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From Kardar-Parisi-Zhang Superdiffusion in Heisenberg Quantum Magnets to Novel Quantum Optical Light Matter Interfaces with Subwavelength Atomic Arrays

Summary
Prof. Immanuel Bloch (Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics)
Physics & Astrophysics Building, Room 102/103
May
2022
Date(s)
, -
Content

ABSTRACT: Quantum simulation with ultracold atoms has opened the avenue to probe non-equilibrium quantum many body dynamics in new parameters regimes and with completely new detection techniques. In my talk, I will show how we utilize the high-resolution, single-spin sensitive detection afforded by a quantum gas microscope to track the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of Heisenberg quantum magnets in one and two dimension. Surprisingly, in 1D, the system exhibits a novel transport paradigm of anomalous superdiffusive transport compared to standard ballistic or diffusive transport scenarios. Additionally, by accessing the full counting statistics of transported spins, we find strong supporting evidence for the conjecture that transport in the XXZ chain at the Heisenberg point indeed falls in the so called Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class. I will explain the arguments for this conjecture and introduce the peculiar features of this anomalous transport regime.

 In the second part of my talk, I will show how fundamentally new avenues of controlling light-matter interactions can be realized based on the rich interplay of photon-mediated dipole-dipole interactions in structured subwavelength arrays of quantum emitters. In the experiments, we  directly observe the cooperative subradiant response of such an ordered array of ultracold atoms. Through spatially resolved spectroscopic measurements, our experiments show that the array acts as an efficient mirror formed by only a single monolayer of a few hundred atoms.  Finally, I will discuss latest experiments, where the optical properties of the entire array can be switched via a single Rydberg impurity that is deterministically prepared in the center of the array. This opens the path towards  novel structured quantum light matter interfaces with unique properties in free space.

 

BIO: Immanuel Bloch is scientific director at the Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics, Garching and professor for experimental physics at the Ludwig-Maximilians University (LMU) in Munich. He is also one of the spokespersons of the Munich Center for Quantum Science and Technology (MCQST). Immanuel Bloch obtained his PhD in physics in 2000 from LMU. From 2003-2009 he was full professor at the University of Mainz. In 2009 he returned to Munich, where his research focus lies on the investigation of quantum many-body systems, quantum simulations, quantum information processing and quantum optics. Immanuel Bloch received several prizes for his work, among them the Gottfried-Wilhelm-Leibniz prize of the German Science Foundation (DFG), the German National Merit Medal in 2005, the international commission of optics prize, the Senior Prize for Fundamental Aspects of Quantum Electronics and Optics of the European Physical Society, the Körber European Science Prize, the Senior BEC Award and the Harvey Prize of the Technion.

 

 

Q-FARM Seminars are held biweekly on Wednesdays, from 12-1pm. See website for our upcoming schedule.

 

Quantum simulation with ultracold atoms has opened the avenue to probe non-equilibrium quantum many body dynamics in new parameters regimes and with completely new detection techniques. In my talk, I will show how we utilize the high-resolution, single-spin sensitive detection afforded by a quantum gas microscope to track the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of Heisenberg quantum magnets in one and two dimension. Surprisingly, in 1D, the system exhibits a novel transport paradigm of anomalous superdiffusive transport compared to standard ballistic or diffusive transport scenarios. Additionally, by accessing the full counting statistics of transported spins, we find strong supporting evidence for the conjecture that transport in the XXZ chain at the Heisenberg point indeed falls in the so called Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class. I will explain the arguments for this conjecture and introduce the peculiar features of this anomalous transport regime.

In the second part of my talk, I will show how fundamentally new avenues of controlling light-matter interactions can be realized based on the rich interplay of photon-mediated dipole-dipole interactions in structured subwavelength arrays of quantum emitters. In the experiments, we  directly observe the cooperative subradiant response of such an ordered array of ultracold atoms. Through spatially resolved spectroscopic measurements, our experiments show that the array acts as an efficient mirror formed by only a single monolayer of a few hundred atoms.  Finally, I will discuss latest experiments, where the optical properties of the entire array can be switched via a single Rydberg impurity that is deterministically prepared in the center of the array. This opens the path towards  novel structured quantum light matter interfaces with unique properties in free space.

 

BIO: Immanuel Bloch is scientific director at the Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics, Garching and professor for experimental physics at the Ludwig-Maximilians University (LMU) in Munich. He is also one of the spokespersons of the Munich Center for Quantum Science and Technology (MCQST). Immanuel Bloch obtained his PhD in physics in 2000 from LMU. From 2003-2009 he was full professor at the University of Mainz. In 2009 he returned to Munich, where his research focus lies on the investigation of quantum many-body systems, quantum simulations, quantum information processing and quantum optics. Immanuel Bloch received several prizes for his work, among them the Gottfried-Wilhelm-Leibniz prize of the German Science Foundation (DFG), the German National Merit Medal in 2005, the international commission of optics prize, the Senior Prize for Fundamental Aspects of Quantum Electronics and Optics of the European Physical Society, the Körber European Science Prize, the Senior BEC Award and the Harvey Prize of the Technion.

 

 

Q-FARM Seminars are held biweekly on Wednesdays, from 12-1pm. See website for our upcoming schedule.