News

image of Professor Goldsmith
October 2014

Electrical Engineering Professor Andrea Goldsmith is the 2014 recipient of IEEE's Edwin Howard Armstrong Achievement Award. IEEE celebrates and recognizes scientific and engineering excellence through the presentation of peer reviewed Medals, Technical Field Awards, and Society, Council and Unit Awards.

Goldsmith's research is to develop novel techniques, protocols, and designs for future wireless systems and networks. Her specific research areas include the design and capacity analysis of wireless systems and networks, multiple-antenna wireless networks, cognitive radios, sensor and networks, cross-layer wireless network design, and applications of communications and signal processing to health and neuroscience.

Read more about IEEE: http://www.ieee.org/index.html

 

image of Professor Harris
October 2014

Professor James Harris received the Al Cho MBE Award for his seminal and sustained contributions to the science, technology, device applications, and commercialization of molecular beam epitaxy [MBE] including dilute-nitride multijunction solar cells.

Harris was presented with the Al Cho MBE Award at the International Conference on Molecular Beam Epitaxy (ICMBE) in September.

The International MBE Advisory Committee presents the Al Cho MBE Award annually at the International MBE Conference in honor of Al Cho, "Father of MBE", recognizing individuals who have made fundamental contributions to the science and technology of MBE.

image of Assoc. Professor Pop
October 2014

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering Eric Pop has won the 2014 Okawa Foundation Research Grant. Pop’s research theme is “Tunable Thermal and Thermoelectric Metamaterials.” The Grant Presentation Ceremony will occur in December.

The mission of the Okawa Foundation is promotion and development in the field of Information and Communications Technology through awards and research grants as well as efforts to nurture researchers, engineers, and providers. It also seeks to promote diversity and ubiquitousness of human communication and thereby contribute to the peace and prosperity of humankind.

Read more about the Okawa Foundation: http://www.okawa-foundation.or.jp/en/outline/index.html

image of tiny, sound-powered chip developed by EE
October 2014

Stanford engineers are developing a way to send power – safely and wirelessly – to "smart chips" programmed to perform medical tasks and report back the results.

Their approach involves beaming ultrasound at a tiny device inside the body designed to do three things:

  • convert the incoming sound waves into electricity;
  • process and execute medical commands; and
  • report the completed activity via a tiny built-in radio antenna.

"We think this will enable researchers to develop a new generation of tiny implants designed for a wide array of medical applications," said Amin Arbabian, an assistant professor of electrical engineering at Stanford.

Arbabian's team recently presented a working prototype of this wireless medical implant system at the IEEE Custom Integrated Circuits Conference in San Jose. 

For the full story, visit news.stanford.edu/news

 

Image credit: Arbabian Lab

image of Asst. Professor Ada Poon
October 2014

Ada Poon, a Stanford assistant professor of electrical engineering, is a master at building miniscule wireless devices that function in the body and can be powered remotely. Now, she and collaborators in bioengineering and anesthesia want to leverage this technology to develop a way of studying – and eventually developing treatments for – pain.

Chronic pain costs the economy $600 billion a year and the two most common treatments have significant drawbacks: narcotics are addictive and surgery is costly and carries considerable risks.

"What we will be able to look at is a more natural measure of pain relief," Poon said. They could assess whether a treatment allows mice to return to normal activities by tallying time spent on an exercise wheel or socializing.

This collaboration is one of 22 projects recently funded by the Stanford Bio-X Seed grants, which Carla Shatz, the director of Bio-X, calls the "glue" that brings interdisciplinary teams together. This project is typical, with an electrical engineer, a bioengineer and an anesthesiologist, all of whom are Bio-X affiliates, working together to solve a biomedical problem. Bio-X has so far brought together more than 600 interconnected faculty members from across campus.

"When you combine people with different skills you will come up with something with truly high impact," Clark said.

For the full story, visit news.stanford.edu/news

Image: L.A. Cicero

 

image of Professor Kailath
October 2014

President Obama announced a new class of recipients of the National Medal of Science and National Medal of Technology and Innovation—our Nation’s highest honors for achievement and leadership in advancing the fields of science and technology. 

EE Professor Thomas Kailath received the National Medal of Science. He was the first recipient of the Hitachi America Professorship in 1988, and received numerous awards and recognition for his research, writing and contributions. Professor Kailath assumed emeritus status in 2001.

Read Stanford Report article

Photo of Vikram Prasad ('16) by Sam Girvin, the Stanford Daily
October 2014

The electrical engineering department implemented new curriculum changes and introduced several extracurricular activities for its students this year. The overhaul was intended to give the students a greater degree of control and flexibility over their major.

“The old curriculum required students to go through a series of prerequisite courses, such as those in math and physics, without being able to get into application until deeper in the program,” said Abbas El Gamal, chair of the Electrical Engineering department.

“The goal of EE, I think, is not to define itself in how rigorous it is, but more in enabling a broad set of applications for interested students – I think new students should find it more accessible, for sure,” Omid-Zohoor said.

 

Image credit: SAM GIRVIN/The Stanford Daily

Professor Robert Dutton
September 2014

Electrical engineers make the technologies and systems that communicate, store and process information. They harness the fundamental forces of nature to serve everyday needs, whether this involves creating a computer based on carbon nanotubesimplanting sensors deep inside the human body or inventing next generation memory chips. Electrical engineers change the world. Our new curriculum gives Stanford students a rigorous foundation in classical and modern physics while quickly immersing them in the exciting applications made possible by EE.  Read more »

ant-sized radio
September 2014

A Stanford engineering team, in collaboration with researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, has built a radio the size of an ant, a device so energy efficient that it gathers all the power it needs from the same electromagnetic waves that carry signals to its receiving antenna – no batteries required.

Designed to compute, execute and relay commands, this tiny wireless chip costs pennies to fabricate – making it cheap enough to become the missing link between the Internet as we know it and the linked-together smart gadgets envisioned in the "Internet of Things."

"The next exponential growth in connectivity will be connecting objects together and giving us remote control through the web," said Amin Arbabian, an assistant professor of electrical engineering who recently demonstrated this ant-sized radio chip at the VLSI Technology and Circuits Symposium in Hawaii.

For the full story, please visit http://news.stanford.edu.

August 2014

The Final Presentation Day for the Electrical Engineering Research Experience for Undergraduates (EE REU) Program took place on Thursday, August 28, 2014.  This day marked the end of the ten week research program that 44 EE undergraduates participated in over the summer.  The first part of the final presentation day was the oral presentations that took place in Allen CIS-X Auditorium from 12:30pm - 2:20pm.  Each REU Intern gave a 2-3 minute oral presentation about the research they conducted over the summer.  After the oral presentations, a poster session was held from 2:30pm-5:00pm in the Packard Atrium.  With over 110 guests including students, faculty, staff, donors, and others from the Engineering community, all of the interns were able to showcase their summer research.  

Electrical Engineering Research Experience for Undergraduates

The EE REU Program is a 10 week summer research program for Electrical Engineering undergraduate students.  Funded by the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Research (VPUE), the EE REU Program gives undergraduates the opportunity to conduct research.  Each EE REU Intern is matched with a faculty and graduate mentor on various topics including mobile networking, nanotechnology, and bio-medical imaging.  As an intern of the program, students receive a research stipend and the opportunity to live on-campus.  More information about the EE REU Program can be viewed at http://ee.stanford.edu/academics/reu.


EE REU 2014 Stats:

44 students total
8 females, 36 males
15 rising sophomores, 19 rising juniors, 9 rising seniors, 1 co-term student

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February 2014

Three staff members each received a $50 Visa card in recognition of their extraordinary efforts as part of the department’s 2014 Staff Gift Card Bonus Program. The EE department received several nominations in January, and nominations from 2013 were also considered.

Following are January’s gift card recipients and some of the comments from their nominators:

Ann Guerra, Faculty Administrator

  • “She is very kind to students and always enthusiastic to help students… every time we need emergent help, she is willing to give us a hand.”
  • “Ann helps anyone who goes to her for help with anything, sometimes when it’s beyond her duty.” 

Teresa Nguyen, Student Accounting Associate

  • “She stays on top of our many, many student financial issues, is an extremely reliable source of information and is super friendly.”
  • “Teresa’s cheerful disposition, her determination, and her professionalism seem to go above and beyond what is simply required.”

Helen Niu, Faculty Administrator

  • “Helen is always a pleasure to work with.”
  • “She goes the extra mile in her dealings with me, which is very much appreciated.”

The School of Engineering once again gave the EE department several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond. More people will be recognized next month, and past nominations will still be eligible for future months. EE faculty, staff and students are welcome to nominate a deserving staff person by visitinghttps://gradapps.stanford.edu/NotableStaff/nomination/create.

Ann Guerra  Teresa Nguyen  Helen Niu

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