grad student

September 2016

For years, the net neutrality debate has been at an impasse: either the internet is open or preferences are allowed. But professors Nick McKeown and Sachin Katti, and EE PhD Yiannis Yiakoumis ­– say their new technology, called Network Cookies, makes it possible to have preferential delivery and an open internet. Network Cookies allow users to choose which home or mobile traffic should get favored delivery, while putting network operators and content providers on a level playing field in catering to such user-signaled preferences.

"So far, net neutrality has been promoted as the best possible defense for users," Katti said. "But treating all traffic the same isn't necessarily the best way to protect users. It often restricts their options and this is why so-called exceptions from neutrality often come up. We think the best way to ensure that ISPs and content providers don't make decisions that conflict with the interests of users is to let users decide how to configure their own traffic."

McKeown said Network Cookies implement user-directed preferences in ways that are consistent with the principles of net neutrality.

"First, they're simple to use and powerful," McKeown said. "They enable you to fast-lane or zero-rate traffic from any application or website you want, not just the few, very popular applications. This is particularly important for smaller content providers – and their users – who can't afford to establish relationships with ISPs. Second, they're practical to deploy. They don't overwhelm the user or bog down user devices and network operators and they function with a variety of protocols. Finally, they can be a very practical tool for regulators, as they can help them design simple and clear policies and then audit how well different parties adhere to them."

 


This article is adapted from Stanford Engineering News. Read full article.

September 2016

Technology developed by Stanford Bio-X scientists Krishna Shenoy (EE) and postdoctoral fellow Paul Nuyujukian, directly reads brain signals to drive a cursor moving over a keyboard. In an experiment conducted with monkeys, the animals were able to transcribe passages from the New York Times and Hamlet at a rate of up to 12 words per minute.

Earlier versions of the technology have already been tested successfully in people with paralysis, but the typing was slow and imprecise. This latest work tests improvements to the speed and accuracy of the technology that interprets brain signals and drives the cursor.

"Our results demonstrate that this interface may have great promise for use in people," said Nuyujukian, who will join Stanford faculty as an assistant professor of bioengineering in 2017. "It enables a typing rate sufficient for a meaningful conversation."

The technology developed by the Stanford team involves a multi-electrode array implanted in the brain to directly read signals from a region that ordinarily directs hand and arm movements used to move a computer mouse.

It's the algorithms for translating those signals and making letter selections that the team members have been improving. They had tested individual components of the updated technology in prior monkey studies but had never demonstrated the combined improvements in typing speed and accuracy.

"The interface we tested is exactly what a human would use," Nuyujukian said. "What we had never quantified before was the typing rate that could be achieved." Using these high-performing algorithms developed by Nuyujukian and his colleagues, the animals could type more than three times faster than with earlier approaches.

 

This article is adapted from the Stanford Report. Read full article.

 

Related News:

Krishna Shenoy's translation device; turning thought into movement, March 2017.

Krishna Shenoy receives Inaugural Professorship, February 2017.


 

Olaf Solgaard, EE Associate Chair of Graduate Education
November 2014

A new joint Stanford Electrical Engineering MS/MBA degree program will be available to graduate students in the 2015-2016 academic year. Students may apply for admission starting this fall.

“The joint focus recognizes that the students we educate need and want an integrated understanding of engineering, strategy and execution as they drive future innovations that increasingly involve both technology and business,” said Madhav Rajan, senior associate dean and faculty director of the MBA program at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. 

The joint program structure will allow students to complete the two degrees in three years instead of the usual four years needed to complete each one separately. 

“The Electrical Engineering MS/MBA program represents the growing emphasis on multidisciplinary learning at Stanford,” said Olav Solgaard, professor of electrical engineering at the School of Engineering. “This program builds on the culture of entrepreneurship and creativity in the schools of business and engineering at Stanford and will better equip our students to take new technologies from basic research to commercial products.” 

Students wishing to undertake the joint program must separately apply to and be accepted by both the Stanford Graduate School of Business MBA program and the School of Engineering’s Electrical Engineering MS program.  Completion of the joint program requires a combined total of 129 units, including 84 units at Stanford GSB and 45 units in the Electrical Engineering department. Students who complete the joint program will earn two degrees: an MS in electrical engineering and the MBA.

Admission to the Masters in Electrical Engineering requires a strong undergraduate background in engineering or quantitative subjects such as physics or mathematics. Applicants to the MBA program are assessed on intellectual vitality, demonstrated leadership potential and personal qualities. Students also must take the Graduate Records Exam to be eligible for admission. Details on admission can be found on the EE Joint Degree Programs pages. The deadline for application to the Electrical Engineering MS program for the 2015-2016 academic year is December 9, 2014.

For more information about the admission process for the Stanford MBA, please visit: http://www.gsb.stanford.edu/programs/mba/admission. Application to the MBA program may be made in any of three rounds ending October 1, 2014, January 7, 2015, or April 1, 2015. Applicants for joint degrees with the School of Engineering are encouraged to apply for the MBA in round two in January.

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