Award

December 2017

The paper, "ESPRIT-Estimation of Signal Parameters Via Rotational Invariance Techniques" was coauthored by professor Thomas Kailath and Richard Roy in 1989.

The award will be presented at the Opening Ceremony of the 2018 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP) in Calgary, Canada. Ali H. Sayed, president of IEEE Signal Processing Society, will present emeritus professor Kailath with the award.

ICASSP is the world's largest and most comprehensive technical conference focused on signal processing and its applications. The conference introduces new developments in the field and provides an engaging forum to exchange ideas with researchers and developers. Signal Processing and Artificial Intelligence encompass many areas including advanced communications technologies and smarter homes/devices.

Thomas Kailath's research and teaching have ranged over several fields of engineering and mathematics: information theory, communications, linear systems, estimation and control, signal processing, semiconductor manufacturing, probability and statistics, and matrix and operator theory. He has also co-founded and served as a director of several high-technology companies. He has mentored an outstanding array of over a hundred doctoral and postdoctoral scholars. He is a fellow of the IEEE and a member of the US National Academy of Engineering, the US National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Indian National Academy of Engineering, the Academy of Sciences of the Developing World and the Royal Spanish Academy of Engineering. In 2006, he was inducted into the Silicon Valley Engineering Hall of Fame. In 2014, he received a US National Medal of Science from President Obama "for transformative contributions to the fields of information and system science, for distinctive and sustained mentoring of young scholars, and for translation of scientific ideas into entrepreneurial ventures that have had a significant impact on industry." Read article.

Congratulations to Tom and Richard on this well-deserved recognition.

December 2017

Ting Chia (Jerry) Chang (PhD candidate '20) is the lead author of "Scaling of Ultrasound-Powered Receivers for Sub-Millimeter Wireless Implants." He and his co-authors received the Best Paper Award at the 2017 IEEE BioCAS Conference.

The 13th IEEE Biomedical Circuits and Systems Conference (BioCAS), was held October 19-21 in Turin, Italy. The annual conference is a premier international forum for researchers and engineers to present their state-of-the-art multidisciplinary research and development activities at the frontiers of medicine, life sciences, and engineering.

Jerry's research focuses on circuits and system design for miniaturized wireless medical implantable devices with ultrasonic links. He is advised by professor Amin Arbabian, who oversees the ArbabianLab Ultrasonically Powered Implantable Devices research team.

 

Congratulations to Jerry Chang and co-authors: M. J. Weber, J. Charthad, S. Baltsavias, and A. Arbabian for receiving the best paper award!

Paper Abstract:
We investigate scaling of ultrasound-powered wireless receivers for efficient, miniaturized implantable medical devices. Single crystalline piezoelectric material, PMN-PT, is chosen in this study as it has low resonance frequency with scaled dimensions. For accurate modeling of sub-mm-sized receivers, we perform simulations using the finite element method, followed by validation with measurements. Results are presented for scaling of the resonance frequency, resistance at resonance, and aperture efficiency of PMN-PT receivers with thickness of 0.5 mm and widths ranging from 0.3 mm to 1.0 mm. Since optimizing the overall harvesting efficiency of an implant requires not only an efficient receiver but also an efficient interface to the power electronics, we analyze impedance matching efficiency between the receivers and the power electronics using optogenetic stimulation as an example application. Finally, we show the measurement of prototype implants with scaled receivers and discuss the trade-off between size and power harvesting efficiency of sub-mm wireless implants.

 

 

December 2017

Stephen Boyd has been elected to the Chinese Academy of Engineering, one of China's highest academic honors. The elected candidates become lifetime members of the academy. Stephen is one of 17 elected foreign academicians.

New academicians are selected every two years from academic institutions, research institutes, enterprises and hospitals, both inside and outside China.

The Chinese Academy of Engineering (CAE) – which falls under the State Council, China's top governing body – also has a role advising Beijing on the country's economic and social development, and its new members need to have "strict political clearance."

Foreigners are eligible for membership if they have contributed to the development of or played an important role in promoting China's engineering, science, and technology, the CAE said on its website.

The academy's selection of foreign members is part of this effort to strengthen China's presence and influence in engineering, science, and technology, the organisation said on its website.

 

Please join us in congratulating Stephen for this special and very well-deserved recognition.

 

Excerpts taken from "Bill Gates given one of China's highest academic honours," published in South China Morning Post.

 

November 2017

Congratulations to Andrea Montanari on his elevation to IEEE Fellow. IEEE Grade of Fellow is conferred by the Board of Directors upon a person with an extraordinary record of accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest. Less than 0.1% of voting IEEE members are selected annually for this member recognition. IEEE Fellows will be formally announced by the IEEE at end of the 2017.

Professor Montanari's research interests include understanding patterns in complex high-dimensional data, and what mathematical and algorithmic methods can be used to disentangle them from noise. His research spans several disciplines including statistics, computer science, information theory, and machine learning. He also works on applications of these techniques to healthcare data analytics.

Congratulations to Andrea!

 

Related:

Andrea's EE Spotlight

Andrea Montanari's EE Spotlight

 

November 2017

Emeritus professor Tom Kailath has been elected a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society (AMS). The citation reads, "For contributions to information theory and related areas, and for applications."

The Fellows of the AMS designation recognizes members who have made outstanding contributions to the creation, exposition, advancement, communication, and utilization of mathematics. Among the goals of the program are to create an enlarged class of mathematicians recognized by their peers as distinguished because of their contributions to the profession, and to honor excellence.

On the 2018 Class of Fellows of the AMS, Professor Kenneth A. Ribet, President of the American Mathematical Society, states, "This year's class of AMS Fellows has been selected from a large and deep pool of superb candidates. It is my pleasure and honor as AMS President to congratulate the new Fellows for their diverse contributions to the mathematical sciences and to the mathematics profession."

 

Please join us in congratulating Tom for this most recent recognition of his groundbreaking contributions!

 

Read more at the American Mathematical Fellows

October 2017

Ruishan Liu (PhD candidate) has received the Best Poster Award at the Bay Area Machine Learning Symposium, October 19, 2017. Ruishan belongs to the Stanford Laboratory for Machine Learning group, advised by Professor James Zou. Ruishan develops algorithms and theories in machine learning and reinforcement learning. She is also interested in applications in genomics and healthcare.

 

Poster Title:
"The Effects of Memory Replay in Reinforcement Learning"

Poster Abstract:
Experience replay is a key technique behind many recent advances in deep reinforcement learning. Despite its wide-spread application, very little is understood about the properties of experience replay. How does the amount of memory kept affect learning dynamics? Does it help to prioritize certain experiences?

In our work, we address these questions by formulating a dynamical systems ODE model of Q-learning with experience replay. We derive analytic solutions of the ODE for a simple setting. We show that even in this very simple setting, the amount of memory kept can substantially affect the agent's performance. Too much or too little memory both slow down learning.

We also proposed a simple algorithm for adaptively changing the memory buffer size which achieves consistently good empirical performance.

 

Congratulations to Ruishan!

October 2017

 Professor Andrea Goldsmith has been selected as the recipient of the 2017 WICE Mentorship Award from the IEEE Communications Society. She will be presented with a plaque at the IEEE Globecom'17 in Singapore.

The WICE Mentorship Award recognizes members of IEEE ComSoc who have made a strong commitment to mentoring WICE members, have had a significant positive impact on their mentees' education and career, and who, through their mentees, have advanced communications engineering.

The IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc.) is the world's largest technical professional society. Through its more than 400,000 members in 150 countries, the organization is a leading authority on a wide variety of areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications to biomedical engineering, electric power and consumer electronics. Dedicated to the advancement of technology, the IEEE publishes 30 percent of the world's literature in the electrical and electronics engineering and computer science fields, and has developed nearly 900 active industry standards. The organization annually sponsors more than 850 conferences worldwide.

The IEEE Communications Society (IEEE ComSoc) is a leading global community comprised of a diverse set of professionals with a common interest in advancing all communications and networking technologies.

 

Congratulations to Andrea on this well-deserved recognition!

 

 

July 2017

Kirby Smithe (PhD candidate) received first place for his presentation, "High-field transport and velocity saturation in CVD monolayer MoS2" at the EDISON 20 Conference in July.

All student preesenters were ranked by a committee comprised of members of the International Advisory Committee. More than 25 presentations and posters were evaluated by this committee. Kirby's award is accompanied by $300 and a glass commemorative trophy.

 

Kirby's research involves growth and material characterization of 2D semiconductors and engineering 2D electronic devices for circuit-level applications. He is the recipient of the Stanford Graduate Fellowship as well as the NSF Graduate Fellowship. Kirby is part of the Pop Lab research group, advised by Professor Eric Pop.

 

Congratulations to Kirby!

 

 

October 2017

Congratulations to PhD candidates Connor McClellan and Fiona Ching-Hua Wang. Each received the best in session award at the TechCon 2017, held in Austin, Texas. 

  • Connor's paper, "Effective n-type Doping of Monolayer MoS2 by AlO(x)" was presented in the 2-D and TMD Materials and Devices: I session. Professor Eric Pop is Connor's advisor

  • Fiona's paper, "N-type Black Phosphorus Transistor with Low Work Function Contacts," was presented in the 2-D and TMD Materials and Devices: III session. Professor H.-S. Philip Wong is Fiona's advisor.

They were presented with a certificate and medal during the final event for SRC TECHCON 2017.

 

 

Image credit: L.A. Cicero
September 2017

John L. Hennessy, inaugural director of the Knight-Hennessy Scholars Program and president emeritus of Stanford, has been elected an international fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, the national academy for engineering in the United Kingdom.

Founded in 1976, the Royal Academy of Engineering brings together the most successful and talented engineers for a shared purpose: to advance and promote excellence in engineering. Earlier this week, the academy announced 50 new fellows, two international fellows, including Hennessy, and one honorary fellow.

Hennessy, a pioneer in computer architecture, said the honor held special significance because so many early pioneers in the field did their great work in England, from Alan Turing (1912-1954), a mathematician who conceived of modern computing and played a crucial role in the Allied victory over Nazi Germany in WWII, to Maurice Wilkes (1913-2010), a professor at Cambridge University who is considered the most important figure in the development of practical computing in the United Kingdom.

"I have had the pleasure of knowing many colleagues who are members of the Royal Academy of Engineering, including Wilkes, a colleague from Cambridge who I knew personally for many years," Hennessy said. "It is an honor to join such an august group."

Hennessy has won numerous awards for his work, including election to the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Sciences. He is also a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Association for Computing Machinery, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

After stepping down as president of Stanford a year ago, Hennessy became the Shriram Family Director of the Knight-Hennessy Scholars Program, which is the largest fully endowed graduate-level scholarship program in the world. The program, which is currently located in the Littlefield Center, held a groundbreaking ceremony last spring for its future home, Denning House. Currently, the program is accepting applications for its first class of 50 scholars, who will begin their studies in the fall of 2018.

Hennessy joined Stanford's faculty in 1977 as an assistant professor of electrical engineering. In 1981, he drew together researchers to focus on a technology known as RISC (reduced instruction set computer), which revolutionized computing by increasing performance while reducing costs. Hennessy helped transfer this technology to industry. In 1984, he cofounded MIPS Computer Systems, now MIPS Technologies, which designs microprocessors.

Hennessy, who rose through the academic ranks at Stanford and became a full professor in 1986, served as chair of the Department of Computer Science and took the helm as dean of the School of Engineering in 1996. He became provost in 1999 and was inaugurated as Stanford's 10th president in 2000. He stepped down from the presidency in 2016.

As president, Hennessy fostered interdisciplinary collaboration, launching university-wide initiatives in human health, environmental sustainability, international affairs, the arts and creativity, and greatly expanding opportunities for multidisciplinary teaching and learning. Under his leadership, the campus underwent a physical transformation to support 21st-century research and teaching needs, including cutting-edge facilities for the Graduate School of Business, the Law School, the Science and Engineering Quadrangle, Stanford Medicine and the Arts District.


 

 

Reprinted from Stanford News, "John L. Hennessy elected to Royal Academy of Engineering," September 7, 2017.

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