Undergraduate

Beyond prosthetics: brain-machine interfaces as common clinical tools

Topic: 
Beyond prosthetics: brain-machine interfaces as common clinical tools
Abstract / Description: 

To date, the scope of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) has largely been to restore lost function to people with paralysis stemming from conditions such as neurodegenerative disease and spinal cord injury. These systems interface with the brain using neurosurgically implanted electrodes, measure the voltage of individual and groups of neurons, and translate these measurements via a decoding algorithm to control an end effector such as a computer cursor. I will discuss work performed in preclinical rhesus models that led to the highest performing communication BMI demonstrated to date, as well as recent results of an ongoing clinical trial where these preclinical algorithmic innovations have been successfully translated to a human participant, again yielding the highest communication rates of any known clinical BMI.

The example of prosthetics is just one important application leveraging intracortical BMIs as a platform for accurately assessing and acting on the neural state. However, these measurements could play a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of a wide range of neurological and psychiatric diseases and disorders, ranging from stroke and epilepsy to depression and unconsciousness. Just as EEG recordings help localize seizures both temporally and spatially, and MRI imaging provides morphological and gross functional evaluations of the brain, BMI measurements may reveal previously unrecognized disease-specific adulterations in the neural state. Not only could this aid in forming better prognoses, but may also lead to interventions to prevent or alleviate undesirable symptoms and improve rehabilitation. In this manner, the utility of BMIs could extend far beyond communication or motor prosthetics to become an indispensable clinical tool in the treatment of brain disorders. I will discuss the emerging potential and key initial steps of this new class of medical system.


Event is sponsored by the Department of Neurosciences Institute and Bioengineering. View Event on Stanford Neuro Institute.

 

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 10:00am to 11:00am
Venue: 
Clark Center Auditorium

GSEE Afternoon Tea

Topic: 
EE community event
Abstract / Description: 

Take a break this Wednesday afternoon to enjoy some beverages, snacks, and conversation! All members of the EE community - students, faculty, and staff - are welcome. Don't forget to bring a reusable mug if you have one.

Hope to see you there!

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, March 4, 2015 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 2nd Floor lounge

Circuitry underlying robust perception and memory

Topic: 
Circuitry underlying robust perception and memory
Abstract / Description: 

The nervous system is a surprisingly noisy place. For example, if one presents the exact same stimulus to an animal many times, and records the activities of their sensory neurons, those neural responses typically show high levels of trial-to-trial variability. At the same time, we have the experience of having robust thoughts and perceptions. How do our brains generate this robustness from systems of individually unreliable components? In my talk, I will discuss three major circuit mechanisms that have been advanced by my research program. First, I will discuss a mechanism through which the nervous system can learn the statistical structure of the stimuli that it typically experiences. This knowledge allows for the nervous system to make educated guesses about the most likely stimulus presented, even when that stimulus is corrupted by noise. The de-noising process works best when the stimuli, and the noise that corrupts them, have different statistical structures. This motivates the second principle that I will discuss, namely that the peripheral nervous system can shape its noise statistics such that the noise only minimally interferes with the transmission of information about the external world. In particular, I will present a circuit mechanism through which the retina appears to perform this noise shaping. Finally, I will confront the fact that neural systems (like those involved in memory) must typically maintain stable representations even while the responses of individual neurons evolve dynamically over time, and are noisy. Using modern data-science tools, I will illustrate a novel mechanism through which the hippocampus appears to solve this problem. In addition to the importance of these circuit mechanisms for basic science, I will highlight in my talk the implications of my work for the creation of useful biomimetic technologies.

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 2, 2015 - 10:00am to 11:00am
Venue: 
Clark, S360

EE Distinguished Lecture: Will Clean Energy Take Our Economy to the Cleaners?

Topic: 
Will Clean Energy Take Our Economy to the Cleaners?
Abstract / Description: 

In 2009 when the Obama-Biden ticket was inaugurated into office, they set out to accomplish the following aspirational goals:

  • Implement an economy-wide cap and trade systems to reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions by 83% of 2005 levels by 2050;
  • Save more oil than we import from the Middle East and Venezuela by 2019;
  • Ensure 10% of our electricity comes from renewables in 2012 and 25% by 2025;
  • Put one million Plug-In Hybrid Vehicles on the road by 2015;
  • Create five million jobs by investing $150 bn over ten years to catalyze private efforts to build a clean-energy future.

And in the 2011 State of the Union address, the President put forth a goal to reach 80% clean electricity by 2035. The Office of the Under Secretary for Energy at the US Department of Energy put together a plan to realize these goals, along with the cost of attaining 80% clean electricity by 2035. In this talk, I will summarize this plan, called the "Strategic Technology Energy Plan (STEP)" as well highlight the unique role of run-of-river and pumped storage hydropower in STEP.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, March 10, 2015 - 4:15pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

GSEE Afternoon Tea

Topic: 
EE community event
Abstract / Description: 

Take a break this Wednesday afternoon to enjoy some beverages, snacks, and conversation!

All members of the EE community - students, faculty, and staff - are welcome.

Don't forget to bring a reusable mug if you have one. Hope to see you there!

 

- Hosted by GSEE

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 18, 2015 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Venue: 
Packard Kitchen, 2nd floor

Stanford Optical Society Seminar: Cleantech Investing - A Perspective from KPCB

Topic: 
Cleantech Investing - A Perspective from KPCB
Abstract / Description: 

John Denniston was previously a Partner at the venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, where he co-founded and co-ran the firm's $1 billion Green Growth Fund. John retired from the firm in 2013. Before joining KPCB, John was a Managing Director and Head of Technology Investment Banking for the Western United States at Salomon Smith Barney. He also served on the Investment Committee for Salomon's venture capital direct investment fund and CitiGroup's venture capital fund-of-funds. Earlier in his career, John was a Partner at Brobeck, Phleger & Harrison, where he was Head of the firm's Venture Capital Practice Group and Co-Head of its Information Technology Practice Group. He also served on the investment committee for the firm's venture capital fund. John earned his B.A. in Economics and J.D. from the University of Michigan.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 21, 2015 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

Toward energy-neutral computational sensing - challenges and opportunities

Topic: 
Toward energy-neutral computational sensing - challenges and opportunities
Abstract / Description: 

The "internet of everything" envisions trillions of connected objects loaded with high-bandwidth sensors requiring massive amounts of local signal processing, fusion, pattern extraction and classification, coupled with advanced multi-standard/multi-mode communication capabilities. Higher level intelligence, requiring local storage and complex search and matching algorithms, will come next, ultimately leading to situational awareness and truly "intelligent things" harvesting energy from their environment.


From the computational viewpoint, the challenge is formidable and can be addressed only by pushing computing fabrics toward massive parallelism and brain-like energy efficiency levels. We believe that CMOS technology can still take us a long way toward this vision. Our recent results with the PULP (parallel ultra-low power) open computing platform demonstrate that pj/OP (GOPS/mW) computational efficiency is within reach in today's 28nm CMOS FDSOI technology. In the longer term, looking toward the next 1000x of energy efficiency improvement, we will need to fully exploit the flexibility of heterogeneous 3D integration, stop being religious about analog vs. digital, Von Neumann vs. "new" computing paradigms, and seriously look into relaxing traditional "hardware-software contracts" such as numerical precision and error-free permanent storage.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, January 27, 2015 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
Venue: 
Gates 415

SmartGrid Seminar: SmartSacramento®, SMUD's Smart Grid Initiatives Project Overview and Lessons Learned

Topic: 
SmartSacramento®, SMUD's Smart Grid Initiatives Project Overview and Lessons Learned
Abstract / Description: 

With the help of a Smart Grid Investment Grant from DOE, SMUD completed over 40 smart grid initiatives valued at $308 million. SMUD also completed $43 million worth of R&D projects bringing total smart grid spending to over $350 million over a four-year period.

The eight broad smart grid categories included:
1. Advanced Metering Infrastructure
2. Distribution Automation
3. Consumer Behavior Study (Smart Pricing Options)
4. Customer Applications
5. Demand Response
6. Technology Infrastructure
7. Cyber Security and
8. R&D Projects

Many innovative projects were developed and implemented as part of this project and many lessons were learned while going through the process of designing initiatives, procuring and installing equipment, and implementing, operating and evaluating programs and pilots.

Jim Parks of SMUD will talk about the projects, highlight the lessons learned and discuss next steps.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 1:15pm to 2:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 270

Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders Series: Alon Cohen

Topic: 
Talks from leaders in technology, business, finance, education and philanthropy
Abstract / Description: 

The DFJ Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders Series features talks from leaders in technology, business, finance, education and philanthropy, the DFJ Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders Series continues to educate and inspire. Presented by the Stanford Technology Ventures Program and BASES, we thank the venture capital firm of Draper Fisher Jurvetson (DFJ) for their continued support of the series and entrepreneurship education at Stanford. 

For details, please see etl.stanford.edu

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 4, 2015 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
NVIDIA Auditorium, Huang Engineering Center

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REU Seminar; REU Event

2018 EE REU Mixer

Topic: 
2018 EE REU Mixer
Abstract / Description: 

Planning what to do over the summer? Interested in AI, Deep Learning, and Machine Learning? Looking into VR/AR, Neuroscience, Medical Imaging, and Bioengineering? A die-hard fan of EE hot topics like Convex Optimization, Signal Processing, Electronics, and more?

You're all set! Come to our EE ReU Mixer to meet professors and graduate researchers and learn about 30 projects open to you this summer.

The mixer is open to all undergraduates; freshmen and sophomores who are exploring their major/minor options are especially welcome.

RSVP by Feb 7 (Wed)

 

This event is sponsored by Stanford IEEE Chapter and FUSE – EE Student Groups.


 

Date and Time: 
Friday, February 9, 2018 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm
Venue: 
Packard Atrium

REU Presentation Day

Topic: 
REU Final Presentations
Abstract / Description: 

Please join us for the Electrical Engineering REU Final Presentation Day.

The oral session will begin at 12noon in AllenX Auditorium; the poster session will begin at 2:30pm in Packard Atrium.


Research areas include:

  • Circuits and Physical Systems,
  • Materials and Devices, and
  • Signals and Information Systems

Thank you for supporting the EE REU Program!

Read about Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU)

 

Date and Time: 
Thursday, August 31, 2017 - 12:00pm to 5:00pm
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium; Packard Atrium

REU Seminar: How to Make a Good Poster Workshop

Topic: 
How to Make a Good Poster Workshop
Abstract / Description: 

Learn how to design an effective research poster.

This informative session will provide plenty of insights into poster design for REU students, answer all their questions, and provide helpful tools for future poster making. 

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

REU Seminar: Research-to-Technology-to-Startup and the Internet of Things

Topic: 
Research-to-Technology-to-Startup and the Internet of Things
Abstract / Description: 

Andrew Scheuermann earned a PhD in Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford working on silicon electronics and renewable energy technologies under Professor Paul McIntyre and Chris Chidsey. He subsequently founded and currently leads as CEO Arch Systems, a venture-backed company scaling up a modular platform for the so-called industrial internet of things. Andrew was also one of the early team members that helped build StartX, now one of the top startup accelerators in the world, and was selected as Forbes 30 under 30 in 2016.

In this seminar, Andrew will share his own experience moving from research to technology development to starting a company, and attempt to answer more of your questions than just pontificate about the general case of such transitions. He will also provide a special lens into what is happening with the new set of technologies called the 'industrial internet of things'. Andrew will highlight what challenges remain unsolved for research, what areas require research to technology development, and where new startup ventures may be possible.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

REU Seminar: Dr. Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Enjoy Asking Hard Research Questions

Topic: 
Dr. Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Enjoy Asking Hard Research Questions
Abstract / Description: 

In this seminar we will discuss what it's like to do science & engineering research, how to be a productive researcher, and how to ask (hard) research questions. We will also discuss the importance of creativity, collaborations, and social skills for researchers. We will explore the importance of focused long-term research, what parts of "publish or perish" culture make sense, and why running a research team is a lot like running a small company. Examples will come from Prof. Pop's 20+ year research career and from recent research news, including anecdotes and lessons from Nobel prize-winning discoveries.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, August 8, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

REU Seminar: Quantum nanophotonics

Topic: 
Quantum nanophotonics: from inverse design to implementation
Abstract / Description: 

By completely opening the parameter space in nanophotonics design, new functionalities and better performance relative to traditional optoelectronics can be achieved. We have recently developed an inverse approach to design nanophotonic structures based only on their desired performance. Moreover, constraints including structure robustness, fabrication error, and minimum feature sizes can be incorporated in design, without need to have an optics expert as a designer. Such structures are fully fabricable using modern lithography and nanofabrication techniques. We have also demonstrated devices designed using this approach, including ultra-compact and efficient wavelength and power splitters on the silicon platform. Beyond integrated photonics, this approach can also be applied to design quantum photonic circuits. For example, we are working on inverse design of nanoresonators that can localize photons efficiently into sub-wavelength volumes and lead to studies of new regimes of light-matter interaction, and new applications in computing, communications, and sensing. While our traditional quantum nanophotonics platform is based on quantum dots inside photonic crystal cavities, we have recently focused on color centers in diamond and silicon carbide, which could potentially bring these experiments to room temperature and facilitate scaling to large quantum networks.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

REU Seminar: Soft Electronic Systems for Biomedical Devices

Topic: 
Soft Electronic Systems for Biomedical Devices
Abstract / Description: 

Conventional electronic devices are mechanically stiff and therefore cannot seamlessly interface with the body, which is mechanically soft. In this talk, I will review new advances in the field of stretchable electronics, where advances in materials science, mechanics, and electronics combine to produce mechanically soft and stretchable electronic systems with advanced sensing functionality. This new class of devices can form excellent interfaces with body parts, including the brain, heart, and skin. In this talk, Professor Fan will discuss specifically the use of these electronic platforms as next generation electrodes, skin-like tattoos, catheters, and bio-resorbable sensors

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 18, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

REU Seminar: Engineering Consulting

Topic: 
Engineering Consulting: Solving Other People’s Engineering Problems
Abstract / Description: 

In many industries, engineering consultants are hired to solve challenging technical problems that cannot be solved in-house. But what exactly does this process involve, and how do these professionals find a solution to these problems? In this talk, Dr. Jessica Piper will give an overview of the engineering consulting profession and Exponent Inc, the largest engineering consulting firm in the world. The talk will also cover interesting examples of real cases from the Electrical Engineering & Computer Science group, including example work in optics and consumer electronics.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

REU Orientation 2017

Topic: 
Orientation Begins – Welcome EE Undergrads!
Abstract / Description: 

REU Orientation 

The Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program is 10 weeks long. Orientation provides answers to any questions participating students have, including how to get paid, and requirements for the final presentation.

 

Date and Time: 
Thursday, June 29, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

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lab64 makerspace

lab64 Speaker Series: Nothing Half Way - Being Fearless With Your Projects

Topic: 
Nothing Half Way - Being Fearless With Your Projects
Abstract / Description: 

Quinn has been making games for 36 years, on platforms ranging from the Apple II to all manner of newfangled things. She currently manages engineering for mobile games at Scopely. She also pursues consulting, independent development, mixed-media engineering projects, and writing. In her spare time she welds things, races cars, hacks electronics, and berates her friends with sarcasm.

www.quinndunki.com
www.quinndunki.com/blondihacks

Editorial comment: Quinn decided that if Steve Wozniak could make a computer in a garage, she should be able to do that too. She then embarked on a journey to build a computer from scratch (PCBs and all) in her kitchen / garage. The result, which she calls Veronica, is a truly homemade programmable computer. You can find out more about all this on her web sites.

 

Please RSVP for Quinn's talk (and free food) by 2/13/16.

Date and Time: 
Friday, February 16, 2018 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
lab64 (Packard 064)

Intro to Unity Workshop

Topic: 
Intro to Unity Workshop
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Come build your own game from the ground up using Unity, the main game engine used for VR development in the industry. We will go over most aspects necessary for using Unity, including use of the Asset Store, basic programming structures of Unity scripts, creating user interfaces, and building a publishable exe.

The workshop will be lead by Khoi Le, a Rabbit Hole member who has been working with Unity for 2 years. The event will be held Saturday, 1/20 in Lab64 from 6-8 pm. Bring your laptop and make sure to download Unity before coming.

Date and Time: 
Saturday, January 20, 2018 - 6:00pm
Venue: 
lab64 (Packard 064)

lab64 workshop: Circuits, Devices, and Debugging!

Topic: 
Circuits, Devices, and Debugging!
Abstract / Description: 

Come learn about circuits and devices from Ron Quan! Ron is an expert in many things, including analog circuits, audio and video applications, and RF circuits.

 

WHAT IS lab64? We're a community-oriented makerspace designed to give students a free place to work on electronics projects outside the realm of traditional research labs. Our workshops, assistants, and tools are here to support a variety of project and skill levels. Everyone is welcome!

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 15, 2017 - 6:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

lab64 workshop: Mechanical How-To Session 4

Topic: 
Mechanical How-To Session 4
Abstract / Description: 

MECHANICAL HOW-TO FALL QUARTER SESSIONS

This should be tons of fun and save lots of time and effort when you go to work on your projects.

This is Session 4; there will be 6 -7 sessions in all and we hope to get as far as building a simple robotic arm. You can attend any or all of these workshops

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 30, 2017 - 7:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

VR/AR Community presents 'Privacy and VR'

Topic: 
Privacy and VR
Abstract / Description: 

With widespread adoption of VR, what data could we collect about users, and what can we then extrapolate from that data? Where's the line between reasonable and unreasonable knowledge? This talk will cover potential risks and concerns about Privacy and VR and offer suggestions for developers and users.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 16, 2017 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 103

VR/AR Community presents 'Designing Multi-Person Immersive Experiences'

Topic: 
Designing Multi-Person Immersive Experiences
Abstract / Description: 

Immersive interfaces have the potential to enable powerful human-to-human interactions by creating shared spaces. Learn best practices for designing VR and AR experiences around communal interactions to enable collaboration, communication and co-presence. By also considering asymmetric experiences that take place across heterogeneous devices like a headset and a mobile phone, designers can open up new opportunities for participation. Mechanics built around asynchronous interactions can make small communities feel bigger.

This session will discuss findings from dozens of social interaction tests and highlight best practices towards designing fantastic multi-person immersive experiences.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 2, 2017 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 103

lab64 - open lab / office hours

Topic: 
Office Hours - get help with projects
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Tutorials and instructional office hours will be held during Fall quarter for students who are interested in XR but don't have much experience. There will be weekly office hours (Sundays 5 - 6 p.m., lab64) with an experienced core member who will help with weekly assignments starting week 3. The content covered, courtesy of Udacity, is listed below:

Introduction to Virtual Reality
VR Scenes and Objects
VR Software Development

​The pacing of the content will be about 2-3 hours per week. The timeline for these unofficial assignments are listed below.

By week 3: Finish Introduction to Virtual Reality
By week 4: Finish Animations in Scenes and Objects
By week 5: Finish Scenes and Objects
By week 6: Finish Controlling Objects Using Code in Software Development
By week 7: Finish Programming Animations in Software Development
By week 8: Finish Software Development

Basic programming experience is highly recommended. An experience level of having completed CS 106A will suffice for most of the topics covered, and an experience level of having completed CS 106B/X is ideal

Date and Time: 
Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

lab64 - open lab / office hours

Topic: 
Office Hours - get help with projects
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Tutorials and instructional office hours will be held during Fall quarter for students who are interested in XR but don't have much experience. There will be weekly office hours (Sundays 5 - 6 p.m., lab64) with an experienced core member who will help with weekly assignments starting week 3. The content covered, courtesy of Udacity, is listed below:

Introduction to Virtual Reality
VR Scenes and Objects
VR Software Development

​The pacing of the content will be about 2-3 hours per week. The timeline for these unofficial assignments are listed below.

By week 3: Finish Introduction to Virtual Reality
By week 4: Finish Animations in Scenes and Objects
By week 5: Finish Scenes and Objects
By week 6: Finish Controlling Objects Using Code in Software Development
By week 7: Finish Programming Animations in Software Development
By week 8: Finish Software Development

Basic programming experience is highly recommended. An experience level of having completed CS 106A will suffice for most of the topics covered, and an experience level of having completed CS 106B/X is ideal

Date and Time: 
Sunday, November 12, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

lab64 - open lab / office hours

Topic: 
Office Hours - get help with projects
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Tutorials and instructional office hours will be held during Fall quarter for students who are interested in XR but don't have much experience. There will be weekly office hours (Sundays 5 - 6 p.m., lab64) with an experienced core member who will help with weekly assignments starting week 3. The content covered, courtesy of Udacity, is listed below:

Introduction to Virtual Reality
VR Scenes and Objects
VR Software Development

​The pacing of the content will be about 2-3 hours per week. The timeline for these unofficial assignments are listed below.

By week 3: Finish Introduction to Virtual Reality
By week 4: Finish Animations in Scenes and Objects
By week 5: Finish Scenes and Objects
By week 6: Finish Controlling Objects Using Code in Software Development
By week 7: Finish Programming Animations in Software Development
By week 8: Finish Software Development

Basic programming experience is highly recommended. An experience level of having completed CS 106A will suffice for most of the topics covered, and an experience level of having completed CS 106B/X is ideal

Date and Time: 
Sunday, November 5, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

lab64 - open lab / office hours

Topic: 
Office Hours - get help with projects
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Tutorials and instructional office hours will be held during Fall quarter for students who are interested in XR but don't have much experience. There will be weekly office hours (Sundays 5 - 6 p.m., lab64) with an experienced core member who will help with weekly assignments starting week 3. The content covered, courtesy of Udacity, is listed below:

Introduction to Virtual Reality
VR Scenes and Objects
VR Software Development

​The pacing of the content will be about 2-3 hours per week. The timeline for these unofficial assignments are listed below.

By week 3: Finish Introduction to Virtual Reality
By week 4: Finish Animations in Scenes and Objects
By week 5: Finish Scenes and Objects
By week 6: Finish Controlling Objects Using Code in Software Development
By week 7: Finish Programming Animations in Software Development
By week 8: Finish Software Development

Basic programming experience is highly recommended. An experience level of having completed CS 106A will suffice for most of the topics covered, and an experience level of having completed CS 106B/X is ideal.

Date and Time: 
Sunday, October 29, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

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