News

David Hallac, EE PhD candidate
September 2017

David Hallac, EE PhD candidate, is the lead author of "Toeplitz Inverse Covariance-Based Clustering of Multivariate Time Series Data," which has been selected to receive the KDD 2017 Conference Best Paper Runner-Up Award and the Best Student Paper runner-up Award. Co-authors include research assistant Sagar Vare (CS), professor Stephen Boyd (EE) and professor Jure Leskovec (CS).

ACM SIGKDD is the Association for Computing Machinery Special Interest Group on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining. The award recognizes papers presented at the annual SIGKDD conference, KDD2017, that advance the fundamental understanding of the field of knowledge discovery in data and data mining.

Their paper will received both the KDD 2017 Best Paper runner-up Award, as well as the Best Student Paper runner-up Award at the KDD 2017 ceremonies held in Halifax, Canada in August. The group will receive individual award plaques as well as a check.

 

Congratulations to David, Sagar, Stephen and Jure on this special recognition!

 

 

 

View "Toeplitz Inverse Covariance-Based Clustering of Multivariate Time Series Data" Abstract.

John Hennessy and Philip Knight. Image credit: L.A. Cicero
September 2017

The Knight-Hennessy Scholars program will be lead by EE professor and Stanford's former president John Hennessy. The program is funded by philanthropist Philip Knight (MBA '62).

The program aims to prepare a new generation of leaders with the deep academic foundation and broad skill set needed to develop creative solutions for the world's most complex challenges.

Fifty scholars will join the first cohort that enrolls in fall 2018, with up to 100 scholars admitted annually in subsequent years. Scholars will comprise an interdisciplinary graduate community representing a wide range of backgrounds and nationalities.

Building on his or her core Stanford graduate degree program, each scholar will participate in opportunities for leadership training, mentorship and experiential learning across multiple disciplines. Knight-Hennessy Scholars will receive financial support for the full cost of attendance to pursue a graduate education at Stanford.

"We recognize that an application cannot fully reflect who Knight-Hennessy Scholars are and how they live," said Derrick Bolton, dean of Knight-Hennessy Scholars admission. "We believe it's essential that we learn not only about what they have done, but also who they are: their influences, ideals, hopes and dreams."

The program's faculty advisory board and global advisory board, respectively comprising faculty from all seven schools and leaders from business, government, health care, law, technology and other fields, shaped the criteria to guide the selection of scholars. The Knight-Hennessy Scholars admission committee will consider three primary criteria when evaluating applications: independence of thought, purposeful leadership and a civic mindset.

Up to 100 application finalists will be invited to attend Immersion Weekend, which will take place at Stanford in January 2018.

"Immersion Weekend will be an experience that is fun, informal and informative for applicants," Bolton said. "Our aim is that the candidates will learn more about the graduate programs, the Knight-Hennessy Scholars program and themselves. It also gives a chance for the departments and us to get to know the applicants better."

In addition to submitting the Knight-Hennessy Scholars application, applicants must also apply to the Stanford graduate program of their choice.

 

Additional information available Knight-Hennessy.stanford.edu

 

Excerpted from "Knight-Hennessy Scholars launches inaugural application," May 2017.

Professor Lambertus 'Bert' Hesselink
August 2017

The paper, "Visualization of Second Order Tensor Fields and Matrix Data," was coauthored by professor Bert Hesselink and Thierry Delmarcelle in 1992. This paper describes some of their work on mathematical topology related to data analysis and lossless compression and visualization of tensor and vector data sets. The committee selected this paper for its importance and long term impact.

The IEEE VIS Test of Time Award is an accolade given to recognize articles published at previous conferences whose contents are still vibrant and useful today and have had a major impact and influence within and beyond the visualization community.

Papers are selected for each of the three conferences (VAST, InfoVis and SciVis) by Test of Time Awards panels appointed by the conference Steering Committees.

The decisions are based on objective measures such as the numbers of citations, and more subjective ones such as the quality and longevity and influence of ideas, outreach, uptake and effect not only in the research community, but also within application domains and visualization practice.

A full rationale will be provided for each paper at the conference opening, where we hope to encourage researchers to aim to produce work that is forward looking and has transformational potential. We're trying to build on our heritage to establish an ambitious future by making it clear at the outset of the conference opening that we want participants to aspire to be writing papers today that will be relevant in decades to come.

Professor Hesselink's research encompasses nano-photonics, ultra high density optical data storage, nonlinear optics, optical super-resolution, materials science, three-dimensional image processing and graphics, and Internet technologies.

 

Congratulations to Bert on this well-deserved recognition.

 

IEEE 2017 Test of Time Awards

Photo credit, The Marconi Society
August 2017

Engineering Professor emeritus Thomas Kailath will be given the Marconi Society's Lifetime Achievement Award in recognition of his many transformative contributions to information and system science, as well as his sustained mentoring and development of new generations of scientists.

Kailath is the sixth scientist to be honored with a Marconi Society Lifetime Achievement Award. The society is dedicated to furthering scientific achievements in communications and the internet.

"The award is being conferred on Kailath for mentoring a generation of research scholars and writing a classic textbook in linear systems that changed the way the subject is taught and his special purpose architecture to implement the signal processing algorithms on VLSI (Very Large-scale System Integration) chips," the society said.

Kailath's research and teaching at Stanford have ranged over several fields of engineering and mathematics, with a different focus roughly every decade.

 

Please join us in congratulating Tom for this very special recognition. Tom will receive his award at the annual Marconi Society Awards dinner in October.

 

Excerpted from Stanford News, "Stanford electrical engineering Professor Thomas Kailath honored for lifetime achievement by Marconi Society," August 16, 2017.

The Marconi Society press release, "Legendary Stanford Professor Thomas Kailath Will Receive The Marconi Society Lifetime Achievement Award," August 14, 2017. 

 

 

Related News

Professor Emeritus Thomas Kailath Awarded Honorary Degree, April 2017

Tom Kailath selected as Eminent Member, IEEE-HKN, February 2017

Professor Kailath Receives National Medal of Science from President Obama, October 2014

August 2017

This month, Electrical Engineering recognized several staff for their outstanding effort! Please join us in acknowledging the extraordinary efforts of Vickie Carillo, Doug Chaffee, Julia Gillespie, Kenny Green, Ann Guerra, Edwin Mendoza, Helen Lin, Joe Little, and Eric Wheeler.

Each were nominated by peers, faculty and/or students for professionalism that went above and beyond their everyday roles. Gift card recipients continue to make profound and positive impact in the department's everyday work and academic environment.

Please join us in congratulating Vickie, Doug, Julia, Kenny, Ann, Edwin, Helen, Joe, and Eric. Modified excerpts from their nominations follow.

 

Vickie Carillo, Administrative Associate

  • Vickie really helps the department run smoothly – all while remaining calm and polite.
  • As a colleague, I appreciate her willingness to step in and provide assistance and support!

Doug Chaffee, ISL Faculty Administrator

  • Doug's professionalism and inclusion is really inspiring.
  • He works so hard on staff appreciation events, we are lucky to have him!

Julia Gillespie, Faculty Administrator

  • Julia's transparency is greatly appreciated, especially when there are many people involved.
  • Her work is always excellent and thoughtful.

Kenny Green, Facilities Manager

  • Kenny is always pleasant and helpful and goes out of his way to find solutions for challenging problems.
  • He bridges many groups and finds solutions that work for everyone — thanks, Kenny!

Ann Guerra, Faculty Administrator

  • I appreciate Ann's quick responses to all my emails.
  • She is so patient and willing to explain.

Helen Lin, Faculty Administrator

  • Helen's support in preparing and running the ICCP 2017 was crucial to its success.
  • She surpasses expectations!

Joe Little, Principal Systems Architect

  • Joe is supremely efficient and responsive colleague.
  • His server and networking knowledge is vast, and he's always willing to share.

Edwin Mendoza, Faculty & Staff Affairs Administrator

  • His work juggling several projects simultaneously is appreciated by the department.
  • Edwin's contributions as a colleague are appreciated — he is such a pleasure to work with.

Eric Wheeler, Systems and Web Developer

  • His thoughtful attention is evident in his outstanding deliverables!
  • Eric's expertise and ability to take on new areas is a great benefit to the department.

The Staff Gift Card Bonus Program is sponsored by the School of Engineering. Each year, the EE department receives several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond their role. Staff are chosen from nominations received from faculty, students, and staff. Past nominations are eligible for future months.

Nominate a deserving staff person or group today! We encourage you to nominate individuals or groups that have made a profound improvement in your daily work life. Each recipient receives a $50 Visa card. Nominations can be made at any time.

Orly Liba (PhD candidate ’18)
July 2017

Orly Liba (PhD candidate '18) is the lead author of a study published in Nature Communications. Her advisor, Professor Adam de la Zerda and fellow researchers have devised a way to improve the quality of images obtained through optical coherence tomography (OCT).

The relatively simple, low-cost fix — entailing a pair of lenses, a piece of ground glass and some software tweaks — erases blemishes that have bedeviled images obtained via OCT since its invention in 1991. This improvement, combined with the technology's ability to optically penetrate up to 2 millimeters into tissue, could enable physicians to perform "virtual biopsies," visualizing tissue in three dimensions at microscope-quality resolution without excising any tissue from patients.

Their study describes how the researchers tested the enhancement in two different commercially available OCT devices. They were able to view cell-scale features in intact tissues, including in a mouse's ear, retina and cornea, as well as Meissner's corpuscle, found in the skin of a human fingertip.

"We saw sebaceous glands, hair follicles, blood vessels, lymph vessels and more," Liba said.

Other Stanford co-authors of the study are former postdoctoral scholars Matthew Lew, PhD, and Debasish Sen, PhD; graduate student Elliott SoRelle; research assistant Rebecca Dutta; professor of ophthalmology Darius Moshfeghi, MD; and professor of physics and of molecular and cellular physiology Steven Chu, PhD.

 

 

Excerpted from "Scientists turbocharge high-resolution, 3-D imaging," published on Stanford Medicine's News Center, June 20, 2017

Professor Gordon Wetzstein, left; postdoctoral research fellow Donald Dansereau (Image credit: L.A. Cicero)
July 2017

A new 4D camera designed by Professor Gordon Wetzstein and postdoc Dr. Donald Dansereau captures light field information over a 138° field of view.

The difference between looking through a normal camera and the new design is like the difference between looking through a peephole and a window, the scientists said.

"A 2D photo is like a peephole because you can't move your head around to gain more information about depth, translucency or light scattering," Dansereau said. "Looking through a window, you can move and, as a result, identify features like shape, transparency and shininess."

That additional information comes from a type of photography called light field photography, first described in 1996 by EE Professors Marc Levoy and Pat Hanrahan. Light field photography captures the same image as a conventional 2D camera plus information about the direction and distance of the light hitting the lens, creating what's known as a 4D image. A well-known feature of light field photography is that it allows users to refocus images after they are taken because the images include information about the light position and direction. Robots might use this to see through rain and other things that could obscure their vision.

The extremely wide field of view, which encompasses nearly a third of the circle around the camera, comes from a specially designed spherical lens. However, this lens also produced a significant hurdle: how to translate a spherical image onto a flat sensor. Previous approaches to solving this problem had been heavy and error prone, but combining the optics and fabrication expertise of UCSD and the signal processing and algorithmic expertise of Wetzstein's lab resulted in a digital solution to this problem that not only leads to the creation of these extra-wide images but enhances them.

This camera system's wide field of view, detailed depth information and potential compact size are all desirable features for imaging systems incorporated in wearables, robotics, autonomous vehicles and augmented and virtual reality.

"Many research groups are looking at what we can do with light fields but no one has great cameras. We have off-the-shelf cameras that are designed for consumer photography," said Dansereau. "This is the first example I know of a light field camera built specifically for robotics and augmented reality. I'm stoked to put it into peoples' hands and to see what they can do with it."

 

Two 138° light field panoramas and a depth estimate of the second panorama. (Image credit: Stanford Computational Imaging Lab and Photonic Systems Integration Laboratory at UC San Diego)

 


Read more at Professor Wetztein's research site, Stanford Computational Imaging Lab.

Excerpted from Stanford News, "New camera designed by Stanford researchers could improve robot vision and virtual reality," July 21, 2017.

Yuanfang Li and Dr. Ardavan Pedram: Best Paper Award, IEEE ASAP
July 2017

Co-authors Yuanfang Li (MS candidate) and Dr. Ardavan Pedram received the Best Paper Award at the 28th annual IEEE International Conference on Application-specific Systems, Architectures and Processors (ASAP).

The conference covers the theory and practice of application-specific systems, architectures and processors – specifically building upon traditional strengths in areas such as computer arithmetic, cryptography, compression, signal and image processing, network processing, reconfigurable computing, application-specific instruction-set processors, and hardware accelerators.

Yuanfang Li is an M.S. candidate and Dr. Ardavan Pedram is a senior research associate who manages the PRISM Project. The PRISM project enables the design of reconfigurable architectures to accelerate the building blocks of machine learning, high performance computing, and data science routines.

 

Congratulations to Yuanfang and Ardavan for their well-deserved award!

 

Abstract "CATERPILLAR: Coarse Grain Reconfigurable Architecture for Accelerating the Training of Deep Neural Networks":
Accelerating the inference of a trained DNN is a well studied subject. In this paper we switch the focus to the training of DNNs. The training phase is compute intensive, demands complicated data communication, and contains multiple levels of data dependencies and parallelism. This paper presents an algorithm/architecture space exploration of efficient accelerators to achieve better network convergence rates and higher energy efficiency for training DNNs. We further demonstrate that an architecture with hierarchical support for collective communication semantics provides flexibility in training various networks performing both stochastic and batched gradient descent based techniques. Our results suggest that smaller networks favor non-batched techniques while performance for larger networks is higher using batched operations.

June 2017

Congratulations to Dianmin Lin (PhD '16), she has been awarded the 2017 QEP Doctoral Research Prize, jointly with Dr. Jamie Francis-Jones (University of Bath).

The QEP Doctoral Research Prize recognizes students who have conducted work of an exceptional standard in the field of quantum electronics and photonics. The winning student receives an award of £250 and a certificate.

Dr. Dianmin Lin is recognized for the design and demonstration of all-dielectric (silicon) phase-gradient metasurface optical elements, such as axicons, flat lenses and blazed gratings, operating in transmission mode at visible wavelengths, as well as multifunctional metasurfaces providing new or combined functions that are difficult if not impossible to achieve with conventional optical components. Her research has been published in Advanced Materials, Nano Letters, and Science. Three patent applications have been filed for her work at Stanford, one patent has been issued, and two are pending.

Dianmin is currently a senior optical scientist working on augmented reality.

 

Congratulations to Dianmin on her well-deserved recognition and award!

The Brongersma Group

Pictured, The Brongersma Group is concerned with the development and understanding of nanophotonic devices. As part of a worldwide research and development effort on 'metamaterials' - manmade media that possess unique properties not found in nature, students in the group aim to nanostructure the layered materials in conventional optoelectronic devices so as to increase their performance or to achieve entirely new functions. They have successfully applied this approach to the fields of solar energy production, information technology, and optical imaging.

 

 

 

 

Excerpted from IOP's 'QEP Group Prize.'

June 2017

Professor David Tse has been appointed to the Thomas Kailath and Guanghan Xu Professorship in the School of Engineering. This professorship was established with an endowed gift from Guanghan Xu, a Stanford alum who earned his PhD in EE. Guanghan established this professorship to honor his advisor, Thomas Kailath, the Hitachi America Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus. The Thomas Kailath and Guanghan Xu Professorship carries preference for faculty whose academic focus is in the broad field of signal processing and its applications.

David has been a member of the Stanford faculty since 2014. His research focuses on information theory and its applications in various fields, including wireless communication, energy, and computational biology. David serves at the Stanford Information Systems Laboratory, and is the inventor of the proportional fair scheduling algorithm used in all third- and fourth-generation cellular systems. He also co-authored with Pramod Viswanath the text Fundamentals of Wireless Communication, which has been used in over 60 institutions around the world.

Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, David served in the department of electrical engineering and computer sciences at the University of California, Berkeley from 1995 to 2014, and was a member of the technical staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories from 1994 to 1995.

A fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), David has received the IEEE Communications Society and Information Theory Society Joint Paper Award on three occasions, and he has served on the IEEE Information Theory Society's Board of Governors twice. He is a recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER Award and the Canadian Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council 1967 Graduate Fellowship. David has been honored with the Outstanding Teaching Award from the department of electrical engineering and computer sciences at the University of California, Berkeley, and he is a recipient of the American Society for Engineering Education's Frederick Emmons Terman Award, the National Academy of Engineering's Gilbreth Lectureship, and the IEEE Information Theory Society Claude E. Shannon Award.

David received a bachelor's degree in systems design engineering from the University of Waterloo in 1989, and MS and PhD degrees in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1992 and 1994, respectively.

David's contributions to the field of information theory and its applications make him a deserving candidate for the Thomas Kailath and Guanghan Xu Professorship in the School of Engineering.

 

Please join us in congratulating David on this achievement.

 

Related News:

2017 Claude E. Shannon Award, July 2016

David's EE Spotlight 

 

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February 2014

Three staff members each received a $50 Visa card in recognition of their extraordinary efforts as part of the department’s 2014 Staff Gift Card Bonus Program. The EE department received several nominations in January, and nominations from 2013 were also considered.

Following are January’s gift card recipients and some of the comments from their nominators:

Ann Guerra, Faculty Administrator

  • “She is very kind to students and always enthusiastic to help students… every time we need emergent help, she is willing to give us a hand.”
  • “Ann helps anyone who goes to her for help with anything, sometimes when it’s beyond her duty.” 

Teresa Nguyen, Student Accounting Associate

  • “She stays on top of our many, many student financial issues, is an extremely reliable source of information and is super friendly.”
  • “Teresa’s cheerful disposition, her determination, and her professionalism seem to go above and beyond what is simply required.”

Helen Niu, Faculty Administrator

  • “Helen is always a pleasure to work with.”
  • “She goes the extra mile in her dealings with me, which is very much appreciated.”

The School of Engineering once again gave the EE department several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond. More people will be recognized next month, and past nominations will still be eligible for future months. EE faculty, staff and students are welcome to nominate a deserving staff person by visitinghttps://gradapps.stanford.edu/NotableStaff/nomination/create.

Ann Guerra  Teresa Nguyen  Helen Niu

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