Award

April 2017

Andrea Goldsmith has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, one of the country's oldest and most prestigious honorary learned societies. The 2017 class includes some of the world's most accomplished scholars, scientists, writers, artists and civic, business and philanthropic leaders.

"It is an honor to welcome this new class of exceptional women and men as part of our distinguished membership," said Don Randel, Chair of the Academy's Board of Directors. "Their talents and expertise will enrich the life of the Academy and strengthen our capacity to spread knowledge and understanding in service to the nation."

Members of the 2017 class include winners of the Pulitzer Prize and the Wolf Prize; MacArthur Fellows; Fields Medalists; Presidential Medal of Freedom and National Medal of Arts recipients; and Academy Award, Grammy Award, Emmy Award, and Tony Award winners.

"In a tradition reaching back to the earliest days of our nation, the honor of election to the American Academy is also a call to service," said Academy President Jonathan F. Fanton. "Through our projects, publications, and events, the Academy provides members with opportunities to make common cause and produce the useful knowledge for which the Academy's 1780 charter calls."

The new class will be inducted at a ceremony on October 7, 2017, in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Founded in 1780, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences is one of the country's oldest learned societies and independent policy research centers, convening leaders from the academic, business, and government sectors to respond to the challenges facing—and opportunities available to—the nation and the world. Members contribute to Academy publications and studies in science, engineering, and technology policy; global security and international affairs; the humanities, arts, and education; and American institutions and the public good.

Please join us in congratulating Andrea for this very well deserved recognition of her work!

 

American Academy of Arts & Sciences Press Release

Undergrad Vivian Wang (BS '17) is a 2017 Churchill Scholarship winner
March 2017

Congratulations to Vivian Wang (BS '17) on her well-deserved award!

As an undergraduate, Vivian has been involved in numerous events on campus. She is a former co-director, and teacher, of Stanford Splash, which brings middle and high school students to campus to learn from Stanford students. Vivian has taught Splash courses since 2014. Her most recent course was "Sewable Electronics."

Vivian has also been a teaching assistant for two of the department's most popular courses, "An Intro to Making: What is EE" and "Digital Systems Design". She was selected through a competitive process, to be a peer tutor in math and physics. Vivian also participated in EE's REU program, doing research, and eventually co-authoring a paper with Professor Jim Harris. Vivian has also worked as an undergraduate research assistant for Professor Amin Arbabian.

"I am grateful for the research and other experiences Stanford has provided me thus far and look forward to the scientific and cultural opportunities provided through the Churchill Scholarship," Wang said.

The goal of the Churchill Scholarships program, established at the request of Sir Winston Churchill, is to advance science and technology on both sides of the Atlantic, helping to ensure future prosperity and security.

 

Excerpted from Stanford News article, "Stanford electrical engineering senior wins Churchill Scholarship"

March 2017

Professor Shanhui Fan has been selected to receive the 2017 Vannevar Bush Faculty Fellowship.

"The fellowship program provides research awards to top-tier researchers from U.S. universities to conduct revolutionary "high risk, high pay-off" research of strategic importance to the Department of Defense," said Mary J. Miller, acting assistant secretary of defense for research and engineering.

Fellows conduct basic research in core science and engineering disciplines that underpin future DoD technologies, such as, quantum information science, neuroscience, nanoscience, novel engineered materials, applied mathematics, statistics, and fluid dynamics. Fellows directly engage with the DoD research enterprise to share knowledge and insights with DoD civilian and military leaders, researchers in DoD laboratories, and the national security science and engineering community.

"Grants supporting the program engage the next generation of outstanding scientists and engineers in the "hard" problems that DoD needs to solve," Miller said.

DoD congratulates each of these remarkable scientists and engineers on selection as Vannevar Bush Faculty Fellows, bringing the current cohort to 45 Fellows.

 

Please join the department in congratulating Shanhui for this well deserved recognition and support of his outstanding research!

 

DoD press release

Lisa Sickorez receives 2016 SoE Leadership Award
March 2017

 

Lisa Sickorez received the School of Engineering's Leadership Award. Lisa's award underscores her dedication and enthusiasm for advancing the mission of the school and Stanford university.  

The Leadership Award recognizes mentoring and management contributions. Her citation reads, "Lisa is known as an individual who leads by example, finds solutions to difficult problems, and has the integrity to do the right thing. In addition to managing a demanding workload in the EE department, Lisa stepped up to assist the SoE Finance team with implementing a new budgeting system. Her business knowledge and expertise is a great resource to the EE department and to all departments in the school."

Lisa was presented with her award at an annual Staff Service Awards Ceremony in March.

 

Hearty congratulations to Lisa on receiving the 2016 School of Engineering Leadership Award.

March 2017

Congratulations to Isha Datye and Alexander Gabourie on their winning poster, "Reduction of hysteresis in MoS2 transistors using pulsed voltage measurements". 

 

The Device Research Conference (DRC) brings together leading scientists, researchers, and students to share their latest discoveries in device science, technology and modeling. 2016 marked the 75th anniversary of the DRC — the longest running device research meeting in the world.

 

Abstract

Transistors based on atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) materials like MoS2 have attractive properties for applications in low-power electronics. However, in practice their electrical measurements often exhibit hysteresis, masking their intrinsic behavior. In this study we used pulsed measurements to decrease hysteresis, examine charge trapping, and extract device parameters (like mobility) that represent the "true" behavior of 2D devices. Hysteresis is minimized even with modest ≤ 1 ms pulses, and the extracted mobility converges to a unique value, unlike the less reliable conventional methods which rely either on forward or reverse DC sweeps.

Link to paper

March 2017

Ning Wang, EE PhD candidate, received best paper and best poster awards at TECHCON 2016. The title of his paper is "GDOT: A Graphene-Based Nanofunction for Dot-Product Computation".

TECHCON is a technical conference and networking event for Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) members and students.

Ning Wang's research is in Physical Technology & Science and his advisor is Eric Pop.

 

Congratulations to Ning on his well-deserved recognition!

 

Abstract
Though much excitement surrounds two-dimensional (2D) beyond CMOS fabrics like graphene and MoS2, most efforts have focused on individual devices, with few high-level implementations. Here we present the first graphene-based dot-product nanofunction (GDOT) using a mixed-signal architecture. Dot product kernels are essential for emerging image processing and neuromorphic computing applications, where energy efficiency is prioritized. SPICE simulations of GDOT implementing a Gaussian blur show up to ~10(4) greater signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over CMOS based implementations - a direct result of higher graphene mobility in a circuit tolerant to low on/off ratios. Energy consumption is nearly equivalent, implying the GDOT can operate faster at higher SNR than CMOS counterparts while preserving energy benefits over digital implementations. We implement a prototype 2-input GDOT on a waferscale 4" process, with measured results confirming dot-product operation and lower than expected computation error.

 

February 2017

John Duchi has been selected as a 2017 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in Mathematics. The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is pleased to announce the selection of 126 outstanding U.S. and Canadian researchers as recipients of the 2017 Sloan Research Fellowships. The fellowships, awarded yearly since 1955, honor those early-career scholars whose achievements mark them as the next generation of scientific leaders.

"The Sloan Research Fellows are the rising stars of the academic community," says Paul L. Joskow, President of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. "Through their achievements and ambition, these young scholars are transforming their fields and opening up entirely new research horizons. We are proud to support them at this crucial stage of their careers."

Open to scholars in eight scientific and technical fields—chemistry, computer science, economics, mathematics, computational and evolutionary molecular biology, neuroscience, ocean sciences, and physics—the Sloan Research Fellowships are awarded in close coordination with the scientific community. Candidates must be nominated by their fellow scientists and winning fellows are selected by an independent panel of senior scholars on the basis of a candidate's independent research accomplishments, creativity, and potential to become a leader in his or her field.

Congratulations to John for this outstanding achievement!

The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is a philanthropic, not-for-profit grant making institution based in New York City. Established in 1934 by Alfred Pritchard Sloan Jr., then-President and Chief Executive Officer of the General Motors Corporation, the Foundation makes grants in support of original research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. www.sloan.org

 

Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Press Release

February 2017

Excerpted from acting Dean Thomas Kenny's announcement:

 

Krishna Shenoy has been appointed as the inaugural Hong Seh and Vivian W. M. Lim Professor in the School of Engineering. This professorship was established with an endowed gift from Hong Seh and Vivian Lim

Krishna joined the Stanford faculty as an assistant professor in 2001, was promoted to associate professor in 2008, and has been a full professor at Stanford since 2012. He currently leads the Neural Prosthetic Systems Laboratory (NPSL) and co-directs the Neural Prosthetics Translational Laboratory (NPTL) with Professor Jaimie Henderson, MD. Krishna is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigator and currently serves on advisory boards for the National Science Foundation's Research Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering at the University of Washington, Heal Inc., and Cognescent Inc.

A senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) since 2006, Krishna is also a fellow at the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering and an investigator for the Simons Collaboration on the Global Brain. He is a recipient of the McKnight Foundation's Technological Innovations in Neurosciences Award and the National Institutes of Health Director's Pioneer Award. Additionally, Krishna was awarded the Alfred P. Sloan Research Foundation fellowship in 2002 and the Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award in the Biomedical Sciences in 1999. He has also served on the Defense Science Research Council (DSRC) for DARPA and was elected a fellow of the DSRC in 2003.

Krishna received his bachelor's degree in electrical engineering and computer science from the University of California, Irvine, and his master's degree and PhD in electrical engineering and computer science from MIT, in 1992 and 1995, respectively. He was a postdoctoral scholar (1995 to 1998) and a senior postdoctoral scholar (1998 to 2001) in neurobiology at Caltech.

Krishna's innovative research, which blends a deep understanding of signal processing and neuroscience with techniques to build clinical innovations, makes him a deserving recipient of this endowed chair.

 

Please join us in congratulating Krishna on this well-deserved honor.

 

Related News:

Krishna Shenoy's translation device; turning thought into movement, March 2017.

Brain-Sensing Tech Developed by Krishna Shenoy and Team, September 2016.


 

February 2017

Tom Kailath has been selected as an Eminent Member of IEEE-Eta Kappa Nu (IEEE-HKN). The designation of Eminent Member is the organization's highest membership category and is conferred upon those select few whose outstanding technical attainments and contributions through leadership in the fields of electrical and computer engineering have significantly benefited society.

Eta Kappa Nu established the Eminent Member recognition in 1950 as the society's highest membership classification. It is to be conferred upon those select few whose attainments and contributions to society through leadership in the fields of electrical and computer engineering have resulted in significant benefits to humankind. Since 1950, only 134 individuals have been selected to receive this honor.

Designation of Eminent Member is the organization's highest membership category and is conferred upon those select few whose outstanding technical attainments and contributions through leadership in the field of electrical and computer engineering have significantly benefited society.

IEEE-Eta Kappa Nu (IEEE-HKN), the honor society of IEEE, is dedicated to encouraging and recognizing individual excellence in education and meritorious work, in professional practice, and in any of the areas within the IEEE-designated fields of interest.

 

Please join us in congratulating Tom for this very well deserved honor.

 

Related News:

The President Awards the National Medal of Science to EE Professor Kailath, November 2014. Read article

Chan Zuckerberg Biohub includes four Stanford EE faculty
February 2017

Four EE faculty have been awarded an opportunity to join the Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, a project of the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative. The CZ Biohub vision is to find and support the best and brightest scientists, engineers and technologists. [To] foster an environment that emphasizes intellectual freedom and true collaboration. [To] provide the best scientific tools available – and when they don't exist, [to] invent them. (source: https://czbiohub.org/vision/)

"The research by these extraordinary scientists receiving CZ Biohub awards exemplifies the exciting opportunities that lie in collaborative research at the intersection of biology and engineering," states Marc Tessier-Lavigne, Stanford's President. "We look forward to the new discoveries benefiting human health that will be made possible by their collaborations."

The EE faculty currently involved are Adam de la Zerda, Ada PoonH. Tom Soh, and James Zou.

 

Chan Zuckerberg Biohub is a project of the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative. CZI is committed to harnessing the power of science, technology and human capacity to cure, prevent or manage all disease in our children's lifetime.

Working collaboratively is at the heart of everything Biohub is doing. It starts with bringing together—for the first time ever—three of the world's leaders in biomedical and engineering innovation: University of California, Berkeley, University of California, San Francisco and Stanford.

[The] three university partners provide the very backbone of Biohub's work. Investigators come from these outstanding research institutions, and their faculty will be an integral part of day-to-day operations at Biohub.

 

Visit CZBiohub.org

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