2018

October 2018

Professor Balaji Prabhakar researches traffic and routes and how a nudge can help us better manage our commute. Stanford Radio host Russ Altman speaks with Balaji on "The Future of Everything". 

While well-known mapping apps have transformed the daily commute through better information, Balaji Prabhakar is exploring ways to digitally incentivize people to improve their driving habits.

He calls it "nudging," and says that small shifts in commute times — just 20 minutes earlier or later — can make a considerable impact on the day's congestion in highly trafficked urban areas, like San Francisco.

A few years ago, Prabhakar made headlines with a Stanford-only study that used small monetary incentives backed by larger lottery-like rewards to reduce peak-hour commuting on campus. He later undertook a similar but much larger effort in Singapore to promote off-peak train travel. In four years, participation in Singapore grew from 20,000 to 400,000 users.

Listen to the Stanford Radio, "Nudging your Commute with guest Balaji Prabhakar"

Excerpted from the School of Engineering, Research & Ideas, "Balaji Prabhakar: Can digital incentives help alleviate traffic?" October 2018. 

Related News

"Research by EE PhD candidates Geng, Liu, and Yin featured in NYT Tech article", July 2018.

"Balaji Prabhakar has been named ACM Fellow", December 2017.

October 2018

The Optical Society (OSA) has named Joseph W. Goodman, emeritus professor, the 2018 Honorary Member of The Optical Society. Honorary Membership is the most distinguished of all OSA Member categories, bestowed on individuals who have made seminal contributions to the field of optics as determined by unanimous vote of the OSA Board of Directors.

Dr. Goodman is honored for fundamental contributions in the fields of Fourier Optics and Optical Information Processing through his research, teaching and classic textbooks.

"Joe Goodman's pioneering work in holography, Fourier optics, and optical information processing produced the defining textbooks on these topics," said OSA President Ian Walmsley. "He has made outstanding contributions to OSA and our community. It is my great pleasure to welcome Joe into this group of distinguished OSA Members."

Dr. Goodman received an A.B. Degree in Engineering and Applied Physics from Harvard University in 1958, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University in 1960 and 1963, respectively. He has held several positions at Stanford including, William E. Ayer Professor of Electrical Engineering, Chairman of the Department of Electrical Engineering, and Senior Associate Dean in the School of Engineering.

Since retiring from Stanford in 2000, Dr. Goodman has devoted time to philanthropic activities, including administering the J.W. and H.M. Goodman Family Charitable Foundation. In 2005, he and his wife, Hon Mai Goodman, endowed a book-writing prize, the Goodman Book Writing Award, which recognizes a recent and influential book in the field of optics and photonics. The award is co-sponsored by OSA and SPIE.

Goodman has held numerous leadership positions in the optics community. He was the 1988-1990 President of the International Commission for Optics (ICO). He has served OSA as a traveling lecturer, technical group leader, conference organizer, journal editor, Board of Directors member and 1992 President. He also served as a director of several corporations, including Optivision, Inc., where he was a co-founder, ONI Systems and E-TEK Dynamics.

Dr. Goodman is a Fellow of OSA, IEEE, and SPIE. He is the recipient of many prestigious awards including OSA's Frederic Ives Medal / Jarus W. Quinn Prize, Max Born Award, Esther Hoffman Beller Medal and Emmett Leith Award. He was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering in 1987, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1996.

 

Please join us in congratulating Joe on this wonderful recognition!

Source: www.osa.org, "Joseph W. Goodman Named 2018 Honorary Member of The Optical Society", September 2018.

October 2018

Professor Jelena Vuckovic has received NSF grants for two quantum research projects.

Many of today's technologies rely on the interaction of matter and energy at extremely small scales. Quantum mechanics studies nature at such scales -- at least a million times smaller than the width of a human hair -- allowing researchers to observe, manipulate and control the behavior of particles. Next-generation technologies for communication, computing and sensing will exploit interactions among particles in quantum systems, offering the promise of dramatic increases in accuracy and efficiency.

NSF-funded researchers will explore new ways to detect photons, build bio-inspired circuits, develop light-based communication systems and more. The new awards support multi-disciplinary research through two efforts: Research Advanced by Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering (RAISE)-Transformational Advances in Quantum Systems (TAQS) effort, and RAISE-Engineering Quantum Integrated Platforms for Quantum Communication (EQuIP) effort.

Some of the supported research teams will study new possibilities about the behavior of quantum states. Others will investigate new ways to stabilize quantum systems, making them more useful for technological applications. Both efforts support training of the future quantum workforce.

Jelena's projects are both within the RAISE-TAQS effort. RAISE-TAQS will support several projects for innovative approaches, experimental demonstrations and transformative advances that will help lead to systems and proof-of-concept validations in quantum sensing, communication, computing and simulations.

The NSF RAISE-TAQS effort is at the intersection of multiple disciplines and is designed to encourage scientists to pursue exploratory, cutting-edge concepts. It is meant to build a strong community of team participants who have demonstrated a readiness to examine a broad range of scientific and engineering topics related to quantum technologies.

Jelena is the Principal Investigator of "Engineering high quality, practical qubits in diamond". She is coordinating the research effort between Stanford, Harvard, and Virginia Tech.

Her second project is titled, "Inverting the design paradigm: Tunable qubits in hybrid photonic materials as a scalable platform for quantum photonic devices". She is the co-Principal Investigator.

 

Please join us in congratulating Jelena for this outstanding achievement.

 

 

 

 

Excerpted from the National Science Foundation Press Release, "NSF Announces new awards for quantum research, technologies", September 24, 2018.

September 2018

Congratulations to Professor Andrea Goldsmith and Santa Clara University Professor Katie Wilson (PhD '94).

As co-chairs of the IEEE Wireless Communications & Networking Conference (WCNC), they are recognized for their successful mission to incorporate diversity, the latest technologies, and both industrial and academic forums.

The IEEE WCNC event is the world premier wireless event to exchange ideas and information on the advancement of wireless communications and networking technology. The event brings together industry professionals, academics, and individuals from government agencies and other institutions to exchange information and ideas.

Held in San Francisco, IEEE WCNC 2017 featured a comprehensive technical program with numerous technical sessions showcasing the latest technologies, applications and services. In addition, the conference program includes workshops, tutorials, keynote talks from industrial leaders and renowned academics, panel discussions, a large exhibition, business and industrial forums. 

Professors Goldsmith and Wilson receive the iCON Award
The award was accepted by co-chairs Andrea Goldsmith and Katie Wilson of Santa Clara University, whose outstanding leadership drove results for and led advancement for the conference's long-term goals. This event is exemplary of how future events can grow, evolve, and be representative of today's technology industry. The WCNC organizing committee included several Stanford alums who also participated as chairs for the technical, tutorial, workshop, and panel sessions.
 
 

Please join us in congratulating Andrea, Katie and the planning committee that helped make this event such a success!

Pictured are Professor Goldsmith and Professor Wilson, receiving the iCON Award, August 2018. 

 

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September 2018

Ayfer Ozgur was recently selected to receive the Communication Theory Technical Committee (CTTC) Early Achievement Award for 2018. Her citation reads: "For contributions in the fundamental capacity limits of multihop wireless networks and energy-harvesting radios."

The CTTC Early Achievement Award recognizes members of the Communication Theory Technical Committee (CTTC) who have achieved early career visibility in the field through research and service and who have participated in the CTTC, and are within 10 years of their Ph.D.


Please join us in congratulating Ayfer on this well-deserved award!

 

Related News: 

 

September 2018

Welcome back to our undergraduate and graduate students who participated in an inaugural week long joint forum with the University of Hong Kong in Shenzhen (CUHKCZ).

Stanford and CUHKSZ students visited several Chinese tech companies such as Huawei, Tencent, and DJI. Students also spent time together doing various activities, as well as collaborative projects. Their projects were created in a new maker space on campus, and were presented at the end of the week. Being in China's tech capitol gave Stanford students an opportunity to interact with the infrastructure afforded to people in Shenzhen. For example, touring Huaqiangbei (a massive electronics hub), where visitors are able to peruse hundreds of shops to select parts for current and future projects. Students report they had an amazing time experiencing Chinese culture and the growing tech industries in Shenzhen.

 

Students and faculty during an outing in Shenzhen, September 2018.

August 2018

Congratulations to the four Electrical Engineering staff recognized this month for their outstanding effort! Included are Doug Chaffee, John DeSilva, Kenny Green and Kara Marquez.

Each of them received nominations from peers, faculty and/or students who included descriptions of the staff member's professionalism that goes above and beyond their everyday roles.

Staff gift card recipients make profound and positive impact in the department's everyday work and academic environment. Consider nominating a staff member today.

 

Join us in congratulating Doug, John, Kenny and Kara for their extraordinary work!

Modified excerpts from their nominations follow.

Doug Chaffee, Faculty Administrator

  • Doug is very friendly and helped me settle in. I appreciate his support with reimbursements, answering questions, and chatting!
  • "He's very helpful and prompt. He always makes sure everything runs smoothly."

John DeSilva, Systems and Network Manager

  • "John always has options to solve any problem –– and he always follows up on the status."
  • He has greatly improved our lab's productivity by upgrading our internet speed and adding new computers.

Kenny Green, Building Manager

  • He is a tremendous resource -– quickly solving problems and providing support.
  • "Kenny can be relied on to always have a solution, and he goes about everything in a calm and capable manner."

Kara Marquez, Faculty Administrator

  • "Kara's ability to really listen and understand what is needed is terrific. She keeps things moving forward."
  • She is always willing to help resolve unforeseen issues — which can be frustrating for her, but is greatly appreciated!

The Staff Gift Card Bonus Program is sponsored by the School of Engineering. Each year, the EE department receives several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond their role. Each month, staff are chosen from nominations received from faculty, students, and staff. Past nominations are eligible for future months.

 

Nominate a deserving staff person or group today – nominate individuals or groups that have made a profound improvement in your daily work life. Each recipient receives a $50 Visa card. Nominations can be made at any time.

EE PhD candidate, Julie Chang
August 2018

The team, led by professor Gordon Wetzstein, is addressing the challenge of autonomous vehicles and aerial drones relying on large, energy intensive computers to process images. They have joined two types of computers: optical and electrical, to create a hybrid machine that can analyze images with far less computation and energy.

The result is profoundly fewer calculations, fewer calls to memory and far less time to complete the process. Having leapfrogged these preprocessing steps, the remaining analysis proceeds to the digital computer layer with a considerable head start.

"Millions of calculations are circumvented and it all happens at the speed of light," reports Gordon Wetzstein. "Some future version of our system would be especially useful in rapid decision-making applications, like autonomous vehicles."

In addition to shrinking the prototype, Wetzstein, Chang and colleagues at the Stanford Computational Imaging Lab are now looking at ways to make the optical component do even more of the preprocessing. Eventually, their smaller, faster technology could replace the trunk-size computers that now help cars, drones and other technologies learn to recognize the world around them.

 

Their work was published in Nature Scientific Reports, "Hybrid optical-electronic convolutional neural networks with optimized diffractive optics for image classification", in August.

Excerpted from The Stanford News, "Stanford engineers create new AI camera for faster, more efficient image classification", August 17, 2018

 

professor Gordon Wetzstein
August 2018

Congratulations to professor Gordon Wetzstein! He has been presented with the Significant New Researcher Award for his work in advanced display hardware and display-specific rendering techniques.

Gordon develops displays that address a variety of perceptual challenges, including auto-stereoscopy, the elimination of vergence-accommodation conflict, and elimination of the need for observers with vision defects to wear corrective lenses.

His research has produced technology that corrects for myopia, hyperopia, or presbyopia. The Light Field Stereoscope, in 2015, presented a near-eye display technology that supports focus cues in virtual reality applications.

To utilize these display mechanisms, images are rendered with new algorithms that substantially increase image fidelity. The displays are not only designed, but also prototyped and tested. Indeed, several have been demonstrated in the SIGGRAPH Emerging Technologies exhibit.

Gordon is author or coauthor of over 80 conference and journal publications in Transactions on Graphics and in journals and proceedings in the fields of computer graphics, optics, information display, computer vision, and computational photography. These publications include contributions that support advanced display techniques, such as virtual reality camera rigs and cameras that capture both depth and velocity.

Please join us in congratulating Gordon on this terrific acknowledgement!

 

Excerpted from siggraph.org's "2018 Significant New Researcher Award: Gordon Wetzstein"

 

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August 2018

Congratulations to President Emeritus and EE Professor John Hennessy. He has been named the 2018 recipient of the Semiconductor Industry Association's Robert N. Noyce Award. The annual award recognizes a leader who has made outstanding contributions to the semiconductor industry in technology or public policy.

"Throughout his outstanding and influential career spanning more than four decades, John Hennessy has helped move the semiconductor industry forward, leading efforts to advance semiconductor technology and train future generations of electrical engineers," said John Neuffer, president and CEO, Semiconductor Industry Association. "John literally wrote the book on computer architecture design and has spearheaded semiconductor research that has helped make our industry what it is today. On behalf of the SIA board of directors, it is an honor to announce John's selection as the 2018 Robert N. Noyce Award recipient in recognition of his exceptional accomplishments."

John co-developed an approach to computer architecture that came to be known as the reduced instruction set computer (RISC) architecture, which involved significantly fewer transistors. The simpler design led to faster speeds, lower costs and shorter design times.

John joined EE in 1977 as an assistant professor and rose through the academic ranks to become Stanford's 10th president, serving in that role from 2000 until his retirement in 2016. In February 2018, Dr. Hennessy was appointed chairman of Alphabet Inc., parent company of Google.

 

Please join us in congratulating John on this well-deserved recognition!

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