News

March 2015

The IEEE Computer Pioneer Award was established in 1981 to recognize and honor the vision of those people whose efforts resulted in the creation and continued vitality of the computer industry. The IEEE Computer Society site states, "[Michael J. Flynn] began his engineering career at IBM as a designer of mainframe computers. He became Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford in 1975 where he set up the Stanford Architecture and Arithmetic group. He retired from Stanford in 1999 and continues there as Emeritus Professor. Some of his best-known work includes the development of the now familiar stream outline of computer organization (SIMD, etc.). For many years this has served as the fundamental formal taxonomy of parallel computers.

In the early 1970s Prof. Flynn founded both of the specialist organizations on Computer Architecture: the IEEE Computer Society's Technical Committee on Computer Architecture and the ACM's SIGARCH.

Prof. Flynn was the 1992 recipient of the ACM/IEEE Eckert-Mauchley Award for his technical contributions to computer and digital systems architecture. He has been awarded honorary Doctorates from Trinity College (University of Dublin) and the University of Belgrade and is an honorary Professor of Informatics at the University of Sofia. He is the author of five books and over 300 technical papers. He is a fellow of both the IEEE and ACM."

 

Read the full IEEE Computer Society Pioneer Award citation 

February 2015

Congratulations to EE PhD students Aman Sinha and Jinye Zhang. They are the recipients of the 2015 Numerical Technologies Founders awards for being the top performers in the Electrical Engineering Qualifying Exam.


 

The Numerical Technologies Founders awards were established by Dr. Yao-Ting Wang (Ph.D., 1997) and his advisor Professor Thomas Kailath, co-founders of Numerical Technologies, Inc., and their spouses. The company was created to commercialize the resolution enhancement techniques for optical lithography developed in Dr. Wang's dissertation as part of a DARPA-sponsored project (1990-2000) on the applications of Control and Signal Processing to Semiconductor Manufacturing. The theme of the project was to demonstrate the power of the Mathematical Engineering approach: going from an ill-defined physical problem to an idealized mathematical model, its often-approximate solution, and then compromises for practical implementation and transition to industry. The first applications were to Rapid Thermal Processing and then to Optical Lithography where, when the project began, the industry was facing a so-called 100nm barrier. Numerical Technologies, in collaboration with Motorola, were the first to show that the barrier could be broken. This spurred further development of a host of resolution enhancement techniques the barrier has been lowered to 32nm. The company was founded in 1995, went public in 2000, and was acquired by Synopsis, Inc. in 2003. A different measure of the importance of the Mathematical Engineering approach is that the work on Rapid Thermal Processing won outstanding paper prizes in 1994 and 2003 from the IEEE Transactions on Semiconductor Manufacturing.

February 2015

Professor Bernd Girod has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering with the citation: For contributions to video compression, streaming, and multimedia systems.

In addition to his seminal contributions to video compression and communication and his pioneering work in video streaming and networked multimedia systems, Professor Girod helped found and lead several successful centers at Stanford, including:

  • the Stanford Image Systems Engineering Center
  • the Max Planck Center for Visual Computing and Communication
  • and the Brown Institute for Media Innovation

As the School of Engineering's first Senior Associate Dean for Online Learning and Professional Development, Professor Girod has been instrumental in guiding and supporting the school's strategy and implementation of online learning.

The NAE announcement reads, "Election to the National Academy of Engineering is among the highest professional distinctions accorded to an engineer. Academy membership honors those who have made outstanding contributions to 'engineering research, practice, or education, including, where appropriate, significant contributions to the engineering literature,' and to the 'pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of engineering, or developing/implementing innovative approaches to engineering education.'"

Please join us in congratulating Professor Girod for this very well-deserved recognition of his profound contributions and leadership.

 

Read full NAE press release.

image of Assistant Professor Jonathan Fan
January 2015

The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) has announced the Young Investigator Research program (YIP) grant recipients. EE Assistant Professor Jonathan Fan's winning proposal will investigate Neuromorphic Infrared Nano-Optical Systems.

"The YIP is open to scientists and engineers at research institutions across the United States who received Ph.D. or equivalent degrees in the last five years and who show exceptional ability and promise for conducting basic research."

The AFOSR news article continues, "This year AFOSR received over 200 proposals in response to the AFOSR broad agency announcement solicitation in major areas of interest to the Air Force. These areas include: Dynamical Systems and Control, Quantum and Non-Equilibrium Processes, Information, Decision and Complex Networks, Complex Materials and Devices, and Energy, Power and Propulsion. AFOSR officials select proposals based on the evaluation criteria listed in the broad agency announcement. Those selected will receive the grants over a 3-year period."

Read the entire article

Fely, Beverly, Darlene, and Meo with their staff gift card award
January 2015

Four EE staff members each received a $50 Visa card in recognition of their extraordinary efforts. Staff are recognized from nominations made by faculty, students and staff. Each month, nominations are collected and previous nominations are also considered.

Following are November and December's 2014 Staff Gift Card Bonus Program Recipients, as well as some comments from their nominators:

Fely Barrera, Faculty Administrator and
Beverly Davis, Faculty Administrator (nominated jointly)

  • "They both went above and beyond to prepare and organize a visit from NSF. The event was quite complicated and it was handled extremely well."
  • "The event required detailed orchestration, and together, Fely and Beverly handled every detail in an extraordinary way."

Darlene Hadding, Program Manager

  • "Darlene takes the time and does everything she can to help students feel happier and more comfortable."
  • "I appreciate how much she really cares about her students."

Meo Kittiwanich, Academic Services Specialist

  • "Meo did a great job organizing EE's REU program last summer. With her leadership, the REU program goes beyond expectations and is a great experience for our undergrad students."
  • "She's incredibly friendly, and it seems that her door is always open and she is happy to help."
  • "I recognize that Meo goes the extra mile. She is prompt in answering my queries on administrative process, and helps me achieve deadlines."

The Staff Gift Card Bonus Program is sponsored by the School of Engineering. Each year, the EE department receives several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond their role. Each month, staff are chosen from nominations received from faculty, students, and staff. Past nominations are eligible for future months. EE faculty, staff and students are welcome to nominate a deserving staff person by visiting https://gradapps.stanford.edu/NotableStaff/nomination/create.

Be sure to recognize the staff member, or members, that help in your accomplishments!

    

Wetzstein's research featuredScientific American’s features Assistant Professor Wetzstein’s Research as a World-Changing Idea as a world-changing idea
December 2014

In an article titled, "Smartphone Screens Correct for Your Vision Flaws," the December issue of Scientific American features Wetzstein's research with colleagues from MIT and University of California, Berkeley. The articles states, "Informal tests on a handful of users have shown that the technology works, Wetzstein says, but large-scale studies are needed to further refine it. In the process, the researchers also plan on developing a slider that can be used to manually adjust the focus of the screen. Wetzstein says that the technology could be a boon for people in developing countries who have easier access to mobile devices than prescription eyewear."

Gordon Wetzstein's research addresses challenges in computational imaging and display and in computational light transport. He received his PhD in computer science from the University of British Columbia in 2011, then worked at MIT's Media Lab as a research scientist and postdoctoral associate before joining the Stanford faculty.

 

Read the complete article from Scientific American.

Professors Wong and Mitra's CNT chips revealed at IEDM conference
December 2014

Professor H.-S. Philip Wong and Associate Professor Subhasish Mitra's research team has built a four-layer high-rise chip using carbon nanotubes (CNT) and resistive random access memory (RRAM). The new materials required a new method of connecting them, which were created by EE grad students, Max Shulaker and Tony Wu.

"This research is at an early stage, but our design and fabrication techniques are scalable," Mitra said. "With further development this architecture could lead to computing performance that is much, much greater than anything available today."

Wong said the prototype chip to be unveiled at IEDM shows how to put logic and memory together into three-dimensional structures that can be mass-produced.

"Paradigm shift is an overused concept, but here it is appropriate," Wong said. "With this new architecture, electronics manufacturers could put the power of a supercomputer in your hand."

 

Read the full article in the Stanford Report. 

Professors Hesselink and Rivas received Precourt Institute seed grants for their energy research
December 2014

Professor Lambertus Hesselink and Assistant Professor Juan Rivas-Davila are two of eight Stanford faculty seed grant recipients. The awards are to assist in new research that promises clean technology and energy efficiency.

Assistant Professor Juan Rivas' and his research team will continue exploration of more energy-efficient power supplies. An initial goal is to provide energy-efficient methods to pasteurize liquids like milk and fruit juice. The team's long-range goal is to revolutionize the design and manufacture of power electronics components. The Precourt Institute for Energy awarded Rivas-Davila's grant.

Professor Lambertus Hesselink's research will assess and design a method to capture heat waste from computers. His team projects that at least 20% of the waste could be recouped, saving $6 million in electricity per day in the U.S. alone. The Precourt Energy Efficiency Center (PEEC) provided this award.

 

Read the full Stanford report article.

Dr. Spilker at the dedication of the James and Anna Marie Spilker Engineering and Applied Sciences Building
December 2014

EE alumnus James J. Spilker has been awarded the 2015 IEEE Edison Medal. Spilker received his BS, MS and Ph.D. from Stanford's Electrical Engineering department. Currently, Dr. Spilker is the Executive Chairman of AOSense, Inc., and a consulting professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. In 2013, Dr. and Mrs. Anna Marie Spilker dedicated the third of four buildings that comprise Stanford’s Science and Engineering Quad (SEQ).

The aim of the IEEE Edison Medal is to recognize "a career of meritorious achievement in electrical science, electrical engineering, or the electrical arts.” Dr. Spilker is recognized “for contributions to the technology and implementation of civilian GPS navigation systems.”

Dr. Spilker will receive the award at the 2015 IEEE Honors Ceremony. 

 

Image: Steve Costillo

Professor Jelena Vuckovic in her Nanoscale and Quantum Photonics Lab
December 2014

Published in a recent article in Scientific Reports, Professor Vuckovic and her team present the inverse design technique. As stated in the introduction, the "inverse design concept is simple and extendable to a broad class of highly compact devices including frequency filters, mode converters, and spatial mode multiplexers."

"Light can carry more data than a wire, and it takes less energy to transmit photons than electrons," said electrical engineering Professor Jelena Vuckovic, who led the research.

In previous work her team developed an algorithm that did two things: It automated the process of designing optical structures and it enabled them to create previously unimaginable, nanoscale structures to control light. Now, she and lead author Alexander Piggott, a doctoral candidate in electrical engineering, have employed that algorithm to design, build and test a link compatible with current fiber optic networks.

 

Read the article in Scientific Reports

Read the Stanford Report article 

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February 2014

Three staff members each received a $50 Visa card in recognition of their extraordinary efforts as part of the department’s 2014 Staff Gift Card Bonus Program. The EE department received several nominations in January, and nominations from 2013 were also considered.

Following are January’s gift card recipients and some of the comments from their nominators:

Ann Guerra, Faculty Administrator

  • “She is very kind to students and always enthusiastic to help students… every time we need emergent help, she is willing to give us a hand.”
  • “Ann helps anyone who goes to her for help with anything, sometimes when it’s beyond her duty.” 

Teresa Nguyen, Student Accounting Associate

  • “She stays on top of our many, many student financial issues, is an extremely reliable source of information and is super friendly.”
  • “Teresa’s cheerful disposition, her determination, and her professionalism seem to go above and beyond what is simply required.”

Helen Niu, Faculty Administrator

  • “Helen is always a pleasure to work with.”
  • “She goes the extra mile in her dealings with me, which is very much appreciated.”

The School of Engineering once again gave the EE department several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond. More people will be recognized next month, and past nominations will still be eligible for future months. EE faculty, staff and students are welcome to nominate a deserving staff person by visitinghttps://gradapps.stanford.edu/NotableStaff/nomination/create.

Ann Guerra  Teresa Nguyen  Helen Niu

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