Faculty

April 2015

Announced April 22nd, the American Academy of Arts and Scientists, elected 197 new members.

The American Academy is one of the nation's most prestigious honorary societies, it is also a leading center for independent policy research. Members contribute to Academy publications and studies of science and technology policy, global security and international affairs, social policy and American institutions, and the humanities, arts, and education.

Members of the 2015 class include winners of the Nobel Prize and the Pulitzer Prize; MacArthur and Guggenheim Fellowships; and Grammy, Emmy, Oscar, and Tony Awards. The list of new members is located at www.amacad.org/members.

"We are honored to elect a new class of extraordinary women and men to join our distinguished membership," said Don Randel, Chair of the Academy's Board of Directors. "Each new member is a leader in his or her field and has made a distinct contribution to the nation and the world. We look forward to engaging them in the intellectual life of this vibrant institution."

Academy President Jonathan Fanton added, "The honor of election is also a call to service. Through its projects, publications, and events, the Academy provides its members with opportunities to discover common interests and find common ground. We invite every new member to participate in our important and rewarding work."

The new class will be inducted at a ceremony on October 10, 2015, in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

Read the full American Academy Press Release

Professor McKeown's EE Spotlight

April 2015

"In theory one fiber could transport perhaps as many as a hundred different beams, each carrying its own data stream of light flashing on and off. Our challenge is creating the optics to gather those beams, flow them through the fiber together and then separate out each data stream at the other end." states David A. B. Miller, the W. M. Keck Professor of Electrical Engineering.

What makes this possible is a series of breakthroughs in the design and fabrication of optical structures that can combine and separate laser beams based on the shape of the wave they generate.

"We now know how to design those structures using efficient algorithms. Some of our approaches automate the designs and adapt them to changes in the fiber. We have also proved mathematically that such designs can always be created for light beams in fibers."

Miller's colleagues, Professors Shanhui Fan and Jelena Vuckovic, are also developing different computational approaches to automate the design of the necessary optical structures.

 

Read complete Science article
Read complete School of Engineering News article

March 2015

From the ACM Press release: "ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, (www.acm.org) and the Infosys Foundation announced today that Dan Boneh is the recipient of the 2014 ACM-Infosys Foundation Award in the Computing Sciences for ground-breaking contributions to the development of pairing-based cryptography and its application in identity-based encryption. His work helped establish the field of pairing-based cryptography, a dominant area in cryptography for the last decade, by demonstrating the use of pairing functions to solve wide variety of problems in cryptography. Boneh, with Matt Franklin, showed how pairings could be used to develop a fully functional identity-based encryption scheme (IBE). This ushered in a new area of cryptography research to which Boneh's contributions have been central. Pairing-based cryptography makes security mechanisms easier to use and deploy, and improves computer security to keep data, devices and critical systems safe, private and accessible."

The ACM-Infosys Foundation Award recognizes the finest recent innovations by young scientists and system developers for a contemporary innovation that, through its depth, fundamental impact and broad implications, exemplifies the greatest achievements in the discipline.

 

Read full Press Release

March 2015

The IEEE Computer Pioneer Award was established in 1981 to recognize and honor the vision of those people whose efforts resulted in the creation and continued vitality of the computer industry. The IEEE Computer Society site states, "[Michael J. Flynn] began his engineering career at IBM as a designer of mainframe computers. He became Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford in 1975 where he set up the Stanford Architecture and Arithmetic group. He retired from Stanford in 1999 and continues there as Emeritus Professor. Some of his best-known work includes the development of the now familiar stream outline of computer organization (SIMD, etc.). For many years this has served as the fundamental formal taxonomy of parallel computers.

In the early 1970s Prof. Flynn founded both of the specialist organizations on Computer Architecture: the IEEE Computer Society's Technical Committee on Computer Architecture and the ACM's SIGARCH.

Prof. Flynn was the 1992 recipient of the ACM/IEEE Eckert-Mauchley Award for his technical contributions to computer and digital systems architecture. He has been awarded honorary Doctorates from Trinity College (University of Dublin) and the University of Belgrade and is an honorary Professor of Informatics at the University of Sofia. He is the author of five books and over 300 technical papers. He is a fellow of both the IEEE and ACM."

 

Read the full IEEE Computer Society Pioneer Award citation 

February 2015

Professor Bernd Girod has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering with the citation: For contributions to video compression, streaming, and multimedia systems.

In addition to his seminal contributions to video compression and communication and his pioneering work in video streaming and networked multimedia systems, Professor Girod helped found and lead several successful centers at Stanford, including:

  • the Stanford Image Systems Engineering Center
  • the Max Planck Center for Visual Computing and Communication
  • and the Brown Institute for Media Innovation

As the School of Engineering's first Senior Associate Dean for Online Learning and Professional Development, Professor Girod has been instrumental in guiding and supporting the school's strategy and implementation of online learning.

The NAE announcement reads, "Election to the National Academy of Engineering is among the highest professional distinctions accorded to an engineer. Academy membership honors those who have made outstanding contributions to 'engineering research, practice, or education, including, where appropriate, significant contributions to the engineering literature,' and to the 'pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of engineering, or developing/implementing innovative approaches to engineering education.'"

Please join us in congratulating Professor Girod for this very well-deserved recognition of his profound contributions and leadership.

 

Read full NAE press release.

image of Assistant Professor Jonathan Fan
January 2015

The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) has announced the Young Investigator Research program (YIP) grant recipients. EE Assistant Professor Jonathan Fan's winning proposal will investigate Neuromorphic Infrared Nano-Optical Systems.

"The YIP is open to scientists and engineers at research institutions across the United States who received Ph.D. or equivalent degrees in the last five years and who show exceptional ability and promise for conducting basic research."

The AFOSR news article continues, "This year AFOSR received over 200 proposals in response to the AFOSR broad agency announcement solicitation in major areas of interest to the Air Force. These areas include: Dynamical Systems and Control, Quantum and Non-Equilibrium Processes, Information, Decision and Complex Networks, Complex Materials and Devices, and Energy, Power and Propulsion. AFOSR officials select proposals based on the evaluation criteria listed in the broad agency announcement. Those selected will receive the grants over a 3-year period."

Read the entire article

Wetzstein's research featuredScientific American’s features Assistant Professor Wetzstein’s Research as a World-Changing Idea as a world-changing idea
December 2014

In an article titled, "Smartphone Screens Correct for Your Vision Flaws," the December issue of Scientific American features Wetzstein's research with colleagues from MIT and University of California, Berkeley. The articles states, "Informal tests on a handful of users have shown that the technology works, Wetzstein says, but large-scale studies are needed to further refine it. In the process, the researchers also plan on developing a slider that can be used to manually adjust the focus of the screen. Wetzstein says that the technology could be a boon for people in developing countries who have easier access to mobile devices than prescription eyewear."

Gordon Wetzstein's research addresses challenges in computational imaging and display and in computational light transport. He received his PhD in computer science from the University of British Columbia in 2011, then worked at MIT's Media Lab as a research scientist and postdoctoral associate before joining the Stanford faculty.

 

Read the complete article from Scientific American.

Professors Wong and Mitra's CNT chips revealed at IEDM conference
December 2014

Professor H.-S. Philip Wong and Associate Professor Subhasish Mitra's research team has built a four-layer high-rise chip using carbon nanotubes (CNT) and resistive random access memory (RRAM). The new materials required a new method of connecting them, which were created by EE grad students, Max Shulaker and Tony Wu.

"This research is at an early stage, but our design and fabrication techniques are scalable," Mitra said. "With further development this architecture could lead to computing performance that is much, much greater than anything available today."

Wong said the prototype chip to be unveiled at IEDM shows how to put logic and memory together into three-dimensional structures that can be mass-produced.

"Paradigm shift is an overused concept, but here it is appropriate," Wong said. "With this new architecture, electronics manufacturers could put the power of a supercomputer in your hand."

 

Read the full article in the Stanford Report. 

Professors Hesselink and Rivas received Precourt Institute seed grants for their energy research
December 2014

Professor Lambertus Hesselink and Assistant Professor Juan Rivas-Davila are two of eight Stanford faculty seed grant recipients. The awards are to assist in new research that promises clean technology and energy efficiency.

Assistant Professor Juan Rivas' and his research team will continue exploration of more energy-efficient power supplies. An initial goal is to provide energy-efficient methods to pasteurize liquids like milk and fruit juice. The team's long-range goal is to revolutionize the design and manufacture of power electronics components. The Precourt Institute for Energy awarded Rivas-Davila's grant.

Professor Lambertus Hesselink's research will assess and design a method to capture heat waste from computers. His team projects that at least 20% of the waste could be recouped, saving $6 million in electricity per day in the U.S. alone. The Precourt Energy Efficiency Center (PEEC) provided this award.

 

Read the full Stanford report article.

Professor Jelena Vuckovic in her Nanoscale and Quantum Photonics Lab
December 2014

Published in a recent article in Scientific Reports, Professor Vuckovic and her team present the inverse design technique. As stated in the introduction, the "inverse design concept is simple and extendable to a broad class of highly compact devices including frequency filters, mode converters, and spatial mode multiplexers."

"Light can carry more data than a wire, and it takes less energy to transmit photons than electrons," said electrical engineering Professor Jelena Vuckovic, who led the research.

In previous work her team developed an algorithm that did two things: It automated the process of designing optical structures and it enabled them to create previously unimaginable, nanoscale structures to control light. Now, she and lead author Alexander Piggott, a doctoral candidate in electrical engineering, have employed that algorithm to design, build and test a link compatible with current fiber optic networks.

 

Read the article in Scientific Reports

Read the Stanford Report article 

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