EE Student Information

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EE Student Information, Spring & Summer Quarters 19-20: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

Updates will be posted on this page, as well as emailed to the EE student mail list.

Please see Stanford University Health Alerts for course and travel updates.

As always, use your best judgement and consider your own and others' well-being at all times.

News

image of the Stanford Student Robotics Mars rover
June 2019

Congratulations to the Mars Rover Team, part of the Stanford Student Robotics Club. The team won 3rd place in the 2019 University Rover Challenge (URC) competition which took place at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) in southern Utah. Thirty-four teams from 10 countries competed throughout various challenges in the Utah desert.

2018 was the first time Stanford Student Robotics participated in the MRC – they placed 34th, and began immediately planning for the 2019 competition. The execution of their planning paid off, earning 3rd place this year. First place went to the IMPULS team from Poland's Kielce University of Technology.

Placing 3rd, Stanford's Student Robotics Mars Rover Team moved up thirty-one spots!

The 2019 Stanford Student Robotics Mars Rover Team members include,

  • Michal Adamkiewicz - Team Lead
  • Claire Huang - Mechanics and Software
  • Neil Movva - Electrical and Software
  • Connor Tingley - Mechanical
  • Connor Cremers - Mechanical and Software
  • Rita Tlemcani - Mechanical and Science
  • Amy Dunphy - Science
  • Alan Tomusiak - Science
  • Patin Inkaew - Mechanics
  • Derian Williams - Electrical and Mechanics
  • Jasmine Bayrooti - Software
  • Julia Thompson - Science
  • Mei-Lan Steimle - Science

As in past years, the teams and their rovers competed in four incredibly difficult and unique events,

  • Science Mission (soil and rock samples),
  • Extreme Retrieval and Delivery Mission,
  • Equipment Servicing Mission, and
  • Autonomous Traversal Mission.

"Reliability and ingenuity were the keys to success for several teams throughout the 3 day event," states the URC Mars Society website. Event judges included astrobiologists from NASA Ames Research Center.

 

Congratulations to all of the teams and participants! And an EXTRA congratulations to Stanford Student Robotics!


 Related links & news

 

portrait of professor Andrea Goldsmith
June 2019

Congratulations to Professor Andrea Goldsmith for receiving the 2019 Qualcomm Faculty Award. Andrea is the Stephen Harris Professor in the School of Engineering. Her research interests are in information theory, communication theory, and signal processing, and their application to wireless communications, interconnected systems, and neuroscience.

Andrea introduced innovative approaches to the design, analysis and fundamental performance limits of wireless systems and networks. Her efforts helped develop technologies used in long-term evolution (LTE) cellular devices as well as the Wi-Fi standards that are used in wireless local area networks. She founded two companies to commercialize her work, which has led to the adoption of her ideas throughout the communications industry.

The Qualcomm Faculty Award (QFA) supports key professors and their research through a charitable donation. The goal of the QFA funding is to advance wireless communications research and to strengthen Qualcomm's engagement with faculty who are playing a key role in Qualcomm's recruitment of top graduate students.

 

Please join us in congratulating Andrea for this award!

 

Related news:

image of Anastasios Angelopoulos (BS '19), 2018-19 Terman Scholar
May 2019

The Frederick Emmons Terman Engineering Award for Scholastic Achievement was awarded to Anastasios Angelopoulos (BS '19). The Terman Award is one of the most selective academic awards. It is based on overall academic performance and is presented to the top five percent of each year's School of Engineering seniors. Anastasios is a third-year undergraduate – completing his Bachelor's degree in a reduced amount of time, while maintaining high academic performance.

Anastasios' most influential secondary instructor is Aquita Winslow, the Polytechnic School librarian, who generously spent hundreds of hours of time as his high school debate coach and was a transformative force in his life. His Stanford advisor is Professor and Chair Stephen Boyd.

Anastasios will graduate with a B.S. EE in Spring 2019.

Please join us in congratulating Anastasios on his scholastic achievements.

 

2018-2019 Terman Engineering Award also awarded to Jonathan and Meera. Read more


This award is named after Fred Terman (BS; MS Stanford) who was the fourth Dean of the School of Engineering at Stanford, serving from 1944-1958, after which he became the Provost at the University, and is generally credited, along with President Wally Sterling, as having started the process that has led Stanford to its present position among the leading universities of the world. View Frederick Terman on EE's Timeline.

incoming EE professor Chelsea Finn
May 2019

Congratulations to incoming EE and CS professor Chelsea Finn. She was awarded the 2019 ACM Doctoral Dissertation Award for her dissertation, "Learning to Learn with Gradients." In her thesis, Finn introduced algorithms for meta-learning that enable deep networks to solve new tasks from small datasets, and demonstrated how her algorithms can be applied in areas including computer vision, reinforcement learning and robotics.

Deep learning has transformed the artificial intelligence field and has led to significant advances in areas including speech recognition, computer vision and robotics. However, deep learning methods require large datasets, which aren't readily available in areas such as medical imaging and robotics.

Meta-learning is a recent innovation that holds promise to allow machines to learn with smaller datasets. Meta-learning algorithms "learn to learn" by using past data to learn how to adapt quickly to new tasks. However, much of the initial work in meta-learning focused on designing increasingly complex neural network architectures. In her dissertation, Finn introduced a class of methods called model-agnostic meta-learning (MAML) methods, which don't require computer scientists to manually design complex architectures. Finn's MAML methods have had tremendous impact on the field and have been widely adopted in reinforcement learning, computer vision and other fields of machine learning.

At a young age, Finn has become one of the most recognized experts in the field of robotic learning. She has developed some of the most effective methods to teach robots skills to control and manipulate objects. In one instance highlighted in her dissertation, she used her MAML methods to teach a robot reaching and placing skills, using raw camera pixels from just a single human demonstration.

Finn is a Research Scientist at Google Brain and a postdoctoral researcher at the Berkeley AI Research Lab (BAIR). In the fall of 2019, she will start a full-time appointment as an Assistant Professor at Stanford University. Finn received her PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley and a BS in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

 

Join us in congratulating Chelsea on this well-deserved award!

 

 

Source: www.acm.org/media-center/2019/may/dissertation-award-2018

image of Douglas Chaffee
May 2019

Please join us in acknowledging the tremendous dedication of Doug Chaffee. During his years as an EE staff member, Doug has supported various faculty, and scores of graduate students, visiting scholars, and post-doctoral students. His colleagues enjoy his expertise and thoroughness in many areas. In addition to his professionism, Doug has a great sense of humor and is involved in community service. Please take a moment to thank him for his valuable contributions to both Stanford and the community.

Doug is a member of the Stanford Electrical Engineering Staff (SEES) Committee which provides several social activities each year for staff. Often he acts as the event emcee, and makes great effort to involve everyone in fun, supportive activities. Doug receives many acknowledgements for his outstanding work and committment to the department.

Congratulations Doug!

May 2019

The final project for EE25N is to create a podcast episode about a theme that was covered during the quarter. EE25N exposes incoming freshmen to the myriad forms that information takes in modern academic research. Student teams combine information from lectures, lab tours and their own research into a compelling, layperson science podcast episode.

Team Go HAAM (consisting of Hamza el Boudali, Ashley Kwon, Alexa Ramachandran and Mia Bahr) had among the most difficult episode themes due to its breadth of scope and highly technical material: "information and physics." Despite a wildly disparate set of topics and little to no understanding of the material going into the class, Team Go HAAM managed to create a coherent, understandable, and enjoyable podcast episode highlighting two very different physics experiments.

In a few weeks, Team Go HAAM managed to digest dense scientific information, interview sources for follow-up questions, create a compelling narrative script, record voiceovers in the recording studio and perform very competent audio editing. When challenged to improve an initial draft, all team members willingly made time to meet with the course assistant for feedback and revisions. In the end, Team Go HAAM created a funny and accurate podcast.

 

Congratulations to Team Go HAAM!

 

 

Listen to Episode 5: The Physicists.

2019 Terman award winners Anastasios Angelopoulos, Jonathan Lin, and Meera Radhakrishnan
May 2019

The Frederick Emmons Terman Engineering Award for Scholastic Achievement was awarded to Anastasios Angelopoulos (BS '19), Jonathan Taylor Lin (BS '19; MS '20) and Meera Radhakrishnan (BS '19; MS '20). The Terman Award is one of the most selective academic awards. It is based on overall academic performance and is presented to the top five percent of each year's School of Engineering seniors.

The Terman scholars celebratory luncheon took place April 27. The scholars were encouraged to invite the most influential secondary school or other pre-college teacher who guided them during the formative stages of their academic career.

 

Anastasios' most influential secondary instructor is Aquita Winslow, the Polytechnic School librarian, who generously spent hundreds of hours of time as his high school debate coach and was a transformative force in his life. His Stanford advisor is Professor and Chair Stephen Boyd.. Anastasios is a third-year undergraduate – completing his Bachelor's degree in a reduced amount of time, while maintaining high academic performance. He will graduate with a B.S. EE in Spring 2019.

 


 

Jonathan Taylor Lin invited his secondary teacher, Mr. Jim Birdsong. His Stanford advisor is Professor Subhasish Mitra. Jonathan will graduate with a B.S. EE in Spring 2019 and M.S. EE in Spring 2020.

 


 

Meera, 2019 Terman Award Winner, BS EE 2019
Meera Radhakrishnan's most influential secondary teacher is Mr. Christian Perry, and her Stanford advisor is Professor Dwight Nishimura. She will complete her Bachelor of Science degree in 2019 and M.S. in 2020.

 

Please join us in congratulating Anastasios, Jonathan, and Meera on their scholastic achievements. Best to all of them!


This award is named after Fred Terman (BS; MS Stanford) who was the fourth Dean of the School of Engineering at Stanford, serving from 1944-1958, after which he became the Provost at the University, and is generally credited, along with President Wally Sterling, as having started the process that has led Stanford to its present position among the leading universities of the world. View Frederick Terman on EE's Timeline.

image of Vickie Carillo, EE staff member
May 2019

Please join us in acknowledging the tremendous dedication of Vickie Carrillo during the past 38 years. Vickie is often times the "face of EE" as she frequently greets visitors and answers their myriad of questions with grace and warmth. She has supported nearly every member of EE in one form or another: faculty, staff, students (even their parents) and campus visitors. Please take a moment to thank her for her valuable contributions.

Vickie is frequently nominated for EE Staff Awards, and a popular member of several committees. Recently, Vickie was enthusiastically nominated for the 2019 Amy J. Blue Awards and made the top 14 out of 260 nominees. From the perspective of this writer – she is #1.

 

We are honored to have Vickie as a member of the Electrical Engineering Staff. Please join us in acknowledging Vickie's important contributions and years of dedicated service.

Photo credit: Meo Kittiwanich

 

image of Professor Shan Wang!
April 2019

[Excerpted from Stanford News]

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S. and a growing problem around the world, but not because it's a particularly difficult cancer to detect and halt. The problem, doctors and researchers believe, is that not enough people are being screened for early signs of the disease, either because they do not know the recommendations or because they are avoiding getting a colonoscopy, which many perceive as an unpleasant procedure.

The current alternatives, said Professor Shan Wang, aren't exactly more pleasant – most of those involve gathering and testing stool samples.

But Shan, his graduate student Jared Nesvet and Uri Ladabaum, a professor of medicine, may have at least a possible solution: a blood test to detect colorectal cancer, which in principle would be less expensive, less invasive and more convenient than colonoscopies and other current tests, the researchers said. Wang and Nesvet have already developed a test that works in the controlled environment of a materials science lab, and now, with help from a Stanford ChEM-H seed grant, the trio are working to validate their approach in the real world of clinical medicine.

[...]

Shan and Nesvet have tested their idea in the lab, and it works well so far, Nesvet said. Now, with help from Ladabaum and the ChEM-H grant, they'll start testing it on blood samples from real patients. Among the questions they'll address are practical ones about how to identify the right people to study, when to draw blood or how to handle the samples.

"That's where we as clinical researchers can help," Ladabaum said.

Shan cautions that a new screen for colon cancer is still a ways off, and that it could involve hundreds, if not thousands, of blood samples before they can be confident their blood test really works. "I expect this will be a five- to 10-year study to bring this technology to fruition," he said.

 

Read full story, "Stanford doctors, materials scientists hope a blood test will encourage more colon cancer screenings."

 


 

Related Links

 

image of professor Jon Fan
April 2019

Professor of Electrical Engineering Jonathan Fan has won the 2019 Okawa Foundation Research Grant. The Research Grant Presentation Ceremony will occur in San Francisco later this year.

The mission of the Okawa Foundation is promotion and development in the field of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) through awards and research grants as well as efforts to nurture researchers, engineers, and providers. It also seeks to promote diversity and ubiquitousness of human communication and thereby contribute to the peace and prosperity of humankind.

 

Please join us in congratulating Jonathan for this well-deserved award!

 

Read more about the Okawa Foundation: www.okawa-foundation.or.jp/en/outline/index.html

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February 2014

Three staff members each received a $50 Visa card in recognition of their extraordinary efforts as part of the department’s 2014 Staff Gift Card Bonus Program. The EE department received several nominations in January, and nominations from 2013 were also considered.

Following are January’s gift card recipients and some of the comments from their nominators:

Ann Guerra, Faculty Administrator

  • “She is very kind to students and always enthusiastic to help students… every time we need emergent help, she is willing to give us a hand.”
  • “Ann helps anyone who goes to her for help with anything, sometimes when it’s beyond her duty.” 

Teresa Nguyen, Student Accounting Associate

  • “She stays on top of our many, many student financial issues, is an extremely reliable source of information and is super friendly.”
  • “Teresa’s cheerful disposition, her determination, and her professionalism seem to go above and beyond what is simply required.”

Helen Niu, Faculty Administrator

  • “Helen is always a pleasure to work with.”
  • “She goes the extra mile in her dealings with me, which is very much appreciated.”

The School of Engineering once again gave the EE department several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond. More people will be recognized next month, and past nominations will still be eligible for future months. EE faculty, staff and students are welcome to nominate a deserving staff person by visitinghttps://gradapps.stanford.edu/NotableStaff/nomination/create.

Ann Guerra  Teresa Nguyen  Helen Niu

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