Undergraduate

Internet of Things, Smart Plug Workshop Series [lab64 workshop]

Topic: 
Workshop 2: Generate manufacturing files, order PCBs
Abstract / Description: 

Workshop series – please RSVP.

We'll be running a four-workshop series on building an "Internet of Things" smart plug that you'll be able to use control power outlets remotely. And yes, you'll be able to keep it at the end.

Over the course of the workshops, you'll do everything from PCB layout to board assembly to embedded programming. All experience levels are welcome – we will teach you what you need to know (and there will be extensions for those with more experience and want to go further).

The workshops will be much more valuable for people who attend all four, but it will also be possible to participate if you can't make it every time. If you plan on attending the workshops, please RSVP with the following form: https://goo.gl/forms/bGRZF9CAsK3km93p1

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, April 26, 2017 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
lab64 (Packard 064)

Internet of Things, Smart Plug Workshop Series [lab64 workshop]

Topic: 
Workshop 1: Go over the circuit schematic, basic PCB layout
Abstract / Description: 

Workshop series – please RSVP.

We'll be running a four-workshop series on building an "Internet of Things" smart plug that you'll be able to use control power outlets remotely. And yes, you'll be able to keep it at the end.

  • The first workshop will be Wednesday, 4/19, from 7-9pm, and will continue the three following Wednesdays at the same time.

Over the course of the workshops, you'll do everything from PCB layout to board assembly to embedded programming. All experience levels are welcome – we will teach you what you need to know (and there will be extensions for those with more experience and want to go further).

 

The workshops will be much more valuable for people who attend all four, but it will also be possible to participate if you can't make it every time. If you plan on attending the workshops, please RSVP with the following form: https://goo.gl/forms/bGRZF9CAsK3km93p1

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
lab64 (Packard 064)

The Brain is a Unary Computer [Special Seminar]

Topic: 
The Brain is a Unary Computer
Abstract / Description: 

The cognitive brain (neocortex) performs computational tasks that far exceed the capabilities of conventional computer systems. Furthermore, it is very fast (considering its biological components) and extremely energy efficient.

As a model for neocortical operation, a broad class of spiking neural networks encode information with precise spike timing relationships across multiple parallel lines. These temporal neural networks then process information as a wave-front of spikes that sweeps forward through the neural network. At the outputs, results are encoded in a temporal format. The time it takes to compute a result is the result.

Recently proposed race logic performs computation using a feedforward network of AND gates, OR gates, and delays. Information is encoded as the times at which logic transitions take place; i.e. when logic levels change from 0 to 1. Computation is performed by initializing logic levels to 0. Then input values are encoded as 0 to 1 transition times, and these transitions sweep forward through the logic network. Output transition times encode the results. The time it takes to compute a result is the result.

A very broad family of temporal neural networks and a generalized form of race logic are isomorphic. One uses spike times for encoding information, the other uses logic transition times.

This means that we can design neural networks with widely-used spiking neuron models, and then implement them directly in hardware using conventional logic gates and design techniques. In the process, the speed and energy efficiency advantages are retained. Improvements versus conventional best-effort binary designs are: speedups of 2-3X and reduction in dynamic energy consumption of 10X or more. Furthermore, we can design certain other non-brain-like functions with similar improvements. Examples are sorting and graph long/short path problems.

The key principle is that time is used as a resource for communication and computation. Time is the ultimate physical resource. Time is freely available everywhere; it consumes no power and takes up no space. By using time as a physical implementation resource, we can use less of other physical resources, dynamic energy being the most significant.

Both temporal neural networks and generalized race logic are examples of spacetime computing paradigms. Spacetime computing, in turn, can be characterized by a unary algebra, that operates on unary encoded information using simple primitives: max, min, increment, inhibit. These primitives are complete with respect to the set functions computable by temporal neural networks and generalized race logic. So, if one accepts that temporal neural networks model the brain's operation, then the brain is a unary computer. And, by using generalized race logic we may eventually be able to achieve brain-like capabilities with conventional digital hardware.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 20, 2017 - 3:00pm
Venue: 
Gates 104

IEEE Workshops on Machine Learning and Convolutional Neural Networks

Topic: 
IEEE Workshops on Machine Learning and Convolutional Neural Networks
Abstract / Description: 

Workshop 1: May 30th (Tuesday)
4:30 PM-5.00 PM (PT) Check In/Networking/Refreshments,
5:00 PM-9.00 PM Workshop 1

Workshop 2: May 31st (Wednesday)
4:30 PM- 5.00 PM (PT) Check In/Networking/Refreshments,
5:00 PM-9.00 PM Workshop 2

Location/Venue:
Texas Instruments Silicon Valley Auditorium
(formerly National Semiconductor Auditorium E)
2900 Semiconductor Dr
Santa Clara, CA 95051

 

Cost $.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 30, 2017 - 5:00pm to Wednesday, May 31, 2017 - 5:00pm
Venue: 
Texas Instruments Silicon Valley Auditorium

Spacetime replication of continuous variable quantum information [IEEE Information Theory Society, Santa Clara Valley Chapter]

Topic: 
Spacetime replication of continuous variable quantum information
Abstract / Description: 

It is well known that no information can be transmitted faster than light, and it is also known that quantum information cannot be cloned or copied arbitrarily. These two "laws" place restrictions on the transmission of information through spacetime, but are there other limitations? The answer is no: the only such restrictions are (1) no-signalling (faster- than-light communication), and (2) no-cloning of quantum information. In this talk, This talk will first provide a brief introduction to some fundamentals of quantum information theory (including the no-cloning theorem and quantum error correction), and then it will show that any process that transmits information through spacetime without violating (1) or (2) is physically realizable as a so-called spacetime information replication task. In particular, this talk will describe how one can succeed at distributing information in seemingly impossible ways using quantum error correction, and showcase new, continuous variable quantum error correcting codes that can efficiently replicate information in spacetime.

Agenda:
6-6:30pm - Check-in, Refreshments & Networking
6:30-7:30pm - Detailed Abstract
7:30-7:45pm - Q&A

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, April 26, 2017 - 6:00pm to 9:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

TomKat Center's Women in Sustainability Event

Topic: 
TomKat Center's Women in Sustainability Event
Abstract / Description: 

 

Keynote: Fireside chat with Kat Taylor and Stacey Bent

Kat Taylor (JD/MBA) works towards a more equitable and inclusive world by championing social justice and environmental well-being through the advocacy of good money, good food, and good energy. She is the Co-Founder and Co-CEO of Beneficial State Bank, a Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI) whose mission is to bring beneficial banking to low-income communities in an economically and environmentally sustainable manner. Kat is also a TomKat Center founding benefactor. (Yes, the Kat in TomKat).


Panel: Moderated by Prof. Stacey Bent, Director, TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy

Submit questions in advance

  • Christine Su, PastureMap
  • Hedi Razavi, Keewi
  • Ugwem Eneyo, Solstice

 

RSVP Required (Stanford students are given priority) 

Networking reception immediately following. 

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Venue: 
Huang Engineering Center, Mackenzie Room

PhD Research Poster Session

Topic: 
PhD Research Poster Session
Abstract / Description: 

Join us for Research Poster presentations by EE PhD students.

EE students eager to share their research -- come enjoy their posters and demonstrations.

Student posters will also be judged by a group of faculty and staff. Presenters will have an opportunity to summarize their work and answer questions within a set timeframe. Judging criteria is based on 4 components: originality, content, oral presentation, and visual quality. One winner and one honorable mention will be awarded from each core research area. Winning presenters will receive a gift card and certificate. 

 

Join us afterward for GSEE (Grad Students of EE) HappEE Hour (21 and over, please).

Date and Time: 
Friday, March 10, 2017 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Packard Atrium

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REU Seminar; REU Event

2018 EE REU Mixer

Topic: 
2018 EE REU Mixer
Abstract / Description: 

Planning what to do over the summer? Interested in AI, Deep Learning, and Machine Learning? Looking into VR/AR, Neuroscience, Medical Imaging, and Bioengineering? A die-hard fan of EE hot topics like Convex Optimization, Signal Processing, Electronics, and more?

You're all set! Come to our EE ReU Mixer to meet professors and graduate researchers and learn about 30 projects open to you this summer.

The mixer is open to all undergraduates; freshmen and sophomores who are exploring their major/minor options are especially welcome.

RSVP by Feb 7 (Wed)

 

This event is sponsored by Stanford IEEE Chapter and FUSE – EE Student Groups.


 

Date and Time: 
Friday, February 9, 2018 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm
Venue: 
Packard Atrium

REU Presentation Day

Topic: 
REU Final Presentations
Abstract / Description: 

Please join us for the Electrical Engineering REU Final Presentation Day.

The oral session will begin at 12noon in AllenX Auditorium; the poster session will begin at 2:30pm in Packard Atrium.


Research areas include:

  • Circuits and Physical Systems,
  • Materials and Devices, and
  • Signals and Information Systems

Thank you for supporting the EE REU Program!

Read about Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU)

 

Date and Time: 
Thursday, August 31, 2017 - 12:00pm to 5:00pm
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium; Packard Atrium

REU Seminar: How to Make a Good Poster Workshop

Topic: 
How to Make a Good Poster Workshop
Abstract / Description: 

Learn how to design an effective research poster.

This informative session will provide plenty of insights into poster design for REU students, answer all their questions, and provide helpful tools for future poster making. 

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

REU Seminar: Research-to-Technology-to-Startup and the Internet of Things

Topic: 
Research-to-Technology-to-Startup and the Internet of Things
Abstract / Description: 

Andrew Scheuermann earned a PhD in Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford working on silicon electronics and renewable energy technologies under Professor Paul McIntyre and Chris Chidsey. He subsequently founded and currently leads as CEO Arch Systems, a venture-backed company scaling up a modular platform for the so-called industrial internet of things. Andrew was also one of the early team members that helped build StartX, now one of the top startup accelerators in the world, and was selected as Forbes 30 under 30 in 2016.

In this seminar, Andrew will share his own experience moving from research to technology development to starting a company, and attempt to answer more of your questions than just pontificate about the general case of such transitions. He will also provide a special lens into what is happening with the new set of technologies called the 'industrial internet of things'. Andrew will highlight what challenges remain unsolved for research, what areas require research to technology development, and where new startup ventures may be possible.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

REU Seminar: Dr. Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Enjoy Asking Hard Research Questions

Topic: 
Dr. Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Enjoy Asking Hard Research Questions
Abstract / Description: 

In this seminar we will discuss what it's like to do science & engineering research, how to be a productive researcher, and how to ask (hard) research questions. We will also discuss the importance of creativity, collaborations, and social skills for researchers. We will explore the importance of focused long-term research, what parts of "publish or perish" culture make sense, and why running a research team is a lot like running a small company. Examples will come from Prof. Pop's 20+ year research career and from recent research news, including anecdotes and lessons from Nobel prize-winning discoveries.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, August 8, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

REU Seminar: Quantum nanophotonics

Topic: 
Quantum nanophotonics: from inverse design to implementation
Abstract / Description: 

By completely opening the parameter space in nanophotonics design, new functionalities and better performance relative to traditional optoelectronics can be achieved. We have recently developed an inverse approach to design nanophotonic structures based only on their desired performance. Moreover, constraints including structure robustness, fabrication error, and minimum feature sizes can be incorporated in design, without need to have an optics expert as a designer. Such structures are fully fabricable using modern lithography and nanofabrication techniques. We have also demonstrated devices designed using this approach, including ultra-compact and efficient wavelength and power splitters on the silicon platform. Beyond integrated photonics, this approach can also be applied to design quantum photonic circuits. For example, we are working on inverse design of nanoresonators that can localize photons efficiently into sub-wavelength volumes and lead to studies of new regimes of light-matter interaction, and new applications in computing, communications, and sensing. While our traditional quantum nanophotonics platform is based on quantum dots inside photonic crystal cavities, we have recently focused on color centers in diamond and silicon carbide, which could potentially bring these experiments to room temperature and facilitate scaling to large quantum networks.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

REU Seminar: Soft Electronic Systems for Biomedical Devices

Topic: 
Soft Electronic Systems for Biomedical Devices
Abstract / Description: 

Conventional electronic devices are mechanically stiff and therefore cannot seamlessly interface with the body, which is mechanically soft. In this talk, I will review new advances in the field of stretchable electronics, where advances in materials science, mechanics, and electronics combine to produce mechanically soft and stretchable electronic systems with advanced sensing functionality. This new class of devices can form excellent interfaces with body parts, including the brain, heart, and skin. In this talk, Professor Fan will discuss specifically the use of these electronic platforms as next generation electrodes, skin-like tattoos, catheters, and bio-resorbable sensors

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 18, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

REU Seminar: Engineering Consulting

Topic: 
Engineering Consulting: Solving Other People’s Engineering Problems
Abstract / Description: 

In many industries, engineering consultants are hired to solve challenging technical problems that cannot be solved in-house. But what exactly does this process involve, and how do these professionals find a solution to these problems? In this talk, Dr. Jessica Piper will give an overview of the engineering consulting profession and Exponent Inc, the largest engineering consulting firm in the world. The talk will also cover interesting examples of real cases from the Electrical Engineering & Computer Science group, including example work in optics and consumer electronics.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

REU Orientation 2017

Topic: 
Orientation Begins – Welcome EE Undergrads!
Abstract / Description: 

REU Orientation 

The Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program is 10 weeks long. Orientation provides answers to any questions participating students have, including how to get paid, and requirements for the final presentation.

 

Date and Time: 
Thursday, June 29, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

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lab64 makerspace

lab64 Speaker Series: Nothing Half Way - Being Fearless With Your Projects

Topic: 
Nothing Half Way - Being Fearless With Your Projects
Abstract / Description: 

Quinn has been making games for 36 years, on platforms ranging from the Apple II to all manner of newfangled things. She currently manages engineering for mobile games at Scopely. She also pursues consulting, independent development, mixed-media engineering projects, and writing. In her spare time she welds things, races cars, hacks electronics, and berates her friends with sarcasm.

www.quinndunki.com
www.quinndunki.com/blondihacks

Editorial comment: Quinn decided that if Steve Wozniak could make a computer in a garage, she should be able to do that too. She then embarked on a journey to build a computer from scratch (PCBs and all) in her kitchen / garage. The result, which she calls Veronica, is a truly homemade programmable computer. You can find out more about all this on her web sites.

 

Please RSVP for Quinn's talk (and free food) by 2/13/16.

Date and Time: 
Friday, February 16, 2018 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
lab64 (Packard 064)

Intro to Unity Workshop

Topic: 
Intro to Unity Workshop
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Come build your own game from the ground up using Unity, the main game engine used for VR development in the industry. We will go over most aspects necessary for using Unity, including use of the Asset Store, basic programming structures of Unity scripts, creating user interfaces, and building a publishable exe.

The workshop will be lead by Khoi Le, a Rabbit Hole member who has been working with Unity for 2 years. The event will be held Saturday, 1/20 in Lab64 from 6-8 pm. Bring your laptop and make sure to download Unity before coming.

Date and Time: 
Saturday, January 20, 2018 - 6:00pm
Venue: 
lab64 (Packard 064)

lab64 workshop: Circuits, Devices, and Debugging!

Topic: 
Circuits, Devices, and Debugging!
Abstract / Description: 

Come learn about circuits and devices from Ron Quan! Ron is an expert in many things, including analog circuits, audio and video applications, and RF circuits.

 

WHAT IS lab64? We're a community-oriented makerspace designed to give students a free place to work on electronics projects outside the realm of traditional research labs. Our workshops, assistants, and tools are here to support a variety of project and skill levels. Everyone is welcome!

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 15, 2017 - 6:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

lab64 workshop: Mechanical How-To Session 4

Topic: 
Mechanical How-To Session 4
Abstract / Description: 

MECHANICAL HOW-TO FALL QUARTER SESSIONS

This should be tons of fun and save lots of time and effort when you go to work on your projects.

This is Session 4; there will be 6 -7 sessions in all and we hope to get as far as building a simple robotic arm. You can attend any or all of these workshops

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 30, 2017 - 7:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

VR/AR Community presents 'Privacy and VR'

Topic: 
Privacy and VR
Abstract / Description: 

With widespread adoption of VR, what data could we collect about users, and what can we then extrapolate from that data? Where's the line between reasonable and unreasonable knowledge? This talk will cover potential risks and concerns about Privacy and VR and offer suggestions for developers and users.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 16, 2017 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 103

VR/AR Community presents 'Designing Multi-Person Immersive Experiences'

Topic: 
Designing Multi-Person Immersive Experiences
Abstract / Description: 

Immersive interfaces have the potential to enable powerful human-to-human interactions by creating shared spaces. Learn best practices for designing VR and AR experiences around communal interactions to enable collaboration, communication and co-presence. By also considering asymmetric experiences that take place across heterogeneous devices like a headset and a mobile phone, designers can open up new opportunities for participation. Mechanics built around asynchronous interactions can make small communities feel bigger.

This session will discuss findings from dozens of social interaction tests and highlight best practices towards designing fantastic multi-person immersive experiences.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 2, 2017 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 103

lab64 - open lab / office hours

Topic: 
Office Hours - get help with projects
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Tutorials and instructional office hours will be held during Fall quarter for students who are interested in XR but don't have much experience. There will be weekly office hours (Sundays 5 - 6 p.m., lab64) with an experienced core member who will help with weekly assignments starting week 3. The content covered, courtesy of Udacity, is listed below:

Introduction to Virtual Reality
VR Scenes and Objects
VR Software Development

​The pacing of the content will be about 2-3 hours per week. The timeline for these unofficial assignments are listed below.

By week 3: Finish Introduction to Virtual Reality
By week 4: Finish Animations in Scenes and Objects
By week 5: Finish Scenes and Objects
By week 6: Finish Controlling Objects Using Code in Software Development
By week 7: Finish Programming Animations in Software Development
By week 8: Finish Software Development

Basic programming experience is highly recommended. An experience level of having completed CS 106A will suffice for most of the topics covered, and an experience level of having completed CS 106B/X is ideal

Date and Time: 
Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

lab64 - open lab / office hours

Topic: 
Office Hours - get help with projects
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Tutorials and instructional office hours will be held during Fall quarter for students who are interested in XR but don't have much experience. There will be weekly office hours (Sundays 5 - 6 p.m., lab64) with an experienced core member who will help with weekly assignments starting week 3. The content covered, courtesy of Udacity, is listed below:

Introduction to Virtual Reality
VR Scenes and Objects
VR Software Development

​The pacing of the content will be about 2-3 hours per week. The timeline for these unofficial assignments are listed below.

By week 3: Finish Introduction to Virtual Reality
By week 4: Finish Animations in Scenes and Objects
By week 5: Finish Scenes and Objects
By week 6: Finish Controlling Objects Using Code in Software Development
By week 7: Finish Programming Animations in Software Development
By week 8: Finish Software Development

Basic programming experience is highly recommended. An experience level of having completed CS 106A will suffice for most of the topics covered, and an experience level of having completed CS 106B/X is ideal

Date and Time: 
Sunday, November 12, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

lab64 - open lab / office hours

Topic: 
Office Hours - get help with projects
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Tutorials and instructional office hours will be held during Fall quarter for students who are interested in XR but don't have much experience. There will be weekly office hours (Sundays 5 - 6 p.m., lab64) with an experienced core member who will help with weekly assignments starting week 3. The content covered, courtesy of Udacity, is listed below:

Introduction to Virtual Reality
VR Scenes and Objects
VR Software Development

​The pacing of the content will be about 2-3 hours per week. The timeline for these unofficial assignments are listed below.

By week 3: Finish Introduction to Virtual Reality
By week 4: Finish Animations in Scenes and Objects
By week 5: Finish Scenes and Objects
By week 6: Finish Controlling Objects Using Code in Software Development
By week 7: Finish Programming Animations in Software Development
By week 8: Finish Software Development

Basic programming experience is highly recommended. An experience level of having completed CS 106A will suffice for most of the topics covered, and an experience level of having completed CS 106B/X is ideal

Date and Time: 
Sunday, November 5, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

lab64 - open lab / office hours

Topic: 
Office Hours - get help with projects
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Tutorials and instructional office hours will be held during Fall quarter for students who are interested in XR but don't have much experience. There will be weekly office hours (Sundays 5 - 6 p.m., lab64) with an experienced core member who will help with weekly assignments starting week 3. The content covered, courtesy of Udacity, is listed below:

Introduction to Virtual Reality
VR Scenes and Objects
VR Software Development

​The pacing of the content will be about 2-3 hours per week. The timeline for these unofficial assignments are listed below.

By week 3: Finish Introduction to Virtual Reality
By week 4: Finish Animations in Scenes and Objects
By week 5: Finish Scenes and Objects
By week 6: Finish Controlling Objects Using Code in Software Development
By week 7: Finish Programming Animations in Software Development
By week 8: Finish Software Development

Basic programming experience is highly recommended. An experience level of having completed CS 106A will suffice for most of the topics covered, and an experience level of having completed CS 106B/X is ideal.

Date and Time: 
Sunday, October 29, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

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