EE Student Information

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 EE Student Information, Spring & Summer Quarters 19-20: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

Updates will be posted on this page, as well as emailed to the EE student mail list.

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Award

image of prof Jelena Vuckovic
May 2020

Professor Jelena Vučković announced as the CLEO 2020 James P. Gordon Memorial Speaker. Jelena is the Jensen Huang Professor in Global Leadership in the School of Engineering, Professor of Electrical Engineering and by courtesy of Applied Physics. She leads the Nanoscale and Quantum Photonics Lab, and is a director of Q-FARM, Stanford-SLAC Quantum Science and Engineering Initiative.

Jelena's research focuses on studying solid-state quantum emitters, such as quantum dots and defect centers in diamond, and their interactions with light. Her team is transforming conventional nanophotonics with the concept of inverse design, by designing arbitrary optical devices from scratch using computer algorithms with little to no human input. These efforts aim to enable a wide variety of technologies ranging from silicon photonics to quantum computing.

The Optical Society (OSA) Foundation memorial speakership pays tribute to Dr. James P. Gordon for his numerous high-impact contributions to quantum electronics and photonics, including the demonstration of the maser.

CLEO 2020 is an all-virtual web conference this year. All are invited to view Dr. Vuckovic's talk and ask questions remotely. There is no fee for CLEO attendees, simply register for online participation. You can also watch previous talks from Gordon speakers by visiting osa.org/Gordon.

 

Jelena's talk will be on 11 May 2020 at 2pm PDT.


 

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image of prof Andrea Goldsmith
April 2020

Electrical Engineering Professor Andrea Goldsmith has won the prestigious Marconi Prize of the Marconi Society for "her ground-breaking work to deliver high-performing cellular and wifi services."

Andrea's technical innovations that have shaped the fundamental performance of cellular and WiFi networks, combined with her leadership to radically improve diversity and inclusion in engineering, have changed both the consumer experience and the profession.

Andrea is the first woman to win the Marconi Award in the 45 years that it has been given.

"Andrea has enabled billions of consumers around the world to enjoy fast and reliable wireless service, as well as applications such as video streaming and autonomous vehicles that require stable network performance," said Vint Cerf, Chair of the Marconi Society and 1998 Marconi Fellow. "As the Stephen Harris Professor of Engineering at Stanford University, Andrea's personal work and that of the many engineers who she has mentored have had a global impact on wireless networking."

About the Marconi Society - The Marconi Society envisions a world in which all people can create opportunity through the benefits of connectivity. The foundation celebrates, inspires and connects individuals building tomorrow's technologies in service of a digitally inclusive world.

Please join us in congratulating Andrea for her numerous contributions to the field.

Excerpted from "Shattering the Silicon Ceiling: 2020 Marconi Prize Awarded to Wireless Innovator Dr. Andrea Goldsmith," The Marconi Society.

 

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image of prof Balaji Prabhakar
April 2020

Congratulations to Professor Balaji Prabhakar. He has been awarded the 2020 IEEE Koji Kobayashi Computers and Communications Award for outstanding contributions to the integration of computers and communications. His citation reads:

"For contributions to the theory and practice of network algorithms and protocols, in particular Internet routers, data centers, and self-programming networks."

The IEEE Koji Kobayashi Computers and Communications Award was established by the IEEE Board of Directors in 1986. The Award is named in honor of Dr. Koji Kobayashi, who was a leading force in advancing the integrated use of computers and communications.

 

Please join us in congratulating Balaji for this well-deserved recognition.

 

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image of Prof. Paulraj
April 2020

Congratulations to Professor Arogyaswami J. Paulraj for his election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (AAAS).

The American Academy of Arts & Sciences was founded in 1780 by John Adams, John Hancock, and others who believed the new republic should honor exceptionally accomplished individuals and engage them in advancing the public good.

Two hundred and forty years later, the Academy continues to dedicate itself to recognizing excellence and relying on expertise – both of which seem more important than ever.

"The members of the class of 2020 have excelled in laboratories and lecture halls, they have amazed on concert stages and in surgical suites, and they have led in board rooms and courtrooms," said Academy President David W. Oxtoby. "With today's election announcement, these new members are united by a place in history and by an opportunity to shape the future through the Academy's work to advance the public good."

 

Please join us in congratulating Paulraj on this well-deserved recognition.

 

Excerpted from AAAS 2020 Member Announcement.

 

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image of Professor Pat Hanrahan, 2019 Turing Award winner
March 2020

Congratulations to professor Pat Hanrahan and Ed Catmull

Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) named Pat Hanrahan and Edwin (Ed) Catmull recipients of the 2019 ACM A.M. Turing Award for fundamental contributions to 3-D computer graphics, and revolutionary impact of these techniques on computer-generated imagery (CGI) in filmmaking and other applications.

Pat Hanrahan, Canon Professor in the School of Engineering, said "The announcement came totally out of the blue and I am very proud to accept the Turing Award. It is a great honor, but I must give credit to a generation of computer graphics researchers and practitioners whose work and ideas influenced me over the years."

"All of us at Stanford are tremendously proud of Pat and his accomplishments, and I am delighted that he and his colleague Ed Catmull are being recognized with the prestigious Turing Award," said Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne. "Pat has made pioneering contributions to the field of computer graphics. His work has had a profound impact on filmmaking and has created new artistic possibilities in film, video games, virtual reality and more."

The ACM A.M. Turing Award, often referred to as the "Nobel Prize of Computing," carries a $1 million prize, with financial support provided by Google, Inc. It is named for Alan M. Turing, the British mathematician who articulated the mathematical foundation and limits of computing.

Please join us in congratulating Pat and Ed on receiving the 2019 ACM A.M. Turing Award.

 

Excerpted from ACM Turing Award and news.stanford.edu/2020/03/18/pat-hanrahan-wins-turing-award/

 

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Image credit: Andrew Brodhead

image of Meo Kittiwanich, 2020 Shah Award winner
March 2020

Congratulations to Meo Kittiwaniwich, director of student and academic affairs, at Stanford's Department of Electrical Engineering (EE). Meo manages EE's student services team that oversees admissions, degree progress, course scheduling and financial aid.

The Shah Award recognizes School of Engineering staff for outstanding competence, dedication, and accomplishments. Engineering Dean Jennifer Widom stated in her announcement, "We are fortunate to have a superb staff at Stanford Engineering, so selecting the winners is never an easy task! Please join me in congratulating these outstanding individuals and thanking them for their commitment and service to the school."

Excerpts from Meo's nominators include, "Meo has always been a wonderful, collaborative colleague. But this past year she was the "quiet anchor" in the midst of intense challenges." Colleagues also cited Meo's calm compassion for all of those in our community, as well as her knowledge of the university, and a collaborative style that make her "an amazing and important colleague."

 

Please join us in congratulating Meo on her tremendous commitment to EE, her colleagues, and Stanford's students.

professor Srabanti Chowdhury
February 2020

Professor Srabanti Chowdhury has been selected as a 2020 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in Physics. The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation has selected 126 outstanding researchers across eight fields as recipients of the 2020 Sloan Research Fellowships.

Awarded annually since 1955, the fellowships honor scholars in the U.S. and Canada whose creativity, leadership, and independent research achievements make them some of the most promising researchers working today. A full list of the 2020 Fellows cohort is available at https://sloan.org/fellowships/2020-Fellows.

"To receive a Sloan Research Fellowship is to be told by your fellow scientists that you stand out among your peers," says Adam F. Falk, president of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. "A Sloan Research Fellow is someone whose drive, creativity, and insight makes them a researcher to watch."

Open to scholars in eight scientific and technical fields—chemistry, computer science, economics, mathematics, computational and evolutionary molecular biology, neuroscience, ocean sciences, and physics—the Sloan Research Fellowships are awarded in close coordination with the scientific community. Candidates must be nominated by their fellow scientists and winners are selected by independent panels of senior scholars on the basis of a candidate's research accomplishments, creativity, and potential to become a leader in his or her field.

 

Congratulations to Srabanti for this outstanding achievement!

 

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Srabanti Chowdhury awarded the Gabilan Faculty Fellowship

professor John Duchi
June 2020
Professor John Duchi has been award the inaugural SIAM Activity Group on Optimization Early Career Prize (SIAG/OPT Early Career Prize). The prize was established in 2018 and is awarded every three years to an outstanding early career researcher in the field of optimization for distinguished contributions to the field in the six calendar years prior to the award year.

John Duchi’s citation reads, "The selection committee wishes to recognize you for your deep and important contributions to convex, nonconvex, and stochastic optimization as well as to the statistical foundations of optimization methods for data science.”

 

The SIAG/OPT Early Career Prize is awarded every three years to an outstanding early career researcher in the field of optimization for distinguished contributions to the field in the six calendar years prior to the award year. The award recognizes an individual who has made outstanding, influential, and potentially long-lasting contributions to the field of optimization within six years of receiving the PhD or equivalent degree as of January 1 of the award year. The contributions for which the award is given must be publicly available and may belong to any aspect of optimization in its broadest sense. The contributions may include a paper or papers published in English in peer-reviewed journals or conference proceedings, or high quality freely available open source software.


John’s research areas span statistical learning, optimization, information theory, and computation. Please join us in acknowledging John for this special achievement.
 
 
 

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a few of our amazing staff!
January 2020

Congratulations to Chet Frost, Jim McVittie, Rieko Sasaki, and Suzanne Sims. They received several nominations from appreciative faculty, staff and students, praising their commitment that goes above and beyond the ordinary! Excerpts from the nominations are below.

The staff gift card recipients make profound and positive impact in our department's everyday work and academic environment.
Please join us in congratulating each of them.


 

Chet Frost, Faculty Administrator, Electrical Engineering

  • "Chet is efficient, upbeat, easy to work with, patient, pleasant, and an excellent problem solver!"
  • His attitude towards handling both his regular and any excess work, is beyond outstanding.

Jim McVittie, Senior Scientist, Electrical Engineering

  • He is a miracle worker when it comes to maintaining and fixing tools– our lab would not run without him!
  • Jim is a one-man maintenance machine! His contributions to Allen labs and SNF is unparalleled.

Rieko Sasaki, Faculty Administrator, Electrical Engineering

  • She is a great asset to our team!
  • Rieko has generously cleaned up many projects that others left unfinished, and she handles it all with a positive, genuinely helpful attitude.

Suzanne Sims, Faculty Administrator, Electrical Engineering

  • Whenever she has an opportunity to organize and/or optimize, she does – and always to the benefit of everyone.
  • Suzanne is extremely supportive, and a valuable resource to the department.

The Staff Gift Card Bonus Program is sponsored by the School of Engineering. Each year, the EE department receives several gift cards to distribute to staff members who have been recognized for going above and beyond their role. Staff are chosen from nominations received from faculty, students, and staff. Past nominations are eligible for future months.

Consider nominating a deserving staff person, or group, today. Each recipient receives a $50 Visa card. Nominations can be made at any time.

Nominations may be submitted at any time. There are no restrictions on the quantity, persons or groups that you can nominate. Submitters are asked to include a citation of how the group or person went above and beyond. The submitter can choose to remain anonymous. Nominate a deserving colleague today.

PROF MENDEL ROSENBLUM
January 2020

Congratulations to Professor Mendel Rosenblum. He has been elected to the 2019 Class of National Academy of Inventors (NAI) Fellows.

The NAI Fellows Program highlights academic inventors who have demonstrated a spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society. Election to NAI Fellow is the highest professional distinction accorded solely to academic inventors. To date, NAI Fellows hold more than 41,500 issued U.S. patents, which have generated over 11,000 licensed technologies and companies, and created more than 36 million jobs. In addition, over $1.6 trillion in revenue has been generated based on NAI Fellow discoveries.

"Congratulations to the 2019 class of NAI Fellows," said Laura A. Peter, Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Deputy Director at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). "It is a privilege to welcome these exceptionally-qualified individuals to this prestigious organization. I am certain their accomplishments will inspire the next generation of invention pioneers."

Mendel's research interests include system software, distributed systems, and computer architecture. He has published research in the area of disk storage management, computer simulation techniques, scalable operating system structure, virtualization computer security, and mobility.

Please join us in congratulating Mendel for this wonderful distinction!


 

Excerpted from National Academy of Inventors, Press Release, December 2019. 

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