2021

image of prof emeritus Martin E. Hellman
January 2021

Congratulations to Professor Emeritus Martin Hellman. He has been selected as a 2020 Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Fellow.

The ACM Fellows program recognizes the top 1% of ACM Members for their outstanding accomplishments in computing and information technology and/or outstanding service to ACM and the larger computing community. Fellows are nominated by their peers, with nominations reviewed by a distinguished selection committee.

"This year our task in selecting the 2020 Fellows was a little more challenging, as we had a record number of nominations from around the world," explained ACM President Gabriele Kotsis. "The 2020 ACM Fellows have demonstrated excellence across many disciplines of computing. These men and women have made pivotal contributions to technologies that are transforming whole industries, as well as our personal lives. We fully expect that these new ACM Fellows will continue in the vanguard in their respective fields."

 

Excerpted from ACM.org's "2020 ACM Fellows Recognized for Work that Underpins Today's Computing Innovations".

 

Please join us in congratulating Marty for this well-deserved recognition.

 

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image of prof H. Tom Soh
January 2021

EE Professor Tom Soh, in collaboration with Professor Eric Appel, and colleagues have developed a technology that can provide real time diagnostic information. Their device, which they've dubbed the "Real-time ELISA," is able to perform many blood tests very quickly and then stitch the individual results together to enable continuous, real-time monitoring of a patient's blood chemistry. Instead of a snapshot, the researchers end up with something more like a movie.

"A blood test is great, but it can't tell you, for example, whether insulin or glucose levels are increasing or decreasing in a patient," said Professor Tom Soh. "Knowing the direction of change is important."

In their recent study, "A fluorescence sandwich immunoassay for the real-time continuous detection of glucose and insulin in live animals", published in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering, the researchers used the device to simultaneously detect insulin and glucose levels in living diabetic laboratory rats. But the researchers say their tool is capable of so much more because it can be easily modified to monitor virtually any protein or disease biomarker of interest.

Authors are PhD candidates Mahla Poudineh, Caitlin L. Maikawa, Eric Yue Ma, Jing Pan, Dan Mamerow, Yan Hang, Sam W. Baker, Ahmad Beirami, Alex Yoshikawa, researcher Michael Eisenstein, Professor Seung Kim, and Professor Jelena Vučković.

Technologically, the system relies upon an existing technology called Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay – ELISA ("ee-LYZ-ah") for short. ELISA has been the "gold standard" of biomolecular detection since the early 1970s and can identify virtually any peptide, protein, antibody or hormone in the blood. An ELISA assay is good at identifying allergies, for instance. It is also used to spot viruses like HIV, West Nile and the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

The Real-time ELISA is essentially an entire lab within a chip with tiny pipes and valves no wider than a human hair. An intravenous needle directs blood from the patient into the device's tiny circuits where ELISA is performed over and over.

 Excerpted from "Stanford researchers develop lab-on-a-chip that turns blood test snapshots into continuous movies", December 21, 2020.

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image of prof Stephen P. Boyd
January 2021

The Boyd group's CVXGEN software has been used in all SpaceX Falcon 9 first stage landings.  

From spacex.com: Falcon 9 is a reusable, two-stage rocket designed and manufactured by SpaceX for the reliable and safe transport of people and payloads into Earth orbit and beyond. Falcon 9 is the world's first orbital class reusable rocket. Reusability allows SpaceX to refly the most expensive parts of the rocket, which in turn drives down the cost of space access.

On December 9, Starship serial number 8 (SN8) lifted off from a Cameron County launch pad and successfully ascended, transitioned propellant, and performed its landing flip maneuver with precise flap control to reach its landing point. Low pressure in the fuel header tank during the landing burn led to high touchdown velocity resulting in a hard (and exciting!) landing. Re-watch SN8's flight here

 

Although Stephen doesn't plan to travel to Mars, he's thrilled that one day, some of his and his students' work will.

image of prof Nick McKeown
December 2020
Professor Nick McKeown will receive the 2021 IEEE Alexander Graham Bell medal, for exceptional contributions to communications and networking sciences and engineering. The IEEE Alexander Graham Bell Medal was established in 1976, in commemoration of the centennial of the telephone's invention, to provide recognition for outstanding contributions to telecommunications.
 
The award will be presented to Nick at a future IEEE Honors Ceremony.
 
Nick researches techniques to improve the Internet. Most of this work has focused on the architecture, design, analysis, and implementation of high-performance Internet switches and routers. More recently, his interests have broadened to include network architecture, backbone network design, congestion control; and how the Internet might be redesigned if we were to start with a clean slate.
 
Please join us in congratulating Nick on this well-deserved honor!
  

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image of prof. Tom Lee
July 2020

Congratulations to Professor Thomas Lee. He has been awarded the IEEE Gustav Robert Kirchhoff Award for "pioneering CMOS technology for high-performance wireless circuits and systems."

The IEEE Gustav Robert Kirchhoff Award recognizes an outstanding contribution to the fundamentals of any aspect of electronic circuits and systems that has a long-term significance or impact.

Tom is the principal investigator of the SMIrC Lab, which has been a driving force in developing the theory of radio frequency (RF) CMOS integrated circuit design as well as in educating tomorrow's RFIC designers.

Please join us in congratulating Tom for this well-deserved recognition.

 

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image of prof Andrea Goldsmith
July 2020

Congratulations to Professor Andrea Goldsmith, Stephen Harris Professor of Engineering. She has been awarded the IEEE Leon K. Kirchmayer Graduate Teaching Award. Her citation reads, "For educating, developing, guiding, and energizing generations of highly successful students and postdoctoral fellows."

The IEEE Leon K. Kirchmayer Graduate Teaching Award recognizes inspirational teaching of graduate students in the IEEE fields of interest.

Andrea's research interests are in information theory, communication theory, and signal processing, and their application to wireless communications, interconnected systems, and neuroscience. She is the director of Stanford's Wireless Systems Lab.

Please join us in congratulating Andrea!

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