2021

June 2021
Capstone Course Award

Design Award, Capstone Courses

This award is given to the outstanding design project in one of the capstone design courses. This year the award goes to Ryan Ressmeyer for his EE 264 project: "Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexer".

Centennial Award

Centennial Teaching Award

The School of Engineering's Centennial TA Award is given to students to recognize their outstanding contributions to teaching. The 2021 Centennial TA award recipients are: Shubham ChandakAmy FritzSiavash KananianAnna NunesErik Van.

JEDI award

Justice, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion (JEDI) Graduation Awards

The School of Engineering's Justice, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion Graduation Awards recognizes the exceptional work done by graduating graduate students in outreach and mentorship for underserved and underrepresented communities with the goal of improving the accessibility of STEMM. This includes the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, and Medicine.
The JEDI Graduation Award recipients are Crystal NattooCindy NguyenSean Peters.

Gibbons Award

James F. Gibbons Outstanding Student Teaching Award 2021

The James F. Gibbons Award for Outstanding Student Teaching Award highlights students who have been nominated by faculty and peers for their extraordinary service as teaching assistants. Thank you for your tremendous work in our department – Anna NunesElizabeth Chen, and Erik Van.

Phil Levis Chairs Award 2021

Chair's Award for Outstanding Contributions to Undergraduate Education

Congratulations to Professor Phil Levis - Over the last few years, Phil has led a team of students on the FLIGHT project, it's a large-scale electromechanical art installation for the Packard [building] stairwell, right behind me. It consists of 76 Fractal Flyers, each of which is a programmable shape inspired by the geometry of the stairwell, with hundreds of LEDs and moving dichroic surfaces that cast colored reflections and shadows.

Terman Award

Frederick E. Terman Engineering Scholastic Award

The Terman Award is presented to the top 5% of each senior class in the School of Engineering. We are pleased to congratulate our 2021 Terman Scholars for their outstanding work. Joaquin BorggioRahul Lall, and Ryan Ressmeyer.

TBP Teaching Award

Tau Beta Pi (TBP) Teaching Honor Roll (The Engineering Society)

Professor John Pauly and Assistant Professor Mary Wootters - This award recognizes outstanding faculty instructors in the School of Engineering. These faculty instructors were nominated by Stanford students to recognize their distinguished teaching, superior mentorship, and/or any other notable contribution to engineering education at Stanford.

TBP Student Honor Roll

Tau Beta Pi (TBP) Honor Roll (The Engineering Society)

The California Gamma chapter of Tau Beta Pi at Stanford University serves the Stanford community by acting as a representative entity for academic excellence, leadership, and continued service to our community. Tau Beta Pi is the only engineering honor society representing the entire engineering profession. Congratulations to
  • Vineet Edupuganti, EE-BS
  • Yong (Collin) Kwon, EE-BS
  • Rahul Lall, EE-BSH
  • Michael Oduoza, EE-BS
  • Kangrui Xue, EE-BS

image of Londa Schiebinger and James Zou
June 2021

Debiasing artificial intelligence (AI)

In the medical field, AI encompasses a suite of technologies that can help diagnose patients’ ailments, improve health care delivery and enhance basic research. The technologies involve algorithms, or instructions, run by software. These algorithms can act like an extra set of eyes perusing lab tests and radiological images; for instance, by parsing CT scans for particular shapes and color densities that could indicate disease or injury.

Problems of bias can emerge, however, at various stages of these devices’ development and deployment, James explained. One major factor is that the data for forming models used by algorithms as baselines can come from nonrepresentative patient datasets.

By failing to properly take race, sex and socioeconomic status into account, these models can be poor predictors for certain groups. To make matters worse, clinicians might lack any awareness of AI medical devices potentially producing skewed results. 


In a new perspective paper, James Zou and Londa Schiebinger discuss sex, gender and race bias in medicine and how these biases could be perpetuated by AI devices. 
 
James and Londa suggest several short- and long-term approaches to prevent AI-related bias, such as changing policies at medical funding agencies and scientific publications to ensure the data collected for studies are diverse, and incorporating more social, cultural and ethical awareness into university curricula.

“The white body and the male body have long been the norm in medicine guiding drug discovery, treatment and standards of care, so it’s important that we do not let AI devices fall into that historical pattern,” said Londa Schiebinger, the John L. Hinds Professor in the History of Science in the School of Humanities and Sciences and senior author of the paper published in the journal EBioMedicine.

“As we’re developing AI technologies for health care, we want to make sure these technologies have broad benefits for diverse demographics and populations,” said James Zou, assistant professor of biomedical data science and, by courtesy, of computer science and of electrical engineering and co-author of the study.

The matter of bias will only become more important as personalized, precision medicine grows in the coming years, said the researchers. Personalized medicine, which is tailored to each patient based on factors such as their demographics and genetics, is vulnerable to inequity if AI medical devices cannot adequately account for individuals’ differences.

“We’re hoping to engage the AI biomedical community in preventing bias and creating equity in the initial design of research, rather than having to fix things after the fact,” said Londa Schiebinger.
 
 
 
 

Related News

image of prof Boris Murmann
May 2021

Congratulations to Professor Boris Murmann for receiving the 2021 Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA)-SRC University Researcher Award. Award winners are selected by SRC members who truly recognize great contributions to the semiconductor industry.

Source: src.org/award/university-researcher/

The SIA University Research Award was established in 1995 by the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) to recognize lifetime research contributions to the U.S. semiconductor industry by university faculty.

Please join us in recognizing Boris for his significant contributions in the semiconductor industry.

 

Related News

 

 

image of prof Subhasish Mitra
May 2021

Congratulations to Professor Subhasish Mitra for receiving the 2021 Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA)-SRC University Researcher Award. Award winners are selected by SRC members who truly recognize great contributions to the semiconductor industry.

Please join us in recognizing Subhasish for his significant contributions in the semiconductor industry.

 

The SIA University Research Award was established in 1995 by the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) to recognize lifetime research contributions to the U.S. semiconductor industry by university faculty.

Source: SRC.org/award/university-researcher

 

Related

 

image of prof Eric Pop
May 2021

A team of Stanford researchers including EE Professor Eric Pop report the design and fabrication of single-wall carbon nanotube thermoelectric devices on flexible polyimide substrates as a basis for wearable energy converters.

source: ScienceDaily.com [...]
Inspiration came from a desire to ultimately fabricate energy converting devices from the same materials as the active devices themselves, so they can blend in as an integral part of the total system. Today, many biomedical nanodevices' power supplies come from several types of batteries that must be separated from the active portion of the systems, which is not ideal.

In Applied Physics Letters, the researchers report the design and fabrication of single-wall carbon nanotube thermoelectric devices on flexible polyimide substrates as a basis for wearable energy converters.

"Carbon nanotubes are one-dimensional materials, known for good thermoelectric properties, which mean developing a voltage across them in a temperature gradient," said Professor Eric Pop. "The challenge is that carbon nanotubes also have high thermal conductivity, meaning it's difficult to maintain a thermal gradient across them, and they have been hard to assemble them into thermoelectric generators at low cost."

The group uses printed carbon nanotube networks to tackle both challenges.

Professor Pop continued, "For example, carbon nanotube spaghetti networks have much lower thermal conductivity than carbon nanotubes taken alone, due to the presence of junctions in the networks, which block heat flow. Also, direct printing such carbon nanotube networks can significantly reduce their cost when they are scaled up."

Thermoelectric devices generate electric power locally "by reusing waste heat from personal devices, appliances, vehicles, commercial and industrial processes, computer servers, time-varying solar illumination, and even the human body," said Hye Ryoung Lee, lead author and a research scientist.

"To eliminate hindrances to large-scale application of thermoelectric materials – toxicity, materials scarcity, mechanical brittleness – carbon nanotubes offer an excellent alternative to other commonly used materials," Lee said.

The group's approach demonstrates a path to using carbon nanotubes with printable electrodes on flexible polymer substrates in a process anticipated to be economical for large-volume manufacturing. It is also "greener" than other processes, because water is used as the solvent and additional dopants are avoided.

Excerpted from "Nontoxic, flexible energy converters could power wearable devices" April 27, 2021

 

Related

image of LaToya Powell, graduate admission officer
May 2021

LaToya Powell, Graduate Admissions Officer for Electrical Engineering is featured in a Stanford School of Engineering Spotlight article.

LaToya is a tireless advocate for our students and is very passionate about diversity and inclusion. She founded EE's dEEbug program for EE students to receive support academically and socially. 

LaToya received the 2020 Staff Award for Innovation and has been recognized for going above and beyond in her daily role. In addition to managing EE's graduate admissions and playing an active role in the programs and student groups, she has also served on EE's Culture, Equity, and Inclusion (CEI) Committee.

 

Please join us in acknowledging LaToya for her exceptional work in the department; we are fortunate she is part of EE.

 

Related News 

image of PhD candidate Riley Culberg
April 2021

Research by EE PhD candidate Riley Culberg and Prof. Dustin Schroeder is revealing the long-term impact of vast ice melt in the Arctic.

Using a new approach to ice-penetrating radar data, researchers show that this melting left behind a contiguous layer of refrozen ice inside the snowpack, including near the middle of the ice sheet where surface melting is usually minimal. Most importantly, the formation of the melt layer changed the ice sheet's behavior by reducing its ability to store future meltwater. The research appears in Nature Communications.

"When you have these extreme, one-off melt years, it's not just adding more to Greenland's contribution to sea-level rise in that year – it's also creating these persistent structural changes in the ice sheet itself," said lead author Riley Culberg, EE PhD candidate. "This continental-scale picture helps us understand what kind of melt and snow conditions allowed this layer to form."

Airborne radar data, a major expansion to single-site field observations on the icy poles, is typically used to study the bottom of the ice sheet. But by pushing past technical and computational limitations through advanced modeling, the team was able to reanalyze radar data collected by flights from NASA's Operation IceBridge from 2012 to 2017 to interpret melt near the surface of the ice sheet, at a depth up to about 50 feet.

"Once those challenges were overcome, all of a sudden, we started seeing meltwater ice layers near the surface of the ice sheet," EE courtesy professor, Dustin Schroeder said. "It turns out we've been building records that, as a community, we didn't fully realize we were making."

Melting ice sheets and glaciers are the biggest contributors to sea-level rise – and the most complex elements to incorporate into climate model projections. Ice sheet regions that haven't experienced extreme melt can store meltwater in the upper 150 feet, thereby preventing it from flowing into the ocean. A melt layer like the one from 2012 can reduce the storage capacity to about 15 feet in some parts of the Greenland Ice Sheet, according to the research.

 

 

Excerpted from "Stanford researchers reveal the long-term impacts of extreme melt on Greenland Ice Sheet", Stanford News, April 20, 2021

April's outstanding EE staff!
April 2021

Congratulations to these outstanding staff: Thomas Carlson, Marisa Cheng, Julie Kline, Kara Marquez, Edwin Mendoza, and Denise Murphy!

They received nominations from faculty, staff and students, who appreciate their commitment and willingness to go above and beyond the ordinary. Excerpts from their nominations are below.

Our staff gift card recipients make profound and positive impact in the electrical engineering department's everyday work and academic environment. Please take a moment to congratulate them personally.

 

Thomas Carlson, System and Network Development Management/System Administrator/Developer

  • Thomas is very helpful, knowledgeable, and easy going.
  • He always provides first class IT support.

Marisa Cheng, Academic Affairs & Programs Administrator

  • Marisa always works extremely hard; during COVID, she adapted all our course changes superbly.
  • She shines like a star!

Julie Kline, Faculty Administrator

  • Julie is highly responsive and consistent in dealing with a myriad of tasks.
  • She communicates extremely well and is a joy to work with.

Kara Marquez, Faculty Administrator

  • Kara's vast knowledge and resourcefulness helps us stay organized and deal with any issues.
  • Our lab group knows that we are very fortunate to work with her.

Edwin Mendoza, Faculty & Staff Affairs Administrator

  • Edwin is incredibly detail-oriented and thorough; he always provides all supporting documents, which saves tons of time.
  • He also has taken the initiative to transition to new updates and guidelines, ensuring smooth running for the department.

Denise Murphy, Faculty & Staff Affairs Manager

  • Even during COVID, Denise has been her usual, unflappable self. More than once she has made herself available to spontaneously join meetings to talk about various topics.
  • She always does a great job getting people together and learning about one another. I miss interacting with her in person, but I always look forward to seeing her via Zoom.

 

The Staff Gift Card Bonus Program is sponsored by the School of Engineering. Each year, the EE department receives several gift cards to distribute to staff members who have been recognized for going above and beyond their role. Staff are chosen from nominations received from faculty, students, and staff. Past nominations are eligible for future months.

Nominate a deserving staff person today. Each recipient receives a $50 Amazon gift card. Nominations can be made at any time. There are no restrictions on the quantity or persons that you can nominate!

Submitters are asked to include a citation of how the person went above and beyond. The submitter can choose to remain anonymous. Nominate now

 

image of April's EE staff awardees

*Some photos were taken from our photo library and are pre-Covid.

image of prof Shanhui Fan
April 2021

Professor Shanhui Fan presented his latest advances in radiative cooling at annual energy sector conference. Shanhui's radiative cooling harvests electricity from the coldness of the universe, which in turn, can be harvested on Earth for several renewable energy applications. For millennia, humans in regions where the ambient temperature never falls below freezing have used the concept to make ice by burying water at night.

Radiative cooling could have a significant impact on lowering electricity use and boosting output of renewables, but it will require advances in blackbody emitters, materials that absorb heat and radiate the heat at frequencies that send it into space.

"This requires a good blackbody emitter," said Shanhui, "but we can cool objects to a temperature 13 degrees Celsius (55 degrees Fahrenheit) below the ambient temperature with no electricity; it's purely passive cooling."

Radiative cooling systems could, for example, reduce the electricity required for air conditioning by 10 percent to 15 percent, he said. Such systems at night could also generate enough electricity for LED lighting in homes, which would be a significant development for the billion humans without electricity.

 

Other Stanford faculty research presented includes,

  • Professor Yi Cui, discussed new horizons for energy and climate research as part of a panel. To Cui, the big issue is energy storage to enable greater use of intermittent solar and wind power.
  • Professor Reihold Dauskardt's Spray-on Solar cells
  • Professor Arun Majumdar discussed gigaton-scale solutions for getting to zero greenhouse gas emissions globally from human activity.

 

Excerpted from Precourt Institute "Stanford at CERAWeek: energy storage, net-zero GHG, radiative cooling and perovskite solar cells"

 

Related News

prof Kunle Olukotun
April 2021

Professor Kunle Olukotun has built a career out of building computer chips for the world.

These days his attention is focused on new-age chips that will broaden the reach of artificial intelligence to new uses and new audiences — making AI more democratic.

The future will be dominated by AI, he says, and one key to that change rests in the hardware that makes it all possible — faster, smaller, more powerful computer chips. He imagines a world filled with highly efficient, specialized chips built for specific purposes, versus the relatively inefficient but broadly applicable chips of today.

Making that vision a reality will require hardware that focuses less on computation and more on streamlining the movement of data back and forth, a function that now claims 90% of computing power, as Kunle tells host Russ Altman on this episode of Stanford Engineering's The Future of Everything podcast. 

 

 

Source: The Future of Everything Series, "Kunle Olukotun: How to make AI more democratic"

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