Undergraduates

Oil painting of Fred Terman
May 2016

The Frederick Emmons Terman Engineering Award for Scholastic Achievement has been awarded to five EE undergraduates. The Terman Award is one of the most selective academic awards. It is based on overall academic performance and is presented to the top five percent of each year's School of Engineering seniors. The 2015-2016 Terman Scholars include five undergraduate seniors from Electrical Engineering.

Congratulations to all Terman Award recipients. The five EE students are:

  • Cynthia De Dalmady ( pictured below front row, left)
  • Yuki Inoue (front row, center)
  • Kristen Pownell (front row, right)
  • Allan Raventos Knohr (back row, fifth from left)
  • Moosa Zaidi (back row, sixth from left)

Terman scholars are invited to attend a celebratory luncheon and encouraged to invite the most influential secondary school or other pre-college teacher who guided them during the formative stages of their academic career. Pictured below are the 2015-16 Terman Scholars majoring in EE, along with their Stanford advisors and influential pre-college teachers.

The award is named after Fred Terman who was the fourth Dean of the School of Engineering at Stanford, serving from 1944-1958, after which he became the Provost at the University, and is generally credited, along with President Wally Sterling, as having started the process that has led Stanford to its present position among the leading universities of the world.

March 2016

In EE27N, Electronics Rocks, students are encouraged to explore and move beyond the status quo. Most recently, students re-thought water-based sculptures on campus.

"All day, everyday, California's drought is on everyone's mind. My students chose to explore what a water-free 'fountain' might look like," stated Professor Greg Kovacs. "I also challenged them to consider other aesthetic priorities like maintenance and public interaction. In the end, I'm really impressed by the light fountain – it's dazzling!"

The completed "electronic" fountain stands nearly 6' high, with blue and red LEDs flowing along 7 semi-transparent cylinders, loosely arranged in a conical shape. Sensors on either side of the base respond to passersby by signaling the LEDs to begin a cycle of programmed light sequences.

"It's really cool!" exclaimed several students. "We talked so much about all of our ideas, and the light fountain came together, and looks awesome!"

Electrical engineering undergraduate curriculum embraces the 'maker' sentiment as a guiding principal. EE27N provides the basics of how electronic devices work through hands-on discussion, design and construction. Students hack and modify, but are encouraged to focus on building from scratch. Throughout the quarter, Electronics Rocks students work as teams on projects that ultimately inform or become their collaborative final project, which is built as a class. The light fountain embodies several EE core competencies, including embedded microprocessors, programming, power management, LEDs, sensors, and a great deal of teamwork.

Electronics Rocks, EE27N is offered in Winter quarter and is open to all freshmen regardless of their major.


 

July 2015

Stanford Professor Ada Poon gave 22 female high school students a chance to explore introductory concepts about electricity and electronics during a week-long program called Girlz Gone Wireless (GGW).

Offered for the first time this summer at Stanford, the program was hosted Professor Poon and her lab members in the Stanford Electrical Engineering (EE) department. The week-long workshop gave the 9th and 10th grade students a chance to build various projects using the lab equipment, tools, and kits.

The five day program culminated with each student building their own cell phone charger and a wireless speaker.

Professor William Cruz of Los Medanos College and Stanford EE PhD candidate Kamal Aggarwal (pictured below, back row) led the daily sessions. EE's Instructional Labs Manager, Steven Clark, provided hardware and tools.

Other Stanford faculty, staff, and researchers also presented lectures and shared personal experiences at the Girlz Gone Wireless sessions, covering topics like solar cells, wireless medical devices, and interaction design.

Anjali Datta and Irena Tammy Fischer-Hwang, both EE PhD candidates, encouraged the participants to consider joining organizations that would help them grow as students and professionals. They introduced the GGW to three relevant groups: WEE (Women in Electrical Engineering), WISE (Women in Science and Engineering), and SWE (Society of Women Engineers).

Girlz Gone Wireless was free and open to local students with a minimum 3.5 GPA interested in engineering.

Participants were enthusiastic about experiencing the lab environment, and learning and applying the concepts. "On Monday I didn't know what any of the tools or meters were for, and now I know what they are and how to use all of them," one student said.

Professor Poon hopes that many of the young women will set their sites on studying electrical engineering.

"I hope they'll find the lessons interesting and experience fewer hurdles with studying EE or any other engineering field," Poon said. "So many girls applied for the program but we had to limit it because of the size of our lab," she added. "I know it's a commitment for the students and their parents to come every day, especially during their summer."

Professor Poon closed the program by giving each participant a certificate and encouraging them to continue to grow their interest in engineering.

Several Girlz Gone Wireless participants pose with Professor Ada Poon (far right, front row), Prof. William Cruz of Los Medanos College, and Stanford EE PhD candidate Kamal Aggarwal (back row).

View more photos

 


Professor Poon's Lab works on implantable bio-medical devices. The wireless, rechargeable devices may assist in controlling prosthetic limbs for amputees; providing medicine or therapeutic relief; and possibly treating diseases with electronics rather than medication.

Visit EE Student Organizations page to learn more about WEE (Women in EE) and other student organizations.

Stanford's Office of Science Outreach (OSO) assisted in this program.

Prof. Solgaard and a 2015 EE graduate
June 2015

June 14th marked Electrical Engineering's 121st commencement, Stanford's 124th. Beginning with a picnic lunch on the Medical School Dean's lawn, EE graduates, their families, and friends, gathered to celebrate. Following lunch, graduates lined up between the Li Ka Shing Center and the Fairchild Center, sorting into B.S., M.S., and PhD lines. Led by Bachelor of Science students, the processional of nearly 400 students made its way into the shaded tent, filled with family and friends.

As the graduates took their seats, a gentle breeze lifted the university, state, and national flags on either side of the stage. Abbas El Gamal, Hitachi America Professor in the School of Engineering, and Professor and Chairman of Electrical Engineering, called the ceremony to order. Professor El Gamal emphasized the extraordinary efforts of the graduating students, complimenting them on their curiosity, creativity and energy.

Prof El Gamal and Maisy Weiman
Three departmental awards were announced. The first being the Departmental Design Project Award, sponsored by Agilent. This year's recipients are from EE 152 – the Green Electronics Capstone Project Course – one of eight Capstone Project coursees available to undergraduates. Capstones reflect the breadth of the EE major and the diversity of students' interests and depth areas. The group of recipients include Meredith Burkle, Ned Danyliw, Alex Dewing, Travis Geis, Axel Sly, Nathan Staffa, and Michael Tomasi.

 

The James F. Gibbons Outstanding Student Teaching Award went to Steven Bell (PhD candidate), Jayant Charthad (PhD candidate), Seonghyun Paik (PhD Candidate), and Maisy Weiman (M.S. '15) (pictured above).

The Chair's Award for Outstanding Contributions to Undergraduate Education, is awarded each year to peer-elected faculty or staff member for their exceptional contributions to undergraduate education and support of the department as a whole. Professor Simon Wong is the 2015 recipient, acknowledged for his tremendous commitment to undergraduate education.

student speaker Atinuke Ademola-Idowa (M.S.'15)
Student speaker Vince Sparacio (B.S. '15) encouraged those in attendance to care for themselves by practicing balance in all aspects of their lives, beginning with enjoying graduation day and expressing gratitude to those that helped them complete their degree. Atinuke Ademola-Idowa (M.S. '15) (pictured) answered the question, "What next?" by reminding graduates and guests of Stanford's founding idea: to benefit society. She encouraged us to make the world a better place by taking action – not to be indifferent to the world's challenges, but be voices of justice through our work.

 

 

Congratulations to the 2015 Electrical Engineering graduates!

View the 2015 EE Commencement photo album.

April 2015

"Electricity for All" is the course Kristen Pownell, a junior in EE, designed for the Stanford Splash program. As nearly 50 students filed into her classroom, Kristen grew more enthused to share the fun and potential of Electrical Engineering.

Kristen's "students" were 7th-9th graders participating in Stanford's Splash program. The Splash program brings more than 2,000 high school and middle school students to Stanford's campus for a two-day learning extravaganza. Classes are taught by Stanford undergraduates, graduate students, and community members.

"Electricity for All" was designed to teach basic EE principles like current, voltage, and resistance. In addition to introducing and talking through the principles, Kristen brought a simple LED flashlight project for each student to make and take home.

Excitement grew as the room went dark and each student was able to turn on and off their handmade LED flashlight, basking in the glow of their new EE knowledge.

 

Kristen Pownell (EE '16) was assisted by 3 other undergraduates. They plan to continue teaching Splash courses and sharing the fantastic possibilities of EE.

 

Read more about Stanford's Splash program.

Photo of Vikram Prasad ('16) by Sam Girvin, the Stanford Daily
October 2014

The electrical engineering department implemented new curriculum changes and introduced several extracurricular activities for its students this year. The overhaul was intended to give the students a greater degree of control and flexibility over their major.

“The old curriculum required students to go through a series of prerequisite courses, such as those in math and physics, without being able to get into application until deeper in the program,” said Abbas El Gamal, chair of the Electrical Engineering department.

“The goal of EE, I think, is not to define itself in how rigorous it is, but more in enabling a broad set of applications for interested students – I think new students should find it more accessible, for sure,” Omid-Zohoor said.

 

Image credit: SAM GIRVIN/The Stanford Daily

Professor Robert Dutton
September 2014

Electrical engineers make the technologies and systems that communicate, store and process information. They harness the fundamental forces of nature to serve everyday needs, whether this involves creating a computer based on carbon nanotubesimplanting sensors deep inside the human body or inventing next generation memory chips. Electrical engineers change the world. Our new curriculum gives Stanford students a rigorous foundation in classical and modern physics while quickly immersing them in the exciting applications made possible by EE.  Read more »

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