Faculty

image of professors Dutton and Osgood
October 2014

 Two EE professors were recognized for their undergraduate education conrtibutions: Robert Dutton received the William and Lynda Steere University Fellow in Undergraduate Education and Brad Osgood was reappointed the Paul Davies Family University Fellow in Undergraduate Education.

Provost John Etchemendy announced the nine Stanford faculty members on Thursday, October 23rd.

Read the entire article at the Stanford Report.

image of EE directory, Packard Bldg
October 2014

Three Stanford Electrical Engineering professors have been honored with new endowed chair titles. The honored professors are

  • Dan Boneh, received The Rajeev Motwani Professorship in Computer Science;
  • Kunle Olukotun, received The Cadence Design Systems Professorship; and
  • John Pauly received The Reid Weaver Dennis Professorship in Electrical Engineering.

An endowed professorship (also referred to as an endowed chair) is one of the highest honors bestowed on a member of the faculty. This prestigious appointment recognizes his or her many outstanding accomplishments and contributions. 

Approximately one third of the more than 60 endowed professorships in the School of Engineering are held by EE faculty. Chairs may be created to honor individuals or organizations and may express a preference to honor a professor working in a specific academic area.

image of Professor Goldsmith
October 2014

Electrical Engineering Professor Andrea Goldsmith is the 2014 recipient of IEEE's Edwin Howard Armstrong Achievement Award. IEEE celebrates and recognizes scientific and engineering excellence through the presentation of peer reviewed Medals, Technical Field Awards, and Society, Council and Unit Awards.

Goldsmith's research is to develop novel techniques, protocols, and designs for future wireless systems and networks. Her specific research areas include the design and capacity analysis of wireless systems and networks, multiple-antenna wireless networks, cognitive radios, sensor and networks, cross-layer wireless network design, and applications of communications and signal processing to health and neuroscience.

Read more about IEEE: http://www.ieee.org/index.html

 

image of Professor Harris
October 2014

Professor James Harris received the Al Cho MBE Award for his seminal and sustained contributions to the science, technology, device applications, and commercialization of molecular beam epitaxy [MBE] including dilute-nitride multijunction solar cells.

Harris was presented with the Al Cho MBE Award at the International Conference on Molecular Beam Epitaxy (ICMBE) in September.

The International MBE Advisory Committee presents the Al Cho MBE Award annually at the International MBE Conference in honor of Al Cho, "Father of MBE", recognizing individuals who have made fundamental contributions to the science and technology of MBE.

image of Assoc. Professor Pop
October 2014

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering Eric Pop has won the 2014 Okawa Foundation Research Grant. Pop’s research theme is “Tunable Thermal and Thermoelectric Metamaterials.” The Grant Presentation Ceremony will occur in December.

The mission of the Okawa Foundation is promotion and development in the field of Information and Communications Technology through awards and research grants as well as efforts to nurture researchers, engineers, and providers. It also seeks to promote diversity and ubiquitousness of human communication and thereby contribute to the peace and prosperity of humankind.

Read more about the Okawa Foundation: http://www.okawa-foundation.or.jp/en/outline/index.html

image of Asst. Professor Ada Poon
October 2014

Ada Poon, a Stanford assistant professor of electrical engineering, is a master at building miniscule wireless devices that function in the body and can be powered remotely. Now, she and collaborators in bioengineering and anesthesia want to leverage this technology to develop a way of studying – and eventually developing treatments for – pain.

Chronic pain costs the economy $600 billion a year and the two most common treatments have significant drawbacks: narcotics are addictive and surgery is costly and carries considerable risks.

"What we will be able to look at is a more natural measure of pain relief," Poon said. They could assess whether a treatment allows mice to return to normal activities by tallying time spent on an exercise wheel or socializing.

This collaboration is one of 22 projects recently funded by the Stanford Bio-X Seed grants, which Carla Shatz, the director of Bio-X, calls the "glue" that brings interdisciplinary teams together. This project is typical, with an electrical engineer, a bioengineer and an anesthesiologist, all of whom are Bio-X affiliates, working together to solve a biomedical problem. Bio-X has so far brought together more than 600 interconnected faculty members from across campus.

"When you combine people with different skills you will come up with something with truly high impact," Clark said.

For the full story, visit news.stanford.edu/news

Image: L.A. Cicero

 

image of Professor Kailath
October 2014

President Obama announced a new class of recipients of the National Medal of Science and National Medal of Technology and Innovation—our Nation’s highest honors for achievement and leadership in advancing the fields of science and technology. 

EE Professor Thomas Kailath received the National Medal of Science. He was the first recipient of the Hitachi America Professorship in 1988, and received numerous awards and recognition for his research, writing and contributions. Professor Kailath assumed emeritus status in 2001.

Read Stanford Report article

Gordon Wetzstein
September 2014

The Electrical Engineering Department welcomes two new assistant professors, Gordon Wetzstein and John Duchi. Both are joining Stanford this September.

Gordon Wetzstein's research addresses challenges in computational imaging and display and in computational light transport. He received his PhD in computer science from the University of British Columbia in 2011, then worked at MIT's Media Lab as a research scientist and postdoctoral associate before joining the Stanford faculty. His office is on the second floor of the Packard Electrical Engineering Building in room 236.

John Duchi
John Duchi's interests include optimization, statistics, machine learning and computation. He completed his PhD in computer science at UC Berkeley in June and is joining both Statistics and Electrical Engineering with a joint appointment. His office is on the first floor of Sequoia Hall in room 126.

S. Fan
July 2014

Scientists may have overcome one of the major hurdles in developing high-efficiency, long-lasting solar cells – keeping them cool, even in the blistering heat of the noonday Sun.

By adding a specially patterned layer of silica glass to the surface of ordinary solar cells, a team of researchers led by Shanhui Fan, an electrical engineering professor at Stanford University, has found a way to let solar cells cool themselves by shepherding away unwanted thermal radiation. The researchers describe their innovative design in the premiere issue of The Optical Society’s  new open-access journal Optica.

Solar cells are among the most promising and widely used renewable energy technologies on the market today. Though readily available and easily manufactured, even the best designs convert only a fraction of the energy they receive from the sun into usable electricity.

Part of this loss is the unavoidable consequence of converting sunlight into electricity. A surprisingly vexing amount, however, is causesd by solar cells overheating.

Under normal operating conditions, solar cells can easily reach temperatures of 130 degrees Fahrenheit (55 degrees Celsius) or more. These harsh conditions quickly sap efficiency and can markedly shorten the lifespan of a solar cell. Actively cooling solar cells, however – either by ventilation or coolants – would be prohibitively expensive and at odds with the need to optimize exposure to the sun.

For the full story, visit engineering.stanford.edu.

EE Professor Emeritus Arogyaswami Paulraj
January 2014

Electrical Engineering Professor Emeritus Arogyaswami Paulraj has won the prestigious Marconi Prize of the Marconi Society for "his pioneering contributions to developing the theory and applications of MIMO antennas."

“Paulraj’s contributions to wireless technology, and the resulting benefit to mankind, are indisputable. Every WiFi router and 4G phone today uses MIMO technology pioneered by him,” says Professor Sir David Payne, Chairman of the Marconi Society.

According to the Marconi Society, its aim is to enhance the spirit of Guglielmo Marconi – scientist, engineer, inventor, and entrepreneur – his contributions to communications and information, and his determination that such knowledge be directed to the social, economic and cultural improvement of all humanity. The $100,000 Marconi Prize recognizes achievements of those living individuals from anywhere in the world whose aspirations, careers and accomplishments are characterized by a similar dedication.

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