Allen Building Entryway gets Artistic Facelift

Angad Rekhi (PhD ’20), Allen Building, Stanford EE
April 2018

Come to the Allen Building and view the original wall art designed by EE PhD candidate Angad Rekhi.

Angad Rekhi has spent many hours in the Allen Building, researching & reflecting on low power circuits and systems. As a member of the Arbabian Lab, he also helped develop a low power wake up receiver for IoT.

Angad was intrigued by the call to submit a design for the Allen Building entrance. The design challenge opened in October 2017, encouraging students, faculty & staff to create a visually representative piece that illustrates the research done within the Allen Buildings.

Angad's concept illustrates the entire electrical engineering design hierarchy – from a device-focused perspective at the far left, through chip and board design in the center, to end applications on the far right. "Design at all levels occurs in the Allen Buildings. They contain spaces and labs for the full process of design and build, from concept to product," states Angad. "For example, ExFab allows rapid prototyping of microelectronics, and the SPF (System Prototyping Facility) supports electronic sub-system design. So really, anyone on campus can go from idea to product within these walls."

Angad Rekhi (PhD ’20) posing with his wall design in the Allen Building

Please come by to view Angad's artwork!
The wall art is a creative way to greet those interested in leveraging Allen's spectrum of device development, and those who are yet to discover what's possible inside of the Allen Buildings.

About the Allen Buildings
At the time of it's construction, the building (originally named CIS) was considered "the best example of Stanford's resident architect's progressive historicism," acknowledging the blending of 1880s architectural style with 20th and 21st century Stanford architecture. The "building was designed by Antoine Predock, an Albuquerque architect with a reputation for New Age structures that rise organically from the Southwest's desert landscape." The building is named after Microsoft's co-founder, Paul G. Allen.

Together, the Allen and Gates buildings anchor the north side of the Engineering Quad. Twenty years ago, former Dean James Gibbons said "It has been a 10-year dream of ours to draw electrical engineering and computer science – the hardware and the software ­– together in an environment surrounded by such things as the biological sciences and medicine." And by spring 2019, the Neurosciences and ChEM-H research facility is expected to be complete, just on the north side of the Allen Buildings.

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