Poon Powers Optogenetic Implant Wirelessly

August 2015

The first fully internal method of delivering optogenetics has been established. Miniature implanted devices are being wirelessly powered by a special power source that transmits frequencies that resonate in certain lab mice.

The device dramatically expands the scope of research that can be carried out through optogenetics to include experiments involving mice in enclosed spaces or interacting freely with other animals. The work is published in the Aug. 17 edition of Nature Methods.

Professor Ada Poon states, "This is a new way of delivering wireless power for optogenetics. It's much smaller and the mouse can move around during an experiment." See video.

The device can be assembled and reconfigured for different uses in a lab, and the design of the power source is publicly available. "I think other labs will be able to adapt this for their work," Poon said.

This novel way of delivering power is what allowed the team to create such a small device. And in this case, size is critical. The device is the first attempt at wireless optogenetics that is small enough to be implanted under the skin and may even be able to trigger a signal in muscles or some organs, which were previously not accessible to optogenetics.

The team says the device and the novel powering mechanism open the door to a range of new experiments to better understand and treat mental health disorders, movement disorders and diseases of the internal organs. They have a Stanford Bio-X grant to explore and possibly develop new treatments for chronic pain.


Professor Poon's lab recently sponsored a summer program for local female high school students, providing them a chance to explore several introductory concepts of EE. View article.

Excerpts are from the Stanford Report. View full article