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Lead author Jerry Chang (PhD candidate ‘20), receives Best Paper Award at BioCAS 2017

December 2017

Ting Chia (Jerry) Chang (PhD candidate '20) is the lead author of "Scaling of Ultrasound-Powered Receivers for Sub-Millimeter Wireless Implants." He and his co-authors received the Best Paper Award at the 2017 IEEE BioCAS Conference.

The 13th IEEE Biomedical Circuits and Systems Conference (BioCAS), was held October 19-21 in Turin, Italy. The annual conference is a premier international forum for researchers and engineers to present their state-of-the-art multidisciplinary research and development activities at the frontiers of medicine, life sciences, and engineering.

Jerry's research focuses on circuits and system design for miniaturized wireless medical implantable devices with ultrasonic links. He is advised by professor Amin Arbabian, who oversees the ArbabianLab Ultrasonically Powered Implantable Devices research team.

 

Congratulations to Jerry Chang and co-authors: M. J. Weber, J. Charthad, S. Baltsavias, and A. Arbabian for receiving the best paper award!

Paper Abstract:
We investigate scaling of ultrasound-powered wireless receivers for efficient, miniaturized implantable medical devices. Single crystalline piezoelectric material, PMN-PT, is chosen in this study as it has low resonance frequency with scaled dimensions. For accurate modeling of sub-mm-sized receivers, we perform simulations using the finite element method, followed by validation with measurements. Results are presented for scaling of the resonance frequency, resistance at resonance, and aperture efficiency of PMN-PT receivers with thickness of 0.5 mm and widths ranging from 0.3 mm to 1.0 mm. Since optimizing the overall harvesting efficiency of an implant requires not only an efficient receiver but also an efficient interface to the power electronics, we analyze impedance matching efficiency between the receivers and the power electronics using optogenetic stimulation as an example application. Finally, we show the measurement of prototype implants with scaled receivers and discuss the trade-off between size and power harvesting efficiency of sub-mm wireless implants.