Lead author Orly Liba (PhD candidate ’18) and team remove problem that has limited OCT’s diagnostic capabilities

Orly Liba (PhD candidate ’18)
July 2017

Orly Liba (PhD candidate '18) is the lead author of a study published in Nature Communications. Her advisor, Professor Adam de la Zerda and fellow researchers have devised a way to improve the quality of images obtained through optical coherence tomography (OCT).

The relatively simple, low-cost fix — entailing a pair of lenses, a piece of ground glass and some software tweaks — erases blemishes that have bedeviled images obtained via OCT since its invention in 1991. This improvement, combined with the technology's ability to optically penetrate up to 2 millimeters into tissue, could enable physicians to perform "virtual biopsies," visualizing tissue in three dimensions at microscope-quality resolution without excising any tissue from patients.

Their study describes how the researchers tested the enhancement in two different commercially available OCT devices. They were able to view cell-scale features in intact tissues, including in a mouse's ear, retina and cornea, as well as Meissner's corpuscle, found in the skin of a human fingertip.

"We saw sebaceous glands, hair follicles, blood vessels, lymph vessels and more," Liba said.

Other Stanford co-authors of the study are former postdoctoral scholars Matthew Lew, PhD, and Debasish Sen, PhD; graduate student Elliott SoRelle; research assistant Rebecca Dutta; professor of ophthalmology Darius Moshfeghi, MD; and professor of physics and of molecular and cellular physiology Steven Chu, PhD.

 

 

Excerpted from "Scientists turbocharge high-resolution, 3-D imaging," published on Stanford Medicine's News Center, June 20, 2017