News

April 2016

DiscoverEE Days welcomes newly admitted grad students, connecting them with EE students, faculty and staff. The 2-day event brings everyone together; encouraging exploration of the department and current research. The event concludes with a student research poster session, social reception and raffle. This year, admits were able to view and discuss 25 posters.

Posters present research from EE's core and subareas, and is an opportunity for graduate students to verbally and visually present their work. Posters are judged by a group of staff, faculty and students. Judging criteria is based on overall oral presentation, visual quality, and presenting within a one minute timeframe. Three winners, one from each core research area, were selected. The awards went to:

Neal Master (pictured center), Information Systems & Science
 Nicholas McDonald (not pictured), Hardware/Software Systems
Ning Wang (pictured left), Physical Technology & Science

Winning presenters were awarded a gift card and certificate, presented by Professor Andrea Goldsmith (pictured right).

The raffle winner was Sawaby Mahmoud, pictured with Professor Goldsmith below. His area of research is Information Systems and Science.

Congratulations and thanks to everyone for participating in DiscoverEE Days.
Additional thanks to the EE Admissions, GSEE, and the EE Student Life Committee for sponsoring the poster contest and generous prizes.


 

March 2016

The Staff Gift Card Program awarded four staff members a $50 Visa card. Nominations were submitted recognizing each of them for their professional contributions that are above and beyond their everyday roles. Students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to nominate individuals or groups that have made a profound improvement in their daily work life.

 

Please congratulate the awardees listed below with excerpts from their nominations.

John DeSilva, Systems & Network Manager, EE

  • "He's really proactive; letting us know about potential issues. John always makes himself available, and is quick to solve the problem."
  • "His knowledge and upbeat attitude make him pleasure to work with."

Marsha Dillon, Executive Assistant to the Chair, EE

  • "Marsha's ability to troubleshoot and work through projects of all kinds is truly appreciated!"
  • "Her thoroughness is a great asset."

Megan Hagquist, Research and Financial Administrator, ERA

  • "Megan has made great strides towards improving the efficiency of aspects of our work."
  • "She is truly a wonderful addition to our group!"

Emily Wang, Associate Director of Graduate Admissions, EE

  • "Emily works extremely well with everyone and consistently performs in an outstanding fashion."
  • "She has been instrumental in supporting the department with our admissions system."

 

The Staff Gift Card Bonus Program is sponsored by the School of Engineering. Each year, the EE department receives several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond their role. Each month, staff are chosen from nominations received from faculty, students, and staff. Past nominations are eligible for future months. Nominate a deserving staff person today!

February 2016

A reception honoring School of Engineering staff for their years of service was held Monday, February 29th. Eleven Electrical Engineering staff were acknowledged for their valuable contributions and service to the department and Stanford University.

"EE appreciates the dedication of our staff," states Abbas El Gamal, EE's Chair. "Not only do they keep our department running efficiently and smoothly, they provide vital support to our faculty and students' research. We are fortunate to have such dedicated staff assisting in the extraordinary work being done in EE and at Stanford."

 

Thank you to all EE staff for your dedication.

Individuals recognized at the 2016 School of Engineering Seervice Award Reception include:

  • John DeSilva, 5 Years of Service
  • Jun-Hua (June) Wang, 10 Years of Service
  • Adam Kerr, 10 Years of Service
  • Mackenzie Mazariegos, 10 Years of Service
  • Maria Spasojevic, 10 Years of Service
  • Kelly Yilmaz, 15 Years of Service
  • Joseph Little, 20 Years of Service
  • Amy Duncan, 25 Years of Service
  • Ann Guerra, 30 Years of Service
  • Charles Orgish, 30 Years of Service
  • Victoria Carrillo, 35 Years of Service

 

Pictured from left to right are School of Engineering Dean Persis S. Drell, John DeSilva, Charles Orgish, Amy Duncan, Joe Little, Victoria Carrillo, Ann Guerra, Jun-Hua (June) Wang.

March 2016

Emeritus Professor Martin E. Hellman and former Sun Microsystems Chief Security Officer Whitfield Diffie, have been named recipients of the 2015 ACM A.M. Turing Award for critical contributions to modern cryptography. The ability for two parties to communicate privately over a secure channel is fundamental for billions of people around the world. On a daily basis, individuals establish secure online connections with banks, e-commerce sites, email servers and the cloud. Diffie and Hellman's groundbreaking 1976 paper, "New Directions in Cryptography," introduced the ideas of public-key cryptography and digital signatures, which are the foundation for most regularly-used security protocols on the Internet today. The Diffie-Hellman Protocol protects daily Internet communications and trillions of dollars in financial transactions.

The ACM Turing Award, often referred to as the "Nobel Prize of Computing," carries a $1 million prize with financial support provided by Google, Inc. It is named for Alan M. Turing, the British mathematician who articulated the mathematical foundation and limits of computing and who was a key contributor to the Allied cryptoanalysis of the German Enigma cipher during World War II.

"Today, the subject of encryption dominates the media, is viewed as a matter of national security, impacts government-private sector relations, and attracts billions of dollars in research and development," said ACM President Alexander L. Wolf. "In 1976, Diffie and Hellman imagined a future where people would regularly communicate through electronic networks and be vulnerable to having their communications stolen or altered. Now, after nearly 40 years, we see that their forecasts were remarkably prescient."

Please join us in congratulating Marty for this outstanding recognition of his public key cryptography.


 

Excerpts from the ACM Press Release

Read Stanford Report article

 

February 2016

Jonathan Fan selected as a 2016 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in Physics. The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is pleased to announce the selection of 126 outstanding U.S. and Canadian researchers as recipients of the 2016 Sloan Research Fellowships. Awarded annually since 1955, the fellowships honor early-career scientists and scholars whose achievements and potential identify them as rising stars, the next generation of scientific leaders.

"Getting early-career support can be a make-or-break moment for a young scholar," said Paul L. Joskow, President of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. "In an increasingly competitive academic environment, it can be difficult to stand out, even when your work is first rate. The Sloan Research Fellowships have become an unmistakable marker of quality among researchers. Fellows represent the best-of-the-best among young scientists."

Awarded in eight scientific and technical fields—chemistry, computer science, economics, mathematics, computational and evolutionary molecular biology, neuroscience, ocean sciences, and physics—the Sloan Research Fellowships are awarded in close coordination with the scientific community. Candidates must be nominated by their fellow scientists and winning fellows are selected by an independent panel of senior scholars on the basis of a candidate's independent research accomplishments, creativity, and potential to become a leader in his or her field.

 

Congratulations to Jonathan for this outstanding achievement!

 

The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is a philanthropic, not-for-profit grant making institution based in New York City. Established in 1934 by Alfred Pritchard Sloan Jr., then-President and Chief Executive Officer of the General Motors Corporation, the Foundation makes grants in support of original research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. www.sloan.org

Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Press Release

February 2016

This month, five staff members were recognized through the Staff Gift Card Program. Each received a $50 Visa card.

The program provides a forum for recognizing staff contributions that are above and beyond their everyday roles. Any staff, faculty or student may nominate a staff member for consideration.

Congratulations to this month's awardees, listed below with excerpts from the submissions.

 

Kenny Green, Facilities Manager, EE

  • "His professionalism and upbeat personality are very much appreciated."
  • "Kenny's got us covered!"

Rachelle Mozeleski, Web Content Manager, EE

  • "Her ability to work with a variety of people to find solutions is very impressive."
  • "Creative and enthusiastic; she always brings a smile and positive attitude."

Denise Murphy, Faculty Affairs and Staffing Manager, EE

  • "She is extremely knowledgable with all things faculty affairs, and always available to answer questions."
  • "Denise makes EE staff feel comfortable, appreciated and valued."

Helen Niu, Administrative Associate, EE

  • "Highly capable and dedicated, Helen is a pleasure to work with."
  • "She handles complicated procedures with efficiency and ease."

Lisa Sickorez, Financial Officer, EE

  • "She did a fantastic job transitioning EE to a new expense system."
  • "Lisa's extensive knowledge and patience are greatly appreciated!"

The Staff Gift Card Bonus Program is sponsored by the School of Engineering. Each year, the EE department receives several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond their role. Each month, staff are chosen from nominations received from faculty, students, and staff. Past nominations are eligible for future months. Nominate a deserving staff person today!


Be sure to recognize the staff member, or members, that help in your accomplishments!

February 2016

Dan Boneh has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering with the citation, "For contributions to the theory and practice of cryptography and computer security."

Election to the National Academy of Engineering is among the highest professional distinctions accorded to an engineer. Academy membership honors those who have made outstanding contributions to "engineering research, practice, or education, including, where appropriate, significant contributions to the engineering literature," and to "the pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of engineering, or developing/implementing innovative approaches to engineering education."

A professor in EE and CS, Boneh heads the applied cryptography group. His research focuses on applications of cryptography to computer security. His focus is on building security mechanisms that are easy to use and deploy. He has developed new mechanisms for improving web security, file system security, and copyright protection. He contributed to the security and performance of the RSA cryptosystem and contributed to the study of cryptographic watermarking.

Professor Boneh is part of the Stanford Cyber Initiative. In 2014, Professor Boneh received the ACM-Infosys Foundation Award in the Computing Sciences.

Please join us in congratulating Dan Boneh for this well-deserved recognition of his profound contributions and leadership.

 

Full NAE press release.

January 2016

The Department of Electrical Engineering is pleased to announce that Gordon Wetzstein has received the National Science Foundation (NSF) Faculty Early Career Development Award (CAREER). Professor Wetzstein's award is entitled "CAREER: Optimizing Computational Range and Velocity Imaging."

Gordon Wetzstein, an assistant professor of electrical engineering and by courtesy, computer science, was awarded a five-year grant to develop optimized hardware and software for emerging computational range and velocity imaging.

His research anticipates insights and contributions to advance knowledge and gain an understanding of the limits of time-resolved computational imaging and how to practically achieve them. The developed computational imaging systems and mathematical models are expected to provide fundamentally new building blocks for a diversity of applications in computer and machine vision, medical imaging, microscopy, scientific imaging, remote sensing, defense, and robotics.

The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a Foundation-wide activity that offers the National Science Foundation's most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations. The intention of such activities is to build a firm foundation for a lifetime of leadership in integrating education and research.

 

Please join the department in congratulating Professor Wetzstein on this recognition of his work.

December 2015

Collaborative efforts of researchers at Stanford, University of California Berkeley, University of Michigan, and Carnegie Mellon University are working toward creating a faster and more efficient computing architecture.

The team describes their approach as 'N3XT, Nano-Engineered Computing Systems Technology.' N3XT will eliminate bottlenecks by integrating processors and memory like floors in a skyscraper and by connecting these components with millions of "vias," which play the role of tiny electronic elevators.

The key is the use of non-silicon materials that can be fabricated at much lower temperatures than silicon, so that processors can be built on top of memory without the new layer damaging the layer below.

N3XT high-rise chips are based on carbon nanotube transistors (CNTs). Transistors are fundamental units of a computer processor, the tiny on-off switches that create digital zeroes and ones. CNTs are faster and more energy-efficient than silicon processors. Moreover, in the N3XT architecture, they can be fabricated and placed over and below other layers of memory.

Mitra and Wong have already demonstrated a working prototype of a high-rise chip. At the International Electron Devices Meeting in December 2014 they unveiled a four-layered chip made up of two layers of RRAM memory sandwiched between two layers of CNTs.

In their N3XT paper they ran simulations showing how their high-rise approach was a thousand times more efficient in carrying out many important and highly demanding industrial software applications.

"When you combine higher speed with lower energy use, N3XT systems outperform conventional approaches by a factor of a thousand," Wong said.

 

Excerpts from the Stanford Report.

November 2015

Professor Jelena Vuckovic has been elected as a 2016 Optical Society of America (OSA) Fellow Member. Fellows of the Optical Society are elected based on their significant contributions to the advancement of optics and photonics. Several factors are considered for election, including specific scientific, engineering, and technological contributions, a record of significant publications or patents related to optics, technical or industry leadership in the field as well as service to OSA and the global optics community. 

The OSA Fellow Members Committee reviews nominations submitted by current OSA Fellows and then recommends candidates to the OSA Board of Directors. No more than 10 percent of the total OSA membership may be chosen as Fellows, making the process both highly selective and competitive. As a reflection of the Optical Society's global reach, 60 percent of this year's Fellows reside outside the United States.

Professor Vuckovic's citation reads, "for field opening contributions to the science and engineering of photonic crystals, and in particular, for the use of 2D microcavites for the Purcell-like enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate of embedded quantum dots."

The 2016 class of Fellows will be honored at OSA conferences and meetings throughout 2016. 

 

Read OSA news release.

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February 2014

Three staff members each received a $50 Visa card in recognition of their extraordinary efforts as part of the department’s 2014 Staff Gift Card Bonus Program. The EE department received several nominations in January, and nominations from 2013 were also considered.

Following are January’s gift card recipients and some of the comments from their nominators:

Ann Guerra, Faculty Administrator

  • “She is very kind to students and always enthusiastic to help students… every time we need emergent help, she is willing to give us a hand.”
  • “Ann helps anyone who goes to her for help with anything, sometimes when it’s beyond her duty.” 

Teresa Nguyen, Student Accounting Associate

  • “She stays on top of our many, many student financial issues, is an extremely reliable source of information and is super friendly.”
  • “Teresa’s cheerful disposition, her determination, and her professionalism seem to go above and beyond what is simply required.”

Helen Niu, Faculty Administrator

  • “Helen is always a pleasure to work with.”
  • “She goes the extra mile in her dealings with me, which is very much appreciated.”

The School of Engineering once again gave the EE department several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond. More people will be recognized next month, and past nominations will still be eligible for future months. EE faculty, staff and students are welcome to nominate a deserving staff person by visitinghttps://gradapps.stanford.edu/NotableStaff/nomination/create.

Ann Guerra  Teresa Nguyen  Helen Niu

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