Award

January 2017

Jonathan Fan was awarded the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). This is the highest honor bestowed by the United States Government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers.

Announced by President Obama in early January, Fan and 101 other scientists and researchers were honored with the PECAS. "I congratulate these outstanding scientists and engineers on their impactful work," Obama said. "These innovators are working to help keep the United States on the cutting edge, showing that federal investments in science lead to advancements that expand our knowledge of the world around us and contribute to our economy."

Jonathan is an assistant professor and director of the ExFab at the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility. He recently won the prestigious 2016 Packard Fellowship in Science and Engineering, which funds the most promising early-career professors in fields ranging from physics and chemistry to engineering.

Two other Stanford faculty also received the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE): Jacob Fox, professor of mathematics, and Marco Pavone, assistant professor of aeronautics and astronautics.

 

Related news:

 

Amin Arbabian
January 2017

The Department of Energy (DOE) announced projects selected as part of the Rhizosphere Observations Optimizing Terrestrial Sequestration (ROOTS) program funding opportunity. ROOTS is a new program of the Energy Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E).

Amin Arbabian's project, "Thermoacoustic Root Imaging, Biomass Analysis, and Characterization," has been awarded $2 million by the ROOTS program. The team also includes, (Pierre Khuri-Yakub EE, José Dinneny and David Ehrhardt, Carnegie Institution for Science) and will develop a non-contact, high throughput, thermoacoustic root imaging system where ultrasonic signals from roots are generated by radio signals and then recorded by a novel sensor array. The Stanford team will demonstrate use of the system across a variety of soil and root types in the field to map the root architecture of plants. If successful, the project will be the first low-cost, large-scale, field-based plant phenotyping solution for eventual use with a fully autonomous measurement system.

The Rhizosphere Observations Optimizing Terrestrial Sequestration (ROOTS) program seeks to develop advanced technologies and crop cultivars that enable a 50 percent increase in soil carbon accumulation while reducing N2O emissions by 50 percent and increasing water productivity by 25 percent. Since 2009, ARPA-E has funded over 400 potentially transformational energy technology projects.

ROOTS projects will tackle the growing problem of soil "carbon debt" by developing sensing technologies to help farmers choose crop varieties that better capture carbon molecules from the atmosphere and store them in their root systems.

 

Arpa-E Roots Program: https://arpa-e.energy.gov/?q=arpa-e-programs/roots

ROOTS program project descriptions (PDF) 

December 2016

ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, the world's leading computing society, has named the 2016 ACM Fellows. Recognized for major contributions in areas including artificial intelligence, cryptography, computer architecture, high performance computing and programming languages. The achievements of the 2016 ACM Fellows are accelerating the digital revolution, and affect almost every aspect of how we live and work today.

Please join us in congratulating professors Dan Boneh and Christos Kozyrakis for this well-deserved recognition.

  • Dan Boneh's main research area is applied cryptography and network security. His focus is on building security mechanisms that are easy to use and deploy. He has developed new mechanisms for improving web security, file system security, and copyright protection. He contributed to the security and performance of the RSA cryptosystem and contributed to the study of cryptographic watermarking.
  • Christos Kozyrakis' research focuses on making computer systems of any size faster, cheaper, and greener. His current work focuses on the hardware architecture, runtime environment, programming models, and security infrastructure for warehouse-scale data centers and many-core chips with thousands of general purpose cores and fixed functions accelerators.

ACM will formally recognize its 2016 Fellows at the annual Awards Banquet, to be held in San Francisco on June 24, 2017. Additional information about the 2016 ACM Fellows, the awards event, as well as previous ACM Fellows and award winners is available on the ACM Awards site.

 

 

Read more, ACM Press release.

November 2016

Congratulations to Olav Solgaard on his elevation to IEEE Fellow. IEEE Grade of Fellow is conferred by the Board of Directors upon a person with an extraordinary record of accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest. Less than 0.1% of voting IEEE members are selected annually for this member recognition. IEEE Fellows will be formally announced by the IEEE at end of the 2016.

Professor Solgaard's research interests include optical MEMS, Photonic Crystals, optical sensors, microendoscopy, atomic force microscopy, and solar energy conversion. He has authored more than 350 technical publications and holds 60 patents. Olav came to Stanford with the support of a Royal Norwegian Council for Scientific and Industrial Research Fellowship in 1986 and was named a Terman Fellow at Stanford for the period 1999-2002. He is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America, the Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters, and the Norwegian Academy of Technological Sciences.

 

November 2016

Stephen P. Boyd has been awarded the 2017 IEEE James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal. The award is given for a career of outstanding contributions to education in the fields of interest of IEEE.

 

The James H. Mulligan Jr., Education Medal acknowledges:

  • Excellence in teaching and ability to inspire students,
  • Leadership in electrical engineering education through publication of course materials and writings on engineering education,
  • Leadership in the development of programs in curricula or teaching methodology,
  • Contributions to the engineering profession through research, engineering achievements, and technical papers, and
  • Participating in the education activities of professional societies. 

Stephen has received many awards and honors for his research in control systems engineering and optimization. In 2016, he also received Stanford's highest teaching honor, the Walter J. Gores teaching award for his signature course, Convex Optimization, and was named as a 2016 INFORMS Fellow. He is the author of many research articles and three books: Convex Optimization (with Lieven Vandenberghe, 2004), Linear Matrix Inequalities in System and Control Theory (with L. El Ghaoui, E. Feron, and V. Balakrishnan, 1994), and Linear Controller Design: Limits of Performance (with Craig Barratt, 1991). His group has produced many open source tools, including CVX (with Michael Grant), CVXPY (with Steven Diamond) and Convex.jl (with Madeleine Udell and others), widely used parser-solvers for convex optimization.

Stephen is the Samsung Professor of Engineering, and Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Information Systems Laboratory at Stanford University. He has courtesy appointments in the Department of Management Science and Engineering and the Department of Computer Science, and is member of the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering. His current research focus is on convex optimization applications in control, signal processing, finance, and circuit design.

For nearly a century, the IEEE Awards Program has paid tribute to researchers, inventors, innovators, and practitioners whose exceptional achievements and outstanding contributions have made a lasting impact on technology, society, and the engineering profession.

The IEEE Honors Ceremony was held in San Francisco.  Please join us in congratulating Stephen! 

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November 2016

November’s Electrical Engineering staff recognized for their outstanding effort are Steven Clark, Rachel Pham and Jennifer Wong. Nominated by peers, students and faculty, each are an example of professional contribution above and beyond their everyday roles, and continue to make profound and positive impact improving everyday work and academic life. 

Please congratulate Steve, Rachel, and Jennifer for their outstanding contributions to the EE department.  

  

Excerpts from this month’s recipient nominations follow. 

Steven Clark, Instructional Labs Manager

  • “Steven constantly goes above and beyond helping make new lab-based classes happen."
  • “He was instrumental in launching EE’s new maker space, lab64."

Rachel Pham, Academic Affairs & Programs Administrator

  • “Rachel was instrumental in the 2016 REU experience being well-attended, and professional."  
  • "I struggled with finalizing the room for my course, and for 2 weeks, she updated a lot — I appreciate her patience and helpfulness!"

Jennifer Wong, Research Administration Manager, Ginzton, E.L. Lab

  • “Jennifer’s timeliness and attention to detail are tremendously appreciated.”
  • “Her extraordinary effort underscores everything she does."

The Staff Gift Card Bonus Program is sponsored by the School of Engineering. Each year, the EE department receives several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond their role. Each month, staff are chosen from nominations received from faculty, students, and staff. Past nominations are eligible for future months.

 Nominate a deserving staff person or group today! We encourage you to nominate individuals or groups that have made a profound improvement in daily work life. Each recipient receives a $50 Visa card. Nominations can be made at any time.

 

November 2016


Yanjun Han (PhD candidate) and co-authors Jiantao Jiao (PhD candidate) and Professor Tsachy Weissman received the ISITA 2016 Student Paper Award. The award was announced at the International Symposium on Information Theory and its Applications (ISITA2016) event in Monterey, California.

Their paper is titled, "Minimax Rate-Optimal Estimation of KL Divergence between Discrete Distributions."

Congratulations to Yanjun, Jiantao and Tsachy!

 

 

October 2016

Congratulations to David H. Lin (PhD '16), Eshan Singh (PhD candidate), and Professor Subhasish Mitra for receiving the 2015 IEEE International Test Conference (ITC) Best Paper Award.

To encourage excellence in its technical program, ITC presents awards to authors of outstanding papers presented at ITC and published in the proceedings. In determining award-winning papers, the ITC Awards Selection Committee considers the quality of the papers as published in the Proceedings and as presented at the conference technical sessions. The committee's decisions are based on responses by conference attendees as recorded on session rating cards and on the observations and recommendations of the ITC Program Committee.

Their paper, "A Structured Approach to Post-Silicon Validation and Debug using Symbolic Quick Error Detection", has been selected as the Best Paper for International Test Conference (ITC).

The Best Paper Award will be presented to Mitra and co-authors during the plenary session at ITC on November 15th.

 

Congratulations to all!

Prof. Sachin Katti (pictured left) and Dinesh Bharadia (pictured right) at EE commencement 2016
October 2016

The Marconi Society honors Dinesh Bharadia (PhD '16) with the 2016 Paul Baran Young Scholar Award. Dedicated to furthering scientific achievements in communications and the internet, the Marconi Society will honor four scholars for their outstanding research and innovations in networking. The 2016 Paul Baran Young Scholars Awards will be presented at a gala on November 2 at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA.

"Bharadia's research disproved a long-held assumption that, it is generally not possible for a radio to receive and transmit on the same frequency band because of the interference that results," reads the announcement.

The self-interference cancellation filter Bharadia developed also unleashed the potential for many more applications. The unique architecture had to allow cancellation in all environments. According to Bharadia's PhD advisor, Sachin Katti, "Dinesh's work enables a whole host of new applications, from extremely low-power Internet of Things connectivity to motion tracking. It has the potential to be used for important future applications such as building novel wireless imaging that can enable accuracy in driverless cars during severe weather scenarios, helping blind people to navigate indoors, and much more."

Bharadia thinks receiving the Marconi Young Scholar award is especially rewarding because his work has a direct connection to Marconi. "Marconi invented the radio and I was able to make radios full-duplex," he says. "It's fitting that this work should be recognized by the Marconi Society."

 

Hearty congratulations to Dinesh Bharadia!

 

Excerts from the Marconi Society press release.

June 2016

Congratulations to Tim Anderson and José Padovani!

 

Tim (EE and ICME PhD candidate) and José (EE PhD '16) were recognized for their outstanding teaching. They each were awarded the 2016 Centennial Teaching Assistant Award. The award program recognizes outstanding instruction by TA's in the Humanities and Sciences, Earth Sciences, and Engineering schools.

Nominated by faculty, peers, and previous students, each received a $500 stipend and certificate.


About Tim

Tim is a committed instructor. He has taught, tutored, or assisted with Computational and Mathematical Engineering (CME) 102, 108 and 100. His nominators emphasized his valuable contribution in advancing equity via ACE (Additional Calculus for Engineers) in CME. Tim is a first-year PhD student, having completed his EE BS earlier in 2016.

A few comments from Tim's nomination:

PhD candidate Tim Anderson
  • Tim did a phenomenal job not only reviewing and explaining material in-depth, but going the extra mile in explaining industry and major related applications for nearly every topic.
  • I really benefited from the extra practice, and having a good relationship with Tim.
  • ACE has greatly helped me with my academic experiences so far in STEM: developing better study habits, giving me extra help, and gaining confidence in my abilities.

 

 

 

 

 

About José

José Padovani
José Padovani was the Teaching Assistant and head lab TA for EE101A. Being the first to incorporate the course's new curriculum, he rewrote the exercises, synchronizing them with the lectures, while incorporating feedback from students. EE101A's enrollment climbed significantly with José's insights and improvements.

Excerpts from José's nomination:

  • He is genuinely dedicated to making sure that the labs ran smoothly, and that students truly learn from the exercises.
  • José's mini-tutorials helped all the students be better prepared for each section, resulting in an improved learning experience for students.
  • He doesn't leave until he's sure that everyone 'gets it'.

 

Please join us in recognizing Tim and José – their efforts are greatly valued!

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