EE Student Information

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EE Student Information, Spring Quarter through Academic Year 2020-2021: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

Updates will be posted on this page, as well as emailed to the EE student mail list.

Please see Stanford University Health Alerts for course and travel updates.

As always, use your best judgement and consider your own and others' well-being at all times.

Students

image of prof. Shanhui Fan
August 2020

Professor Shanhui Fan's rooftop cooling system could eventually help meet the need for nighttime lighting in urban areas, or provide lighting in developing countries.

Using commercially available technology, the research team has designed an off-grid, low-cost modular energy source that can efficiently produce power at night.

Although solar power brings many benefits, its use depends heavily on the distribution of sunlight, which can be limited in many locations and is completely unavailable at night. Systems that store energy produced during the day are typically expensive, thus driving up the cost of using solar power.

To find a less-expensive alternative, researchers led by professor Shanhui Fan looked to radiative cooling. Their approach uses the temperature difference resulting from heat absorbed from the surrounding air and the radiant cooling effect of cold space to generate electricity.

In The Optical Society (OSA) journal Optics Express, the researchers theoretically demonstrate an optimized radiative cooling approach that can generate 2.2 Watts per square meter with a rooftop device that doesn't require a battery or any external energy. This is about 120 times the amount of energy that has been experimentally demonstrated and enough to power modular sensors such as ones used in security or environmental applications.

"We are working to develop high-performance, sustainable lighting generation that can provide everyone–including those in developing and rural areas–access to reliable and sustainable low cost lighting energy sources," said Lingling Fan, EE PhD candidate and first author of the paper. "A modular energy source could also power off-grid sensors used in a variety of applications and be used to convert waste heat from automobiles into usable power."

Additional authors include Wei Li (EE PhD candidate), and post-doctoral researcher Weiliang Jin, PhD, and Meir Orenstein (Technion-Israel Institute of Technology).

 

 

Excerpted from Science Daily, "Efficient low-cost system for producing power at night".

 

image of professors Shenoy and Murmann
August 2020

The current generation of neural implants record enormous amounts of neural activity, then transmit these brain signals through wires to a computer. But, so far, when researchers have tried to create wireless brain-computer interfaces to do this, it took so much power to transmit the data that the implants generated too much heat to be safe for the patient. A new study suggests how to solve his problem -- and thus cut the wires.

Research led by Professors Krishna Shenoy, Boris Murmann and Dr. Jaimie Henderson, have shown how it would be possible to create a wireless device, capable of gathering and transmitting accurate neural signals, but using a tenth of the power required by current wire-enabled systems. These wireless devices would look more natural than the wired models and give patients freer range of motion.

Graduate student Nir Even-Chen and postdoctoral fellow Dante Muratore, PhD, describe the team's approach in a Nature Biomedical Engineering paper.

The next step will be to build an implant based on this new approach and proceed through a series of tests toward the ultimate goal.

 

 

Excerpted from Science News, "How thoughts could one day control electronic prostheses, wirelessly", August 5, 2020.

Stanford Class of 2020!
June 2020

Congratulations to our 2020 graduates

The Department of Electrical Engineering would like everyone to celebrate and congratulate all 2020 graduates!

It's been a challenging spring quarter, but you all made it through! Please join us to reflect on all of the work you did to get here. It hasn't been easy, and we want every student to know that we value your contributions and look forward to seeing where you go. Congratulations!

CONGRATULATIONS 2020 GRADUATES! From Dean Widom, Professor Stephen Boyd, Student Services, and others! youtu.be/kme9svWjo5A

 


Celebrating our graduates provides an opportunity to spotlight many awards and outstanding contributions by individuals. 

 

Design Awards

Undergraduate students that receive the Student Design Project Awards, have demonstrated novel innovation in their capstone projects. The 2020 recipients are Rohan Deshpande, BS '22 and Kao Kitichotkul, BS '22.


Centennial Teaching Assistant Award

The Centennial Award recognizes tremendous service and dedication in providing excellent classroom instruction. Students and faculty nominate outstanding teaching assistants throughout the year. The department is fortunate to have many highly skilled teaching assistants!

  • Jonathan Jia-An Mak, MS '20, BS '19
  • Lars Thorben Neustock, PhD '21
  • Chris Strong, MS '21

Jonathan Jia-An Mak, MS '20, BS '19Lars Thorben Neustock, PhD '21Chris Strong, MS '21


Ford Scholar Award

Milind Jagota, MS and BS '20 has received the Ford Scholar Award. Ford Scholars have the highest total GPA and Engineering GPAs in the School of Engineering and are pursuing an advanced degree. Milind will receive a Ford Scholar award certificate and $1,500 check. 

James F. Gibbons Outstanding Student Teaching Award 2020

The James F. Gibbons Award for Outstanding Student Teaching Award highlights students who have been nominated by faculty and peers for their extraordinary service as teaching assistants. We are deeply appreciative of the commitment to learning and sharing that our students display.

Congratulations to Elaine Chou, PhD '21, MS '18, Trisha Jani, MS '20, and Jonathan Lin, MS '20 and BS '19!


 

Chair's Award for Outstanding Contributions to Undergraduate Education:

This year's award recognizes Professor Joseph Kahn! In recognition of the tireless work he has done in the area of undergraduate education and contributions to the success of the department. Thank you!

 


Frederick Emmons Terman Engineering Scholastic Award

The Terman Award is presented to the top 5% of each senior class in the School of Engineering. We are pleased to congratulate our 2020 Terman Scholars for their outstanding work.

  • Anthony S. Degleris, BS '20
  • Milind Jagota, MS and BS '20
  • Joe Lou, MS (CS) and BS '20
  • Alex Mallery, BS '20
  • Eajer Toh, MS '21, BS '20

 

 

Tau Beta Pi (TBP) Teaching Honor Roll (The Engineering Honor Society)

This award recognizes engineering instructors for excellent teaching, commitment to students, and great mentoring. Professor Mary Wootters received this award for her excellent instruction and commitment – please join us in congratulating Mary for her extraordinary teaching!

Tau Beta Pi (TBP) Honor Roll (The Engineering Honor Society)

Anthony S. Degleris, BS '20
Milind Jagota, MS and BS '20
Joe Lou, MS (CS) and BS '20
Jacob Meisel, MS and BS '21 
Michael Oduoza, MS '22 and BS '21
Eajer Toh, MS '21, BS '20
Chris Wu, BS '20 and MS '21

Not pictured: Michal Adamkiewicz, Erick Blankenberg, Wyeth Coulter, Collin Cremers,  Rahul Lall, and Vineet Edupuganti.


Phi Beta Kappa

Seven EE students were elected to Phi Beta Kappa for their academic excellence and breadth of their scholarly accomplishments. Congratulations to all!


Zach Belateche, BS and MS '20
Anthony S. Degleris, BS '20
Milind Jagota, MS and BS '20
Joe Lou, MS (CS) and BS '20
Eajer Toh, MS '21, BS '20
Cole Winstanley, MS and BS '20

Not pictured: Gregorio Lopes, MS and BS '20 


Undergraduate Degrees with Distinction

In recognition of high scholastic attainment, distinction is awarded by the University to the top 15% of the graduating class based on cumulative grade point averages calculated at the end of Winter Quarter. Congratulations!

Zach Belateche, BS and MS '20
Anthony S. Degleris, BS '20 
Milind Jagota, MS and BS '20
Joe Lou, MS (CS) and BS '20
Alex Mallery, BS '20
Eajer Toh, MS '21 and BS '20
Chris Wu, BS '20 and MS '21 

 

Not pictured: Gregorio Lopes


EE Honors

These undergraduate students maintain a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Electrical Engineering courses and conduct independent study and research at an advanced level with a faculty mentor, graduate students, and fellow undergraduates. Congratulations!

Yap Dian Ang, MS (CS) and BS '20
Anthony S. Degleris
, BS '20
Milind Jagota, MS and BS '20
Alex Mallery, BS '20

YapDianAngAnthonyDeglerisMilindJagotaAlexMallery

2020 Graduates, be sure to add your page to the EE Yearbook!

The EE Yearbook is for all 2020 graduates and walk-through participants. The PDF yearbook will be available to the public in early July 2020 on our EE website: ee.stanford.edu/2020-graduates
 
 

Related Links

image of Cindy Nguyen, EE PhD candidate and Prof. Tsachy Weissman
March 2020

A collaboration on image compression between researchers and three high school students found human-powered image sharing proved more effective than an algorithm's work. Professor Tsachy Weissman realized the algorithm had hundreds of thousands of human engineering hours, but didn't include human-centric factors that three high schoolers had.

 

This was the seed for STEM to SHTEM– an internship program for high school students whose various backgrounds, brings tremendous benefit to the research collaboration.

 

The STEM to SHTEM program kicked off in 2019. 

All of the projects from summer 2019 are included in the "Journal for High Schoolers" which was produced by last year's interns and mentors. Several projects have resulted in papers submitted to scholarly journals, with one planning to be presented at the Human-Robot Interaction Conference in spring. The work also lives on in new collaborations between other research groups who may have remained unacquainted if not for STEM to SHTEM.

Professor Weissman, PhD candidates Cindy Nguyen and Kedar Tatwawadi are currently figuring out what workshops and presentations they and their colleagues can give to the interns this summer. Their goal is to offer sessions that are educational, fun and encouraging.

"During the process of designing what the program would look like, I thought about my experiences as a high school intern and as a first-generation, low-income undergraduate," said Cindy Nguyen (EE PhD candidate). "Being able to give other students the opportunity that I had is such a privilege."

With the program open for applications, the team hopes to draw broad interest from students – including those who lack confidence in their STEM skills, whose talents lie outside STEM or who aren't yet sure about their future academic plans after high school. The program also offers some financial support to students who would otherwise be unable to participate.

"We aim to give every student a taste of the college adventure," said Kedar Tatwawadi (EE PhD candidate). "It could inspire them to take that adventure on and, perhaps, they will even go for graduate studies."


2019 mentors and collaborators included producer and director Devon Baur, sketch artist Frank Hom, and professors Srabanti Chowdhury, Subhasish Mitra, Dorsa Sadigh, Debbie Senesky and Gordon Wetzstein, and the members of their labs.

Note on COVID-19 and STEM to SHTEM program: We plan to proceed with the program for the time being. If needed, we intend to take the program fully online (e.g. weekly lectures via video, mentoring meetings online, etc.) and possibly adapt the start and end date of the program to fit the summer schedules of high schools that are currently dismissed.


Related

image of EE professors Dwight Nishimura and John Pauly
February 2020

Professors Dwight Nishimura, John Pauly, and Albert Macovski lead the Magnetic Resonance Systems Research Lab (MRSRL) in Electrical Engineering. Their lab designs new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques and equipment for improved disease diagnosis and treatment. These technologies enable MRI scanning with greater speed, clarity, contrast, and comfort. Students and staff work with physicians on imaging solutions for major health problems such as cancer, heart disease, blood vessel disease, and joint pain.

Recently, Dwight and John joined the Medical and Scientific Advisory Board of HeartVista, a pioneer in AI-assisted MRI solutions. The company uses technology that originated in their research lab, MRSRL. Additional details on the MRSRL research can be found on the lab's website: mrsrl.stanford.eduBoth Dwight and John are recipients the highest honor from the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine – the Gold Medal.

Photo source: mrsrl.stanford.edu

Related

2019 Terman award winners Anastasios Angelopoulos, Jonathan Lin, and Meera Radhakrishnan
May 2019

The Frederick Emmons Terman Engineering Award for Scholastic Achievement was awarded to Anastasios Angelopoulos (BS '19), Jonathan Taylor Lin (BS '19; MS '20) and Meera Radhakrishnan (BS '19; MS '20). The Terman Award is one of the most selective academic awards. It is based on overall academic performance and is presented to the top five percent of each year's School of Engineering seniors.

The Terman scholars celebratory luncheon took place April 27. The scholars were encouraged to invite the most influential secondary school or other pre-college teacher who guided them during the formative stages of their academic career.

 

Anastasios' most influential secondary instructor is Aquita Winslow, the Polytechnic School librarian, who generously spent hundreds of hours of time as his high school debate coach and was a transformative force in his life. His Stanford advisor is Professor and Chair Stephen Boyd.. Anastasios is a third-year undergraduate – completing his Bachelor's degree in a reduced amount of time, while maintaining high academic performance. He will graduate with a B.S. EE in Spring 2019.

 


 

Jonathan Taylor Lin invited his secondary teacher, Mr. Jim Birdsong. His Stanford advisor is Professor Subhasish Mitra. Jonathan will graduate with a B.S. EE in Spring 2019 and M.S. EE in Spring 2020.

 


 

Meera, 2019 Terman Award Winner, BS EE 2019
Meera Radhakrishnan's most influential secondary teacher is Mr. Christian Perry, and her Stanford advisor is Professor Dwight Nishimura. She will complete her Bachelor of Science degree in 2019 and M.S. in 2020.

 

Please join us in congratulating Anastasios, Jonathan, and Meera on their scholastic achievements. Best to all of them!


This award is named after Fred Terman (BS; MS Stanford) who was the fourth Dean of the School of Engineering at Stanford, serving from 1944-1958, after which he became the Provost at the University, and is generally credited, along with President Wally Sterling, as having started the process that has led Stanford to its present position among the leading universities of the world. View Frederick Terman on EE's Timeline.

John Hennessy and Philip Knight. Image credit: L.A. Cicero
September 2017

The Knight-Hennessy Scholars program will be lead by EE professor and Stanford's former president John Hennessy. The program is funded by philanthropist Philip Knight (MBA '62).

The program aims to prepare a new generation of leaders with the deep academic foundation and broad skill set needed to develop creative solutions for the world's most complex challenges.

Fifty scholars will join the first cohort that enrolls in fall 2018, with up to 100 scholars admitted annually in subsequent years. Scholars will comprise an interdisciplinary graduate community representing a wide range of backgrounds and nationalities.

Building on his or her core Stanford graduate degree program, each scholar will participate in opportunities for leadership training, mentorship and experiential learning across multiple disciplines. Knight-Hennessy Scholars will receive financial support for the full cost of attendance to pursue a graduate education at Stanford.

"We recognize that an application cannot fully reflect who Knight-Hennessy Scholars are and how they live," said Derrick Bolton, dean of Knight-Hennessy Scholars admission. "We believe it's essential that we learn not only about what they have done, but also who they are: their influences, ideals, hopes and dreams."

The program's faculty advisory board and global advisory board, respectively comprising faculty from all seven schools and leaders from business, government, health care, law, technology and other fields, shaped the criteria to guide the selection of scholars. The Knight-Hennessy Scholars admission committee will consider three primary criteria when evaluating applications: independence of thought, purposeful leadership and a civic mindset.

Up to 100 application finalists will be invited to attend Immersion Weekend, which will take place at Stanford in January 2018.

"Immersion Weekend will be an experience that is fun, informal and informative for applicants," Bolton said. "Our aim is that the candidates will learn more about the graduate programs, the Knight-Hennessy Scholars program and themselves. It also gives a chance for the departments and us to get to know the applicants better."

In addition to submitting the Knight-Hennessy Scholars application, applicants must also apply to the Stanford graduate program of their choice.

 

Additional information available Knight-Hennessy.stanford.edu

 

Excerpted from "Knight-Hennessy Scholars launches inaugural application," May 2017.

EE PhD admit poster session winners
March 2017

The 2017 EE Admit Weekend welcomed nearly 80 newly admitted PhD graduate students. The 2-day event connected admitted students with current students, faculty and staff. Bringing everyone together, the event encourages exploration of the department and current research. Friday concludes with a PhD student research poster session and social reception. Admits enthusiastically engaged with presenters to discuss their research and various aspects of graduate life at Stanford.

The research posters present topics from EE's core research areas. In addition to meeting incoming PhD students, it is an opportunity for current grad students to present their work and hone their presentation skills. The posters are competitively judged, based on oral presentation, visual quality, and clarity of presenting their research within a one minute timeframe. The judges include staff, faculty and students. A winner from each core research area are selected based on their score in the judging criteria.

The well-deserved awards went to:

  • Leighton Barnes (pictured below second from left) winner in Information Systems and Science for poster titled "Geometry and the Relay Channel,” 
  • Adrian Alabi (pictured below, center) in Hardware/Software Systems for poster titled "915 MHz FSK Detection for Wireless Ultrasonic Imaging Data Reception,” 
  • Max Wang (pictured below second from right) in Physical Technology and Science for poster titled "Minimally Invasive Ultrasonically Powered Implants for Next-Generation Therapies and Neuromodulation” 

The winning researchers were awarded a gift card and certificate, presented by Daisy Chavez (pictured below, left), Graduate Admissions Specialist and Student Life Coordinator and Professor Andrea Goldsmith (pictured below, right), Chair of the EE Student Life Committee.

Congratulations and thanks to everyone for participating in the 2017 EE Admit Weekend and research poster session. Additional thanks to the EE Admissions, GSEE, and the EE Student Life Committee for sponsoring the poster contest and generous prizes.

July 2015

Stanford Professor Ada Poon gave 22 female high school students a chance to explore introductory concepts about electricity and electronics during a week-long program called Girlz Gone Wireless (GGW).

Offered for the first time this summer at Stanford, the program was hosted Professor Poon and her lab members in the Stanford Electrical Engineering (EE) department. The week-long workshop gave the 9th and 10th grade students a chance to build various projects using the lab equipment, tools, and kits.

The five day program culminated with each student building their own cell phone charger and a wireless speaker.

Professor William Cruz of Los Medanos College and Stanford EE PhD candidate Kamal Aggarwal (pictured below, back row) led the daily sessions. EE's Instructional Labs Manager, Steven Clark, provided hardware and tools.

Other Stanford faculty, staff, and researchers also presented lectures and shared personal experiences at the Girlz Gone Wireless sessions, covering topics like solar cells, wireless medical devices, and interaction design.

Anjali Datta and Irena Tammy Fischer-Hwang, both EE PhD candidates, encouraged the participants to consider joining organizations that would help them grow as students and professionals. They introduced the GGW to three relevant groups: WEE (Women in Electrical Engineering), WISE (Women in Science and Engineering), and SWE (Society of Women Engineers).

Girlz Gone Wireless was free and open to local students with a minimum 3.5 GPA interested in engineering.

Participants were enthusiastic about experiencing the lab environment, and learning and applying the concepts. "On Monday I didn't know what any of the tools or meters were for, and now I know what they are and how to use all of them," one student said.

Professor Poon hopes that many of the young women will set their sites on studying electrical engineering.

"I hope they'll find the lessons interesting and experience fewer hurdles with studying EE or any other engineering field," Poon said. "So many girls applied for the program but we had to limit it because of the size of our lab," she added. "I know it's a commitment for the students and their parents to come every day, especially during their summer."

Professor Poon closed the program by giving each participant a certificate and encouraging them to continue to grow their interest in engineering.

Several Girlz Gone Wireless participants pose with Professor Ada Poon (far right, front row), Prof. William Cruz of Los Medanos College, and Stanford EE PhD candidate Kamal Aggarwal (back row).

View more photos

 


Professor Poon's Lab works on implantable bio-medical devices. The wireless, rechargeable devices may assist in controlling prosthetic limbs for amputees; providing medicine or therapeutic relief; and possibly treating diseases with electronics rather than medication.

Visit EE Student Organizations page to learn more about WEE (Women in EE) and other student organizations.

Stanford's Office of Science Outreach (OSO) assisted in this program.

July 2015

The Innovation Transfer Program at the TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy is providing financial support for 11 new teams trying to put university research to work. The Innovation Transfer Program is in its first year.

Of the 11 teams that have been awarded, three are led by EE faculty advisors.

  • Humblade is an embedded sensor that provides online monitoring of wind power generators, and eventually pipeline, trains, planes and other critical infrastructure. Advisor: Boris Murmann.
  • Spark Thermionics will prototype a device to convert heat to electricity with record-setting efficiency, and is scalable from watts to megawatts. Advisor: Roger Howe.
  • Vorpal (awarded in fall 2014) is developing a handheld device for sterilizing liquids using pulsed electric field technology as an energy-efficient alternative to pasteurization and other means of purification. Advisor: Juan Rivas-Davila.

The Energy Innovation Transfer Program at the TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy provides financial support for clean energy technologies.

 

Read full Stanford Report article.

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