Award

Tony Wu (PhD '18)
April 2018

Congratulations to Tony Wu (PhD '18). He has been awarded the Northern California Electronic Materials Symposium's Ross Tucker Award. Tony's work on systems-level integration of electronic nanomaterials was particularly impressive, and the award is well-deserved. Tony's advisor is Subhasish Mitra.

The Ross N. Tucker Award memorializes Dr. Ross N. Tucker, who contributed significantly to the advancement of the technology of materials used in semiconductor electronics, the Ross Tucker Award is given each year to a pair of graduate students at UC Berkeley and Stanford.

The 46th Annual Northern California Electronic Materials Symposium, co-sponsored by TMS and IEEE Santa Clara Valley Section, will be held at Benson Memorial Center in Santa Clara in May 2018. The program features presentations on advanced electronic materials processing techniques and devices, and analytical techniques by outstanding speakers who have made significant contributions to their respective fields.

 

Congratulations Tony!

Andrea Goldsmith 2018 ACM Athena Lecturer
April 2018

Today the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) named Andrea Goldsmith the 2018-2019 Athena Lecturer for contributions to the theory and practice of adaptive wireless communications, and for the successful transfer of research to commercial technology.

Professor Goldsmith is the Stephen Harris Professor in the School of Engineering. Her research is focused on the design, analysis, and fundamental performance limits of wireless systems and networks, as well as the application of communications and signal processing to biology and neuroscience.

Andrea introduced innovative approaches to the design, analysis and fundamental performance limits of wireless systems and networks. Her efforts helped develop technologies used in long-term evolution (LTE) cellular devices as well as the Wi-Fi standards that are used in wireless local area networks. She participated in the launch of companies to commercialize her work, which has led to the adoption of her ideas throughout the communications industry.

Andrea also serves on Stanford's Budget Group, Academic Council Advisory Board, Faculty Senate, and Faculty Women's Forum Steering Committee. She previously served as Chair of Stanford's Faculty Senate and as a member of its Commissions on Graduate Education and on Undergraduate Education, as well as its Task Force on Women and Leadership.

"The anytime, anywhere computing era in which we now live owes a debt to innovators like Andrea Goldsmith who have helped lay the groundwork for the wireless infrastructure that makes mobile computing possible," said ACM President Vicki L. Hanson. "Her work has improved the transmission, reception and overall quality of wireless communications. Importantly, Goldsmith's career has exemplified the spirit of the ACM Athena Lecturer Award in the numerous ways she has mentored young women throughout her career. She has helped prepare promising young women PhD students and postdocs for faculty positions, and she has worked to develop actionable strategies to improve the climate, recruitment and retention of women in the high tech industry."

Please join us in congratulating Andrea for this well-deserved recognition!

About ACM
ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, is the world's largest educational and scientific computing society, uniting computing educators, researchers and professionals to inspire dialogue, share resources and address the field's challenges. ACM strengthens the computing profession's collective voice through strong leadership, promotion of the highest standards, and recognition of technical excellence. ACM supports the professional growth of its members by providing opportunities for life-long learning, career development, and professional networking. 
Excerpted from The ACM press release.  

Related Links

Ana Klimovic, EE PhD '19
April 2018

Congratulations to Ana Klimovic (PhD candidate '19), Professor Christos Kozyrakis, and postdoc Heiner Litz. They won the 2018 Memorable Paper Award for System Architecture and Applications at the 9th Annual Non-Volatile Memories Workshop (NVMW) hosted by the University of California, San Diego. Their paper, "ReFlex: Remote Flash == Local Flash" was one of six finalists for the award selected from over 80 papers submitted to the workshop.

About The Memorable Paper Award

The Memorable Paper Award recognizes the best recent research on non-volatile memories published throughout the world. It is given annually to outstanding research published in the last two years that is expected to have substantial impact on the study of non-volatile memories. To be eligible, the paper must have been published in peer-reviewed venue in the last two years and the lead researcher must have been a student at the time.

About the Non-Volatile Memories Workshop

The Non-Volatile Memories Workshop is the world's premier venue for research into how to use non-volatile memory technology to improve the performance, reliability, and efficiency of computing systems. It was founded in 2010 by Dr. Paul Siegel and Dr. Steven Swanson of the University of California, San Diego's Jacob School of engineering. The workshop is a co-production of the Center for Magnetic Recording Research and the Non-Volatile Systems Laboratory at UC San Diego. More information, including a detailed program, is available at nvmw.ucsd.edu.

Please join us in congratulating Ana, Christos, and Heiner on their award! 


Award winner Ana Kilmovic (center) with general chairs of NVMW'18 Professor Steven Swanson (left) and Professor Paul Siegel (right), both of UCSD.

Paper Summary:

Internet companies such as Facebook and Google host trillions of messages, photos, and videos for their users. Hence, they need storage systems that are massive in scale, fast to access, and cost effective. Scale is achieved by hosting internet services in datacenters with thousands of machines, each contributing its local storage to the global data pool. Speed is achieved by selectively replacing slow hard disks in machines with Flash storage devices that can serve data accesses with 100x lower latency and 10,000x higher throughput.

However, Flash makes it difficult to build a cost-effective storage system. Flash devices are typically underutilized in terms of capacity and throughput due to the imbalance in the compute and storage requirements of the internet services running on each machine. In the past, datacenter operators dealt with the same challenge for disks by allowing services running on each machine to allocate storage over the network on any disk with spare capacity and bandwidth in the datacenter. Remote (over the network) access to disks enables utilizing all available capacity and throughput. Past efforts to implement similar remote access systems for Flash devices have run into significant challenges. Network protocol processing at the throughput of Flash devices requires a large number of processor cores and adds overheads that cancel out the latency advantages of using Flash. Moreover, when two remote machines access the same Flash device, interference between the two access streams can lead to unpredictable performance degradation.

To address these challenges, researchers Ana Klimovic, Heiner Litz and Christos Kozyrakis developed a software system called ReFlex. ReFlex enables high performance access to remote Flash storage with minimal compute resources and provides predictable performance for multiple services sharing a Flash device over the network. Using a single processing core, the system can process up to 850,000 requests per second which is 11x more than a traditional Linux network storage system. ReFlex makes remote Flash look like local Flash to applications, making it easy for a service running on a particular machine to use spare Flash capacity and bandwidth on other machines in the datacenter. To provide predictable performance when multiple remote machines access the same Flash device, ReFlex uses a novel scheduler to process incoming requests in an interference-aware manner.

ReFlex is having an increasing impact in industry and, in collaboration with IBM Research, has been integrated into the Apache Crail distributed storage system. This integration allows popular data analytics frameworks to leverage ReFlex to improve their resource efficiency while maintaining high, predictable performance. ReFlex is also being ported to a system on chip (SoC) platform by Broadcom Limited. ReFlex is open-source software and available at: https://www.github.com/stanford-mast/reflex.

 

Excerpted from the full NVMW'18 press release.

April 2018

The 2018 EE Admit Weekend welcomed 60 newly admitted PhD graduate students. The 2-day event connected admitted students with current students, faculty and staff. Several student-faculty sessions occurred throughout the 2 days, fostering a range of discussions from research topics to housing. Admitted students also participated in research lab and campus tours. Friday concluded with a PhD student research poster session and dinner with faculty.

Twenty-two PhD research projects were presented in this year's poster session. The posters are judged on oral presentation, visual quality, and clarity of presentation – all within a one minute timeframe. Judges include staff, faculty and students, and select one entry from EE's core research areas.

The 2018 poster award winners are:

  • Spyridon Baltsavias (PhD candidate '21), Hardware/Software Systems, for his poster, "Ingestible and Implantable Ultrasonic Sensors for GI-Tract Real-Time Monitoring"
  • Joseph Landry (PhD candidate '19), Physical Technology & Science, for his poster, "Structured Illumination Light Sheet Microscopy for High Throughput Imaging of Thick Tissue"
  • David Lindell (PhD candidate '22), Information Systems & Science, for his poster titled, "Confocal Non-Line-of-Sight Imaging based on the Light Cone Transform"

The winning student researchers were presented with a gift card and certificate from the EE Student Life Committee.

Congratulations and thanks to everyone for participating in the 2018 EE Admit Weekend and research poster session! Additional thanks to the EE Admissions, GSEE, and the EE Student Life Committee for sponsoring the poster contest and generous prizes. 

 

March 2018

The Electrical Engineering staff recognized this month for their outstanding effort are Beverly Davis, Teresa Nguyen, and Helen Niu.

Each were nominated by peers, faculty and/or students who included descriptions of their professionalism that goes above and beyond their everyday roles. Gift card recipients make profound and positive impact in the department's everyday work and academic environment.

 

Please join us in acknowledging Beverly, Teresa, and Helen's extraordinary work! Modified excerpts from their nominations follow.

 

Beverly Davis, Faculty Administrator

  • "Beverly is a rock star!"
  • She is really fun to talk to and does her job flawlessly.

Teresa Nguyen, Student Financial Officer

  • "She has been such a great help to me during grad school!"
  • Teresa is very knowledgeable and kind - I'm so glad she's part of our team.

Helen Niu, Faculty Administrator

  • Helen is extraordinarily capable and diligent.
  • "I am extremely grateful for her!"

Please congratulate them for their outstanding work!

The Staff Gift Card Bonus Program is sponsored by the School of Engineering. Each year, the EE department receives several gift cards to distribute to staff members who are recognized for going above and beyond their role. Each month, staff are chosen from nominations received from faculty, students, and staff. Past nominations are eligible for future months.

Nominate a deserving staff person or group today – nominate individuals or groups that have made a profound improvement in your daily work life. Each recipient receives a $50 Visa card. Nominations can be made at any time.

electrical engineer John Hennessy wins Turing Award
March 2018

Professor John L. Hennessy and retired UC Berkeley professor David Patterson have been named recipients of the 2017 ACM A.M. Turing Award for pioneering a systematic, quantitative approach to the design and evaluation of computer architectures with enduring impact on the microprocessor industry. Hennessy and Patterson created a systematic and quantitative approach to designing faster, lower power, and reduced instruction set computer (RISC) microprocessors. Their approach led to lasting and repeatable principles that generations of architects have used for many projects in academia and industry. Today, 99% of the more than 16 billion microprocessors produced annually are RISC processors, and are found in nearly all smartphones, tablets, and the billions of embedded devices that comprise the Internet of Things (IoT).

John is the James F. and Mary Lynn Gibbons Professor of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, and Shriram Family Director, Knight-Hennessy Scholars. He was dean of the School of Engineering (1996-2000), university provost (1999-2000), and Stanford University's 10th president (2006-2016).

The ACM Turing Award, often referred to as the "Nobel Prize of Computing," carries a $1 million prize, with financial support provided by Google, Inc. It is named for Alan M. Turing, the British mathematician who articulated the mathematical foundation and limits of computing. Hennessy and Patterson will formally receive the 2017 ACM A.M. Turing Award at the ACM's annual awards banquet being held this June in San Francisco.

"ACM initiated the Turing Award in 1966 to recognize contributions of lasting and major technical importance to the computing field," said ACM President Vicki L. Hanson. "The work of Hennessy and Patterson certainly exemplifies this standard. Their contributions to energy-efficient RISC-based processors have helped make possible the mobile and IoT revolutions. At the same time, their seminal textbook has advanced the pace of innovation across the industry over the past 25 years by influencing generations of engineers and computer designers."

Attesting to the impact of Hennessy and Patterson's work is the assessment of Bill Gates, principal founder of Microsoft Corporation, that their contributions "have proven to be fundamental to the very foundation upon which an entire industry flourished."

Please join us in congratulating John for this outstanding recognition of quantitative computer architectures and impact on the microprocessor industry.


 

Related News:

"Marty Hellman receives 2015 ACM A.M. Turing Award," March 2016.

ACM press release, "Pioneers of Modern Computer Architecture Receive ACM A.M. Turing Award," March 21, 2018. 

Stanford News, "Former Stanford President wins Turing Award for contributions to computing," March 22, 2018.

February 2018

Oyekunle Olukotun, Cadence Design Systems Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Stanford University, has been selected to receive the IEEE Computer Society 2018 Harry H. Goode Award. 

 
The Goode Award was established to recognize achievements in the information processing field which are considered either a single contribution of theory, design, or technique of outstanding significance, or the accumulation of important contributions on theory or practice over an extended time period. 
 
A well-known pioneer in multicore processor design and the leader of the Stanford Hydra Chip Multiprocessor (CMP) research project, Olukotun is being recognized “for fundamental and sustained effort to create and leverage chip-multiprocessors.”
 

Related Links

February 2018

Gordon Wetzstein has been selected as a 2018 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in Computer Science. The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation has selected 126 outstanding U.S. and Canadian researchers as recipients of the 2018 Sloan Research Fellowships. Awarded annually since 1955, the fellowships honor early-career scientists and scholars whose achievements mark them as among the very best scientific minds working today.

"The Sloan Research Fellows represent the very best science has to offer," says Sloan President Adam Falk, "The brightest minds, tackling the hardest problems, and succeeding brilliantly—Fellows are quite literally the future of twenty-first century science."

Awarded in eight scientific and technical fields—chemistry, computer science, economics, mathematics, computational and evolutionary molecular biology, neuroscience, ocean sciences, and physics—the Sloan Research Fellowships are awarded in close coordination with the scientific community. Candidates must be nominated by their fellow scientists and winning fellows are selected by an independent panel of senior scholars on the basis of a candidate's independent research accomplishments, creativity, and potential to become a leader in his or her field.

Congratulations to Gordon for this outstanding achievement!


 

The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is a philanthropic, not-for-profit grant making institution based in New York City. Established in 1934 by Alfred Pritchard Sloan Jr., then-President and Chief Executive Officer of the General Motors Corporation, the Foundation makes grants in support of original research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and economics. www.sloan.org

Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Press Release

February 2018

David Tse has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering with the citation, "For contributions to wireless network information theory."

Election to the National Academy of Engineering is among the highest professional distinctions accorded to an engineer. Academy membership honors those who have made outstanding contributions to "engineering research, practice, or education, including, where appropriate, significant contributions to the engineering literature," and to "the pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of engineering, or developing/implementing innovative approaches to engineering education."

A professor of Electrical Engineering, Tse is the Thomas Kailath and Guanghan Xu Professor of Engineering. Dr. Tse's research interests are in information theory and its applications in various fields, including wireless communication, energy and computational biology.

Previously, Professor Tse was awarded the 2017 Claude E. Shannon Award from IEEE Information Theory Society. Read article.

 

Please join us in congratulating David for this well-deserved recognition of his profound contributions.

 

Read NAE Press Release, February 7, 2018

February 2018

University of California, Berkeley EECS alumna Andrea Goldsmith (B.A. '86/M.S. '91/Ph.D. '94) has been awarded the 2018 Berkeley EECS Distinguished Alumni Award. Her citation reads, "For excellence in research and teaching, and for tireless commitment to the advancement of women in the profession."
Andrea is the Stephen Harris Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering.

Distinguished Alumni Awards winners are selected each year by the EE and CS Chairs in consultation with the Berkeley EECS Faculty Awards Committee and with input from the EECS faculty.

 

Please join us in congratulating Andrea!

 

Related news:

"Prof. Goldsmith receives the 2017 IEEE WICE Mentorship Award," October 2017

"Professor Goldsmith elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences," April 2017

"Professor Andrea Goldsmith elected to the National Academy of Engineering," February 2017

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Award