EE Student Information

EE Student Information, Spring Quarter 19-20: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

Updates will be posted on this page, as well as emailed to the EE student mail list.

Please see Stanford University Health Alerts for course and travel updates.

As always, use your best judgement and consider your own and others' well-being at all times.

student

June 2016

Congratulations to Tim Anderson and José Padovani!

 

Tim (EE and ICME PhD candidate) and José (EE PhD '16) were recognized for their outstanding teaching. They each were awarded the 2016 Centennial Teaching Assistant Award. The award program recognizes outstanding instruction by TA's in the Humanities and Sciences, Earth Sciences, and Engineering schools.

Nominated by faculty, peers, and previous students, each received a $500 stipend and certificate.


About Tim

Tim is a committed instructor. He has taught, tutored, or assisted with Computational and Mathematical Engineering (CME) 102, 108 and 100. His nominators emphasized his valuable contribution in advancing equity via ACE (Additional Calculus for Engineers) in CME. Tim is a first-year PhD student, having completed his EE BS earlier in 2016.

A few comments from Tim's nomination:

PhD candidate Tim Anderson
  • Tim did a phenomenal job not only reviewing and explaining material in-depth, but going the extra mile in explaining industry and major related applications for nearly every topic.
  • I really benefited from the extra practice, and having a good relationship with Tim.
  • ACE has greatly helped me with my academic experiences so far in STEM: developing better study habits, giving me extra help, and gaining confidence in my abilities.

 

 

 

 

 

About José

José Padovani
José Padovani was the Teaching Assistant and head lab TA for EE101A. Being the first to incorporate the course's new curriculum, he rewrote the exercises, synchronizing them with the lectures, while incorporating feedback from students. EE101A's enrollment climbed significantly with José's insights and improvements.

Excerpts from José's nomination:

  • He is genuinely dedicated to making sure that the labs ran smoothly, and that students truly learn from the exercises.
  • José's mini-tutorials helped all the students be better prepared for each section, resulting in an improved learning experience for students.
  • He doesn't leave until he's sure that everyone 'gets it'.

 

Please join us in recognizing Tim and José – their efforts are greatly valued!

July 2016

Electrical Engineering PhD candidate Cheuk Ting Li was awarded the IEEE Jack Keil Wolf ISIT Student Paper Award for his paper titled, "Distributed Simulation of Continuous Random Variables."

The IEEE Jack Keil Wolf ISIT Student Paper Award is given to up to 3 outstanding papers for which a student is the principal author and presenter. Award criteria includes both content and presentation. The award consists of an honorarium and plaque.

The Awards Committee is responsible for selecting the winners with the support of the ISIT TPC. The ISIT TPC recommends between 8 and 12 papers as finalists to the Awards Committee. The Awards Committee selects up to 6 papers as finalists. The Awards Committee judges the presentations, selects the winners, and announces the winners at the ISIT banquet.

 

Congratulations to Cheuk Ting Li!

 

June 2016

Kartik Venkat (PhD '15) has won the 2016 Thomas M. Cover Dissertation Award. The title of his thesis is "Relations Between Information and Estimation: A Unified View."

The Thomas M. Cover Award was established by the IEEE Information Theory Society in 2013. It is awarded annually to the author of an outstanding doctoral dissertation contributing to the mathematical foundations of any of the information sciences within the purview of the Society. Including, but not limited to, Shannon theory, source and channel encoding theory, data compression, learning theory, quantum information theory and computing, complexity theory, and applications of information theory in probability and statistics.

Kartik completed his PhD December 2015. In 2015, he also received the Marconi Young Scholars Award, at which time he planned to pursue entrepreneurial opportunities to apply his work to real world problems, taking "deep ideas in research and using them to transform the way an industry is viewed."

 

Congratulations to Kartik!

Read Kartik's EE Spotlight article

May 2016

EE PhD candidates Spyridon Baltsavias and Junyi Wang have been selected as one of eight winning teams in the 2016 Qualcomm Innovation Fellowship.

Their proposal "Advanced Ultrasound Sensing in the Modern Wireless World: a Miniaturized Ultrasound Transducer System for Biomedical Applications" was reviewed by Qualcomm Research's top engineers. Spyridon and Junyi were then invited to present to a panel of executive judges. Winning students receive a one year fellowship and are mentored by Qualcomm engineers to help facilitate the success of the proposed research.

Congratulations to Spyridon, Junyi, and their advisors, Professors Amin Arbabian and Butrus T. Khuri-Yakub. A description of their winning proposal follows:

 Ultrasound is an invaluable technology that is widely used today in hospitals as an imaging and diagnostic tool. An example ultrasound system is the ultrasonic endoscope, which doctors use to probe the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of a patient and diagnose a variety of diseases and cancers affecting hundreds of thousands of people each year. Existing systems however have several limitations: they tend to be bulky and power-hungry, while procedures are expensive, and even traumatic for patients.

What if we could take the technology from the stationary, bulky form factor, and shrink it down to a disposable pill that can be swallowed at the convenience of the patient? This idea resulted in our proposal for the Qualcomm Innovation Fellowship, where we introduced our miniature ultrasonic ingestible pill, to be demonstrated as a promising alternative to the GI endoscopic procedure. We envision our system to operate as follows: after the pill is swallowed by a patient, it travels through the intestinal system. By emitting and receiving ultrasound waves, ultrasonic "cameras" around the pill take images of the walls of the tract, as well as deeper layers and even surrounding organs. Then the captured images are wirelessly transmitted to a device worn by the patient, such as a smartphone, and can be used by medical experts for diagnosis and screening for bleeding, cancerous tissue, and other diseases.

Although ambitious, we believe our idea to be feasible through the combination of advanced electronics and advanced imaging techniques. Using flexible capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) developed by Professor Butrus T. Khuri-Yakub's research group, and an application-specific-integrated-circuit (ASIC) with RF wireless capabilities, jointly being designed by Prof. Amin Arbabian's and Prof. Khuri-Yakub's groups, we aim to bring this project to fruition and develop a platform that could in the future enable a vast array of exciting new biomedical and consumer applications on and inside the human body.

May 2016

Recently published in Lab on a Chip, a journal of the Royal Society of Chemistry, Professor Audrey Bowden and Gennifer Smith, a PhD student in electrical engineering, detail their new low-cost, portable device that would allow patients to get consistently accurate urine test results at home, easing the workload on primary care physicians.

Other do-it-yourself systems are emerging, but Bowden and Smith's approach is inexpensive and reliable, in part because they base their system on the same tried and trusted dipstick used in medical offices.

Their approach uses an easy-to-assemble black box that allows a smartphone camera to capture video that accurately analyzes color changes in a standard paper dipstick.

 

Excerpts from Stanford News, May 16, 2016.

Read full Stanford News article

Oil painting of Fred Terman
May 2016

The Frederick Emmons Terman Engineering Award for Scholastic Achievement has been awarded to five EE undergraduates. The Terman Award is one of the most selective academic awards. It is based on overall academic performance and is presented to the top five percent of each year's School of Engineering seniors. The 2015-2016 Terman Scholars include five undergraduate seniors from Electrical Engineering.

Congratulations to all Terman Award recipients. The five EE students are:

  • Cynthia De Dalmady ( pictured below front row, left)
  • Yuki Inoue (front row, center)
  • Kristen Pownell (front row, right)
  • Allan Raventos Knohr (back row, fifth from left)
  • Moosa Zaidi (back row, sixth from left)

Terman scholars are invited to attend a celebratory luncheon and encouraged to invite the most influential secondary school or other pre-college teacher who guided them during the formative stages of their academic career. Pictured below are the 2015-16 Terman Scholars majoring in EE, along with their Stanford advisors and influential pre-college teachers.

The award is named after Fred Terman who was the fourth Dean of the School of Engineering at Stanford, serving from 1944-1958, after which he became the Provost at the University, and is generally credited, along with President Wally Sterling, as having started the process that has led Stanford to its present position among the leading universities of the world.

April 2016

DiscoverEE Days welcomes newly admitted grad students, connecting them with EE students, faculty and staff. The 2-day event brings everyone together; encouraging exploration of the department and current research. The event concludes with a student research poster session, social reception and raffle. This year, admits were able to view and discuss 25 posters.

Posters present research from EE's core and subareas, and is an opportunity for graduate students to verbally and visually present their work. Posters are judged by a group of staff, faculty and students. Judging criteria is based on overall oral presentation, visual quality, and presenting within a one minute timeframe. Three winners, one from each core research area, were selected. The awards went to:

Neal Master (pictured center), Information Systems & Science
 Nicholas McDonald (not pictured), Hardware/Software Systems
Ning Wang (pictured left), Physical Technology & Science

Winning presenters were awarded a gift card and certificate, presented by Professor Andrea Goldsmith (pictured right).

The raffle winner was Sawaby Mahmoud, pictured with Professor Goldsmith below. His area of research is Information Systems and Science.

Congratulations and thanks to everyone for participating in DiscoverEE Days.
Additional thanks to the EE Admissions, GSEE, and the EE Student Life Committee for sponsoring the poster contest and generous prizes.


 

October 2015

Stanford EE is pleased to have hosted the first sustainability focused make-a-thon: Earth Hacks. During the 21-hour event, which began Friday, October 30th, teams and individuals were challenged to imagine and make novel solutions to current environmental issues. The event welcomed nearly 100 students from several departments. 

Participating teams demonstrated their projects to judges from faculty and industry during the final leg of the event. "It was impressive to see the intensity and productivity of the students," Professor Bob Dutton said. "After working less than 24 hours, the students presented some quite amazing results."

Because electrical engineering intersects a number of disciplines, the EE department is an ideal makerspace hub. The event kicked off with an Arduino workshop sponsored by Atmel. The Atmel Tech On Tour truck provided a lively, fully equipped makerspace. Tech On Tour also provided technical support for the duration of the event.

"I was also glad to see EE students offering to teach their friends skills like programming and Arduino and soldering," said Earth Hacks organizer, Gary Lee (EE, B.S. '17). 

"The best part about Earth Hacks was having the parts, tools, and a mentor from Atmel to explore Arduino freely," said Anna Zeng (CS, B.S. '18). "Suddenly gaining access to a full-fledged makerspace really changed my attitude towards tackling hardware. Additionally – and quite remarkably – what I found curiously liberating was the lack of the pressure of a hack-a-thon, as everyone around me was learning about the platform just as I was."

Earth Hacks first place

Judging took place on Saturday afternoon. Earth Hacks judges included Stanford professors Bob Dutton and Juan Rivas-Davila; aerospace reliability consultant, Gary Swift; and Y.C. Wang, Atmel's University Program Manager.

First place went to Zero Fire team, who fully integrated sensors with an Atmel microcontroller and Bluetooth wireless hardware to create a heat/smoke/combustibles detection system; the software then relayed warnings and initiated first-responder calls. 

The 'Zero Fire' team included Rubi Mendoza (MS&E, M.S. '17), Fabian Badillo (ME, B.S. '19) and Valerie Garcia (CS, B.S. '19). "We had a lot of fun developing our 'zero fire' project", said Rubi Mendoza, a first year MS&E graduate student. "We were encouraged to come up with a crazy idea and make it happen."

The opportunity to move beyond the design stage and into implementation gave the students confidence in new areas, allowing them to expand their comfort zone. 

"I did not have any experience in electrical engineering before participating," said Fabian Badillo (ME, B.S. '19). "This was definitely a rare opportunity to be able to imagine what the future may hold as I become more involved in the maker culture."

Valerie Garcia (CS, B.S. '19) shared this perspective. She said, "I'd never built anything before and I knew next to nothing going into Earth Hacks. But the resources there were amazing. Bob, Atmel's 'Arduino guy' taught me so much and it was a great experience to get to build something, basically from scratch, and see it working and actually being functional."

Earth Hacks 2nd place
Second place went to Anna Zeng (CS, B.S. '18) whose project measured and reported on varying humidity levels, allowing the user to manage percent of humidity in an environment.

Third place went to three students who built an energy conservation system. The team included Monica Chan (ME, B.S. '17), Mary Cirino (CS, B.S. '17) and Qian Li (CEE, M.S. '17). "It was our first time experiencing the magic of Arduino, and we all had a great time solving a real problem using what we had learned about hardware and software," said Qian Li.

The concept behind their energy conservation project developed an advanced illumination system for buildings on Stanford's campus. The basic idea consisted of two main sensors: the photo sensor and the pressure sensor. When there is enough daylight, the lights in the buildings automatically turn off. Otherwise, the lights will turn on only when someone touches the door at the entrance.

Earth Hacks 3rd place

Winning teams received prizes from sponsors, and included Myo armbands, a drone copter, Fitbits, and Kindle Fire tablets. Y.C. Wang, Earth Hacks sponsor and judge thanked the Electrical Engineering department and Stanford Robotics Club for making the event possible. "We were very excited to sponsor the Make-A-Thon at Stanford and really appreciated the opportunity to interact with the many talented students," Wang said. "We are extremely grateful for their support in bringing the Atmel Tech On Tour truck on campus."

Other Earth Hacks sponsors included Stanford IEEE Student Chapter, Red Bull, and DigiKey.

August 2015

The Marconi Society announced Kartik Venkat as the winner of the 2015 Young Scholar Award. Kartik is an EE doctoral candidate, on track to complete his PhD this December. His principal advisor is Professor Tsachy Weissman, who says, "Kartik's work has helped us develop tools to boost the performance of algorithms in machine learning and AI. He's helping us find smarter ways to process a huge quantity of data—which is applicable to a wide array of disciplines."

Kartik plans to travel to London to receive the award in October. After he completes his PhD, he wants to pursue entrepreneurial opportunities that apply his work to real world problems, taking "deep ideas in research and using them to transform the way an industry is viewed. I don't know if that will be in academia—or in a company of my own," he says.

Marconi Young Scholars are individuals who have, at an early age, already demonstrated exceptional engineering or scientific research and entrepreneurial capabilities with the potential to create significant advances telecommunications and the Internet. They are students whose advisers and nominators believe will make a real difference in science and society, serving as role models and an inspiration for others.

Hearty congratulations to Kartik Venkat!

Read full Marconi Society press release

Professor Weissman and Kartik Venkat

Professor Weissman (left) and Kartik Venkat (right).

June 2015

Students, faculty, and staff gathered in Hewlett auditorium to try their luck at winning one of two $100 gift cards, and of course to hear the presentations and participate in the Q and A session of the 2015 State of the Department event. More than 70 questions were submitted in advance, with others being asked during the event.

An enthusiastic welcome from EE Student Life (EESL) Committee Chair, Professor Andrea Goldsmith, opened the event and also provided an overview of EESL, whose main objective is to initiate and support student activities outside of the classroom and research lab. In addition to the State of the Department event, EESL facilitates and/or co-sponsors numerous activities throughout the year. The activities are highly valued by the students because they provide an opportunity for students to learn about others' experiences and perspectives, and help them navigate a successful path through Stanford and beyond. Says Goldsmith, "EESL was formed to enhance student life, create a strong sense of community within EE, and serve as a conduit for student feedback, input, and new ideas. Our goal is to improve the Stanford experience for every EE student."

Graduating senior and Fuse President, Mersina Simanski (BS '15) represented the EE undergraduate group, Fuse. Having completed its inaugural year, Fuse attracted more than 65 members and hosted many undergraduate events throughout the year. The most popular being the TI Make-a-Thon, the alumni dinner, the faculty mixer, and volleyball games on the Packard lawn. Incoming Fuse president, Iliana Bray (B.S. '17) plans to continue growing Fuse and hosting engaging events for EE undergrads.

GSEE, the graduate student body of the Electrical Engineering department, highlighted their involvement with various EE events throughout the year. Of note, are the popular social HappEE hours, EEPROM, and faculty lunches. The current president, Ziad Shehadeh (MS '15) will pass the role to Kevin Schubert (PhD, '17). Ziad states "Despite the major time commitment involved, it has been a privilege leading this organization in the 2014-2015 academic year. I got heavily involved with EE students from all over the world, interacted with the EE department as a whole, and built several connections with faculty, industry, and other departments and student groups on campus. We tried to target the needs of the EE graduate students and hopefully with a larger leadership team in the future, even more of those needs can be addressed."

EE Department Chair, Professor Abbas El Gamal, provided an update on the department. As the largest department within the School of Engineering, it is home to 58 faculty and nearly 1,000 students. EE welcomes three faculty in 2014 and 2015: John Duchi, Tom Soh, and Gordon Wetzstein.

The EE Department also announced the SystemX Alliance — an industry affiliate program, previously known as CIS. El Gamal reported, "SystemX essentially returns CIS to its' original mission with a 21st century focus: system scaling." SystemX is a multidisciplinary collaboration across 10 departments, with focus areas in energy, bio, quantum, IoE, and others. For EE students, SystemX provides a wealth of research opportunity and faculty collaboration.

The Q and A session, facilitated by Professor El Gamal also stimulated dialogue between students and faculty regarding several important issues. A few of them included:

Q: What change or new initiative in the EE department were you most proud of this year?
A: I think I am most proud of the efforts that our faculty have been putting into developing new undergraduate classes and revamping other classes. Although we started this initiative last year, the big effort started this year and will be continuing over the next years. I think the results are very promising. Another initiative we started this year is to improve graduate admissions. We have many more faculty involved in reviewing applicant folders, and the faculty conducted Skype interviews with the final candidates, which I think worked quite well.

Q: Why do we need to take so many classes in our PhD program?
A: Stanford's EE PhD program is designed to provide students with a strong foundation that will serve them throughout their career. Engineering is a very rapidly changing field and PhD research is by definition very narrow and deep. Courses, if selected correctly, will help broaden students' background and prepare them for moving into new areas in the future.
Or, as one faculty member playfully stated, "Because we said so, It's good for you, and one day you'll thank us," to which the room erupted with laughter.

Q: How is the department helping attract more undergraduate women to the major, especially freshmen who may not even take EE courses their freshman year?
A: EE works very hard to attract the best undergraduates in general. Our revamped undergraduate curriculum helps expose students to the amazing array of application that electrical engineering provides. We hope that students — especially female students — can see themselves being successful in EE. We're continuing to challenge ourselves to teach in new ways, and we want students who learn in new ways.
Student organizations like Fuse, WEE (Women in Electrical Engineering), and GSEE exist to be inclusive. They all do a great job of providing activities that are accessible to every student. Specifically, WEE has a mentoring pair program, and the leadership of Fuse is female. Each student group has it's own focus, and all are outstanding student communities — especially because of the female members.

Another submitted question, was the oft wondered, "Why is Bob Dutton so cool?" Professor El Gamal responded, "The reason Bob is so cool is because he is one of the most passionate and focused people I've ever worked with. When he takes on a mission, he goes all the way. He has done this in his research and is now doing it for the undergrads."

Following the Q and A session, the winning ticket was drawn for the gift cards — Congratulations to Neal Master (PhD candidate), and Atinuke Ademola-Idowu (MS '15) .

The State of the Department event concluded with dinner and drinks, hosted by the EESL Committee and GSEE on the Hewlett/Packard entrance patio.

 Consider joining us at the 2015 EE Commencement Ceremony, Sunday, June 14th on the Medical School Dean's Lawn, where you'll hear more about the EE student experience.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - student