Award

Yuanfang Li and Dr. Ardavan Pedram: Best Paper Award, IEEE ASAP
July 2017

Co-authors Yuanfang Li (MS candidate) and Dr. Ardavan Pedram received the Best Paper Award at the 28th annual IEEE International Conference on Application-specific Systems, Architectures and Processors (ASAP).

The conference covers the theory and practice of application-specific systems, architectures and processors – specifically building upon traditional strengths in areas such as computer arithmetic, cryptography, compression, signal and image processing, network processing, reconfigurable computing, application-specific instruction-set processors, and hardware accelerators.

Yuanfang Li is an M.S. candidate and Dr. Ardavan Pedram is a senior research associate who manages the PRISM Project. The PRISM project enables the design of reconfigurable architectures to accelerate the building blocks of machine learning, high performance computing, and data science routines.

 

Congratulations to Yuanfang and Ardavan for their well-deserved award!

 

Abstract "CATERPILLAR: Coarse Grain Reconfigurable Architecture for Accelerating the Training of Deep Neural Networks":
Accelerating the inference of a trained DNN is a well studied subject. In this paper we switch the focus to the training of DNNs. The training phase is compute intensive, demands complicated data communication, and contains multiple levels of data dependencies and parallelism. This paper presents an algorithm/architecture space exploration of efficient accelerators to achieve better network convergence rates and higher energy efficiency for training DNNs. We further demonstrate that an architecture with hierarchical support for collective communication semantics provides flexibility in training various networks performing both stochastic and batched gradient descent based techniques. Our results suggest that smaller networks favor non-batched techniques while performance for larger networks is higher using batched operations.

June 2017

Congratulations to Dianmin Lin (PhD '16), she has been awarded the 2017 QEP Doctoral Research Prize, jointly with Dr. Jamie Francis-Jones (University of Bath).

The QEP Doctoral Research Prize recognizes students who have conducted work of an exceptional standard in the field of quantum electronics and photonics. The winning student receives an award of £250 and a certificate.

Dr. Dianmin Lin is recognized for the design and demonstration of all-dielectric (silicon) phase-gradient metasurface optical elements, such as axicons, flat lenses and blazed gratings, operating in transmission mode at visible wavelengths, as well as multifunctional metasurfaces providing new or combined functions that are difficult if not impossible to achieve with conventional optical components. Her research has been published in Advanced Materials, Nano Letters, and Science. Three patent applications have been filed for her work at Stanford, one patent has been issued, and two are pending.

Dianmin is currently a senior optical scientist working on augmented reality.

 

Congratulations to Dianmin on her well-deserved recognition and award!

The Brongersma Group

Pictured, The Brongersma Group is concerned with the development and understanding of nanophotonic devices. As part of a worldwide research and development effort on 'metamaterials' - manmade media that possess unique properties not found in nature, students in the group aim to nanostructure the layered materials in conventional optoelectronic devices so as to increase their performance or to achieve entirely new functions. They have successfully applied this approach to the fields of solar energy production, information technology, and optical imaging.

 

 

 

 

Excerpted from IOP's 'QEP Group Prize.'

June 2017

Professor David Tse has been appointed to the Thomas Kailath and Guanghan Xu Professorship in the School of Engineering. This professorship was established with an endowed gift from Guanghan Xu, a Stanford alum who earned his PhD in EE. Guanghan established this professorship to honor his advisor, Thomas Kailath, the Hitachi America Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus. The Thomas Kailath and Guanghan Xu Professorship carries preference for faculty whose academic focus is in the broad field of signal processing and its applications.

David has been a member of the Stanford faculty since 2014. His research focuses on information theory and its applications in various fields, including wireless communication, energy, and computational biology. David serves at the Stanford Information Systems Laboratory, and is the inventor of the proportional fair scheduling algorithm used in all third- and fourth-generation cellular systems. He also co-authored with Pramod Viswanath the text Fundamentals of Wireless Communication, which has been used in over 60 institutions around the world.

Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, David served in the department of electrical engineering and computer sciences at the University of California, Berkeley from 1995 to 2014, and was a member of the technical staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories from 1994 to 1995.

A fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), David has received the IEEE Communications Society and Information Theory Society Joint Paper Award on three occasions, and he has served on the IEEE Information Theory Society's Board of Governors twice. He is a recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER Award and the Canadian Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council 1967 Graduate Fellowship. David has been honored with the Outstanding Teaching Award from the department of electrical engineering and computer sciences at the University of California, Berkeley, and he is a recipient of the American Society for Engineering Education's Frederick Emmons Terman Award, the National Academy of Engineering's Gilbreth Lectureship, and the IEEE Information Theory Society Claude E. Shannon Award.

David received a bachelor's degree in systems design engineering from the University of Waterloo in 1989, and MS and PhD degrees in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1992 and 1994, respectively.

David's contributions to the field of information theory and its applications make him a deserving candidate for the Thomas Kailath and Guanghan Xu Professorship in the School of Engineering.

 

Please join us in congratulating David on this achievement.

 

Related News:

2017 Claude E. Shannon Award, July 2016

David's EE Spotlight 

 

May 2017

Professor Stephen Boyd was awarded an honorary doctorate from the Institute of Statistics, Biostatistics and Actuarial Sciences of the Catholic University of Louvain for his achievements in the field of data sciences.

The awards ceremony was held earlier in May at the Universite Catholique de Louvain. Stephen participated in a roundtable discussion and presented on Convex Optimization.

 

Please join us in congratulating Stephen for this well deserved recognition of his profound contributions.

May 2017

Electrical Engineering staff recognized for their outstanding effort include Fely Barrera, Daisy Chavez, John DeSilva and Helen Niu. Each were nominated by peers, faculty and/or students for professionalism that went above and beyond their everyday roles. Gift card recipients continue to make profound and positive impact in EE's everyday work and academic environment.

 

Please join us in congratulating Fely, Daisy, John and Helen. Excerpts from their nominations follow.

 

Fely Barrera, Administrative Associate

  • "Fely's willingness to help is greatly appreciated."
  • "She is a great resource for all of my questions."

Daisy Chavez, Graduate Admissions Specialist & Student Life Coordinator

  • "Daisy's support of student organizations, like WEE and OSA, is great! She clarifies everything and is willing to help us."
  • "She ensures our admissions process goes smoothly, all the while being a pleasure to work."

John DeSilva, Systems & Network Manager

  • "John is the definition of reliability!"
  • "He is always available, with endless patience for every question and need."

Helen Niu, Administrative Associate

  • "Helen is a pleasure to work with; she's resourceful and energetic."
  • "She is efficient, patient, and provides significant value to our research."

The Staff Gift Card Bonus Program is sponsored by the School of Engineering. Each year, the EE department receives several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond their role. Staff are chosen from nominations received from faculty, students, and staff. Past nominations are eligible for future months.

Nominate a deserving staff person or group today! We encourage you to nominate individuals or groups that have made a profound improvement in your daily work life. Each recipient receives a $50 Visa card. Nominations can be made at any time.

April 2017

The Frederick Emmons Terman Engineering Award for Scholastic Achievement has been awarded to six EE undergraduates. The Terman Award is one of the most selective academic awards. It is based on overall academic performance and is presented to the top five percent of each year's School of Engineering seniors. The 2016-2017 Terman Scholars include six undergraduate seniors from Electrical Engineering.

Terman scholars are invited to attend a celebratory luncheon and encouraged to invite the most influential secondary school or other pre-college teacher who guided them during the formative stages of their academic career.  

Congratulations to all of the Terman Award recipients.

The Electrical Engineering seniors are:

• Darren Hau

• Min Cheol Kim

• Chayakorn Pongsiri

• Peter Franklin Satterthwaite

• Nick John Sovich

• Vivian Wang

The award is named after Fred Terman who was the fourth Dean of the School of Engineering at Stanford, serving from 1944-1958, after which he became the Provost at the University, and is generally credited, along with President Wally Sterling, as having started the process that has led Stanford to its present position among the leading universities of the world.

 

Pictured above are the 2017 Terman Award recipients with their most influencial teacher. (Image credit: Stanford School of Engineering)

 

Learn more about Frederick E. Terman on the EE History timeline. 

Terman image credit, Stanford Historical Photograph Collection.

 

April 2017

The paper, "Packet switching in radio channels: Part I – carrier sense multiple-access modes and their throughput-delay characteristics" was coauthored by professor Fouad Tobagi and Len Kleinrock in 1975.

The award citation reads, "A pioneering contribution to the early days of wireless packet networks that is on the reading list of any student interested in the foundation of media access control in packet radio networks. This paper makes a fundamental contribution to the development of carrier sense multiple access (CSMA) that underpins the wireless edge today."

The SIGMOBILE Test-of-Time awards recognize papers that have had a sustained and significant impact in the SIGMOBILE community over at least a decade. The award recognizes that a paper's influence is often not fully apparent at the time of publication, and it can be best judged with the perspective of time.

The ToT awards were presented at the 22nd Annual International Conference on Mobile Computing and Networking in New York. A half-day session was dedicated to this award comprising presentations and a "Future Mobile Panel" with the several ToT authors.

Professor Tobagi works on network control mechanisms for handling multimedia traffic (voice, video and TCP- based applications) and on the performance assessment of networked multimedia applications using user-perceived quality measures. He also investigates the design of wireless networks, including QoS-based media access control and network resource management, as well as network architectures and infrastructures for the support of mobile users, all meeting the requirements of multimedia traffic. He also investigates the design of metropolitan and wide area networks combining optical and electronic networking technologies, including topological design, capacity provisioning, and adaptive routing.

 

Congratulations to Fouad on this well-deserved recognition.

 

April 2017

Andrea Goldsmith has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, one of the country's oldest and most prestigious honorary learned societies. The 2017 class includes some of the world's most accomplished scholars, scientists, writers, artists and civic, business and philanthropic leaders.

"It is an honor to welcome this new class of exceptional women and men as part of our distinguished membership," said Don Randel, Chair of the Academy's Board of Directors. "Their talents and expertise will enrich the life of the Academy and strengthen our capacity to spread knowledge and understanding in service to the nation."

Members of the 2017 class include winners of the Pulitzer Prize and the Wolf Prize; MacArthur Fellows; Fields Medalists; Presidential Medal of Freedom and National Medal of Arts recipients; and Academy Award, Grammy Award, Emmy Award, and Tony Award winners.

"In a tradition reaching back to the earliest days of our nation, the honor of election to the American Academy is also a call to service," said Academy President Jonathan F. Fanton. "Through our projects, publications, and events, the Academy provides members with opportunities to make common cause and produce the useful knowledge for which the Academy's 1780 charter calls."

The new class will be inducted at a ceremony on October 7, 2017, in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Founded in 1780, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences is one of the country's oldest learned societies and independent policy research centers, convening leaders from the academic, business, and government sectors to respond to the challenges facing—and opportunities available to—the nation and the world. Members contribute to Academy publications and studies in science, engineering, and technology policy; global security and international affairs; the humanities, arts, and education; and American institutions and the public good.

Please join us in congratulating Andrea for this very well deserved recognition of her work!

 

American Academy of Arts & Sciences Press Release

Undergrad Vivian Wang (BS '17) is a 2017 Churchill Scholarship winner
March 2017

Congratulations to Vivian Wang (BS '17) on her well-deserved award!

As an undergraduate, Vivian has been involved in numerous events on campus. She is a former co-director, and teacher, of Stanford Splash, which brings middle and high school students to campus to learn from Stanford students. Vivian has taught Splash courses since 2014. Her most recent course was "Sewable Electronics."

Vivian has also been a teaching assistant for two of the department's most popular courses, "An Intro to Making: What is EE" and "Digital Systems Design". She was selected through a competitive process, to be a peer tutor in math and physics. Vivian also participated in EE's REU program, doing research, and eventually co-authoring a paper with Professor Jim Harris. Vivian has also worked as an undergraduate research assistant for Professor Amin Arbabian.

"I am grateful for the research and other experiences Stanford has provided me thus far and look forward to the scientific and cultural opportunities provided through the Churchill Scholarship," Wang said.

The goal of the Churchill Scholarships program, established at the request of Sir Winston Churchill, is to advance science and technology on both sides of the Atlantic, helping to ensure future prosperity and security.

 

Excerpted from Stanford News article, "Stanford electrical engineering senior wins Churchill Scholarship"

March 2017

Professor Shanhui Fan has been selected to receive the 2017 Vannevar Bush Faculty Fellowship.

"The fellowship program provides research awards to top-tier researchers from U.S. universities to conduct revolutionary "high risk, high pay-off" research of strategic importance to the Department of Defense," said Mary J. Miller, acting assistant secretary of defense for research and engineering.

Fellows conduct basic research in core science and engineering disciplines that underpin future DoD technologies, such as, quantum information science, neuroscience, nanoscience, novel engineered materials, applied mathematics, statistics, and fluid dynamics. Fellows directly engage with the DoD research enterprise to share knowledge and insights with DoD civilian and military leaders, researchers in DoD laboratories, and the national security science and engineering community.

"Grants supporting the program engage the next generation of outstanding scientists and engineers in the "hard" problems that DoD needs to solve," Miller said.

DoD congratulates each of these remarkable scientists and engineers on selection as Vannevar Bush Faculty Fellows, bringing the current cohort to 45 Fellows.

 

Please join the department in congratulating Shanhui for this well deserved recognition and support of his outstanding research!

 

DoD press release

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