EE Student Information

2022

professor Subhasish Mitra
January 2022

Professor Subhasish Mitra has been selected to receive the 2022 IEEE Computer Society Harry H. Goode Memorial Award.

Mitra directs the Stanford Robust Systems Group, leads the Computation Focus Area of the Stanford SystemX Alliance, and is a member of the Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute. His research ranges across Robust Computing, NanoSystems, Electronic Design Automation (EDA), and Neurosciences. Results from his research group have influenced almost every contemporary electronic system, and have inspired significant government and research initiatives in multiple countries. He has held several international academic appointments — the Carnot Chair of Excellence in NanoSystems at CEA-LETI in France, Invited Professor at EPFL in Switzerland, and Visiting Professor at the University of Tokyo in Japan.

The Goode Award is given to individuals for their achievements in the information processing field which are considered either a single contribution of theory, design, or technique of outstanding significance, or the accumulation of important contributions on theory or practice over an extended time period.

 

Join us in celebrating Mitra's contributions!

 

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professor John Hennessy
January 2022

Congratulations to Professor John Hennessy on being selected as one of the winners of the 2022 Charles Stark Draper Prize for Engineering by the National Academy of Engineering.

Recognized as one of the world's preeminent awards for engineering achievement, the Charles Stark Draper Prize for Engineering honors an engineer whose accomplishment has significantly impacted society by improving the quality of life, providing the ability to live freely and comfortably, and/or permitting the access to information. The Draper Prize is awarded biennially, and recognizes achievements in all engineering disciplines.

 

Please join us in congratulating John on another more-than-well-deserved honor!

 

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prof Krishna Saraswat
January 2022

Co-lead authors Koosha Nassiri Nazif and Alwin Daus, both EE postdoctoral scholars, describe their tungsten diselenide solar cells that boast a power-per-weight ratio on par with established thin-film solar cell technologies in their recently published paper. Their prototype achieves 5.1 percent power conversion efficiency, and the team projects they could practically reach 27 percent efficiency upon optical and electrical optimizations. That figure would be on par with the best solar panels on the market today, silicon included.

Their prototype realized a 100-times greater power-to-weight ratio of any transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) yet developed. That ratio is important for mobile applications, like drones, electric vehicles and the ability to charge expeditionary equipment on the move. When looking at the specific power – a measure of electrical power output per unit weight of the solar cell – the prototype produced 4.4 watts per gram, a figure competitive with other current-day thin-film solar cells, including other experimental prototypes.

"We think we can increase this crucial ratio another ten times through optimization," states Krishna, adding that they estimate the practical limit of their TMD cells to be a remarkable 46 watts per gram.


Pictured below are Professor Krishna Saraswat (left) and Dr. Koosha Nassiri Nazif (right), and a photograph of WSe2 solar cells on a flexible polyimide substrate held up with a pair of tweezers. Photo credit: Dr. Koosha Nassiri Nazif.

Prof. Krishna Saraswat and Dr. Koosha Nassiri Nazif

"Imagine an autonomous drone that powers itself with a solar array atop its wing that is 15 times thinner than a piece of paper," said Koosha Nassiri Nazif, a doctoral scholar in EE. "That is the promise of TMDs."

This is collaborative work between the research groups of Professor Krishna Saraswat and Professor Eric Pop.
Additional authors include

  • Department of Electrical Engineering: Koosha Nassiri Nazif, Alwin Daus, Sam Vaziri, Aravindh Kumar, Frederick Nitta, Siavash Kananian, Raisul Islam, Prof. Ada S. Y. Poon, Prof. Eric Pop & Prof. Krishna C. Saraswat
  • Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials (GLAM): Jiho Hong, Nayeun Lee & Prof. Mark L. Brongersma
  • Department of Materials Science and Engineering: Jiho Hong, Nayeun Lee, Michelle E. Chen, Prof. Mark L. Brongersma, Prof. Eric Pop & Prof. Krishna C. Saraswat
  • Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University: Kwan-Ho Kim & Jin-Hong Park
  • Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania: Kwan-Ho Kim
  • SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University: Jin-Hong Park
  • Department of Applied Physics: Prof. Mark L. Brongersma

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prof Dorsa Sadigh
January 2022

Congratulations to Professor Dorsa Sadigh! She is a recipient of the 2021 Okawa Foundation Research Grant. Her research theme is Adaptive Human-Robot Interaction.

 

Please join us in congratulating Dorsa on her well-deserved recognition!

 

Dorsa's research interests lie at the intersection of robotics, machine learning, and control theory. She is interested in developing efficient algorithms for safe, reliable, and adaptive human-robot and generally multi-agent interactions.

The mission of the Okawa Foundation is the promotion and development in the field of information and telecommunications through awards and research grants as well as efforts to nurture researchers, engineers, and providers. It also seeks to promote diversity and ubiquitousness of human communication and thereby contribute to the peace and prosperity of humankind.

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prof Jelena Vučković
January 2022

Excerpted from "Stanford engineers and physicists study quantum characteristics of 'combs' of light"

Professor & Chair Jelena Vučković states, "Many groups have demonstrated on-chip frequency combs in a variety of materials, including recently in silicon carbide by our team. However, until now, the quantum optical properties of frequency combs have been elusive. We wanted to leverage the quantum optics background of our group to study the quantum properties of the soliton microcomb."


While soliton microcombs have been made in other labs, the Stanford researchers are among the first to investigate the system's quantum optical properties, using a process that they outline in a paper published Dec. 16 in Nature Photonics. When created in pairs, microcomb solitons are thought to exhibit entanglement – a relationship between particles that allows them to influence each other even at incredible distances, which underpins our understanding of quantum physics and is the basis of all proposed quantum technologies. Most of the "classical" light we encounter on a daily basis does not exhibit entanglement.

"This is one of the first demonstrations that this miniaturized frequency comb can generate interesting quantum light – non-classical light – on a chip," said Kiyoul Yang, a research scientist in Vučković's Nanoscale and Quantum Photonics Lab and co-author of the paper. "That can open a new pathway toward broader explorations of quantum light using the frequency comb and photonic integrated circuits for large-scale experiments."

Proving the utility of their tool, the researchers also provided convincing evidence of quantum entanglement within the soliton microcomb, which has been theorized and assumed but has yet to be proven by any existing studies.

"I would really like to see solitons become useful for quantum computing because it's a highly studied system," said Melissa Guidry, a graduate student in the Nanoscale and Quantum Photonics Lab and co-author of the paper. "We have a lot of technology at this point for generating solitons on chips at low power, so it would be exciting to be able to take that and show that you have entanglement."

 

Read full article: Stanford News, "Stanford engineers and physicists study quantum characteristics of 'combs' of light

 

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