EE Student Information

The Department of Electrical Engineering supports Black Lives Matter. Read more.

• • • • •

EE Student Information, Spring Quarter through Academic Year 2020-2021: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

Updates will be posted on this page, as well as emailed to the EE student mail list.

Please see Stanford University Health Alerts for course and travel updates.

As always, use your best judgement and consider your own and others' well-being at all times.

News

image of professor Eric Pop
April 2019

Professor Eric Pop was featured in a "People Behind the Science" podcast. People Behind the Science's mission is to inspire current and future scientists, share the different paths to a successful career in science, educate the general population on what scientists do, and show the human side of science. In each episode, a different scientist talks about their journey by sharing their successes, failures, and passions.

Excerpts of Eric's conversation follow.
Please visit People Behind the Science for the full episode.


The Scientific Side (timestamp 3:20)

Research in Eric's laboratory spans electronics, electrical engineering, physics, nanomaterials, and energy. They are interested in applying materials with nanoscale properties to engineer better electronics such as transistors, circuits, and data storage mechanisms. Eric is also investigating ways to better manage the heat that electronics generate.

A Dose of Motivation (timestamp 5:17)

Eric is motivated by curiosity and ensuring that the work they do in the lab is useful to people.

Advice For Us All (timestamp 53:40)

Clearly communicating your research is critically important. This includes all forms of communication, whether it is verbal, written, or visual. Before you give a presentation or communicate your work, you should really try to understand your audience. Get a sense of who they are, what they care about, and the best way to convey the cool things you are working on to them. Regardless of what career you choose, being able to share your ideas with people and convince them of the importance of your work will define your career.

 

Related Links

image of Stanford undergrad students Andrew Zelaya, Felipe Bomfim Pinheiro de Meneses, and James Milan Kanof
April 2019

Congratulations to undergrads Andrew Zelaya, Felipe Bomfim Pinheiro de Meneses, and James Milan Kanof - they have been selected as Introductory Seminars Excellence Award winners! Their "Art and Science of Engineering Design, EE15N" project addressed an important and timely problem for Stanford students, and created a truly unique, compelling, and powerful solution.

"This was one of the most memorable projects from all EE15N classes as it was so uplifting to watch the team come together and create something so special," stated EE15N instructors, Professor Goldsmith and Dr. My T. Le.

For their project, they worked with students, academics, journalists, and filmmakers to design a solution from the ground up to address the root causes of why students do not care about being informed of important global issues. The team's final design centered around building empathy for those most affected by global issues via two components:

  • First, they created a custom Virtual Reality Experience that allows students to experience global issues around the world firsthand.
  • Second, they built a custom online platform that focuses on the human cost of these issues, how they affect the Stanford community, and how students can help.

 

Please join us in congratulating Andrew, Felipe and James on their compelling creation – we look forward to their future contributions!

About the Introductory Seminars Excellence Award

Each academic year, faculty nominate exemplary student projects for an introductory seminars excellence award. All winners are invited to an annual spring awards ceremony that celebrates the diverse and innovative learning experiences across all introductory seminar courses.

Related Links

 

image of professor Srabanti Chowdhury
April 2019

Professor Srabanti Chowdhury has been awarded the Gabilan Faculty Fellowship. The Gabilan Fellows comprise a group of faculty whose aim is to contribute to the support of women in the sciences and engineering at Stanford. Srabanti was appointed by Provost Persis Drell and Vice Provost for Faculty Development and Diversity Karen Cook. Gabilan Fellows have the opportunity to be part of a collegial and vibrant community from the biosciences, engineering, and natural and mathematical sciences.

Srabanti's research focuses on wideband gap (WBG) materials and device engineering for energy efficient and compact system architecture for power electronics, and RF applications. Besides Gallium Nitride, her group is exploring Diamond for various electronic applications. She received her B.Tech in India in Radiophysics and Electronics (Univ. of Calcutta) and her M.S and PhD in Electrical Engineering from University of California, Santa Barbara. She received the DARPA Young Faculty Award, NSF CAREER and AFOSR Young Investigator Program (YIP) in 2015. In 2016 she received the Young Scientist award at the International Symposium on Compound Semiconductors (ISCS). Among her various synergistic activities, she serves as the member of two committees under IEEE Electron Device Society (Compound Semiconductor Devices & Circuits Committee Members and Power Devices and ICs Committee). She has served the IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) technical sub committee on Power Devices & Compound Semiconductor and High Speed Devices (PC) sub-committee in 2016 and 2017. She was the PC subcommittee chair for IEDM-2018, and continues to serve the IEDM executive committee for 2019. She is a senior member of IEEE.

 

Please join us in congratulating Srabanti on her well-deserved recognition!

 

image of Professor Balaji Prabhakar
April 2019

Professors Balaji Prabhakar and Darrell Duffie (GSB) held a moderated conversation about the next generation of finance and high-speed technologies.

Balaji described the accelerating timeframes that gird securities trading infrastructure, where the time from "tick to trade" is now measured in tens of nanoseconds. He also highlighted the potential problems and advantages to be gained by exploiting such lightning-fast speeds. At that nano-scale, it can be hard for networks to properly sequence packets of data being sent over even the faster fiber-optic wires. "If you see a price that's favorable to your trading strategy and you cross the gate ahead of me, then your transactions should happen first," he said. "Unfortunately, in the world where these networks have 'jitters,' this is not easy to guarantee."

The speakers also agreed that one way or another, massive disruption is coming for financial institutions. "There is a mantra that is being repeated on Wall Street, 'We are a tech company that happens to be an investment bank,'" said Balaji. Redefining the role of banks from being consumers of technology to creators of technology will mean that "any bank that's not big enough or not nimble enough is going to lose out," said Duffie.

 

Excerpted from "How is Silicon Valley changing Wall Street?", Stanford Engineering News, April 02, 2019

Watch the conversation in its entirety.

 

Related Links

 

image of Mendel Rosenblum [image credit: ACM]
April 2019

Professor Mendel Rosenblum has been awarded the inaugural ACM Charles P. Thacker Breakthrough Award. The award recognizes individuals or groups with the same out-of-the-box thinking and "can-do" approach to solving the unsolved that Charles Thacker exhibited. Mendel is the DRC Professor in the School of Engineering, Professor of Computer Science, and Professor of Electrical Engineering. He will formally receive the award at ACM's annual Awards Banquet in June, 2019.

Mendel is recognized for reinventing the virtual machine for the modern era and thereby revolutionizing datacenters and enabling modern cloud computing. In the late 1990s, Rosenblum and his students brought virtual machines back to life by using them to solve challenging technical problems in building system software for scalable multiprocessors. In 1998, Rosenblum and colleagues founded VMware. VMware popularized the use of virtual machines as a means of supporting many disparate software environments to share processor resources within a datacenter. This approach ultimately led to the development of modern cloud computing services such as Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud.

"The new paradigm of cloud computing, in which computing services are delivered over the internet, has been one of the most important developments in the computing industry over the past 20 years," said ACM President Cherri M. Pancake. "Cloud computing has vastly improved the efficiency of systems, reduced costs, and been essential to the operations of businesses at all levels. However, cloud computing, as we know it today, would not be possible without Rosenblum's reinvention of virtual machines. His leadership, both through his early research at Stanford and his founding of VMware, has been indispensable to the rise of datacenters and the preeminence of the cloud."

 

Please join us in congratulating Mendel for this well-deserved recognition!

 

Excerpted from "Inaugural ACM Chuck Thacker Breakthrough Award Recognizes Fundamental Contributions that Enabled Cloud Computing", ACM's Latest Awards News, April 10, 2019.


 

Related Links

April 2019

In March, students enrolled in "EE367A: Information Theory" collaborated with an elementary school in Palo Alto, bringing the younger students interactive games, activities and performance centered around aspects of information theory. More than 50 different activities were were available to the grade schoolers. Students of all ages enjoyed the activities that covered topics such as communication in the animal kingdom; the basics of how DNA carries genetic information; the fundamentals of coding; and even picture books – all geared toward a K-5 audience.

The event was the first of its kind for Professor Tsachy Weissman and his students (pictured). He was inspired by his daughter who sparked the idea by asking to learn more about what he does at his job. The well-attended event welcomed all family members, who kept EE367A students busy answering questions and sharing their own recently acquired knowledge. The collaboration between the two groups will continue into another Science Night to occur later in the next school year.

 

Thanks to all the terrific students of EE367A!

Pictured above: Irena Fischer-Hwang (project mentor), Yihui Quek (project mentor), Meltem Tolunay (TA), Joachim Neu (project mentor), Tsachy Weissman (professor), Sofia Dudas (student), Logan Spear (student), Shubham Chandak (TA), Ariana Mann (project mentor), and Jay Mardia (project mentor).

All project mentors and course TAs are graduate students currently advised by Professor Tsachy Weissman.

March 2019

Professor Jelena Vuckovic has been named MPQ Distinguished Scholar, 2019. She leads the Stanford's Nanoscale and Quantum Photonics Lab and is Director of Q-FARM (Quantum Fundamentals, Architecture and Machines), a facility of the Stanford-SLAC Quantum Initiative. Jelena is currently a visiting scientist at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics.

The MPQ award recognizes her groundbreaking contributions to the field of Nanoscale and Quantum Photonics. Jelena is the 7th scientist awarded this honor since the Institute was funded. Previous Distinguished Scholars 

 

Please join us in congratulating Jelena on her tremendous research contributions!

About the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics

Research concentrates on the interaction of light and matter under extreme conditions. One focus is the high-precision spectroscopy of hydrogen. In the course of these measurements Prof. Theodor W. Hänsch developed the frequency comb technique for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 2005. Other experiments aim at capturing single atoms and photons and letting them interact in a controlled way, thus paving the way towards future quantum computers. Theorists on the other hand are working on strategies to communicate quantum information in a most efficient way. They develop algorithms that allow the safe encryption of secret information. MPQ scientists also investigate the bizarre properties quantum-mechanical many-body systems can take on at extremely low temperatures (about one millionth Kelvin above zero). Finally light flashes with the incredibly short duration of several attoseconds (1 as is a billionth of a billionth of a second) are generated which make it possible, for example, to observe quantum-mechanical processes in atoms such as the 'tunnelling' of electrons or atomic transitions in real time.

 

Excerpted from "Jelena Vučković named MPQ Distinguished Scholar", Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, March 28, 2019.


Related Links

 

 

image of professor Tsachy Weissman
March 2019

The project resulted from a collaboration between researchers led by Professor Tsachy Weissman, and three high school students who interned in his lab.

The researchers asked people to compare images produced by a traditional compression algorithm that shrink huge images into pixilated blurs to those created by humans in data-restricted conditions – text-only communication, which could include links to public images. In many cases, the products of human-powered image sharing proved more satisfactory than the algorithm's work. The researchers will present their work at the 2019 Data Compression Conference.

"Almost every image compressor we have today is evaluated using metrics that don't necessarily represent what humans value in an image," said Irena Fischer-Hwang, an EE grad student and co-author of the paper. "It turns out our algorithms have a long way to go and can learn a lot from the way humans share information."

The project resulted from a collaboration between researchers led by Tsachy and three high school students who interned in his lab.

"Honestly, we came into this collaboration aiming to give the students something that wouldn't distract too much from ongoing research," said Weissman. "But they wanted to do more, and that chutzpah led to a paper and a whole new research thrust for the group. This could very well become among the most exciting projects I've ever been involved in."

Weissman stressed the value of the high school students' contribution, even beyond this paper.

"Tens if not hundreds of thousands of human engineering hours went into designing an algorithm that three high schoolers came and kicked its butt," said Weissman. "It's humbling to consider how far we are in our engineering."

Due to the success of this collaboration, Weissman has created a formal summer internship program in his lab for high schoolers. Imagining how an artist or students interested in psychology or neuroscience could contribute to this work, he is particularly keen to bring on students with varied interests and backgrounds.

 

Lead authors of this paper are Ashutosh Bhown of Palo Alto High School, Soham Mukherjee of Monta Vista High School and Sean Yang of Saint Francis High School. Weissman is also a member of Stanford Bio-X and the Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute.

This research was funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Stanford Compression Forum and Google.

 

 

Excerpted from "Stanford experiment finds humans beat algorithms at image compression", Stanford News, March 25, 2019. 

March 2019

Electrical Engineering staff recognized for their outstanding effort include Chet Frost, Joe Little, Rachelle Mozeleski, Helen Niu, and Ryan Samarakoon. Each were nominated by peers, faculty and/or students for professionalism that went above and beyond their everyday roles. Gift card recipients continue to make profound and positive impact in EE's everyday work and academic environment.

Nominations may be submitted at any time. There are no restrictions on the persons or groups that you can nominate. Submitters are asked to include a citation of how the group or person went above and beyond. The submitter can choose to remain anonymous. Link to very brief nomination form.

Please join us in congratulating Chet, Joe, Rachelle, Helen and Ryan. Excerpts from their nominations follow.

Chet Frost, Administrative Associate, Electrical Engineering

  • "Chet is always quick to respond – and always with a sense of humor and kindness."
  • "He always goes out of his way to help our group meet requirements and deadlines."

Joe Little, Principal Systems Architect, Electrical Engineering

  • "Joe always has our back; he was able to fix all my issues really quickly."
  • "He is extremely capable, responsive and efficient."

Rachelle Mozeleski, Web Content Manager, Electrical Engineering

  • "Rachelle's creativity and extensive work on her projects is amazing."
  • "As part of the SEES Committee, she helped transform the annual faculty & staff party into an unparalleled event."

Helen Niu, Administrative Associate, Electrical Engineering

  • "She has found solutions for new practices, and established efficient procedures moving forward."
  • "Helen is positive, helpful, understanding, and always goes the extra mile."

Ryan Samarakoon, Life Science Research Lab Manager, Neurosurgery

  • "Ryan's role is critical and has great complexities - he does a phenomenal job and I trust him completely."
  • "He manages our experiments efficiently and works very hard to make it easy for us."

 

 

The Staff Gift Card Bonus Program is sponsored by the School of Engineering. Each year, the EE department receives several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond their role. Each month, staff are chosen from nominations received from faculty, students, and staff. Past nominations are eligible for future months.

Nominate a deserving staff person or group today! We encourage you to nominate individuals or groups that have made a profound improvement in daily work life. Each recipient receives a $50 Visa card. Nominations can be made at any time.

image of EE Staff Award winners, March 2019

EE alum, astronaut Ellen Ochoa
February 2019

Ellen Ochoa: Ochoa earned her master's and doctoral degrees in electrical engineering at Stanford and soon joined NASA as a research engineer in 1988. In 1990, she was selected as an astronaut and became the first Latina in space, flying aboard Space Shuttle Discovery in 1993. She would go on to log almost 1,000 hours on four separate trips to space. Ochoa then became the 11th director of the Johnson Space Center, the second woman director in the center's history and the first Latina to hold the role. Ochoa received the Distinguished Service Medal, NASA's highest award, and the Presidential Distinguished Rank Award. She has no fewer than six schools named for her, including an elementary school, a public charter middle school and a prep academy.


 

The Engineering Heroes program, which inducts its eighth class in 2019, was established in 2010 to recognize the profound contributions of distinguished alumni and emeritus faculty of Stanford School of Engineering. Past winners include Nobel Prize winners, inventors, writers, teachers and entrepreneurs who have shaped the world as we know it.

Engineering Heroes are considered and chosen by a panel of technology experts, faculty, alumni, students and historians who are charged with evaluating each nominee's impact and selecting those whose works and ideas set them apart.

This year's Stanford Engineering Heroes are:

  • Barbara Liskov, computer science
  • Ellen Ochoa, electrical engineering
  • Walter Vincent, engineer degree

Please join us in congratulating our outstanding alumni!

Pages

January

No content classified for this term

February

February 2014

Three staff members each received a $50 Visa card in recognition of their extraordinary efforts as part of the department’s 2014 Staff Gift Card Bonus Program. The EE department received several nominations in January, and nominations from 2013 were also considered.

Following are January’s gift card recipients and some of the comments from their nominators:

Ann Guerra, Faculty Administrator

  • “She is very kind to students and always enthusiastic to help students… every time we need emergent help, she is willing to give us a hand.”
  • “Ann helps anyone who goes to her for help with anything, sometimes when it’s beyond her duty.” 

Teresa Nguyen, Student Accounting Associate

  • “She stays on top of our many, many student financial issues, is an extremely reliable source of information and is super friendly.”
  • “Teresa’s cheerful disposition, her determination, and her professionalism seem to go above and beyond what is simply required.”

Helen Niu, Faculty Administrator

  • “Helen is always a pleasure to work with.”
  • “She goes the extra mile in her dealings with me, which is very much appreciated.”

The School of Engineering once again gave the EE department several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond. More people will be recognized next month, and past nominations will still be eligible for future months. EE faculty, staff and students are welcome to nominate a deserving staff person by visitinghttps://gradapps.stanford.edu/NotableStaff/nomination/create.

Ann Guerra  Teresa Nguyen  Helen Niu

Pages

March

No content classified for this term

April

No content classified for this term

May

No content classified for this term

June

No content classified for this term

July

No content classified for this term

August

No content classified for this term

September

No content classified for this term

October

No content classified for this term

November

No content classified for this term

December

No content classified for this term

Story

No content classified for this term

Stanford

No content classified for this term

Test

No content classified for this term

Subscribe to RSS - News