EE Student Information

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EE Student Information, Spring Quarter through Academic Year 2020-2021: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

Updates will be posted on this page, as well as emailed to the EE student mail list.

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Award

image of prof. Chelsea Finn
November 2020

Congratulations to Professor Chelsea Finn. She has been awarded an inaugural Samsung AI Researcher of the Year award. Presented at Samsung AI Forum 2020, the five recipients are AI researchers from around the world.

At the event, Chelsea's lecture was titled, "From Few-Shot Adaptation to Uncovering Symmetries". In her lecture, she introduced meta learning technologies in which AI, in spite of changes in data, can adapt swiftly to untrained data, and proceeded to share success stories of the application of these technologies in the areas of robotics and new drug candidate material design.

Chelsea's research interests lie in the ability to enable robots and other agents to develop broadly intelligent behavior through learning and interaction. Her work lies at the intersection of machine learning and robotic control, including topics such as end-to-end learning of visual perception and robotic manipulation skills, deep reinforcement learning of general skills from autonomously collected experience, and meta-learning algorithms that can enable fast learning of new concepts and behaviors.

Please join us in congratulating Chelsea on this well-deserved distinction! Additional awards went to Prof. Kyunghyun Cho (New York University), Prof. Seth Flaxman (Imperial College London), Prof. Jiajun Wu (Stanford), and Prof. Cho-Jui Hsieh (UCLA).

Excerpted from Samsung Newsroom, "[Samsung AI Forum 2020] Day 1: How AI Can Make a Meaningful Impact on Real World Issues"

 

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image of Lei Gu, PhD
July 2020

Congratulations to postdoctoral research fellow Lei Gu, PhD '19. Lei received the IEEE Power Electronics Society (PELS) PhD Thesis Talk Award. His talk, "Design Considerations for Radio Frequency Power Converters" can be viewed online at IEEE-PELS.org.

Dr. Lei Gu is a researcher in professor Juan Rivas-Davila's SUPER Lab.

The IEEE PELS Digital Media Committee invites video submissions for the IEEE PELS Prize Ph.D. Thesis Talk. The goal of this competition is to showcase Ph.D. projects to the entire power electronics community - both in academia and industry. Five IEEE PELS P3 Talks are awarded each year. (source: ieee-pels.org/images/files/pdf/P3_Talks_Write_Up_4-27.pdf

Read more about the P3 award

 

Please join us in congratulating Lei on his award!

 

Image credit: Courtesy Bechtel International Center
July 2020

Congratulations to EE MS candidate Nicolo Zulaybar! He is a recipient of the David L. Boren Fellowship.

As a Boren Fellow, he will study Mandarin at the Inter-University Program for Chinese Studies at Tsinghua University in Beijing. Through the fellowship, he intends to further improve his language skills by auditing Chinese lectures and getting involved with student organizations.

"It's an honor and privilege to receive this Boren Fellowship," Zulaybar said. "In this time of global challenges, it feels all the more urgent that people get involved with government to solve the problems facing their communities. I appreciate how Boren both supports my placement in federal service and prepares me for my role with cultural skills I can use to problem-solve with America's international partners. It complements my technical education in this way."

Zulaybar is from Los Angeles. He graduated from Stanford in 2018 with a bachelor's degree in chemistry. As an undergraduate, he was a research associate in Assistant Professor of Chemistry Yan Xia's Polymer Chemistry Lab, as well as a member of the Alpha Chi Sigma professional fraternity.

Nicolo is one of five Stanford students who are the recipients of the 2020 Boren Awards. Two are graduate students, and will receive David L. Boren Fellowships and three are undergraduates who will receive David L. Boren Scholarships.

Congratulations to Nicolo and his Boren Awards colleagues!

 

Excerpted from "Five Stanford students receive 2020 Boren Awards," June 25, 2020

image of prof. Tom Lee
July 2020

Congratulations to Professor Thomas Lee. He has been awarded the IEEE Gustav Robert Kirchhoff Award for "pioneering CMOS technology for high-performance wireless circuits and systems."

The IEEE Gustav Robert Kirchhoff Award recognizes an outstanding contribution to the fundamentals of any aspect of electronic circuits and systems that has a long-term significance or impact.

Tom is the principal investigator of the SMIrC Lab, which has been a driving force in developing the theory of radio frequency (RF) CMOS integrated circuit design as well as in educating tomorrow's RFIC designers.

Please join us in congratulating Tom for this well-deserved recognition.

 

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image of prof Andrea Goldsmith
July 2020

Congratulations to Professor Andrea Goldsmith, Stephen Harris Professor of Engineering. She has been awarded the IEEE Leon K. Kirchmayer Graduate Teaching Award. Her citation reads, "For educating, developing, guiding, and energizing generations of highly successful students and postdoctoral fellows."

The IEEE Leon K. Kirchmayer Graduate Teaching Award recognizes inspirational teaching of graduate students in the IEEE fields of interest.

Andrea's research interests are in information theory, communication theory, and signal processing, and their application to wireless communications, interconnected systems, and neuroscience. She is the director of Stanford's Wireless Systems Lab.

Please join us in congratulating Andrea!

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image of prof Jelena Vuckovic
May 2020

Professor Jelena Vučković announced as the CLEO 2020 James P. Gordon Memorial Speaker. Jelena is the Jensen Huang Professor in Global Leadership in the School of Engineering, Professor of Electrical Engineering and by courtesy of Applied Physics. She leads the Nanoscale and Quantum Photonics Lab, and is a director of Q-FARM, Stanford-SLAC Quantum Science and Engineering Initiative.

Jelena's research focuses on studying solid-state quantum emitters, such as quantum dots and defect centers in diamond, and their interactions with light. Her team is transforming conventional nanophotonics with the concept of inverse design, by designing arbitrary optical devices from scratch using computer algorithms with little to no human input. These efforts aim to enable a wide variety of technologies ranging from silicon photonics to quantum computing.

The Optical Society (OSA) Foundation memorial speakership pays tribute to Dr. James P. Gordon for his numerous high-impact contributions to quantum electronics and photonics, including the demonstration of the maser.

CLEO 2020 is an all-virtual web conference this year. All are invited to view Dr. Vuckovic's talk and ask questions remotely. There is no fee for CLEO attendees, simply register for online participation. You can also watch previous talks from Gordon speakers by visiting osa.org/Gordon.

 

Jelena's talk will be on 11 May 2020 at 2pm PDT.


 

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image of prof Andrea Goldsmith
April 2020

Electrical Engineering Professor Andrea Goldsmith has won the prestigious Marconi Prize of the Marconi Society for "her ground-breaking work to deliver high-performing cellular and wifi services."

Andrea's technical innovations that have shaped the fundamental performance of cellular and WiFi networks, combined with her leadership to radically improve diversity and inclusion in engineering, have changed both the consumer experience and the profession.

Andrea is the first woman to win the Marconi Award in the 45 years that it has been given.

"Andrea has enabled billions of consumers around the world to enjoy fast and reliable wireless service, as well as applications such as video streaming and autonomous vehicles that require stable network performance," said Vint Cerf, Chair of the Marconi Society and 1998 Marconi Fellow. "As the Stephen Harris Professor of Engineering at Stanford University, Andrea's personal work and that of the many engineers who she has mentored have had a global impact on wireless networking."

About the Marconi Society - The Marconi Society envisions a world in which all people can create opportunity through the benefits of connectivity. The foundation celebrates, inspires and connects individuals building tomorrow's technologies in service of a digitally inclusive world.

Please join us in congratulating Andrea for her numerous contributions to the field.

Excerpted from "Shattering the Silicon Ceiling: 2020 Marconi Prize Awarded to Wireless Innovator Dr. Andrea Goldsmith," The Marconi Society.

 

Related

image of prof Balaji Prabhakar
April 2020

Congratulations to Professor Balaji Prabhakar. He has been awarded the 2020 IEEE Koji Kobayashi Computers and Communications Award for outstanding contributions to the integration of computers and communications. His citation reads:

"For contributions to the theory and practice of network algorithms and protocols, in particular Internet routers, data centers, and self-programming networks."

The IEEE Koji Kobayashi Computers and Communications Award was established by the IEEE Board of Directors in 1986. The Award is named in honor of Dr. Koji Kobayashi, who was a leading force in advancing the integrated use of computers and communications.

 

Please join us in congratulating Balaji for this well-deserved recognition.

 

Related News

image of Prof. Paulraj
April 2020

Congratulations to Professor Arogyaswami J. Paulraj for his election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (AAAS).

The American Academy of Arts & Sciences was founded in 1780 by John Adams, John Hancock, and others who believed the new republic should honor exceptionally accomplished individuals and engage them in advancing the public good.

Two hundred and forty years later, the Academy continues to dedicate itself to recognizing excellence and relying on expertise – both of which seem more important than ever.

"The members of the class of 2020 have excelled in laboratories and lecture halls, they have amazed on concert stages and in surgical suites, and they have led in board rooms and courtrooms," said Academy President David W. Oxtoby. "With today's election announcement, these new members are united by a place in history and by an opportunity to shape the future through the Academy's work to advance the public good."

 

Please join us in congratulating Paulraj on this well-deserved recognition.

 

Excerpted from AAAS 2020 Member Announcement.

 

Related News

image of Professor Pat Hanrahan, 2019 Turing Award winner
March 2020

Congratulations to professor Pat Hanrahan and Ed Catmull

Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) named Pat Hanrahan and Edwin (Ed) Catmull recipients of the 2019 ACM A.M. Turing Award for fundamental contributions to 3-D computer graphics, and revolutionary impact of these techniques on computer-generated imagery (CGI) in filmmaking and other applications.

Pat Hanrahan, Canon Professor in the School of Engineering, said "The announcement came totally out of the blue and I am very proud to accept the Turing Award. It is a great honor, but I must give credit to a generation of computer graphics researchers and practitioners whose work and ideas influenced me over the years."

"All of us at Stanford are tremendously proud of Pat and his accomplishments, and I am delighted that he and his colleague Ed Catmull are being recognized with the prestigious Turing Award," said Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne. "Pat has made pioneering contributions to the field of computer graphics. His work has had a profound impact on filmmaking and has created new artistic possibilities in film, video games, virtual reality and more."

The ACM A.M. Turing Award, often referred to as the "Nobel Prize of Computing," carries a $1 million prize, with financial support provided by Google, Inc. It is named for Alan M. Turing, the British mathematician who articulated the mathematical foundation and limits of computing.

Please join us in congratulating Pat and Ed on receiving the 2019 ACM A.M. Turing Award.

 

Excerpted from ACM Turing Award and news.stanford.edu/2020/03/18/pat-hanrahan-wins-turing-award/

 

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Image credit: Andrew Brodhead

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