Faculty

June 2016

Amin Arbabian was awarded the Tau Beta Pi Undergraduate Teaching Award. Charles Guan (EE BS '16) and Vikram Prasad (EE BS '16) presented Amin with the award during the EE commencement ceremony, June 12, 2016.

Professor Arbabian "combines stellar research with an intuition-driven method of teaching, embedding real-life applications and contemporary thought into our education," stated Vikram Prasad.

Co-presenter, Charles Guan added, "At every level, he has been fully invested in us and our learning. His passion for teaching is apparent in every class and in the way he makes time for students outside the classroom."

  

Congratulations to Amin and to the 2016 graduates!

 

Additional Articles and Information:

June 2016

Audrey Bowden has been selected to win one of two 2016 Stanford Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Awards.

The Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Prize recognizes not only excellence in teaching but also the ability to inspire personal and intellectual development beyond the classroom. This may include, but is not limited to, encouraging critical and analytical thinking, taking an active interest in students as individuals, and influencing the way students think about the world.

Every year, members of Phi Beta Kappa present an award to an outstanding member of the faculty. Nominations are accepted from members of the senior class. The winner is then selected by a committee of previous award winners and Phi Beta Kappa Council members.

Audrey was presented with the award at the Phi Beta Kappa Graduation Ceremony at the Bing Concert Hall on Friday, June 10th. She was also acknowledged at the Electrical Engineering Commencement on Sunday, June 12.

 

Additional Articles and Information: 

 

June 2016

Stephen P. Boyd was honored "for his signature course, Convex Optimization, which attracts more than 300 Stanford students each year, is taught at more than 100 universities and, over the past 20 years has had a profound influence on how researchers and engineers think about convex models to solve problems."

He was commended "for revolutionizing the way mathematical optimization is taught and applied in engineering and the social and natural sciences worldwide," and "for his new course on linear algebra for freshmen and sophomores – anticipated to become a cornerstone in undergraduate engineering mathematics."

Stephen will receive his award on Sunday, June 12, 2016 during the 125th Commencement ceremony.

The Gores Award is the University's highest award for excellence in teaching. The Walter J. Gores Awards recognize undergraduate and graduate teaching excellence. As the University's highest award for teaching, the Gores Award celebrates achievement in educational activities that include lecturing, tutoring, advising, and discussion leading.

 

Excerpts from the Stanford News. Read full article.

 

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June 2016

Andrea Montanari has been selected to receive the 2016 IEEE Information Theory Society James L. Massey Research & Teaching Award for Young Scholars

Andrea's research focuses on developing efficient algorithms to make sense of large amounts of noisy data, extract information from observations, and estimate signals from measurements. This effort spans several disciplines including statistics, computer science, information theory, machine learning. He is also working on applications of these techniques to healthcare data analytics.

2016 marks the second year of the James L. Massey Research & Teaching Award for Young Scholars. The award is named in honor of James L. Massey, who was an internationally acclaimed pioneer in digital communications and a revered teacher and mentor to an entire generation of communications engineers. He was one of the outstanding researchers and leaders of the IEEE Information Theory Society over a period of 50 years. This award recognizes "outstanding achievement in research and teaching by young scholars in the Information Theory community."

 

Congratulations Andrea!
Read his EE SPOTLIGHT article.

 

June 2016

Professor emeritus Calvin Quate has won the 2016 Kavli Nanoscience Prize, along with Gerd Binnig, former member of IBM Zurich Research Laboratory, and Christoph Gerber, of the University of Basel, for the invention of atomic force microscopy.

Throughout his career, Quate invented transformational imaging and sensing technologies that continue to be used in research labs around the world, and even on the surface of Mars. Along with Ross Lemons, he developed the scanning acoustic microscope in the early 1970s. The atomic force microscope (AFM) came in 1986, after working with Gerd Binnig and Christoph Gerber, who share the Kavli Prize with Quate.

The atomic force microscope uses a stylus with a small tip – less than 30 nanometers wide – to move across the surface of an object, bobbing up and down as it passes over the topography of the surface. When the stylus tip crosses a change in the surface, force passes from the stylus to an attached cantilever, which flexes. Instruments record the cantilever's flexing to create an image accurate to the atomic level.

An example of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is on display in the atrium of the Packard Building. 

 The Kavli Prize is a partnership among The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, The Kavli Foundation and The Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research. Winners of each prize will receive a gold medal and share $1 million (U.S.), given during an awards ceremony in Oslo.


Read full Stanford News article.

 

May 2016

Recently published in Lab on a Chip, a journal of the Royal Society of Chemistry, Professor Audrey Bowden and Gennifer Smith, a PhD student in electrical engineering, detail their new low-cost, portable device that would allow patients to get consistently accurate urine test results at home, easing the workload on primary care physicians.

Other do-it-yourself systems are emerging, but Bowden and Smith's approach is inexpensive and reliable, in part because they base their system on the same tried and trusted dipstick used in medical offices.

Their approach uses an easy-to-assemble black box that allows a smartphone camera to capture video that accurately analyzes color changes in a standard paper dipstick.

 

Excerpts from Stanford News, May 16, 2016.

Read full Stanford News article

March 2016

Emeritus Professor Martin E. Hellman and former Sun Microsystems Chief Security Officer Whitfield Diffie, have been named recipients of the 2015 ACM A.M. Turing Award for critical contributions to modern cryptography. The ability for two parties to communicate privately over a secure channel is fundamental for billions of people around the world. On a daily basis, individuals establish secure online connections with banks, e-commerce sites, email servers and the cloud. Diffie and Hellman's groundbreaking 1976 paper, "New Directions in Cryptography," introduced the ideas of public-key cryptography and digital signatures, which are the foundation for most regularly-used security protocols on the Internet today. The Diffie-Hellman Protocol protects daily Internet communications and trillions of dollars in financial transactions.

The ACM Turing Award, often referred to as the "Nobel Prize of Computing," carries a $1 million prize with financial support provided by Google, Inc. It is named for Alan M. Turing, the British mathematician who articulated the mathematical foundation and limits of computing and who was a key contributor to the Allied cryptoanalysis of the German Enigma cipher during World War II.

"Today, the subject of encryption dominates the media, is viewed as a matter of national security, impacts government-private sector relations, and attracts billions of dollars in research and development," said ACM President Alexander L. Wolf. "In 1976, Diffie and Hellman imagined a future where people would regularly communicate through electronic networks and be vulnerable to having their communications stolen or altered. Now, after nearly 40 years, we see that their forecasts were remarkably prescient."

Please join us in congratulating Marty for this outstanding recognition of his public key cryptography.


 

Excerpts from the ACM Press Release

Read Stanford Report article

 

February 2016

Jonathan Fan selected as a 2016 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in Physics. The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is pleased to announce the selection of 126 outstanding U.S. and Canadian researchers as recipients of the 2016 Sloan Research Fellowships. Awarded annually since 1955, the fellowships honor early-career scientists and scholars whose achievements and potential identify them as rising stars, the next generation of scientific leaders.

"Getting early-career support can be a make-or-break moment for a young scholar," said Paul L. Joskow, President of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. "In an increasingly competitive academic environment, it can be difficult to stand out, even when your work is first rate. The Sloan Research Fellowships have become an unmistakable marker of quality among researchers. Fellows represent the best-of-the-best among young scientists."

Awarded in eight scientific and technical fields—chemistry, computer science, economics, mathematics, computational and evolutionary molecular biology, neuroscience, ocean sciences, and physics—the Sloan Research Fellowships are awarded in close coordination with the scientific community. Candidates must be nominated by their fellow scientists and winning fellows are selected by an independent panel of senior scholars on the basis of a candidate's independent research accomplishments, creativity, and potential to become a leader in his or her field.

 

Congratulations to Jonathan for this outstanding achievement!

 

The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is a philanthropic, not-for-profit grant making institution based in New York City. Established in 1934 by Alfred Pritchard Sloan Jr., then-President and Chief Executive Officer of the General Motors Corporation, the Foundation makes grants in support of original research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. www.sloan.org

Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Press Release

February 2016

Dan Boneh has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering with the citation, "For contributions to the theory and practice of cryptography and computer security."

Election to the National Academy of Engineering is among the highest professional distinctions accorded to an engineer. Academy membership honors those who have made outstanding contributions to "engineering research, practice, or education, including, where appropriate, significant contributions to the engineering literature," and to "the pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of engineering, or developing/implementing innovative approaches to engineering education."

A professor in EE and CS, Boneh heads the applied cryptography group. His research focuses on applications of cryptography to computer security. His focus is on building security mechanisms that are easy to use and deploy. He has developed new mechanisms for improving web security, file system security, and copyright protection. He contributed to the security and performance of the RSA cryptosystem and contributed to the study of cryptographic watermarking.

Professor Boneh is part of the Stanford Cyber Initiative. In 2014, Professor Boneh received the ACM-Infosys Foundation Award in the Computing Sciences.

Please join us in congratulating Dan Boneh for this well-deserved recognition of his profound contributions and leadership.

 

Full NAE press release.

January 2016

The Department of Electrical Engineering is pleased to announce that Gordon Wetzstein has received the National Science Foundation (NSF) Faculty Early Career Development Award (CAREER). Professor Wetzstein's award is entitled "CAREER: Optimizing Computational Range and Velocity Imaging."

Gordon Wetzstein, an assistant professor of electrical engineering and by courtesy, computer science, was awarded a five-year grant to develop optimized hardware and software for emerging computational range and velocity imaging.

His research anticipates insights and contributions to advance knowledge and gain an understanding of the limits of time-resolved computational imaging and how to practically achieve them. The developed computational imaging systems and mathematical models are expected to provide fundamentally new building blocks for a diversity of applications in computer and machine vision, medical imaging, microscopy, scientific imaging, remote sensing, defense, and robotics.

The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a Foundation-wide activity that offers the National Science Foundation's most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations. The intention of such activities is to build a firm foundation for a lifetime of leadership in integrating education and research.

 

Please join the department in congratulating Professor Wetzstein on this recognition of his work.

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