Undergraduate

The 2018 Robert Hofstadter Memorial Lecture: The Dawn of Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics

Topic: 
The Dawn of Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics
Abstract / Description: 

In the past two years the gravitational-wave detections enabled by the LIGO detectors have launched a new field in observational astronomy allowing us to study compact object mergers involving pairs of black holes and neutron stars. I will discuss what current results reveal about compact object astrophysics, from binary black hole formation to short gamma-ray bursts and nuclear matter physics. I will also highlight what we can expect in the near future as detectors' sensitivity improves and multi-messenger astronomy further advances.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, April 3, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

The 2018 Robert Hofstadter Memorial Lecture: Cosmic Collisions Reveal Einstein's Gravitational-Wave Universe

Topic: 
Cosmic Collisions Reveal Einstein's Gravitational-Wave Universe
Abstract / Description: 

For the first time, scientists have observed ripples in the fabric of spacetime called gravitational waves, arriving at the earth from a cataclysmic event in the distant universe. This confirms a major prediction of Albert Einstein's 1915 general theory of relativity and opens an unprecedented new window onto the cosmos. Gravitational waves carry unique information about their dramatic origins and about the nature of gravity that cannot otherwise be obtained. Detected gravitational waves were produced during the final fraction of a second of the mergers of two black holes but also during the last hundred seconds of the collision of two neutron stars. The latter is the first ever cosmic event to be observed both in gravitational waves and in electromagnetic waves, shedding light on several long-standing puzzles, like the production of gold in nature and the physics origins of brief gamma-ray flashes. I will review the beginnings of this exciting field of cosmic exploration and the unprecedented technology and engineering that made it possible.

Date and Time: 
Monday, April 2, 2018 - 7:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

IEEE IT Society, Santa Clara Valley presents From Differential Privacy to Generative Adversarial Privacy

Topic: 
From Differential Privacy to Generative Adversarial Privacy
Abstract / Description: 

6:00PM Refreshments and Conversation

6:30PM The explosive growth in connectivity and data collection is accelerating the use of machine learning to guide consumers through a myriad of choices and decisions. While this vision is expected to generate many disruptive businesses and social opportunities, it presents one of the biggest threats to privacy in recent history. In response to this threat, differential privacy (DP) has recently surfaced as a context-free, robust, and mathematically rigorous notion of privacy.
The first part of my talk will focus on understanding the fundamental tradeoff between DP and utility for a variety of unsupervised learning applications. Surprisingly, our results show the universal optimality of a family of extremal privacy mechanisms called staircase mechanisms. While the vast majority of works on DP have focused on using the Laplace mechanism, our results indicate that it is strictly suboptimal and can be replaced by a staircase mechanism to improve utility. Our results also show that the strong privacy guarantees of DP often come at a significant loss in utility.
The second part of my talk is motivated by the following question: can we exploit data statistics to achieve a better privacy-utility tradeoff? To address this question, I will present a novel context-aware notion of privacy called generative adversarial privacy (GAP). GAP leverages recent advancements in generative adversarial networks (GANs) to arrive to a unified framework for data-driven privacy that has deep game-theoretic and information-theoretic roots. I will conclude my talk by showcasing the performance of GAP on real life datasets.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

KIPAC Public Lecture: The Universe Continues to Reveal Surprises

Topic: 
The Universe Continues to Reveal Surprises
Abstract / Description: 

Over the past few decades, astronomers have for the first time identified the major constituents of the universe. Unexpectedly, the universe hardly resembles what we thought only a couple of decades ago. The universe is filled with dark matter more abundant than ordinary matter and dark energy that is causing a runaway acceleration. We do not yet have a complete picture of this unexpected universe. Some discrepancies may be hinting at new discoveries to come. New giant telescopes planned for the next decade are likely to reveal more surprises. In her lecture, Professor Freedman will describe these recent advances.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 13, 2018 - 7:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

CERC Lecture Series: Mihaela van der Schaar

Topic: 
AutoPrognosis: Automating the design of predictive models for clinical risk and prognosis
Abstract / Description: 

CERC Lecture Series Guest:
Mihaela van der Schaar, PhD
MAN Professor, University of Oxford
Faculty Fellow, Alan Turing Institute, London, UK

HER LECTURE TOPIC: "AutoPrognosis: Automating the design of predictive models for clinical risk and prognosis"

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 9:30am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

lab64 Speaker Series: Nothing Half Way - Being Fearless With Your Projects

Topic: 
Nothing Half Way - Being Fearless With Your Projects
Abstract / Description: 

Quinn has been making games for 36 years, on platforms ranging from the Apple II to all manner of newfangled things. She currently manages engineering for mobile games at Scopely. She also pursues consulting, independent development, mixed-media engineering projects, and writing. In her spare time she welds things, races cars, hacks electronics, and berates her friends with sarcasm.

www.quinndunki.com
www.quinndunki.com/blondihacks

Editorial comment: Quinn decided that if Steve Wozniak could make a computer in a garage, she should be able to do that too. She then embarked on a journey to build a computer from scratch (PCBs and all) in her kitchen / garage. The result, which she calls Veronica, is a truly homemade programmable computer. You can find out more about all this on her web sites.

 

Please RSVP for Quinn's talk (and free food) by 2/13/16.

Date and Time: 
Friday, February 16, 2018 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
lab64 (Packard 064)

The Inaugural John G. Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology

Topic: 
The End of the Road for General Purpose Processors & the Future of Computing
Abstract / Description: 

Featured speaker John L. Hennessy presents "The End of the Road for General Purpose Processors & the Future of Computing" - Abstract: After 40 years of remarkable progress in VLSI microprocessors, a variety of factors are combining to lead to a much slower rate of performance growth in the future. These limitations arise from three different areas: IC technology, architectural limitations, and changing applications and usage. The end of Dennard scaling and the slowdown in Moore's Law will require more efficient architectural approaches than we have relied on to date. Although progress on general-purpose processors may hit an asymptote, domain specific architectures may be one attractive path for important classes of problems.


About the John G. Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology:
John Linvill was a revered figure at Stanford as much for his self-effacing and unpretentious style as for his engineering foresight and his commitment to the entrepreneurial spirit. Linvill helped launch Stanford on a trajectory that would ensure Stanford's continuing leadership in electronics engineering for decades to come. These lectures have been created to help us explore our paths going forward, and to honor John Linvill's enormous legacy as both a faculty member and a department chairman, whose commitment to excellence at Stanford continues to be a model for us all. Read more about John Linvill

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 5, 2018 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Mackenzie Room, Huang Engineering Center

2018 EE REU Mixer

Topic: 
2018 EE REU Mixer
Abstract / Description: 

Planning what to do over the summer? Interested in AI, Deep Learning, and Machine Learning? Looking into VR/AR, Neuroscience, Medical Imaging, and Bioengineering? A die-hard fan of EE hot topics like Convex Optimization, Signal Processing, Electronics, and more?

You're all set! Come to our EE ReU Mixer to meet professors and graduate researchers and learn about 30 projects open to you this summer.

The mixer is open to all undergraduates; freshmen and sophomores who are exploring their major/minor options are especially welcome.

RSVP by Feb 7 (Wed)

 

This event is sponsored by Stanford IEEE Chapter and FUSE – EE Student Groups.


 

Date and Time: 
Friday, February 9, 2018 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm
Venue: 
Packard Atrium

Special Seminar: Keeping Moore’s Law Alive – Circuit Challenges and Opportunities

Topic: 
Keeping Moore’s Law Alive – Circuit Challenges and Opportunities
Abstract / Description: 

Process scaling continues to march forward, with continuous advancement in materials and manufacturing providing ever-increasing transistor count and new capabilities. These integration advancements, though, come with difficult challenges: power consumption is more critical than ever, variations are difficult to manage, and interconnects do not see the same benefits from scaling as devices. In this talk I'll describe some of these challenges, as well as circuits research which is ongoing to address these and ensure that the next generation of computing devices can take advantage of the next generation of technology.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 7, 2018 - 10:30am
Venue: 
Gates B01

Pages

REU Seminar; REU Event

2018 REU Seminar Final Presentation Day

Topic: 
Final Presentations by REU participants
Abstract / Description: 

Elecctrical Engineering REU students present their research projects!

Please join us to hear their presentations and view their research posters.
The EE community is invited. Many faculty attend, as well as industry researchers.

 

Please join us!

PDF of REU presentors and titles

Date and Time: 
Thursday, August 30, 2018 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium; Packard Atrium

2018 REU Mentor, Advisor & Researcher Social

Topic: 
Social Mixer for students researchers, advisors, and mentors
Abstract / Description: 

The REU Seminar Series is an educational and developmental opportunity for REU participants. Attendance at the seminars is required for all REU interns. Speakers will discuss their research or work, provide educational and career advice, and share their knowledge with you. There will be a question and answer period at the end of each talk. Light refreshments are provided at each seminar. If you believe you may need accommodations during the seminar series, please contact us at reu@ee.stanford.edu or reu2018@ee.stanford.edu so that we may find a way to accommodate your needs.


 

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 31, 2018 - 11:30am
Venue: 
AllenX Patio

2018 REU Seminar Series, Graduate Panel

Topic: 
Graduate Panel
Abstract / Description: 

The REU Seminar Series is an educational and developmental opportunity for REU participants. Attendance at the seminars is required for all REU interns. Speakers will discuss their research or work, provide educational and career advice, and share their knowledge with you. There will be a question and answer period at the end of each talk. Light refreshments are provided at each seminar. If you believe you may need accommodations during the seminar series, please contact us at reu@ee.stanford.edu or reu2018@ee.stanford.edu so that we may find a way to accommodate your needs.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 10, 2018 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

2018 REU Seminar Series, #5

Topic: 
Research-to-Startup-to-Facebook
Abstract / Description: 

Saara Khan earned a PhD in Electrical Engineering at Stanford working on optical manipulation of dielectric particles under Professor Audrey Bowden and Olav Solgaard. She subsequently founded a sensors AI company targeted for self-driving cars, a venture-backed company developing advanced sensing platforms. After her startup, Saara now works as a Hardware Engineer at Facebook working on next generation Virtual Reality headsets. Saara also teaches the Creativity in Research Scholars Program at the Stanford Design School throughout the year to enable PhD students to push the boundaries of their research using design thinking. In this seminar, Saara will share her own experience moving from research to technology development to starting a company, and dive deep into any questions that people have.


The REU Seminar Series is an educational and developmental opportunity for REU participants. Attendance at the seminars is required for all REU interns. Speakers will discuss their research or work, provide educational and career advice, and share their knowledge with you. There will be a question and answer period at the end of each talk. Light refreshments are provided at each seminar. If you believe you may need accommodations during the seminar series, please contact us at reu@ee.stanford.edu or reu2018@ee.stanford.edu so that we may find a way to accommodate your needs.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, August 14, 2018 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

2018 REU Seminar Series, #4

Topic: 
Apple HW Technologies Careers
Abstract / Description: 

Apple designs industry-leading products including iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch and Apple TV. In the heart of these devices are the Apple application processors designed by Apple's HW Technologies group.

In this talk we will give a brief history of the Apple application processors and how they have evolved over time. We will also highlight the HW Technologies careers at Apple that are contributing to the design and production of the Apple application processors. Apple's HW Technologies group is actively hiring and is interested in interviewing both current students and recent graduates.


The REU Seminar Series is an educational and developmental opportunity for REU participants. Attendance at the seminars is required for all REU interns. Speakers will discuss their research or work, provide educational and career advice, and share their knowledge with you. There will be a question and answer period at the end of each talk. Light refreshments are provided at each seminar. If you believe you may need accommodations during the seminar series, please contact us at reu@ee.stanford.edu or reu2018@ee.stanford.edu so that we may find a way to accommodate your needs.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, August 7, 2018 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

2018 REU Seminar Series, #3

Topic: 
The future of wireless and what it will enable
Abstract / Description: 

Wireless technology has enormous potential to change the way we live, work, and play over the next several decades. Future wireless networks will support 100 Gbps communication between people, devices, and the "Internet of Things," with high reliability and uniform coverage indoors and out. The shortage of spectrum to support such systems will be alleviated by advances in large antenna array technology and moving to higher frequency bands like millimeter wave. Wireless technology will also enable smart and energy-efficient homes and buildings, automated highways and skyways, and in-body networks for monitoring, analysis and treatment of medical conditions. Breakthrough energy-efficiency architectures, algorithms and hardware will allow wireless networks to be powered by tiny batteries, energy-harvesting, or over-the-air power transfer. Finally, new communication systems based on biology and chemistry to encode bits will enable a wide range of new micro and macroscale applications. There are many technical challenges that must be overcome in order to make this vision a reality. This talk will describe what the wireless future might look like along with some of the innovations and breakthroughs required to realize this vision.


The REU Seminar Series is an educational and developmental opportunity for REU participants. Attendance at the seminars is required for all REU interns. Speakers will discuss their research or work, provide educational and career advice, and share their knowledge with you. There will be a question and answer period at the end of each talk. Light refreshments are provided at each seminar. If you believe you may need accommodations during the seminar series, please contact us at reu@ee.stanford.edu or reu2018@ee.stanford.edu so that we may find a way to accommodate your needs.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 31, 2018 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

2018 REU Seminar Series, #2

Topic: 
Very-High-Frequency Power Electronics: Research Directions and New Applications
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk, I will explain the research directions of my group as well as some of the challenges we face designing converters in the HF and VHF frequency range. I will show some examples of RF converters implemented using air-core inductors embedded in the printed circuits board used to drive a plasma thruster for nano-satellites. I will also discuss some of our recent findings regarding the performance of Wide Bandgap power devices when operating at frequencies above 10MHz, and how we are leveraging this information to design dc-dc converters with large conversion ratios.


The REU Seminar Series is an educational and developmental opportunity for REU participants. Attendance at the seminars is required for all REU interns. Speakers will discuss their research or work, provide educational and career advice, and share their knowledge with you. There will be a question and answer period at the end of each talk. Light refreshments are provided at each seminar. If you believe you may need accommodations during the seminar series, please contact us at reu@ee.stanford.edu or reu2018@ee.stanford.edu so that we may find a way to accommodate your needs.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 24, 2018 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

2018 REU Seminar Series, #1

Topic: 
Choosing a career path
Abstract / Description: 

Career paths are never linear. There are a lot of bumps, meanderings and uncertainty that come with choosing a job and/or career. The most important place to start is with you. Reflecting on what matters to you, how you want to live your values, experience your strengths (those things you're already good at), and apply your skills, is key to choosing where you want to go. In this program Pamela Paspa, M.A., Board Certified Career Coach, will walk you through an interactive exercise for thinking about what you know about yourself and how to apply that to meaningful work.


The REU Seminar Series is an educational and developmental opportunity for REU participants. Attendance at the seminars is required for all REU interns. Speakers will discuss their research or work, provide educational and career advice, and share their knowledge with you. There will be a question and answer period at the end of each talk. Light refreshments are provided at each seminar. If you believe you may need accommodations during the seminar series, please contact us at reu@ee.stanford.edu or reu2018@ee.stanford.edu so that we may find a way to accommodate your needs.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 17, 2018 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

2018 EE REU Mixer

Topic: 
2018 EE REU Mixer
Abstract / Description: 

Planning what to do over the summer? Interested in AI, Deep Learning, and Machine Learning? Looking into VR/AR, Neuroscience, Medical Imaging, and Bioengineering? A die-hard fan of EE hot topics like Convex Optimization, Signal Processing, Electronics, and more?

You're all set! Come to our EE ReU Mixer to meet professors and graduate researchers and learn about 30 projects open to you this summer.

The mixer is open to all undergraduates; freshmen and sophomores who are exploring their major/minor options are especially welcome.

RSVP by Feb 7 (Wed)

 

This event is sponsored by Stanford IEEE Chapter and FUSE – EE Student Groups.


 

Date and Time: 
Friday, February 9, 2018 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm
Venue: 
Packard Atrium

REU Presentation Day

Topic: 
REU Final Presentations
Abstract / Description: 

Please join us for the Electrical Engineering REU Final Presentation Day.

The oral session will begin at 12noon in AllenX Auditorium; the poster session will begin at 2:30pm in Packard Atrium.


Research areas include:

  • Circuits and Physical Systems,
  • Materials and Devices, and
  • Signals and Information Systems

Thank you for supporting the EE REU Program!

Read about Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU)

 

Date and Time: 
Thursday, August 31, 2017 - 12:00pm to 5:00pm
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium; Packard Atrium

Pages

lab64 makerspace

lab64 informal "office hours" with TI

Topic: 
lab64 informal "office hours" with TI
Abstract / Description: 

Come to lab64 for an informal "office hours" session with TI's Jason Rubadue (TI's University Marketing Manager).

An informal, open, creative space for students to chat/ask questions about their projects.

Food will be provided, and the event will take place in the break room next to the lab64 makerspace in Packard.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 11, 2018 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
lab64 (Packard 064)

Majors Night 2018

Topic: 
Undergrads interested in EE
Abstract / Description: 

Is EE the right major or minor for you?

Come to Majors Night and speak with EE (and other) undergrad students.

 

The EE Department will be at Majors Night! Come find out more about EE as a major, minor, honors program, and more.

Chat with faculty and current EE undergraduate students. Freshmen and Sophomores encouraged to attend.

See you there!

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 15, 2018 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Erikson Courts (ACSR)

Chibitronics - Democratizing Tech and Bridging the Gender Gap

Topic: 
Chibitronics - Democratizing Tech and Bridging the Gender Gap
Abstract / Description: 

It is our distinct pleasure to welcome noted hacker and engineer, Andrew "bunnie" Huang

Please join us for his talk, Chibitronics - Democratizing Tech and Bridging the Gender Gap


In this talk, bunnie will discuss some of the technical aspects behind the introduction of paper based electronics, and some process details used to manufacture at scale.

In addition, he will present initial results indicating that, by changing materials and approach, a broader swath of society can become engaged with technology.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, July 25, 2018 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

lab64 Speaker Series: Nothing Half Way - Being Fearless With Your Projects

Topic: 
Nothing Half Way - Being Fearless With Your Projects
Abstract / Description: 

Quinn has been making games for 36 years, on platforms ranging from the Apple II to all manner of newfangled things. She currently manages engineering for mobile games at Scopely. She also pursues consulting, independent development, mixed-media engineering projects, and writing. In her spare time she welds things, races cars, hacks electronics, and berates her friends with sarcasm.

www.quinndunki.com
www.quinndunki.com/blondihacks

Editorial comment: Quinn decided that if Steve Wozniak could make a computer in a garage, she should be able to do that too. She then embarked on a journey to build a computer from scratch (PCBs and all) in her kitchen / garage. The result, which she calls Veronica, is a truly homemade programmable computer. You can find out more about all this on her web sites.

 

Please RSVP for Quinn's talk (and free food) by 2/13/16.

Date and Time: 
Friday, February 16, 2018 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
lab64 (Packard 064)

Intro to Unity Workshop

Topic: 
Intro to Unity Workshop
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Come build your own game from the ground up using Unity, the main game engine used for VR development in the industry. We will go over most aspects necessary for using Unity, including use of the Asset Store, basic programming structures of Unity scripts, creating user interfaces, and building a publishable exe.

The workshop will be lead by Khoi Le, a Rabbit Hole member who has been working with Unity for 2 years. The event will be held Saturday, 1/20 in Lab64 from 6-8 pm. Bring your laptop and make sure to download Unity before coming.

Date and Time: 
Saturday, January 20, 2018 - 6:00pm
Venue: 
lab64 (Packard 064)

lab64 workshop: Circuits, Devices, and Debugging!

Topic: 
Circuits, Devices, and Debugging!
Abstract / Description: 

Come learn about circuits and devices from Ron Quan! Ron is an expert in many things, including analog circuits, audio and video applications, and RF circuits.

 

WHAT IS lab64? We're a community-oriented makerspace designed to give students a free place to work on electronics projects outside the realm of traditional research labs. Our workshops, assistants, and tools are here to support a variety of project and skill levels. Everyone is welcome!

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 15, 2017 - 6:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

lab64 workshop: Mechanical How-To Session 4

Topic: 
Mechanical How-To Session 4
Abstract / Description: 

MECHANICAL HOW-TO FALL QUARTER SESSIONS

This should be tons of fun and save lots of time and effort when you go to work on your projects.

This is Session 4; there will be 6 -7 sessions in all and we hope to get as far as building a simple robotic arm. You can attend any or all of these workshops

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 30, 2017 - 7:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

VR/AR Community presents 'Privacy and VR'

Topic: 
Privacy and VR
Abstract / Description: 

With widespread adoption of VR, what data could we collect about users, and what can we then extrapolate from that data? Where's the line between reasonable and unreasonable knowledge? This talk will cover potential risks and concerns about Privacy and VR and offer suggestions for developers and users.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 16, 2017 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 103

VR/AR Community presents 'Designing Multi-Person Immersive Experiences'

Topic: 
Designing Multi-Person Immersive Experiences
Abstract / Description: 

Immersive interfaces have the potential to enable powerful human-to-human interactions by creating shared spaces. Learn best practices for designing VR and AR experiences around communal interactions to enable collaboration, communication and co-presence. By also considering asymmetric experiences that take place across heterogeneous devices like a headset and a mobile phone, designers can open up new opportunities for participation. Mechanics built around asynchronous interactions can make small communities feel bigger.

This session will discuss findings from dozens of social interaction tests and highlight best practices towards designing fantastic multi-person immersive experiences.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 2, 2017 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 103

lab64 - open lab / office hours

Topic: 
Office Hours - get help with projects
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Tutorials and instructional office hours will be held during Fall quarter for students who are interested in XR but don't have much experience. There will be weekly office hours (Sundays 5 - 6 p.m., lab64) with an experienced core member who will help with weekly assignments starting week 3. The content covered, courtesy of Udacity, is listed below:

Introduction to Virtual Reality
VR Scenes and Objects
VR Software Development

​The pacing of the content will be about 2-3 hours per week. The timeline for these unofficial assignments are listed below.

By week 3: Finish Introduction to Virtual Reality
By week 4: Finish Animations in Scenes and Objects
By week 5: Finish Scenes and Objects
By week 6: Finish Controlling Objects Using Code in Software Development
By week 7: Finish Programming Animations in Software Development
By week 8: Finish Software Development

Basic programming experience is highly recommended. An experience level of having completed CS 106A will suffice for most of the topics covered, and an experience level of having completed CS 106B/X is ideal

Date and Time: 
Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Undergraduate