EE Student Information

EE Student Information, Spring Quarter 19-20: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

Updates will be posted on this page, as well as emailed to the EE student mail list.

Please see Stanford University Health Alerts for course and travel updates.

As always, use your best judgement and consider your own and others' well-being at all times.

News

October 2015

Professor Jelena Vuckovic was elected as an American Physical Society (APS) Fellow by the APS Council in October. The election is based on exceptional contributions to the physics enterprise.

Professor Vuckovic's research areas include nanotechnology and NEMS/MEMS, energy harvesting and conversion, photonics, nanoscience and quantum technology, as well as biomedical devices and systems. She leads the Nanoscale and Quantum Physics Lab, and is a faculty member of the Ginzton Lab, Bio-X, and the Pulse Institute.

 

Her citation reads, "For major and field opening contributions to nano photonics and its application to information science; including the design and fabrication of 2D photonic crystals with integrated quantum dot structures."


 

October 2015

Two groups were awarded the 2015 NEC C&C Foundation Awards for their contributions to the development of big data technologies and network virtualization technologies.

Professor Nick McKeown, Dr. Martin Casado (PhD, '07) and Scott Shenker (Berkeley) are the originators of the Software-defined networking (SDN) movement, and OpenFlow protocol which was created as an interface to program the communication devices.

The NEC C&C citation reads, "For Pioneering Research in Advancing Networking Technology and Outstanding Contributions Promoting the Development of Software-Defined Networking".

They have combined their various talents and taken leadership roles in developing technologies for SDN and OpenFlow. The team developed various open-source platforms and tools. In addition, by involving academia, device vendors, telecommunications carriers, and service providers in research at an early stage, they have been able to cultivate and operate eco-systems that have led to widespread practical application of the SDN concepts. They also promoted the development and adoption of SDN by leading the standardization movement and encouraging the open-source community. Their achievements as ICT infrastructure innovators are highly remarkable.

The prize ceremony and acceptance speeches will be held on Monday, December 21 from 15:00 at the ANA InterContinental Tokyo.

 

Excerpts from the NEC C&C press release.


Read EE Spotlight, featuring Professor Nick McKeown

 

 

September 2015

EE Professor Shanhui Fan, research associate Aaswath P. Raman, and doctoral candidate Linxiao Zhu describe their research in the current issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The group's discovery, tested on a Stanford rooftop, addresses a problem that has long bedeviled the solar industry: The hotter solar cells get, the less efficient they become at converting the photons in light into useful electricity.

Their solution is based on a thin, patterned silica material laid on top of a traditional solar cell. The material is transparent to the visible sunlight that powers solar cells, but captures and emits thermal radiation, or heat, from infrared rays.

"Solar arrays must face the sun to function, even though that heat is detrimental to efficiency," Fan said. "Our thermal overlay allows sunlight to pass through, preserving or even enhancing sunlight absorption, but it also cools the cell by radiating the heat out and improving the cell efficiency."

In 2014, the same trio of inventors developed an ultrathin material that radiated infrared heat directly back toward space without warming the atmosphere. They presented that work in Nature, describing it as "radiative cooling" because it shunted thermal energy directly into the deep, cold void of space.

In their new paper, the researchers applied their previous work to improve solar array performance when the sun is beating down.

The Stanford team tested their technology on a custom-made solar absorber – a device that mimics the properties of a solar cell without producing electricity – covered with a micron-scale pattern designed to maximize the capability to dump heat, in the form of infrared light, into space. Their experiments showed that the overlay allowed visible light to pass through to the solar cells, but that it also cooled the underlying absorber by as much as 23 degrees Fahrenheit.

 

Excerpts from the Stanford Report.

 

September 2015

The Information Processing Society of Japan (IPSJ) presented their Funai Achievement Award to Professor Bill Dally, recognizing his accomplishments in computer architecture, particularly in the areas of parallel computing and Very Large Scale Integration processing. The IPSJ noted that Dally has made major contributions in education at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, and in industry as NVIDIA's chief scientist.

Dally is the first non-Japanese scientist to receive the award since the first two awards were given out in 2002 to Alan Kay (a pioneer in personal computing) and in 2003 to Marvin Minsky (a pioneer in artificial intelligence).

"I'm honored to be selected for one of the world's major prizes in computer science. It's particularly rewarding to be in the company of computer science luminaries like Alan Kay and Marvin Minsky," said Dally, who received the award at an IPSJ event in Matsuyama, Japan. "I'm grateful to the IPSJ for acknowledging the importance of my research in parallel computing."

Professor Shuichi Sakai, dean of the Computer Science Department at the University of Tokyo, said, "Bill Dally has always been a revolutionary rather than a revisionist in computer science."

Dally's achievements across more than 30 years of work and research include developing the system and network architecture, signaling, routing and synchronization technology found in most large parallel computers today. He also introduced the Imagine processor, which employs stream processing architecture, providing high performance computing with power, speed and efficiency.

Prior to joining NVIDIA in 2009, Dally served as chairman of Stanford's Computer Science department from 2005-2009, where he taught beginning in 1997. Previously, he led the group at MIT that built the J-Machine and M-Machine, parallel machines that pioneered the separation of mechanism from programming models.

 

Excerpts from NVIDIA press release.

August 2015

The first fully internal method of delivering optogenetics has been established. Miniature implanted devices are being wirelessly powered by a special power source that transmits frequencies that resonate in certain lab mice.

The device dramatically expands the scope of research that can be carried out through optogenetics to include experiments involving mice in enclosed spaces or interacting freely with other animals. The work is published in the Aug. 17 edition of Nature Methods.

Professor Ada Poon states, "This is a new way of delivering wireless power for optogenetics. It's much smaller and the mouse can move around during an experiment." See video.

The device can be assembled and reconfigured for different uses in a lab, and the design of the power source is publicly available. "I think other labs will be able to adapt this for their work," Poon said.

This novel way of delivering power is what allowed the team to create such a small device. And in this case, size is critical. The device is the first attempt at wireless optogenetics that is small enough to be implanted under the skin and may even be able to trigger a signal in muscles or some organs, which were previously not accessible to optogenetics.

The team says the device and the novel powering mechanism open the door to a range of new experiments to better understand and treat mental health disorders, movement disorders and diseases of the internal organs. They have a Stanford Bio-X grant to explore and possibly develop new treatments for chronic pain.


Professor Poon's lab recently sponsored a summer program for local female high school students, providing them a chance to explore several introductory concepts of EE. View article.

Excerpts are from the Stanford Report. View full article

July 2015

Stanford Professor Ada Poon gave 22 female high school students a chance to explore introductory concepts about electricity and electronics during a week-long program called Girlz Gone Wireless (GGW).

Offered for the first time this summer at Stanford, the program was hosted Professor Poon and her lab members in the Stanford Electrical Engineering (EE) department. The week-long workshop gave the 9th and 10th grade students a chance to build various projects using the lab equipment, tools, and kits.

The five day program culminated with each student building their own cell phone charger and a wireless speaker.

Professor William Cruz of Los Medanos College and Stanford EE PhD candidate Kamal Aggarwal (pictured below, back row) led the daily sessions. EE's Instructional Labs Manager, Steven Clark, provided hardware and tools.

Other Stanford faculty, staff, and researchers also presented lectures and shared personal experiences at the Girlz Gone Wireless sessions, covering topics like solar cells, wireless medical devices, and interaction design.

Anjali Datta and Irena Tammy Fischer-Hwang, both EE PhD candidates, encouraged the participants to consider joining organizations that would help them grow as students and professionals. They introduced the GGW to three relevant groups: WEE (Women in Electrical Engineering), WISE (Women in Science and Engineering), and SWE (Society of Women Engineers).

Girlz Gone Wireless was free and open to local students with a minimum 3.5 GPA interested in engineering.

Participants were enthusiastic about experiencing the lab environment, and learning and applying the concepts. "On Monday I didn't know what any of the tools or meters were for, and now I know what they are and how to use all of them," one student said.

Professor Poon hopes that many of the young women will set their sites on studying electrical engineering.

"I hope they'll find the lessons interesting and experience fewer hurdles with studying EE or any other engineering field," Poon said. "So many girls applied for the program but we had to limit it because of the size of our lab," she added. "I know it's a commitment for the students and their parents to come every day, especially during their summer."

Professor Poon closed the program by giving each participant a certificate and encouraging them to continue to grow their interest in engineering.

Several Girlz Gone Wireless participants pose with Professor Ada Poon (far right, front row), Prof. William Cruz of Los Medanos College, and Stanford EE PhD candidate Kamal Aggarwal (back row).

View more photos

 


Professor Poon's Lab works on implantable bio-medical devices. The wireless, rechargeable devices may assist in controlling prosthetic limbs for amputees; providing medicine or therapeutic relief; and possibly treating diseases with electronics rather than medication.

Visit EE Student Organizations page to learn more about WEE (Women in EE) and other student organizations.

Stanford's Office of Science Outreach (OSO) assisted in this program.

August 2015

Stanford's Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP) has awarded Professor Shanui Fan's group funding to develop new techniques for cooling buildings.

Fan reported the energy-saving breakthrough in the journal Nature. Using a thermal photonic approach, the material reflects sunlight and emits heat, demonstrating new possibilities for energy efficiency. The photonic radiative cooler consists of seven alternating layers of hafnium dioxide (HfO2) and silicon dioxide (SiO2) of varying thicknesses, on top of 200 nm of silver (Ag), which are all deposited on top of a 200-mm silicon wafer.

This passive energy source, which exploits the large temperature difference between space and Earth, could provide nighttime lighting without batteries or other electrical inputs.

GCEP is an industry partnership that supports innovative research on energy technologies to address the challenge of global climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The project includes five corporate sponsors: ExxonMobil, GE, Schlumberger, DuPont and Bank of America.

 

View full Stanford Report article.

August 2015

The Marconi Society announced Kartik Venkat as the winner of the 2015 Young Scholar Award. Kartik is an EE doctoral candidate, on track to complete his PhD this December. His principal advisor is Professor Tsachy Weissman, who says, "Kartik's work has helped us develop tools to boost the performance of algorithms in machine learning and AI. He's helping us find smarter ways to process a huge quantity of data—which is applicable to a wide array of disciplines."

Kartik plans to travel to London to receive the award in October. After he completes his PhD, he wants to pursue entrepreneurial opportunities that apply his work to real world problems, taking "deep ideas in research and using them to transform the way an industry is viewed. I don't know if that will be in academia—or in a company of my own," he says.

Marconi Young Scholars are individuals who have, at an early age, already demonstrated exceptional engineering or scientific research and entrepreneurial capabilities with the potential to create significant advances telecommunications and the Internet. They are students whose advisers and nominators believe will make a real difference in science and society, serving as role models and an inspiration for others.

Hearty congratulations to Kartik Venkat!

Read full Marconi Society press release

Professor Weissman and Kartik Venkat

Professor Weissman (left) and Kartik Venkat (right).

August 2015

The Staff Gift Card Program awarded five staff members a $50 Visa card. The program recognizes our staff's extraordinary efforts as submitted by students, faculty, and staff. Nominations are collected online and previous nominations are also considered.

Several staff received nominations this summer. The five recipients are listed below along with excerpts from their nominator(s).

 

Sue George, Administrative Associate, Computer Science

  • "Sue is always willing to help out. She is resourceful, hardworking and always good natured."
  • "No matter how busy she is, her responses are very timely."

 

Andrea Kuduk, Administrative Associate

  • "Andrea introduces new and better options to keep us all up-to-date."
  • "She is doing an excellent job at training new support staff. I am grateful that Andrea is part of the EE department."

 

Bill Murphy, Senior Research and Financial Administrator, Engineering Research Administration

  • "Bill always gets the answer, going above and beyond to untangle complex scenarios, and communicating exactly what is needed."
  • "Bill is an expert at management of grants and contracts. His support is truly exceptional."

 

Helen Niu, Administrative Associate

  • "Our group benefits from Helen's efficiency and thoroughness."
  • "Her excellent work made us all more productive and saved a lot of time and effort."

 

Cindy Ornellas, Staffing and Faculty Affairs Administrator

  • "I appreciate Cindy's quick response and dependability."
  • "We are very lucky to have her in the EE department!"

 

The Staff Gift Card Bonus Program is sponsored by the School of Engineering. Each year, the EE department receives several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond their role. Each month, staff are chosen from nominations received from faculty, students, and staff. Past nominations are eligible for future months. EE faculty, staff and students are welcome to nominate a deserving staff person by visiting gradapps.stanford.edu/NotableStaff/nomination/create.

Be sure to recognize the staff member, or members, that help in your accomplishments!

August 2015

The new light-field stereoscope technology – developed by Wetzstein along with researchers Fu-Chung Huang and Kevin Chen – moves beyond current "flat" VR that essentially is a 2D screen in front of your eyes. The new headset design creates a sort of hologram for each eye to make the experience more natural. A light field creates multiple, slightly different perspectives over different parts of the same pupil. The result: you can freely move your focus and experience depth in the virtual scene, just as in real life.

"If you have a five-hour (robotic) surgery, you really want to try to minimize the eye strain that you put on the surgeon and create as natural and comfortable a viewing experience as possible," Wetzstein said.

"Virtual reality gives us a new way of communicating among people, of telling stories, of experiencing all kinds of things remotely or closely," Wetzstein said. "It's going to change communication between people on a fundamental level."

Wetzstein's computational imaging work is going beyond the lab and into the classroom. In the fall, he will team with Tanja Aitamurto, deputy director of the Brown Institute for Media Innovation at Stanford, to teach an interdisciplinary course at Stanford's d.school focused on the social impacts of virtual reality. The class, EE392D, Designing Civic Technologies with Virtual Reality, will be open to all Stanford students from any major. Wetzstein is also developing a class focused on virtual reality technology for the spring quarter.

 

Professor Wetzstein's research lab, Stanford Computational Imaging Group 

Read full Stanford Report article

Pages

January

No content classified for this term

February

February 2014

Three staff members each received a $50 Visa card in recognition of their extraordinary efforts as part of the department’s 2014 Staff Gift Card Bonus Program. The EE department received several nominations in January, and nominations from 2013 were also considered.

Following are January’s gift card recipients and some of the comments from their nominators:

Ann Guerra, Faculty Administrator

  • “She is very kind to students and always enthusiastic to help students… every time we need emergent help, she is willing to give us a hand.”
  • “Ann helps anyone who goes to her for help with anything, sometimes when it’s beyond her duty.” 

Teresa Nguyen, Student Accounting Associate

  • “She stays on top of our many, many student financial issues, is an extremely reliable source of information and is super friendly.”
  • “Teresa’s cheerful disposition, her determination, and her professionalism seem to go above and beyond what is simply required.”

Helen Niu, Faculty Administrator

  • “Helen is always a pleasure to work with.”
  • “She goes the extra mile in her dealings with me, which is very much appreciated.”

The School of Engineering once again gave the EE department several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond. More people will be recognized next month, and past nominations will still be eligible for future months. EE faculty, staff and students are welcome to nominate a deserving staff person by visitinghttps://gradapps.stanford.edu/NotableStaff/nomination/create.

Ann Guerra  Teresa Nguyen  Helen Niu

Pages

March

No content classified for this term

April

No content classified for this term

May

No content classified for this term

June

No content classified for this term

July

No content classified for this term

August

No content classified for this term

September

No content classified for this term

October

No content classified for this term

November

No content classified for this term

December

No content classified for this term

Story

No content classified for this term

Stanford

No content classified for this term

Test

No content classified for this term

Subscribe to RSS - News