Award

professor Gordon Wetzstein
August 2018

Congratulations to professor Gordon Wetzstein! He has been presented with the Significant New Researcher Award for his work in advanced display hardware and display-specific rendering techniques.

Gordon develops displays that address a variety of perceptual challenges, including auto-stereoscopy, the elimination of vergence-accommodation conflict, and elimination of the need for observers with vision defects to wear corrective lenses.

His research has produced technology that corrects for myopia, hyperopia, or presbyopia. The Light Field Stereoscope, in 2015, presented a near-eye display technology that supports focus cues in virtual reality applications.

To utilize these display mechanisms, images are rendered with new algorithms that substantially increase image fidelity. The displays are not only designed, but also prototyped and tested. Indeed, several have been demonstrated in the SIGGRAPH Emerging Technologies exhibit.

Gordon is author or coauthor of over 80 conference and journal publications in Transactions on Graphics and in journals and proceedings in the fields of computer graphics, optics, information display, computer vision, and computational photography. These publications include contributions that support advanced display techniques, such as virtual reality camera rigs and cameras that capture both depth and velocity.

Please join us in congratulating Gordon on this terrific acknowledgement!

 

Excerpted from siggraph.org's "2018 Significant New Researcher Award: Gordon Wetzstein"

 

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August 2018

Congratulations to President Emeritus and EE Professor John Hennessy. He has been named the 2018 recipient of the Semiconductor Industry Association's Robert N. Noyce Award. The annual award recognizes a leader who has made outstanding contributions to the semiconductor industry in technology or public policy.

"Throughout his outstanding and influential career spanning more than four decades, John Hennessy has helped move the semiconductor industry forward, leading efforts to advance semiconductor technology and train future generations of electrical engineers," said John Neuffer, president and CEO, Semiconductor Industry Association. "John literally wrote the book on computer architecture design and has spearheaded semiconductor research that has helped make our industry what it is today. On behalf of the SIA board of directors, it is an honor to announce John's selection as the 2018 Robert N. Noyce Award recipient in recognition of his exceptional accomplishments."

John co-developed an approach to computer architecture that came to be known as the reduced instruction set computer (RISC) architecture, which involved significantly fewer transistors. The simpler design led to faster speeds, lower costs and shorter design times.

John joined EE in 1977 as an assistant professor and rose through the academic ranks to become Stanford's 10th president, serving in that role from 2000 until his retirement in 2016. In February 2018, Dr. Hennessy was appointed chairman of Alphabet Inc., parent company of Google.

 

Please join us in congratulating John on this well-deserved recognition!

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July 2018

Congratulations to professors Jon Fan and Juan Rivas-Davila! Two of their researchers won the 2018 NASA iTech Forum. The event is a collaborative effort between NASA and the U.S. Department (DOE) of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) to find and foster innovative solutions for critical energy challenges on Earth and in space.

The winning project was presented by Grayson Zulauf and Thaibao (Peter) Phan. Both are PhD candidates. Their collaborative project is developing technology for wireless charging of electric vehicles on Earth, and eventually, Mars. The researchers received invaluable feedback from NASA and DOE's ARPA-E leaders, as well as experts in the field of advanced energy technology.

"NASA is proud to provide a platform for innovators that exposes them to a cadre of industry experts who will be instrumental in the development of their technologies," said Kira Blackwell, NASA iTech program executive for STMD. "NASA's chief technologists and the U.S. Department of Energy's leading subject matter experts provided the teams with a better understanding of requirements for potential infusion of their technologies within a space environment."

Judges selected the top three innovations based on criteria including technical viability, the likely impact on future space exploration, benefits to humanity and commercialization potential. The teams representing the top three entries selected at the end of the forum received a trophy during the recognition ceremony on June 14.

"Our mission at ARPA-E is to change what's possible. We've been delighted to collaborate with NASA for the iTech challenge, to highlight and empower the people driving energy innovation across our country," said Conner Prochaska, senior advisor and chief of staff for ARPA-E. "We look forward to future collaborative opportunities with NASA so, together, we can continue to cultivate the next generation of energy technologies for Americans on the ground and in space."

"It was an honor for Citi to host 'Energy-Tech' thought leaders -- policy makers, academics, scientists, investors and innovators -- for NASA iTech challenge," said Jay Collins, vice chairman of Corporate and Investment Banking at Citi. "We were proud to work with NASA on such an important effort to move energy technology out of the lab and into scalnble solutions for the Moon, Mars and the planet Earth. Congratulations to the winners, whose technological leadership and entrepreneurialism made us all proud."

The top three winners of NASA iTech's 2018 Energy Cycle are listed in alphabetical order:

  • iFeather, Boulder, Colorado. In-situ Fabrication of Extraterrestrial Aerogels for Transparency, Heat, and Energy Regulation (iFEATHER) for Habitat, Aeronautic and Space Vessel, and Space Suit Applications. Focus area: Innovative Power Management and Distribution
  • Stanford University - Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford, California. Two C: Transportation Electrification through Ubiquitous Wireless Charging. Focus area: Innovative Power Management and Distribution
  • WBGlobalSemi, Inc., Lakewood Ranch, Florida. Commercializing High Power Silicon Carbide (SiC) Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs) and Power Modules for Power Management and Distributed Power Applications. Focus area: Innovative Power Management and Distribution

 

Grayson Zulauf (third from left) is an EE PhD candidate. He is a researcher in the SUPERLab, directed by Professor Juan Rivas-Davila. the Fan Lab is directed by professor Jonathan Fan.

 

 

Congratulations Jon, Juan, Grayson and Peter!

July 2018

Professor Dwight G. Nishimura has received the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) Gold Medal. This is the highest award of the ISMRM society.

His citation reads, "For pioneering innovations in angiography, fast imaging pulse sequences, image reconstruction, and MR education.

Dwight was honored at an award ceremony during the Joint Annual Meeting ISMRM–ESMRMB held in Paris, France in June. The award presentation listed highlighted his contributions, including

  • Theme of coronary MR angiography
  • Spiral imaging
  • Tagging sequences
  • Spectral-spatial excitations
  • Non-contrast MRA

A professor of Electrical Engineering, Dwight is the Addie and Al Macovski Professor in the School of Engineering.

 

Please join us in congratulating Dwight for this well-deserved award!

Dr. Andrea Goldsmith wins 2019 IEEE Sumner Award
June 2018

Professor Andrea Goldsmith has been awarded the 2019 Eric E. Sumner Award. Andrea is the Stephen Harris professor in the School of Engineering.

Professor Goldsmith's research is focused on the design, analysis, and fundamental performance limits of wireless systems and networks, as well as the application of communications and signal processing to biology and neuroscience.

Her IEEE citation reads "For contributions to the fundamental understanding and innovation in adaptive and multiple antenna techniques for wireless communication networks."

 

The IEEE Eric E. Sumner Award was established by the IEEE Board of Directors in 1995.

It is named in honor of 1991 IEEE President Eric E. Sumner, who retired as Vice President, Operations Planning, AT&T Bell Laboratories after a long and distinguished career.

Please join us in congratulating Andrea for this well-deserved award!

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June 2018

The Electrical Engineering staff recognized this month for their outstanding effort are Julia Gillespie, Lauren Harris, Meo Kittiwanich, and Rachel Pham.

Each received nominations from peers, faculty and/or students who included descriptions of the staff member's professionalism that goes above and beyond their everyday roles. Staff gift card recipients make profound and positive impact in the department's everyday work and academic environment. Nomination link.

Please join us in acknowledging Julia, Lauren, Meo, and Rachel's extraordinary work!

 

Modified excerpts from their nominations follow.

Julia Gillespie, Faculty Administrator

  • "Julia puts a lot of thought and care into everything she does."
  • Our entire group has benefited from Julia's can-do spirit and competence.

Lauren Harris, Program Assistant

  • "She has done outstanding work this entire year – from leading a new grad student forum to producing visual designs."
  • Lauren always goes above and beyond!

Meo Kittiwanich, Degree Progress Officer

  • Meo is resourceful, and able to coordinate several tasks simultaneously.
  • "She works very well with students, helping them navigate program requirements with kindness and warmth."

Rachel Pham, Academic Affairs & Programs Administrator

  • Rachel is always on top of her work.
  • "She is creative and efficient and finds ways to improve work process for everyone's ease."

 

Please join us in congratulating them for their outstanding work!

The Staff Gift Card Bonus Program is sponsored by the School of Engineering. Each year, the EE department receives several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond their role. Each month, staff are chosen from nominations received from faculty, students, and staff. Past nominations are eligible for future months.

Nominate a deserving staff person or group today – nominate individuals or groups that have made a profound improvement in your daily work life. Each recipient receives a $50 Visa card. Nominations can be made at any time.

 

June 2018

Congratulations to PhD candidate Kawin "North" Surakitbovorn! He received the Student Paper Award at the 2018 International Power Electronics Conference - ECCE Asia, IPEC-Niigata, 2018.

North presented his paper at the conference held in Niigata, Japan on May 23, 2018. Also attending were his advisor, Juan Rivas-Davila and fellow researchers from the SUPER Lab.

 

Please join us in congratulating North on his accomplishment!

Anthropology and EE major Jack Andraka
May 2018

Jack Andraka, a junior in anthropology and electrical engineering has been awarded the 2018 Truman Scholarship for Graduate Studies. He plans to put his training in engineering, anthropology and data science to work as a public health physician devoted to addressing global health inequities affecting citizens in low- and middle-income countries.

Jack is one of 59 exceptional college students chosen from across the nation for the scholarship, which provides up to $30,000 for graduate study – in the United States or abroad – to students who want to attend graduate school in preparation for a career in public service.

Andraka's honors thesis in anthropology focuses on Sierra Leone: Disease Dollars: An Ethnographic Study of Foreign Aid and Ebola in Sierra Leone. Andraka hopes to study how environmental contaminants violate the health and human rights of disadvantaged populations in the impoverished West African country.

He is also writing an honors thesis in electrical engineering, A Novel Paper Biosensor for the Detection of Infectious Diseases and Environmental Contaminants, which describes the sensors he developed that detect 20 different diseases or contaminants in five minutes at a cost of less than one cent.

As a Truman Scholar, Andraka intends to enter an MD/MPH (Doctor of Medicine/Master of Public Health) program specializing in global health.

"The MD degree would enable me to frame my engineering background within medicine and provide me with an appreciation for the clinical realities of working in global health," Andraka wrote in his Truman Scholarship application. "In doing so, I will be able to work with communities in clinical settings to better understand locally relevant issues and design programs to address them. The Master of Public Health degree, alongside my anthropology training, will provide me with a deep understanding of broader socioeconomic, environmental and political determinants of health."

Eventually, Andraka hopes to become a public health physician devoted to addressing the global health inequities in low- and middle-income countries, where life expectancy is 36 years lower than in high-income countries.

Please join us in congratulating Jack on his excellent achievement!

 

 

Excerpted from Stanford News, "Stanford junior wins 2018 Truman Scholarship for graduate studies," April 13, 2018.

Emeritus professor James Gibbons
May 2018

Congratulations to emeritus professor Jim Gibbons! Recognized by Avenidas for his significant contributions in the social well-being of the community at large.

"[...T]he former Dean of the School of Engineering at Stanford, is known internationally for his important achievements in education and for his development of fabrication technologies that were foundational for the modern semiconductor industries in Silicon Valley and around the world. Less well known is the fact that his work has also contributed significantly to the social well-being of our community at large. Jim also served on no less than 13 boards in the Valley (among them Cisco, Raychem, SRI, Lockheed Martin, PARC, and more). In the educational field, he vastly expanded and improved the Stanford Instructional Television Network, which provided topnotch education via television to thousands of engineers at local companies. Again, this provided a crucial piece of "infrastructure" to the Valley, and was a forerunner of present internet courses.

His engagement with the Santa Clara Juvenile Hall in 1996 led him and his colleagues at SERA Learning to develop a successful program that teaches at-risk youth how to manage their anger and walk away from fights. SERA's "Skills for Managing Anger" course has since be used in 355 schools and juvenile justice applications across the country, including Columbine High School and NYC after 9 /11. It included new student centered teaching methods that Jim had developed for the Stanford Video program. Jim credits his wife Lynn who supported him in all his endeavors. He says: "She encouraged me to do things that would serve the needs of others." Avenidas is thrilled to celebrate Jim's amazing contributions and success."

The 2018 Lifetimes of Achievement honorees include Nancy Mueller, Dick Mansfield, Ellie Mansfield, Kristine Erving, John Erving, Christy Holloway and Jim Gibbons.

 

Excerpted from the Avenidas press release, "Avenidas Unveils Names of Community Contributors for the 2018 Avenidas Lifetime of Achievement Awards," February 12, 2018.

EE PhD Sarah Hooper
May 2018

Congratulations to EE PhD candidate Sarah Hooper! She has been selected as a 2018 Hertz Foundation Fellow. Sarah is a member of Sanjiv Sam Gambhir's  research lab, which develops novel materials and biosensor devices for the early detection and personalized treatment of diseases.

Sarah is driven to improve health outcomes through technological innovation. She helped create multiple new medical devices during her undergraduate career at Rice University, where she earned her B.S. in electrical engineering and a minor in global health technologies.

Through developing and implementing different medical devices, she saw the incredible power of technology to transform patient care. In particular, she saw the potential for accessible medical devices to drastically improve health outcomes in resource-limited settings during an internship in Malawi, where she worked to create low-cost devices to combat neonatal hypothermia.

In addition to her work in global health, Sarah became interested in how machine learning could be applied to benefit healthcare through her research using data science to create a seizure prediction system for patients with epilepsy. She is excited by the many opportunities she sees to use machine learning and signal processing to improve domestic and global health outcomes.

Please join us in congratulating Sarah and the other 2018 Hertz Fellows!

The Fannie and John Hertz Foundation, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to empowering America's most brilliant minds in science, mathematics and engineering, announced the 2018 recipients of the prestigious Hertz Fellowship. The 10 newest Hertz Fellows were chosen from nearly 700 applicants interested in pursuing graduate work in the United States. The 2018 class includes six women, the highest proportion of women of any class in the Foundation's history, with Fellows' research focusing on chemistry, electrical engineering, computer science, mathematics and physics.

"The 2018 fellowship awardees are an outstanding group of students, with diverse talents and an extraordinary drive to reach new heights in scientific research and technological innovation,"said Robbee Baker Kosak, president, Fannie and John Hertz Foundation."We are delighted to welcome these six women and four men to the Hertz Community. They join the hundreds of Hertz Fellows who are leading important breakthroughs and developing some of the most important scientific and engineering solutions to challenges in our world today. We look forward to seeing what these 10 women and men contribute to that goal in the coming years."

The Hertz Foundation is the only organization in the United States that supports PhD candidates for a full five years at one of the Foundation's numerous partner institutions and grants students total research freedom, ensuring that each Fellow is able to pursue the most compelling, cutting-edge research. Members of Hertz's 2018 class hail from eight different states and nine different undergraduate schools. Several of this year's Fellows have already published papers in disciplines from biological chemistry to quantum computing.

"Hertz Fellows do extraordinary work and are truly changing the world, so our new Fellows are in fine company," said Dr. David Galas, Hertz Fellow, chairman of The Fannie and John Hertz Foundation's board of directors and Principal Scientist at the Pacific Northwest Research Institute. "The fellowship interviewers were amazed by the brilliance and creativity of these young people. I am confident their careers will have great impact on American and global science and technology."

At Stanford University in the electrical engineering Ph.D. program, Sarah will continue to pursue research aimed at improving patient care. She will focus on developing new medical imaging devices and associated data-driven computational tools to better diagnose and treat patients. After earning her Ph.D., Sarah plans on devoting her career to innovating technical solutions to reduce the global burden of noncommunicable disease.


Excerpted from

the Hertz Foundation: "The Fannie and John Hertz Foundation Announces 2018 Fellows", March 26, 2018

and Hertz Foundation Fellow profile, Sarah Hooper.

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