Award

December 2017

Electrical Engineering staff recognized for their outstanding effort include Charles Chen, Chet Frost, and Sue George. Each were nominated by peers, faculty and/or students for professionalism that went above and beyond their everyday roles. Gift card recipients continue to make profound and positive impact in EE's everyday work and academic environment.

Nominations may be submitted at any time. There are no restrictions on the persons or groups that you can nominate. Submitters are asked to include a citation of how the group or person went above and beyond. The submitter can choose to remain anonymous. Link to very brief nomination form.

 Please join us in congratulating Charles, Chet, and Sue. Excerpts from their nominations follow. 

Charles Chen, Research & Finance Administrator, Engineering Research Administration

  • "Charles was able to deliver a large, complex proposal for us. It wasn't an easy task to get all of the parts—but he did it!"
  • "He is always a pleasure to work with."

Chet Frost, Administrative Associate, Electrical Engineering

  • "I appreciate his level of professionalism; he always follows-up, and verifies that a project is complete."
  • "Chet is always willing to help beyond his ordinary responsibilities."

Sue George, Administrative Associate, Computer Science

  • "Sue always takes time to hear what others have to say. She's efficient, friendly, and FANTASTIC."
  • "With the Gates' Building recent renovation, Sue was instrumental in logistics handling."

 

The Staff Gift Card Bonus Program is sponsored by the School of Engineering. Each year, the EE department receives several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond their role. Each month, staff are chosen from nominations received from faculty, students, and staff. Past nominations are eligible for future months.

Nominate a deserving staff person or group today! We encourage you to nominate individuals or groups that have made a profound improvement in daily work life. Each recipient receives a $50 Visa card. Nominations can be made at any time.

December 2017

The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) today announced Balaji Prabhakar of Stanford University as a 2017 ACM Fellow. ACM Fellows are selected each year for outstanding accomplishments in computing and information technology and/or outstanding service to ACM and the larger computing community.

The 2017 ACM Fellows were selected by their peers from more than 100,000 ACM members worldwide and represent the top one percent of ACM members.

ACM recognizes excellence through its eminent series of awards for technical and professional achievements and contributions in computer science and information technology. ACM also names as Fellows and Distinguished Members those members who, in addition to professional accomplishments, have made significant contributions to ACM's mission.

"To be selected as a Fellow is to join our most renowned member grade and an elite group that represents less than 1 percent of ACM's overall membership," explains ACM President Vicki L. Hanson. "The Fellows program allows us to shine a light on landmark contributions to computing, as well as the men and women whose hard work, dedication, and inspiration are responsible for groundbreaking work that improves our lives in so many ways."

The 2017 Fellows have been cited for numerous contributions in areas including artificial intelligence, big data, computer architecture, computer graphics, high performance computing, human-computer interaction, sensor networks, and wireless networking.

ACM will formally recognize its 2017 Fellows at the annual Awards Banquet, to be held in San Francisco on June 23, 2018. Additional information about the 2017 ACM Fellows, and the awards event, as well as previous ACM Fellows and award winners, is available on the ACM Awards site.

 

Please join us in congratulating Balaji!

 

December 2017

H. Tom Soh has been elected to the rank of National Academy of Inventors Fellow. The NAI Fellows committee chose Tom as he "has demonstrated a highly prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society."

Those elected to the rank of National Academy of Inventors (NAI) Fellow are named inventors on U.S. patents and were nominated by their peers for outstanding contributions in areas such as patents and licensing, innovative discovery and technology, significant impact on society, and support and enhancement of innovation.

The 2017 class of NAI Fellows was evaluated by the 18 members of the 2017 Selection Committee, which encompassed NAI Fellows, U.S. National Medals recipients, National Inventors Hall of Fame inductees, members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and senior officials from the USPTO, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Association of American Universities, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, Association of University Technology Managers, and National Inventors Hall of Fame, among other organizations.

"I am incredibly proud to welcome our 2017 Fellows to the Academy," said NAI President Paul Sanberg. "These accomplished individuals represent the pinnacle of achievement at the intersection of academia and invention––their discoveries have changed the way we view the world. They epitomize the triumph of a university culture that celebrates patents, licensing, and commercialization, and we look forward to engaging their talents to further support academic innovation."

 

Please congratulate Tom for this very well-deserved recognition of his groundbreaking contributions to biosensors and synthetic antibodies.

NAI Press Release, "National Academy of Inventors Announces 2017 Fellows," Dec. 12, 2017

December 2017

We are very proud of the research being done by our graduate and undergraduate students.

Throughout the academic year, we encourage students to present at conferences and related interdisciplinary events. The practice of sharing and speaking about research to a variety of audiences is a quality we encourage. We are pleased to again acknowledge electrical engineering students who have been recognized for their presentation, poster, and/or paper awards.


Jerry Chang (EE PhD candidate)
Ting Chia (Jerry) Chang (PhD candidate '20) is the lead author of "Scaling of Ultrasound-Powered Receivers for Sub-Millimeter Wireless Implants." He and his co-authors received the Best Paper Award at the 2017 IEEE BioCAS Conference.
 

Ruishan Liu (EE PhD candidate)
Ruishan Liu (PhD candidate) received the Best Poster Award at the Bay Area Machine Learning Symposium. Ruishan belongs to the Stanford Laboratory for Machine Learning group, advised by Professor James Zou. Ruishan develops algorithms and theories in machine learning and reinforcement learning, and is interested in applications in genomics and healthcare.

Her poster title is, "The Effects of Memory Replay in Reinforcement Learning."

PhD candidates Connor McClellan and Fiona Ching-Hua Wang
PhD candidates Connor McClellan and Fiona Ching-Hua Wang each received the Best in Session Award at the TechCon 2017.

  • Connor's paper, "Effective n-type Doping of Monolayer MoS2 by AlO(x)" was presented in the 2-D and TMD Materials and Devices: I session. Professor Eric Pop is Connor's advisor 
  • Fiona's paper, "N-type Black Phosphorus Transistor with Low Work Function Contacts," was presented in the 2-D and TMD Materials and Devices: III session. Professor H.-S. Philip Wong is Fiona's advisor. 
Read More

David Hallac EE PhD candidate
David Hallac, EE PhD candidate, is the lead author of "Toeplitz Inverse Covariance-Based Clustering of Multivariate Time Series Data," which has been selected to receive the KDD 2017 Conference Best Paper Runner-Up Award and the Best Student Paper runner-up Award.
 

Iliana Erteza Bray EE PhD candidate
Iliana Erteza Bray, EE PhD candidate, received The Firestone Medal for Excellence in Undergraduate Research. Her paper is titled, “Frequency Shifts and Depth Dependence of Beta Band Activity in Rhesus Premotor Cortex Perceptual Decision-Making.” She ia advised by Krishna Shenoy (Electrical Engineering).
 

 JULY 2017 PhD candidates Alex Gabourie and Saurabh Suryavanshi
PhD candidates Alex Gabourie and Saurabh Suryavanshi received Best Paper Award at the 17th IEEE International Conference on Nanotechnology (IEEE NANO 2017). Their paper is titled, "Thermal Boundary Conductance of the MoS2-SiO2 Interface."

Kirby Smithe EE B.S. candidate
Kirby Smithe (PhD candidate) received first place for his presentation, "High-field transport and velocity saturation in CVD monolayer MoS2" at the EDISON 20 Conference.
 
Kirby's research involves growth and material characterization of 2D semiconductors and engineering 2D electronic devices for circuit-level applications. He is the recipient of the Stanford Graduate Fellowship as well as the NSF Graduate Fellowship. Kirby is advised by Professor Eric Pop.
 

Yuanfang Li (M.S. candidate) and Dr. Ardavan Pedram
Co-authors Yuanfang Li (MS candidate) and Dr. Ardavan Pedram received the Best Paper Award at the 28th annual IEEE International Conference on Application-specific Systems, Architectures and Processors (ASAP).

Yuanfang Li is an M.S. candidate and Dr. Ardavan Pedram is a senior research associate who manages the PRISM Project. The PRISM project enables the design of reconfigurable architectures to accelerate the building blocks of machine learning, high performance computing, and data science routines.

EE Admit Weekend poster winners
EE Admit Weekend hosts a competitive poster session. The presenting students are judged by faculty, peers and staff and scored on their presentation, poster, and professionalism. The awards went to:
  • Leighton Barnes winner in Information Systems and Science for poster titled "Geometry and the Relay Channel,” 
  • Adrian Alabi in Hardware/Software Systems for poster titled "915 MHz FSK Detection for Wireless Ultrasonic Imaging Data Reception,” 
  • Max Wang in Physical Technology and Science for poster titled "Minimally Invasive Ultrasonically Powered Implants for Next-Generation Therapies and Neuromodulation” 
Read More

December 2017

The paper, "ESPRIT-Estimation of Signal Parameters Via Rotational Invariance Techniques" was coauthored by professor Thomas Kailath and Richard Roy in 1989.

The award will be presented at the Opening Ceremony of the 2018 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP) in Calgary, Canada. Ali H. Sayed, president of IEEE Signal Processing Society, will present emeritus professor Kailath with the award.

ICASSP is the world's largest and most comprehensive technical conference focused on signal processing and its applications. The conference introduces new developments in the field and provides an engaging forum to exchange ideas with researchers and developers. Signal Processing and Artificial Intelligence encompass many areas including advanced communications technologies and smarter homes/devices.

Thomas Kailath's research and teaching have ranged over several fields of engineering and mathematics: information theory, communications, linear systems, estimation and control, signal processing, semiconductor manufacturing, probability and statistics, and matrix and operator theory. He has also co-founded and served as a director of several high-technology companies. He has mentored an outstanding array of over a hundred doctoral and postdoctoral scholars. He is a fellow of the IEEE and a member of the US National Academy of Engineering, the US National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Indian National Academy of Engineering, the Academy of Sciences of the Developing World and the Royal Spanish Academy of Engineering. In 2006, he was inducted into the Silicon Valley Engineering Hall of Fame. In 2014, he received a US National Medal of Science from President Obama "for transformative contributions to the fields of information and system science, for distinctive and sustained mentoring of young scholars, and for translation of scientific ideas into entrepreneurial ventures that have had a significant impact on industry." Read article.

Congratulations to Tom and Richard on this well-deserved recognition.

December 2017

Ting Chia (Jerry) Chang (PhD candidate '20) is the lead author of "Scaling of Ultrasound-Powered Receivers for Sub-Millimeter Wireless Implants." He and his co-authors received the Best Paper Award at the 2017 IEEE BioCAS Conference.

The 13th IEEE Biomedical Circuits and Systems Conference (BioCAS), was held October 19-21 in Turin, Italy. The annual conference is a premier international forum for researchers and engineers to present their state-of-the-art multidisciplinary research and development activities at the frontiers of medicine, life sciences, and engineering.

Jerry's research focuses on circuits and system design for miniaturized wireless medical implantable devices with ultrasonic links. He is advised by professor Amin Arbabian, who oversees the ArbabianLab Ultrasonically Powered Implantable Devices research team.

 

Congratulations to Jerry Chang and co-authors: M. J. Weber, J. Charthad, S. Baltsavias, and A. Arbabian for receiving the best paper award!

Paper Abstract:
We investigate scaling of ultrasound-powered wireless receivers for efficient, miniaturized implantable medical devices. Single crystalline piezoelectric material, PMN-PT, is chosen in this study as it has low resonance frequency with scaled dimensions. For accurate modeling of sub-mm-sized receivers, we perform simulations using the finite element method, followed by validation with measurements. Results are presented for scaling of the resonance frequency, resistance at resonance, and aperture efficiency of PMN-PT receivers with thickness of 0.5 mm and widths ranging from 0.3 mm to 1.0 mm. Since optimizing the overall harvesting efficiency of an implant requires not only an efficient receiver but also an efficient interface to the power electronics, we analyze impedance matching efficiency between the receivers and the power electronics using optogenetic stimulation as an example application. Finally, we show the measurement of prototype implants with scaled receivers and discuss the trade-off between size and power harvesting efficiency of sub-mm wireless implants.

 

 

December 2017

Stephen Boyd has been elected to the Chinese Academy of Engineering, one of China's highest academic honors. The elected candidates become lifetime members of the academy. Stephen is one of 17 elected foreign academicians.

New academicians are selected every two years from academic institutions, research institutes, enterprises and hospitals, both inside and outside China.

The Chinese Academy of Engineering (CAE) – which falls under the State Council, China's top governing body – also has a role advising Beijing on the country's economic and social development, and its new members need to have "strict political clearance."

Foreigners are eligible for membership if they have contributed to the development of or played an important role in promoting China's engineering, science, and technology, the CAE said on its website.

The academy's selection of foreign members is part of this effort to strengthen China's presence and influence in engineering, science, and technology, the organisation said on its website.

 

Please join us in congratulating Stephen for this special and very well-deserved recognition.

 

Excerpts taken from "Bill Gates given one of China's highest academic honours," published in South China Morning Post.

 

November 2017

Congratulations to Andrea Montanari on his elevation to IEEE Fellow. IEEE Grade of Fellow is conferred by the Board of Directors upon a person with an extraordinary record of accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest. Less than 0.1% of voting IEEE members are selected annually for this member recognition. IEEE Fellows will be formally announced by the IEEE at end of the 2017.

Professor Montanari's research interests include understanding patterns in complex high-dimensional data, and what mathematical and algorithmic methods can be used to disentangle them from noise. His research spans several disciplines including statistics, computer science, information theory, and machine learning. He also works on applications of these techniques to healthcare data analytics.

Congratulations to Andrea!

 

Related:

Andrea's EE Spotlight

Andrea Montanari's EE Spotlight

 

November 2017

Emeritus professor Tom Kailath has been elected a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society (AMS). The citation reads, "For contributions to information theory and related areas, and for applications."

The Fellows of the AMS designation recognizes members who have made outstanding contributions to the creation, exposition, advancement, communication, and utilization of mathematics. Among the goals of the program are to create an enlarged class of mathematicians recognized by their peers as distinguished because of their contributions to the profession, and to honor excellence.

On the 2018 Class of Fellows of the AMS, Professor Kenneth A. Ribet, President of the American Mathematical Society, states, "This year's class of AMS Fellows has been selected from a large and deep pool of superb candidates. It is my pleasure and honor as AMS President to congratulate the new Fellows for their diverse contributions to the mathematical sciences and to the mathematics profession."

 

Please join us in congratulating Tom for this most recent recognition of his groundbreaking contributions!

 

Read more at the American Mathematical Fellows

October 2017

Ruishan Liu (PhD candidate) has received the Best Poster Award at the Bay Area Machine Learning Symposium, October 19, 2017. Ruishan belongs to the Stanford Laboratory for Machine Learning group, advised by Professor James Zou. Ruishan develops algorithms and theories in machine learning and reinforcement learning. She is also interested in applications in genomics and healthcare.

 

Poster Title:
"The Effects of Memory Replay in Reinforcement Learning"

Poster Abstract:
Experience replay is a key technique behind many recent advances in deep reinforcement learning. Despite its wide-spread application, very little is understood about the properties of experience replay. How does the amount of memory kept affect learning dynamics? Does it help to prioritize certain experiences?

In our work, we address these questions by formulating a dynamical systems ODE model of Q-learning with experience replay. We derive analytic solutions of the ODE for a simple setting. We show that even in this very simple setting, the amount of memory kept can substantially affect the agent's performance. Too much or too little memory both slow down learning.

We also proposed a simple algorithm for adaptively changing the memory buffer size which achieves consistently good empirical performance.

 

Congratulations to Ruishan!

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Award