković, because this prototype accelerator-on-a-chip is a fully integrated circuit. That means all of the critical functions needed to create acceleration are built right into the chip, and increasing its capabilities should be reasonably straightforward.

The researchers plan to pack a thousand stages of acceleration into roughly an inch of chip space by the end of 2020 to reach their 1MeV target. Although that would be an important milestone, such a device would still pale in power alongside the capabilities of the SLAC research accelerator, which can generate energy levels 30,000 times greater than 1MeV. But Byer believes that, just as transistors eventually replaced vacuum tubes in electronics, light-based devices will one day challenge the capabilities of microwave-driven accelerators.

Meanwhile, in anticipation of developing a 1MeV accelerator on a chip, EE professor Olav Solgaard, a co-author on the paper, has already begun work on a possible cancer-fighting application. Today, highly energized electrons aren't used for radiation therapy because they would burn the skin. Solgaard is working on a way to channel high-energy electrons from a chip-sized accelerator through a catheter-like vacuum tube that could be inserted below the skin, right alongside a tumor, using the particle beam to administer radiation therapy surgically.

"We can derive medical benefits from the miniaturization of accelerator technology in addition to the research applications," Solgaard said.

 

Excerpted from Stanford News, "Stanford researchers build a particle accelerator that fits on a chip, miniaturizing a technology that can now find new applications in research and medicine". January 2, 2020.

 

Related News

professor Stephen Boyd
January 2020

Professor Stephen Boyd has been elected as a foreign member of the National Academy of Engineering of Korea (NAEK).

The National Academy of Engineering of Korea aims to discover and acknowledge engineers who have made remarkable contributions to the technological development in universities, companies, and research institutes, and to contribute to Korea's creative engineering technology development through academic research and supporting projects.

With a vision of a global engineering technology platform, NAEK will play a leading role in creating a sustainable and growing society, a creative and smart society, and a healthy and safe society.

 

Please join us in congratulating Stephen on this honor.

 

January 2020

During Fall quarter, professors Abbas El Gamal, Electrical Engineering (EE) and Ram Rajagopal, Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE), co-organized an interdisciplinary seminar / project course, Battery Systems for Transportation and Grid Services (EE/CEE 292X).

The course provided a holistic view of the subject with particular attention to interactions between different aspects of a battery system. It is intended for those who wish to research, design, analyze, model, apply or just learn about battery systems.


 

"We connected with our industry speakers to collect relevant projects for the students to work on in the class", shares Thomas Navidi (pictured right), teaching assistant for 292X. "This led to a wide variety of high quality projects ranging from cell thermal design to the economics of grid storage systems. The students worked hard to tackle these problems in a short time and made excellent discoveries.
 
 
Many projects have the potential to continue into well developed research papers. We are excited to see how our students can contribute to the research around revolutionary applications of battery technology."

The lectures provided an overview of the design, modeling, analysis, and operation of battery systems for transportation and grid services, and were organized into three parts.

  • Part One: Academic experts (including 5 Stanford faculty) introduced the key building blocks of the battery system.
  • Part Two: Experts from national labs discussed thermal and safety issues in battery systems.
  • Part Three: Industry experts (including from Waymo, Tesla, EVGo, and EPRI) provided an overview of use cases and critical concerns for battery systems being implemented in EVs and the grid, including its economics and lifecycle value. 

 

"We both are students from industry, and took this class to expand our knowledge in areas that directly relate to our professional roles."

Project Title, "Techno-economic Feasibility of a Hybrid Storage System at Stanford", Jack Pigott, SCPD graduate student and Ushakar Jha, SCPD graduate student 


Students also had to the opportunity to visit Tesla's Gigafactory (pictured at top) in Sparks, NV, for a factory tour and lectures from Tesla engineers on battery cell engineering and production.

TA and PhD candidate Thomas Navidi adds, "The wide variety of knowledgable guest speakers provided a unique opportunity for students to learn a broad range of perspectives about the applications of batteries in transportation and the grid. The industry experts provided insights into the manufacturing and financial aspects that are hard to learn without direct industry experience. The academic speakers provided insight on the state of the art research for batteries performed at academic institutions and the challenges they face."

The course culminated with a student research poster session. There were 22 featured projects spanning a very broad range of topics from battery technology and modeling to applications to transportation and the grid.


 

"The industry speakers were great; the topics covered and speakers' deep knowledge of their area provided important insights. We appreciated the time for Q and A, and the real-world examples. Working together was also great – we know one another from other classes, and doing this project together was a lot of fun."

Project Title, "Ancillary Services with Vehicle-to-Grid Charging", Michaela Levine, MS candidate, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Velvet Gaston, MS candidate, Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Michelle Solomon, PhD candidate, Materials Science and Engineering


 

RELATED:

Honors Cooperative Program (HCP), enables qualified working professionals to pursue the MS in Electrical Engineering on a part-time basis. Many classes are offered online, and it is possible to complete the MS degree requirements entirely from a distance. This program is offered in partnership with the Stanford Center for Professional Development (SCPD).

professor Krishna Shenoy
December 2019

Professor Krishna Shenoy and neurosurgeon Jaime Henderson, MD lead a team of researchers that implanted multi-electrode arrays in the brains of study participants who suffered from severe limb weakness. In a recently published study, they found that "two neural population dynamics features previously reported for arm movements were also present during speaking: a component that was mostly invariant across initiating different words, followed by rotatory dynamics during speaking. This suggests that common neural dynamical motifs may underlie movement of arm and speech articulators." Read study

The scientists were able to design software that could differentiate among different syllables uttered by two of the implanted participants who retained the power of speech.

By analyzing neural activity across nearly 200 electrodes, the scientists found they could identify which of several syllables a participant was saying – with more than 80% accuracy in the case of one participant.

The implication here is that someday it may be possible to figure out what people who, for one or another reason, can't speak are trying to say – and get a device to say it for them.

"There aren't a lot of opportunities to make measurements from inside someone's brain while they talk," said postdoctoral research fellow, Sergey Stavisky. If these two people hadn't just happened to have multi-electrode arrays implanted in the part of the brain responsible for hand-movement control, that area's connection to speech might never have surfaced.

 

image credit: Photos by Peter Barreras/Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Stavisky, Shenoy and Henderson's work could one day help scientists build medical devices that help people who cannot speak. Photo by Peter Barreras/Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

 

Excerpted from Stanford Medicine's SCOPE Blog, "Why we talk with our hands — and how that may help give speech to the speechless" by Bruce Goldman. 

Umran Inan (Image source: http://mustafaprize.org/media/?id=2053)
December 2019

Our emeritus colleague Umran Inan, the long-time president of Koc University, has been awarded the 2019 Mustafa Prize.

The Mustafa Prize is awarded in five categories of information and communication science and technology, life and medical science and technology, Nano-science and nanotechnology and all areas of science and technology and scientists from Islamic countries.

These areas include the following UNESCO fields of education: natural sciences, mathematics, and statistics; information and communication technologies; engineering, manufacturing, and construction; agriculture, forestry, fisheries and veterinary; health and welfare as well as cognitive science and Islamic economics and banking.

The event aims to improve scientific relations between academics and researchers in order to facilitate the growth of science in the Islamic world.

The prize is given every two years; previous recipients from outside of Iran included Professors Omar Yaghi of UC Berkeley, Erol Gelenbe of Imperial College and Amin Shokrollahi of EPFL.

 

Please join us in congratulating Umran!

 

 

Source: APNEWS.com, "Iran awards prestigious prize to 2 US-educated scientists"

Image source: mustafaprize.org/media

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February 2014

Three staff members each received a $50 Visa card in recognition of their extraordinary efforts as part of the department’s 2014 Staff Gift Card Bonus Program. The EE department received several nominations in January, and nominations from 2013 were also considered.

Following are January’s gift card recipients and some of the comments from their nominators:

Ann Guerra, Faculty Administrator

  • “She is very kind to students and always enthusiastic to help students… every time we need emergent help, she is willing to give us a hand.”
  • “Ann helps anyone who goes to her for help with anything, sometimes when it’s beyond her duty.” 

Teresa Nguyen, Student Accounting Associate

  • “She stays on top of our many, many student financial issues, is an extremely reliable source of information and is super friendly.”
  • “Teresa’s cheerful disposition, her determination, and her professionalism seem to go above and beyond what is simply required.”

Helen Niu, Faculty Administrator

  • “Helen is always a pleasure to work with.”
  • “She goes the extra mile in her dealings with me, which is very much appreciated.”

The School of Engineering once again gave the EE department several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond. More people will be recognized next month, and past nominations will still be eligible for future months. EE faculty, staff and students are welcome to nominate a deserving staff person by visitinghttps://gradapps.stanford.edu/NotableStaff/nomination/create.

Ann Guerra  Teresa Nguyen  Helen Niu

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