EE Student Information

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EE Student Information, Spring Quarter through Academic Year 2020-2021: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

Updates will be posted on this page, as well as emailed to the EE student mail list.

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Award

incoming EE professor Chelsea Finn
May 2019

Congratulations to incoming EE and CS professor Chelsea Finn. She was awarded the 2019 ACM Doctoral Dissertation Award for her dissertation, "Learning to Learn with Gradients." In her thesis, Finn introduced algorithms for meta-learning that enable deep networks to solve new tasks from small datasets, and demonstrated how her algorithms can be applied in areas including computer vision, reinforcement learning and robotics.

Deep learning has transformed the artificial intelligence field and has led to significant advances in areas including speech recognition, computer vision and robotics. However, deep learning methods require large datasets, which aren't readily available in areas such as medical imaging and robotics.

Meta-learning is a recent innovation that holds promise to allow machines to learn with smaller datasets. Meta-learning algorithms "learn to learn" by using past data to learn how to adapt quickly to new tasks. However, much of the initial work in meta-learning focused on designing increasingly complex neural network architectures. In her dissertation, Finn introduced a class of methods called model-agnostic meta-learning (MAML) methods, which don't require computer scientists to manually design complex architectures. Finn's MAML methods have had tremendous impact on the field and have been widely adopted in reinforcement learning, computer vision and other fields of machine learning.

At a young age, Finn has become one of the most recognized experts in the field of robotic learning. She has developed some of the most effective methods to teach robots skills to control and manipulate objects. In one instance highlighted in her dissertation, she used her MAML methods to teach a robot reaching and placing skills, using raw camera pixels from just a single human demonstration.

Finn is a Research Scientist at Google Brain and a postdoctoral researcher at the Berkeley AI Research Lab (BAIR). In the fall of 2019, she will start a full-time appointment as an Assistant Professor at Stanford University. Finn received her PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley and a BS in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

 

Join us in congratulating Chelsea on this well-deserved award!

 

 

Source: www.acm.org/media-center/2019/may/dissertation-award-2018

image of Douglas Chaffee
May 2019

Please join us in acknowledging the tremendous dedication of Doug Chaffee. During his years as an EE staff member, Doug has supported various faculty, and scores of graduate students, visiting scholars, and post-doctoral students. His colleagues enjoy his expertise and thoroughness in many areas. In addition to his professionism, Doug has a great sense of humor and is involved in community service. Please take a moment to thank him for his valuable contributions to both Stanford and the community.

Doug is a member of the Stanford Electrical Engineering Staff (SEES) Committee which provides several social activities each year for staff. Often he acts as the event emcee, and makes great effort to involve everyone in fun, supportive activities. Doug receives many acknowledgements for his outstanding work and committment to the department.

Congratulations Doug!

May 2019

The final project for EE25N is to create a podcast episode about a theme that was covered during the quarter. EE25N exposes incoming freshmen to the myriad forms that information takes in modern academic research. Student teams combine information from lectures, lab tours and their own research into a compelling, layperson science podcast episode.

Team Go HAAM (consisting of Hamza el Boudali, Ashley Kwon, Alexa Ramachandran and Mia Bahr) had among the most difficult episode themes due to its breadth of scope and highly technical material: "information and physics." Despite a wildly disparate set of topics and little to no understanding of the material going into the class, Team Go HAAM managed to create a coherent, understandable, and enjoyable podcast episode highlighting two very different physics experiments.

In a few weeks, Team Go HAAM managed to digest dense scientific information, interview sources for follow-up questions, create a compelling narrative script, record voiceovers in the recording studio and perform very competent audio editing. When challenged to improve an initial draft, all team members willingly made time to meet with the course assistant for feedback and revisions. In the end, Team Go HAAM created a funny and accurate podcast.

 

Congratulations to Team Go HAAM!

 

 

Listen to Episode 5: The Physicists.

2019 Terman award winners Anastasios Angelopoulos, Jonathan Lin, and Meera Radhakrishnan
May 2019

The Frederick Emmons Terman Engineering Award for Scholastic Achievement was awarded to Anastasios Angelopoulos (BS '19), Jonathan Taylor Lin (BS '19; MS '20) and Meera Radhakrishnan (BS '19; MS '20). The Terman Award is one of the most selective academic awards. It is based on overall academic performance and is presented to the top five percent of each year's School of Engineering seniors.

The Terman scholars celebratory luncheon took place April 27. The scholars were encouraged to invite the most influential secondary school or other pre-college teacher who guided them during the formative stages of their academic career.

 

Anastasios' most influential secondary instructor is Aquita Winslow, the Polytechnic School librarian, who generously spent hundreds of hours of time as his high school debate coach and was a transformative force in his life. His Stanford advisor is Professor and Chair Stephen Boyd.. Anastasios is a third-year undergraduate – completing his Bachelor's degree in a reduced amount of time, while maintaining high academic performance. He will graduate with a B.S. EE in Spring 2019.

 


 

Jonathan Taylor Lin invited his secondary teacher, Mr. Jim Birdsong. His Stanford advisor is Professor Subhasish Mitra. Jonathan will graduate with a B.S. EE in Spring 2019 and M.S. EE in Spring 2020.

 


 

Meera, 2019 Terman Award Winner, BS EE 2019
Meera Radhakrishnan's most influential secondary teacher is Mr. Christian Perry, and her Stanford advisor is Professor Dwight Nishimura. She will complete her Bachelor of Science degree in 2019 and M.S. in 2020.

 

Please join us in congratulating Anastasios, Jonathan, and Meera on their scholastic achievements. Best to all of them!


This award is named after Fred Terman (BS; MS Stanford) who was the fourth Dean of the School of Engineering at Stanford, serving from 1944-1958, after which he became the Provost at the University, and is generally credited, along with President Wally Sterling, as having started the process that has led Stanford to its present position among the leading universities of the world. View Frederick Terman on EE's Timeline.

image of Vickie Carillo, EE staff member
May 2019

Please join us in acknowledging the tremendous dedication of Vickie Carrillo during the past 38 years. Vickie is often times the "face of EE" as she frequently greets visitors and answers their myriad of questions with grace and warmth. She has supported nearly every member of EE in one form or another: faculty, staff, students (even their parents) and campus visitors. Please take a moment to thank her for her valuable contributions.

Vickie is frequently nominated for EE Staff Awards, and a popular member of several committees. Recently, Vickie was enthusiastically nominated for the 2019 Amy J. Blue Awards and made the top 14 out of 260 nominees. From the perspective of this writer – she is #1.

 

We are honored to have Vickie as a member of the Electrical Engineering Staff. Please join us in acknowledging Vickie's important contributions and years of dedicated service.

Photo credit: Meo Kittiwanich

 

image of professor Jon Fan
April 2019

Professor of Electrical Engineering Jonathan Fan has won the 2019 Okawa Foundation Research Grant. The Research Grant Presentation Ceremony will occur in San Francisco later this year.

The mission of the Okawa Foundation is promotion and development in the field of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) through awards and research grants as well as efforts to nurture researchers, engineers, and providers. It also seeks to promote diversity and ubiquitousness of human communication and thereby contribute to the peace and prosperity of humankind.

 

Please join us in congratulating Jonathan for this well-deserved award!

 

Read more about the Okawa Foundation: www.okawa-foundation.or.jp/en/outline/index.html

image of Stanford undergrad students Andrew Zelaya, Felipe Bomfim Pinheiro de Meneses, and James Milan Kanof
April 2019

Congratulations to undergrads Andrew Zelaya, Felipe Bomfim Pinheiro de Meneses, and James Milan Kanof - they have been selected as Introductory Seminars Excellence Award winners! Their "Art and Science of Engineering Design, EE15N" project addressed an important and timely problem for Stanford students, and created a truly unique, compelling, and powerful solution.

"This was one of the most memorable projects from all EE15N classes as it was so uplifting to watch the team come together and create something so special," stated EE15N instructors, Professor Goldsmith and Dr. My T. Le.

For their project, they worked with students, academics, journalists, and filmmakers to design a solution from the ground up to address the root causes of why students do not care about being informed of important global issues. The team's final design centered around building empathy for those most affected by global issues via two components:

  • First, they created a custom Virtual Reality Experience that allows students to experience global issues around the world firsthand.
  • Second, they built a custom online platform that focuses on the human cost of these issues, how they affect the Stanford community, and how students can help.

 

Please join us in congratulating Andrew, Felipe and James on their compelling creation – we look forward to their future contributions!

About the Introductory Seminars Excellence Award

Each academic year, faculty nominate exemplary student projects for an introductory seminars excellence award. All winners are invited to an annual spring awards ceremony that celebrates the diverse and innovative learning experiences across all introductory seminar courses.

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image of professor Srabanti Chowdhury
April 2019

Professor Srabanti Chowdhury has been awarded the Gabilan Faculty Fellowship. The Gabilan Fellows comprise a group of faculty whose aim is to contribute to the support of women in the sciences and engineering at Stanford. Srabanti was appointed by Provost Persis Drell and Vice Provost for Faculty Development and Diversity Karen Cook. Gabilan Fellows have the opportunity to be part of a collegial and vibrant community from the biosciences, engineering, and natural and mathematical sciences.

Srabanti's research focuses on wideband gap (WBG) materials and device engineering for energy efficient and compact system architecture for power electronics, and RF applications. Besides Gallium Nitride, her group is exploring Diamond for various electronic applications. She received her B.Tech in India in Radiophysics and Electronics (Univ. of Calcutta) and her M.S and PhD in Electrical Engineering from University of California, Santa Barbara. She received the DARPA Young Faculty Award, NSF CAREER and AFOSR Young Investigator Program (YIP) in 2015. In 2016 she received the Young Scientist award at the International Symposium on Compound Semiconductors (ISCS). Among her various synergistic activities, she serves as the member of two committees under IEEE Electron Device Society (Compound Semiconductor Devices & Circuits Committee Members and Power Devices and ICs Committee). She has served the IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) technical sub committee on Power Devices & Compound Semiconductor and High Speed Devices (PC) sub-committee in 2016 and 2017. She was the PC subcommittee chair for IEDM-2018, and continues to serve the IEDM executive committee for 2019. She is a senior member of IEEE.

 

Please join us in congratulating Srabanti on her well-deserved recognition!

 

image of Mendel Rosenblum [image credit: ACM]
April 2019

Professor Mendel Rosenblum has been awarded the inaugural ACM Charles P. Thacker Breakthrough Award. The award recognizes individuals or groups with the same out-of-the-box thinking and "can-do" approach to solving the unsolved that Charles Thacker exhibited. Mendel is the DRC Professor in the School of Engineering, Professor of Computer Science, and Professor of Electrical Engineering. He will formally receive the award at ACM's annual Awards Banquet in June, 2019.

Mendel is recognized for reinventing the virtual machine for the modern era and thereby revolutionizing datacenters and enabling modern cloud computing. In the late 1990s, Rosenblum and his students brought virtual machines back to life by using them to solve challenging technical problems in building system software for scalable multiprocessors. In 1998, Rosenblum and colleagues founded VMware. VMware popularized the use of virtual machines as a means of supporting many disparate software environments to share processor resources within a datacenter. This approach ultimately led to the development of modern cloud computing services such as Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud.

"The new paradigm of cloud computing, in which computing services are delivered over the internet, has been one of the most important developments in the computing industry over the past 20 years," said ACM President Cherri M. Pancake. "Cloud computing has vastly improved the efficiency of systems, reduced costs, and been essential to the operations of businesses at all levels. However, cloud computing, as we know it today, would not be possible without Rosenblum's reinvention of virtual machines. His leadership, both through his early research at Stanford and his founding of VMware, has been indispensable to the rise of datacenters and the preeminence of the cloud."

 

Please join us in congratulating Mendel for this well-deserved recognition!

 

Excerpted from "Inaugural ACM Chuck Thacker Breakthrough Award Recognizes Fundamental Contributions that Enabled Cloud Computing", ACM's Latest Awards News, April 10, 2019.


 

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March 2019

Professor Jelena Vuckovic has been named MPQ Distinguished Scholar, 2019. She leads the Stanford's Nanoscale and Quantum Photonics Lab and is Director of Q-FARM (Quantum Fundamentals, Architecture and Machines), a facility of the Stanford-SLAC Quantum Initiative. Jelena is currently a visiting scientist at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics.

The MPQ award recognizes her groundbreaking contributions to the field of Nanoscale and Quantum Photonics. Jelena is the 7th scientist awarded this honor since the Institute was funded. Previous Distinguished Scholars 

 

Please join us in congratulating Jelena on her tremendous research contributions!

About the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics

Research concentrates on the interaction of light and matter under extreme conditions. One focus is the high-precision spectroscopy of hydrogen. In the course of these measurements Prof. Theodor W. Hänsch developed the frequency comb technique for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 2005. Other experiments aim at capturing single atoms and photons and letting them interact in a controlled way, thus paving the way towards future quantum computers. Theorists on the other hand are working on strategies to communicate quantum information in a most efficient way. They develop algorithms that allow the safe encryption of secret information. MPQ scientists also investigate the bizarre properties quantum-mechanical many-body systems can take on at extremely low temperatures (about one millionth Kelvin above zero). Finally light flashes with the incredibly short duration of several attoseconds (1 as is a billionth of a billionth of a second) are generated which make it possible, for example, to observe quantum-mechanical processes in atoms such as the 'tunnelling' of electrons or atomic transitions in real time.

 

Excerpted from "Jelena Vučković named MPQ Distinguished Scholar", Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, March 28, 2019.


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