Faculty

image of Assistant Professor Jonathan Fan
January 2015

The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) has announced the Young Investigator Research program (YIP) grant recipients. EE Assistant Professor Jonathan Fan's winning proposal will investigate Neuromorphic Infrared Nano-Optical Systems.

"The YIP is open to scientists and engineers at research institutions across the United States who received Ph.D. or equivalent degrees in the last five years and who show exceptional ability and promise for conducting basic research."

The AFOSR news article continues, "This year AFOSR received over 200 proposals in response to the AFOSR broad agency announcement solicitation in major areas of interest to the Air Force. These areas include: Dynamical Systems and Control, Quantum and Non-Equilibrium Processes, Information, Decision and Complex Networks, Complex Materials and Devices, and Energy, Power and Propulsion. AFOSR officials select proposals based on the evaluation criteria listed in the broad agency announcement. Those selected will receive the grants over a 3-year period."

Read the entire article

Wetzstein's research featuredScientific American’s features Assistant Professor Wetzstein’s Research as a World-Changing Idea as a world-changing idea
December 2014

In an article titled, "Smartphone Screens Correct for Your Vision Flaws," the December issue of Scientific American features Wetzstein's research with colleagues from MIT and University of California, Berkeley. The articles states, "Informal tests on a handful of users have shown that the technology works, Wetzstein says, but large-scale studies are needed to further refine it. In the process, the researchers also plan on developing a slider that can be used to manually adjust the focus of the screen. Wetzstein says that the technology could be a boon for people in developing countries who have easier access to mobile devices than prescription eyewear."

Gordon Wetzstein's research addresses challenges in computational imaging and display and in computational light transport. He received his PhD in computer science from the University of British Columbia in 2011, then worked at MIT's Media Lab as a research scientist and postdoctoral associate before joining the Stanford faculty.

 

Read the complete article from Scientific American.

Professors Wong and Mitra's CNT chips revealed at IEDM conference
December 2014

Professor H.-S. Philip Wong and Associate Professor Subhasish Mitra's research team has built a four-layer high-rise chip using carbon nanotubes (CNT) and resistive random access memory (RRAM). The new materials required a new method of connecting them, which were created by EE grad students, Max Shulaker and Tony Wu.

"This research is at an early stage, but our design and fabrication techniques are scalable," Mitra said. "With further development this architecture could lead to computing performance that is much, much greater than anything available today."

Wong said the prototype chip to be unveiled at IEDM shows how to put logic and memory together into three-dimensional structures that can be mass-produced.

"Paradigm shift is an overused concept, but here it is appropriate," Wong said. "With this new architecture, electronics manufacturers could put the power of a supercomputer in your hand."

 

Read the full article in the Stanford Report. 

Professors Hesselink and Rivas received Precourt Institute seed grants for their energy research
December 2014

Professor Lambertus Hesselink and Assistant Professor Juan Rivas-Davila are two of eight Stanford faculty seed grant recipients. The awards are to assist in new research that promises clean technology and energy efficiency.

Assistant Professor Juan Rivas' and his research team will continue exploration of more energy-efficient power supplies. An initial goal is to provide energy-efficient methods to pasteurize liquids like milk and fruit juice. The team's long-range goal is to revolutionize the design and manufacture of power electronics components. The Precourt Institute for Energy awarded Rivas-Davila's grant.

Professor Lambertus Hesselink's research will assess and design a method to capture heat waste from computers. His team projects that at least 20% of the waste could be recouped, saving $6 million in electricity per day in the U.S. alone. The Precourt Energy Efficiency Center (PEEC) provided this award.

 

Read the full Stanford report article.

Professor Jelena Vuckovic in her Nanoscale and Quantum Photonics Lab
December 2014

Published in a recent article in Scientific Reports, Professor Vuckovic and her team present the inverse design technique. As stated in the introduction, the "inverse design concept is simple and extendable to a broad class of highly compact devices including frequency filters, mode converters, and spatial mode multiplexers."

"Light can carry more data than a wire, and it takes less energy to transmit photons than electrons," said electrical engineering Professor Jelena Vuckovic, who led the research.

In previous work her team developed an algorithm that did two things: It automated the process of designing optical structures and it enabled them to create previously unimaginable, nanoscale structures to control light. Now, she and lead author Alexander Piggott, a doctoral candidate in electrical engineering, have employed that algorithm to design, build and test a link compatible with current fiber optic networks.

 

Read the article in Scientific Reports

Read the Stanford Report article 

Professor Jim Plummer
December 2014

Professor James Plummer, the John M. Fluke Professor of Electrical Engineering, received the IEEE Founders Medal, announced at the recent Board of Directors meeting. Professor Plummer's citation reads, "For leadership in the creation and support of innovative, interdisciplinary, and globally focused education and research programs."

The IEEE Founders Medal was established by the Institute of Radio Engineers in 1952. It derives its character and purpose from the inspiring example of leadership and service set by the three founders of the Institute: Alfred N. Goldsmith, who was Director Emeritus and Editor Emeritus of IEEE, and Messrs. John V. L. Hogan and Robert Marriott. This purpose is perhaps best expressed by the citation that accompanied the first award, which read in part: "For outstanding contributions to the profession and to the Institute through wise and courageous leadership in the planning and administration of technical developments." The progress of a profession rests not only on the technical abilities of its members, but on the qualities of leadership and dedication that they possess.

Please join us in congratulating Professor Plummer for this well deserved recognition, and his transformative contributions to the School of Engineering and to Stanford.

 

Read the Stanford Report article.

Additional information about the IEEE Founders Medal

Associate Professor Subhasish Mitra
December 2014

Associate Professor Subhasish Mitra has been elected Fellow of ACM, "For contributions to the design and testing of robust computing systems." ACM recognizes members for their outstanding accomplishments in computing and information technology and/or outstanding service to ACM and the larger computing community. Recognizing the top 1% of ACM members, Fellow is the most prestigious ACM member grade.

Formal recognition of the 2014 ACM Fellows will be at the annual awards banquet in mid-2015.

 

 

IEEE Fellows, Professors Kozyrakis, Lall, Lee, and Murmann
December 2014

Four Electrical Engineering faculty have been elevated to IEEE Fellow. We congratulate each of them for their breakthrough research and advancement of the field.

IEEE Grade of Fellow is conferred by the Board of Directors upon a person with an extraordinary record of accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest. Less than 0.1% of voting IEEE members are selected annually for this member recognition. IEEE Fellows will be formally announced by the IEEE at end of the 2014.

 

Read Stanford Engineering article

image of Professor Kailath with National Medal of Science
November 2014

Quoting Electrical Engineering Professor Thomas Kailath at the November 20th awards ceremony, President Obama said, "Scientists are intrinsically hopeful and believe in grand answers, and that if we work hard enough we can find some of them in our lifetime."

President Obama also spoke of the importance to encourage a culture of asking questions, discovery and innovation. He pointed out a common thread between the ten awardees was the influence of an encouraging parent or captivating teacher that whet their appetite at a young age. He drew parallels between America's diversity, infrastructure, and the unmatched opportunities at American universities to encourage new ideas which help to transform our world through new businesses and ventures.

President Obama referenced Professor Kailath's journey from India to Stanford as an example of the importance of welcoming scholars to America. Kailath joined Stanford's Electrical Engineering department in 1963, researching and teaching in several fields of engineering and mathematics, as well as mentoring more than 100 doctoral and postdoctoral students. The awards committee citation reads, "for transformative contributions to the fields of information and system science, for distinctive and sustained mentoring of young scholars, and for translation of scientific ideas into entrepreneurial ventures that have had a significant impact on industry."

"This is indeed a great honor for me, which I proudly share with my students and coauthors," Kailath said in an earlier interview. "I am also grateful for the remarkably supportive environment of the Electrical Engineering department and the University."

 

Read additional stories at the Stanford Report and Whitehouse.gov. A video of the ceremony is also available.

Image: www.mercurynews.com

image of Professors Mitchell (left) and Boneh
January 2015

"Our increasing reliance on technology, combined with the unpredictable vulnerabilities of networked information, pose future challenges for all of society," said Stanford President John Hennessy. "We share the Hewlett Foundation's goal to seek a robust understanding of how new technologies affect us all at the most fundamental human levels. Stanford has a long history of fostering interdisciplinary collaborations to find thoughtful and enlightened answers to these paramount questions."

Three universities received grants of $15 million each from the Hewlett Foundation – the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of California, Berkeley, and Stanford – each will take a complementary approach in setting up the new centers based on their particular strengths and expertise.

Stanford's initiative will be highly interdisciplinary in building a new policy framework for cyber issues. It will draw on the campus' experience with multidisciplinary, university-wide initiatives to focus on the core themes of trustworthiness, governance and the emergence of unexpected impacts of technological change over time. Professor John Mitchell will serve as senior technical advisor.

 

For more information, go to Stanford Cyber Initiative.

Read the Stanford Report articles:

 

Updated January 2015 (original post November 13, 2014)

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