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Professors Hesselink and Rivas received Precourt Institute seed grants for their energy research
December 2014

Professor Lambertus Hesselink and Assistant Professor Juan Rivas-Davila are two of eight Stanford faculty seed grant recipients. The awards are to assist in new research that promises clean technology and energy efficiency.

Assistant Professor Juan Rivas' and his research team will continue exploration of more energy-efficient power supplies. An initial goal is to provide energy-efficient methods to pasteurize liquids like milk and fruit juice. The team's long-range goal is to revolutionize the design and manufacture of power electronics components. The Precourt Institute for Energy awarded Rivas-Davila's grant.

Professor Lambertus Hesselink's research will assess and design a method to capture heat waste from computers. His team projects that at least 20% of the waste could be recouped, saving $6 million in electricity per day in the U.S. alone. The Precourt Energy Efficiency Center (PEEC) provided this award.

 

Read the full Stanford report article.

Dr. Spilker at the dedication of the James and Anna Marie Spilker Engineering and Applied Sciences Building
December 2014

EE alumnus James J. Spilker has been awarded the 2015 IEEE Edison Medal. Spilker received his BS, MS and Ph.D. from Stanford's Electrical Engineering department. Currently, Dr. Spilker is the Executive Chairman of AOSense, Inc., and a consulting professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. In 2013, Dr. and Mrs. Anna Marie Spilker dedicated the third of four buildings that comprise Stanford’s Science and Engineering Quad (SEQ).

The aim of the IEEE Edison Medal is to recognize "a career of meritorious achievement in electrical science, electrical engineering, or the electrical arts.” Dr. Spilker is recognized “for contributions to the technology and implementation of civilian GPS navigation systems.”

Dr. Spilker will receive the award at the 2015 IEEE Honors Ceremony. 

 

Image: Steve Costillo

Professor Jelena Vuckovic in her Nanoscale and Quantum Photonics Lab
December 2014

Published in a recent article in Scientific Reports, Professor Vuckovic and her team present the inverse design technique. As stated in the introduction, the "inverse design concept is simple and extendable to a broad class of highly compact devices including frequency filters, mode converters, and spatial mode multiplexers."

"Light can carry more data than a wire, and it takes less energy to transmit photons than electrons," said electrical engineering Professor Jelena Vuckovic, who led the research.

In previous work her team developed an algorithm that did two things: It automated the process of designing optical structures and it enabled them to create previously unimaginable, nanoscale structures to control light. Now, she and lead author Alexander Piggott, a doctoral candidate in electrical engineering, have employed that algorithm to design, build and test a link compatible with current fiber optic networks.

 

Read the article in Scientific Reports

Read the Stanford Report article 

Professor Jim Plummer
December 2014

Professor James Plummer, the John M. Fluke Professor of Electrical Engineering, received the IEEE Founders Medal, announced at the recent Board of Directors meeting. Professor Plummer's citation reads, "For leadership in the creation and support of innovative, interdisciplinary, and globally focused education and research programs."

The IEEE Founders Medal was established by the Institute of Radio Engineers in 1952. It derives its character and purpose from the inspiring example of leadership and service set by the three founders of the Institute: Alfred N. Goldsmith, who was Director Emeritus and Editor Emeritus of IEEE, and Messrs. John V. L. Hogan and Robert Marriott. This purpose is perhaps best expressed by the citation that accompanied the first award, which read in part: "For outstanding contributions to the profession and to the Institute through wise and courageous leadership in the planning and administration of technical developments." The progress of a profession rests not only on the technical abilities of its members, but on the qualities of leadership and dedication that they possess.

Please join us in congratulating Professor Plummer for this well deserved recognition, and his transformative contributions to the School of Engineering and to Stanford.

 

Read the Stanford Report article.

Additional information about the IEEE Founders Medal

Associate Professor Subhasish Mitra
December 2014

Associate Professor Subhasish Mitra has been elected Fellow of ACM, "For contributions to the design and testing of robust computing systems." ACM recognizes members for their outstanding accomplishments in computing and information technology and/or outstanding service to ACM and the larger computing community. Recognizing the top 1% of ACM members, Fellow is the most prestigious ACM member grade.

Formal recognition of the 2014 ACM Fellows will be at the annual awards banquet in mid-2015.

 

 

IEEE Fellows, Professors Kozyrakis, Lall, Lee, and Murmann
December 2014

Four Electrical Engineering faculty have been elevated to IEEE Fellow. We congratulate each of them for their breakthrough research and advancement of the field.

IEEE Grade of Fellow is conferred by the Board of Directors upon a person with an extraordinary record of accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest. Less than 0.1% of voting IEEE members are selected annually for this member recognition. IEEE Fellows will be formally announced by the IEEE at end of the 2014.

 

Read Stanford Engineering article

Doctoral candidate Linxiao Zhu, Professor Shanhui Fan and research associate Aaswath Raman pictured with photonic radiative cooling material
December 2014

Professor Shanhui Fan and interdisciplinary team members from EE, ME, and Applied Physics, reported this energy-saving breakthrough in the journal Nature. Using a thermal photonic approach, the material reflects sunlight and emits heat, demonstrating new possibilities for energy efficiency. The photonic radiative cooler consists of seven alternating layers of hafnium dioxide (HfO2) and silicon dioxide (SiO2) of varying thicknesses, on top of 200 nm of silver (Ag), which are all deposited on top of a 200-mm silicon wafer.

The ultrathin, multilayered material can help cool buildings, reducing the need for air conditioning.

 

Image: Norbert von der Groebe

image of Professor Kailath with National Medal of Science
November 2014

Quoting Electrical Engineering Professor Thomas Kailath at the November 20th awards ceremony, President Obama said, "Scientists are intrinsically hopeful and believe in grand answers, and that if we work hard enough we can find some of them in our lifetime."

President Obama also spoke of the importance to encourage a culture of asking questions, discovery and innovation. He pointed out a common thread between the ten awardees was the influence of an encouraging parent or captivating teacher that whet their appetite at a young age. He drew parallels between America's diversity, infrastructure, and the unmatched opportunities at American universities to encourage new ideas which help to transform our world through new businesses and ventures.

President Obama referenced Professor Kailath's journey from India to Stanford as an example of the importance of welcoming scholars to America. Kailath joined Stanford's Electrical Engineering department in 1963, researching and teaching in several fields of engineering and mathematics, as well as mentoring more than 100 doctoral and postdoctoral students. The awards committee citation reads, "for transformative contributions to the fields of information and system science, for distinctive and sustained mentoring of young scholars, and for translation of scientific ideas into entrepreneurial ventures that have had a significant impact on industry."

"This is indeed a great honor for me, which I proudly share with my students and coauthors," Kailath said in an earlier interview. "I am also grateful for the remarkably supportive environment of the Electrical Engineering department and the University."

 

Read additional stories at the Stanford Report and Whitehouse.gov. A video of the ceremony is also available.

Image: www.mercurynews.com

image of Professors Mitchell (left) and Boneh
January 2015

"Our increasing reliance on technology, combined with the unpredictable vulnerabilities of networked information, pose future challenges for all of society," said Stanford President John Hennessy. "We share the Hewlett Foundation's goal to seek a robust understanding of how new technologies affect us all at the most fundamental human levels. Stanford has a long history of fostering interdisciplinary collaborations to find thoughtful and enlightened answers to these paramount questions."

Three universities received grants of $15 million each from the Hewlett Foundation – the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of California, Berkeley, and Stanford – each will take a complementary approach in setting up the new centers based on their particular strengths and expertise.

Stanford's initiative will be highly interdisciplinary in building a new policy framework for cyber issues. It will draw on the campus' experience with multidisciplinary, university-wide initiatives to focus on the core themes of trustworthiness, governance and the emergence of unexpected impacts of technological change over time. Professor John Mitchell will serve as senior technical advisor.

 

For more information, go to Stanford Cyber Initiative.

Read the Stanford Report articles:

 

Updated January 2015 (original post November 13, 2014)

image of Professor Shan Wang, Joohong Choi and Adi Gani
November 2014

A team of Stanford University students and faculty has been selected as one of five Distinguished Award Prize winners in the Nokia Sensing XCHALLENGE, a global competition to catalyze breakthrough medical sensing technologies that will ultimately enable faster diagnoses and easier personal health monitoring.

The Stanford team was recognized for developing a hepatitis B blood test that can be analyzed in minutes using the microprocessor in a smart phone.

The current prize recognizes a 12-month effort by four PhD students – mechanical engineers Daniel Bechstein and Jung-Rok Lee, and electrical engineers Joohong Choi and Adi W. Gani – to create a mobile version of a technology that [EE Professor] Wang and other Stanford researchers have been developing for years.

In essence, the researchers graft magnetic nanoparticles onto biological markers. In this case they are interested in two biomarkers. One is the hepatitis B virus, called the antigen. The other is the antibody that fights hepatitis B. The magnetic particles are the homing beacons that allow instruments to track these biomarkers.

 

For the full story, visit engineering.stanford.edu/news

Image credit: Eigen Lifesciences

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February 2014

Three staff members each received a $50 Visa card in recognition of their extraordinary efforts as part of the department’s 2014 Staff Gift Card Bonus Program. The EE department received several nominations in January, and nominations from 2013 were also considered.

Following are January’s gift card recipients and some of the comments from their nominators:

Ann Guerra, Faculty Administrator

  • “She is very kind to students and always enthusiastic to help students… every time we need emergent help, she is willing to give us a hand.”
  • “Ann helps anyone who goes to her for help with anything, sometimes when it’s beyond her duty.” 

Teresa Nguyen, Student Accounting Associate

  • “She stays on top of our many, many student financial issues, is an extremely reliable source of information and is super friendly.”
  • “Teresa’s cheerful disposition, her determination, and her professionalism seem to go above and beyond what is simply required.”

Helen Niu, Faculty Administrator

  • “Helen is always a pleasure to work with.”
  • “She goes the extra mile in her dealings with me, which is very much appreciated.”

The School of Engineering once again gave the EE department several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond. More people will be recognized next month, and past nominations will still be eligible for future months. EE faculty, staff and students are welcome to nominate a deserving staff person by visitinghttps://gradapps.stanford.edu/NotableStaff/nomination/create.

Ann Guerra  Teresa Nguyen  Helen Niu

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