PhD candidate Angad Rekhi helped develop low-power ‘wake up’ receiver for IoT

February 2018

Angad Rekhi (PhD candidate) and Amin Arbabian have developed a wake-up receiver that turns on a device in response to incoming ultrasonic signals – signals outside the range that humans can hear. By working at a significantly smaller wavelength and switching from radio waves to ultrasound, this receiver is much smaller than similar wake-up receivers that respond to radio signals, while operating at extremely low power and with extended range.

This wake-up receiver has many potential applications, particularly in designing the next generation of networked devices, including so-called "smart" devices that can communicate directly with one another without human intervention.

"As technology advances, people use it for applications that you could never have thought of. The internet and the cellphone are two great examples of that," said Rekhi. "I'm excited to see how people will use wake-up receivers to enable the next generation of the Internet of Things."

Excerpted from Stanford News, "Stanford researchers develop new method for waking up small electronic devices", February 12, 2018

 

Related news:

Amin's Research Team Powers Tiny Implantable Devices, December 2017.

Stanford Team led by Amin Arbabian receives DOE ARPA-E Award, January 2017.

Amin Arbabian receives Tau Beta Pi Undergrad Teaching Award, June 2016.