Undergraduate

Information Systems Lab Colloquium: Compressive Light Field Imaging and Display Systems

Topic: 
Compressive Light Field Imaging and Display Systems
Abstract / Description: 

With rapid advances in optical fabrication, digital processing power, and computational perception, a new generation of display technology is emerging: compressive displays exploring the co-design of optical elements and computational processing while taking particular characteristics of the human visual system into account. We will review advances in this field and give an outlook on next-generation compressive display and imaging technology. In contrast to conventional technology, compressive displays aim for a joint-design of optics, electronics, and computational processing that together exploit compressibility of the presented data. For instance, light fields show the same 3D scene from different perspectives - all these images are very similar and therefore compressible. By combining displays that use multilayer architectures or directional backlighting combined with optimal light field factorizations, limitations of existing devices, for instance resolution, depth of field, and field of view, can be overcome. In addition to light field display and projection, we will discuss a variety of technologies for compressive super-resolution and high dynamic range image display as well as compressive light field imaging and microscopy.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 6, 2014 - 4:15pm to 5:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

Information Systems Lab Colloquium: Why do Structured Codes help in Streaming Communication?

Topic: 
Why do Structured Codes help in Streaming Communication?
Abstract / Description: 

An increasing number of applications are streaming in nature. Information packets must be encoded and transmitted sequentially in real-time, and the receiver should reproduce the source stream under strict delay constraints. The study of fundamental limits and coding schemes in such communication systems is a fertile area of research. In this talk we will show how certain judiciously constructed structured codes can yield substantial gains over baseline schemes in streaming systems.

The first part of the talk will focus on channel coding over packet erasure channels. We will present a new family of streaming-codes that achieve significant performance gains over the practically relevant Gilbert-Elliott (GE) channel model. We will discuss how a certain “deterministic approximation” to the GE channel provides insights into the optimality of these codes. We will also discuss the operational significance of column-distance and column-span metrics in this setup, and show that our proposed codes achieve a near optimal tradeoff between these. In the second part of the talk we will study sequential coding of correlated sources over a packet erasure channel, using an information theoretic framework. We will discuss the performance of baseline schemes such as predictive coding and random binning, present a novel hybrid scheme, and discuss its optimality. If time permits I will also briefly discuss another recent work on broadcasting to multiple receivers with different demands over packet erasure channels.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 30, 2014 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

Information Systems Lab Colloquium: Powering Implanted Microelectronic Devices

Topic: 
Powering Implanted Microelectronic Devices
Abstract / Description: 

The physics of wave propagation, emergent from Maxwell's equations, impose fundamental bounds on the efficiency of power transfer over biological tissue. Theoretical analysis of these bounds yields insight on performance that can be achieved in specific powering configurations as well as new design concepts that may enhance efficiency. Our approach is inspired by the ideas underlying Shannon's information-theoretic channel capacity. Shannon first defined abstract source and channel models, and then sought to find the maximum information rate that can be reliably transmitted without regard for the details of implementation. By analogy, we adopt an analytically simple model for the channel, source, and receiver; and solve for the optimal source structure, and derive a global upper bound on the efficiency of power transfer. For powering deep-tissue devices, the optimal solution exhibits the properties of an immersion lens. To synthesize the optimal source, we propose and demonstrate the concept of a planar immersion lens based on metasurfaces. In this talk, I will describe the journey of solving this optimal-source problem in the past six years. I will also discuss engineering and experimental challenges to realizing such interfaces in animal models, including a pacemaker that is smaller than a grain of rice. These tiny devices can act as bioelectronic medicines, capable of precisely modulating local activity, that may be more effective treatments than drugs, which act globally throughout the body. I will conclude the talk with my thoughts on how information theory can play a role in realizing such bioelectronic medicines.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 13, 2014 - 4:15pm to 5:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

Information Systems Lab Colloquium: Explicit and almost sure conditions for K/2 degrees of freedom

Topic: 
Explicit and almost sure conditions for K/2 degrees of freedom
Abstract / Description: 

It is well known that in K-user constant single-antenna interference channels K/2 degrees of freedom (DoF) can be achieved for almost all channel matrices. It is also known that almost all channel matrices admit K/2 DoF, but explicit conditions available guaranteeing K/2 DoF are satisfied only on a set of Lebesgue measure zero. We close this gap by identifying explicit conditions for K/2 DoF, which are satisfied for Lebesgue almost all channel matrices. We also provide a construction of corresponding asymptotically DoF-optimal input distributions. The main technical tool used is a recent breakthrough result by Hochman in fractal geometry. We conclude by discussing connections between interference alignment and additive combinatorics.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 9, 2014 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

Information Systems Lab Colloquium: Relative Entropy Relaxations for Signomial Optimization

Topic: 
Relative Entropy Relaxations for Signomial Optimization
Abstract / Description: 

Signomial programs (SPs) are optimization problems specified in terms of signomials, which are weighted sums of exponentials composed with linear functionals of a decision variable. SPs are non-convex optimization problems in general, and families of NP-hard problems can be reduced to SPs. In this paper we describe a hierarchy of convex relaxations to obtain successively tighter lower bounds of the optimal value of SPs. This sequence of lower bounds is computed by solving increasingly larger-sized relative entropy optimization problems, which are convex programs specified in terms of linear and relative entropy functions. Our approach relies crucially on the observation that the relative entropy function – by virtue of its joint convexity with respect to both arguments – provides a convex parametrization of certain sets of globally nonnegative signomials with efficiently computable nonnegativity certificates via the arithmetic-geometric-mean inequality. By appealing to representation theorems from real algebraic geometry, we show that our sequences of lower bounds converge to the global optima for broad classes of SPs. Finally, we also demonstrate the effectiveness of our methods via numerical experiments. (Joint work with Parikshit Shah)

Date and Time: 
Thursday, September 25, 2014 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SmartGrid: Sakis Meliopoulos (Georgia Institute of Technology)

Topic: 
Smart grids and energy systems
Abstract / Description: 

LECTURE SERIES - FALL QUARTER OF 2014

Our speakers will discuss exciting new ideas and technologies that are changing the electricity industry. The theme of the seminar series is on smart grids and energy systems, scheduled to be held approximately every Thursday, with speakers from academic institutions and industry. The hour-long seminars, including ample time for discussion, are held at 1 p.m. approximately every other Thursday.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 13, 2014 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 101

SmartGrid: Michael Caramanis (Boston University)

Topic: 
Smart grids and energy systems
Abstract / Description: 

LECTURE SERIES - FALL QUARTER OF 2014

Our speakers will discuss exciting new ideas and technologies that are changing the electricity industry. The theme of the seminar series is on smart grids and energy systems, scheduled to be held approximately every Thursday, with speakers from academic institutions and industry. The hour-long seminars, including ample time for discussion, are held at 1 p.m. approximately every other Thursday.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 6, 2014 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 101

SmartGrid: Sila Killicote (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)

Topic: 
Smart grids and energy systems
Abstract / Description: 

LECTURE SERIES - FALL QUARTER OF 2014

Our speakers will discuss exciting new ideas and technologies that are changing the electricity industry. The theme of the seminar series is on smart grids and energy systems, scheduled to be held approximately every Thursday, with speakers from academic institutions and industry. The hour-long seminars, including ample time for discussion, are held at 1 p.m. approximately every other Thursday.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 30, 2014 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 101

SmartGrid: Tim Heidel (Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy)

Topic: 
Smart grids and energy systems
Abstract / Description: 

LECTURE SERIES - FALL QUARTER OF 2014

Our speakers will discuss exciting new ideas and technologies that are changing the electricity industry. The theme of the seminar series is on smart grids and energy systems, scheduled to be held approximately every Thursday, with speakers from academic institutions and industry. The hour-long seminars, including ample time for discussion, are held at 1 p.m. approximately every other Thursday.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 16, 2014 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 101

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REU Seminar; REU Event

REU Presentation Day

Topic: 
REU Final Presentations
Abstract / Description: 

Please join us for the Electrical Engineering REU Final Presentation Day.

The oral session will begin at 12noon in AllenX Auditorium; the poster session will begin at 2:30pm in Packard Atrium.


Research areas include:

  • Circuits and Physical Systems,
  • Materials and Devices, and
  • Signals and Information Systems

Thank you for supporting the EE REU Program!

Read about Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU)

 

Date and Time: 
Thursday, August 31, 2017 - 12:00pm to 5:00pm
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium; Packard Atrium

REU Seminar: How to Make a Good Poster Workshop

Topic: 
How to Make a Good Poster Workshop
Abstract / Description: 

Learn how to design an effective research poster.

This informative session will provide plenty of insights into poster design for REU students, answer all their questions, and provide helpful tools for future poster making. 

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

REU Seminar: Research-to-Technology-to-Startup and the Internet of Things

Topic: 
Research-to-Technology-to-Startup and the Internet of Things
Abstract / Description: 

Andrew Scheuermann earned a PhD in Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford working on silicon electronics and renewable energy technologies under Professor Paul McIntyre and Chris Chidsey. He subsequently founded and currently leads as CEO Arch Systems, a venture-backed company scaling up a modular platform for the so-called industrial internet of things. Andrew was also one of the early team members that helped build StartX, now one of the top startup accelerators in the world, and was selected as Forbes 30 under 30 in 2016.

In this seminar, Andrew will share his own experience moving from research to technology development to starting a company, and attempt to answer more of your questions than just pontificate about the general case of such transitions. He will also provide a special lens into what is happening with the new set of technologies called the 'industrial internet of things'. Andrew will highlight what challenges remain unsolved for research, what areas require research to technology development, and where new startup ventures may be possible.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

REU Seminar: Dr. Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Enjoy Asking Hard Research Questions

Topic: 
Dr. Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Enjoy Asking Hard Research Questions
Abstract / Description: 

In this seminar we will discuss what it's like to do science & engineering research, how to be a productive researcher, and how to ask (hard) research questions. We will also discuss the importance of creativity, collaborations, and social skills for researchers. We will explore the importance of focused long-term research, what parts of "publish or perish" culture make sense, and why running a research team is a lot like running a small company. Examples will come from Prof. Pop's 20+ year research career and from recent research news, including anecdotes and lessons from Nobel prize-winning discoveries.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, August 8, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

REU Seminar: Quantum nanophotonics

Topic: 
Quantum nanophotonics: from inverse design to implementation
Abstract / Description: 

By completely opening the parameter space in nanophotonics design, new functionalities and better performance relative to traditional optoelectronics can be achieved. We have recently developed an inverse approach to design nanophotonic structures based only on their desired performance. Moreover, constraints including structure robustness, fabrication error, and minimum feature sizes can be incorporated in design, without need to have an optics expert as a designer. Such structures are fully fabricable using modern lithography and nanofabrication techniques. We have also demonstrated devices designed using this approach, including ultra-compact and efficient wavelength and power splitters on the silicon platform. Beyond integrated photonics, this approach can also be applied to design quantum photonic circuits. For example, we are working on inverse design of nanoresonators that can localize photons efficiently into sub-wavelength volumes and lead to studies of new regimes of light-matter interaction, and new applications in computing, communications, and sensing. While our traditional quantum nanophotonics platform is based on quantum dots inside photonic crystal cavities, we have recently focused on color centers in diamond and silicon carbide, which could potentially bring these experiments to room temperature and facilitate scaling to large quantum networks.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

REU Seminar: Soft Electronic Systems for Biomedical Devices

Topic: 
Soft Electronic Systems for Biomedical Devices
Abstract / Description: 

Conventional electronic devices are mechanically stiff and therefore cannot seamlessly interface with the body, which is mechanically soft. In this talk, I will review new advances in the field of stretchable electronics, where advances in materials science, mechanics, and electronics combine to produce mechanically soft and stretchable electronic systems with advanced sensing functionality. This new class of devices can form excellent interfaces with body parts, including the brain, heart, and skin. In this talk, Professor Fan will discuss specifically the use of these electronic platforms as next generation electrodes, skin-like tattoos, catheters, and bio-resorbable sensors

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 18, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

REU Seminar: Engineering Consulting

Topic: 
Engineering Consulting: Solving Other People’s Engineering Problems
Abstract / Description: 

In many industries, engineering consultants are hired to solve challenging technical problems that cannot be solved in-house. But what exactly does this process involve, and how do these professionals find a solution to these problems? In this talk, Dr. Jessica Piper will give an overview of the engineering consulting profession and Exponent Inc, the largest engineering consulting firm in the world. The talk will also cover interesting examples of real cases from the Electrical Engineering & Computer Science group, including example work in optics and consumer electronics.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

REU Orientation 2017

Topic: 
Orientation Begins – Welcome EE Undergrads!
Abstract / Description: 

REU Orientation 

The Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program is 10 weeks long. Orientation provides answers to any questions participating students have, including how to get paid, and requirements for the final presentation.

 

Date and Time: 
Thursday, June 29, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

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lab64 makerspace

Intro to Unity Workshop

Topic: 
Intro to Unity Workshop
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Come build your own game from the ground up using Unity, the main game engine used for VR development in the industry. We will go over most aspects necessary for using Unity, including use of the Asset Store, basic programming structures of Unity scripts, creating user interfaces, and building a publishable exe.

The workshop will be lead by Khoi Le, a Rabbit Hole member who has been working with Unity for 2 years. The event will be held Saturday, 1/20 in Lab64 from 6-8 pm. Bring your laptop and make sure to download Unity before coming.

Date and Time: 
Saturday, January 20, 2018 - 6:00pm
Venue: 
lab64 (Packard 064)

lab64 workshop: Circuits, Devices, and Debugging!

Topic: 
Circuits, Devices, and Debugging!
Abstract / Description: 

Come learn about circuits and devices from Ron Quan! Ron is an expert in many things, including analog circuits, audio and video applications, and RF circuits.

 

WHAT IS lab64? We're a community-oriented makerspace designed to give students a free place to work on electronics projects outside the realm of traditional research labs. Our workshops, assistants, and tools are here to support a variety of project and skill levels. Everyone is welcome!

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 15, 2017 - 6:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

lab64 workshop: Mechanical How-To Session 4

Topic: 
Mechanical How-To Session 4
Abstract / Description: 

MECHANICAL HOW-TO FALL QUARTER SESSIONS

This should be tons of fun and save lots of time and effort when you go to work on your projects.

This is Session 4; there will be 6 -7 sessions in all and we hope to get as far as building a simple robotic arm. You can attend any or all of these workshops

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 30, 2017 - 7:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

VR/AR Community presents 'Privacy and VR'

Topic: 
Privacy and VR
Abstract / Description: 

With widespread adoption of VR, what data could we collect about users, and what can we then extrapolate from that data? Where's the line between reasonable and unreasonable knowledge? This talk will cover potential risks and concerns about Privacy and VR and offer suggestions for developers and users.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 16, 2017 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 103

VR/AR Community presents 'Designing Multi-Person Immersive Experiences'

Topic: 
Designing Multi-Person Immersive Experiences
Abstract / Description: 

Immersive interfaces have the potential to enable powerful human-to-human interactions by creating shared spaces. Learn best practices for designing VR and AR experiences around communal interactions to enable collaboration, communication and co-presence. By also considering asymmetric experiences that take place across heterogeneous devices like a headset and a mobile phone, designers can open up new opportunities for participation. Mechanics built around asynchronous interactions can make small communities feel bigger.

This session will discuss findings from dozens of social interaction tests and highlight best practices towards designing fantastic multi-person immersive experiences.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 2, 2017 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 103

lab64 - open lab / office hours

Topic: 
Office Hours - get help with projects
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Tutorials and instructional office hours will be held during Fall quarter for students who are interested in XR but don't have much experience. There will be weekly office hours (Sundays 5 - 6 p.m., lab64) with an experienced core member who will help with weekly assignments starting week 3. The content covered, courtesy of Udacity, is listed below:

Introduction to Virtual Reality
VR Scenes and Objects
VR Software Development

​The pacing of the content will be about 2-3 hours per week. The timeline for these unofficial assignments are listed below.

By week 3: Finish Introduction to Virtual Reality
By week 4: Finish Animations in Scenes and Objects
By week 5: Finish Scenes and Objects
By week 6: Finish Controlling Objects Using Code in Software Development
By week 7: Finish Programming Animations in Software Development
By week 8: Finish Software Development

Basic programming experience is highly recommended. An experience level of having completed CS 106A will suffice for most of the topics covered, and an experience level of having completed CS 106B/X is ideal

Date and Time: 
Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

lab64 - open lab / office hours

Topic: 
Office Hours - get help with projects
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Tutorials and instructional office hours will be held during Fall quarter for students who are interested in XR but don't have much experience. There will be weekly office hours (Sundays 5 - 6 p.m., lab64) with an experienced core member who will help with weekly assignments starting week 3. The content covered, courtesy of Udacity, is listed below:

Introduction to Virtual Reality
VR Scenes and Objects
VR Software Development

​The pacing of the content will be about 2-3 hours per week. The timeline for these unofficial assignments are listed below.

By week 3: Finish Introduction to Virtual Reality
By week 4: Finish Animations in Scenes and Objects
By week 5: Finish Scenes and Objects
By week 6: Finish Controlling Objects Using Code in Software Development
By week 7: Finish Programming Animations in Software Development
By week 8: Finish Software Development

Basic programming experience is highly recommended. An experience level of having completed CS 106A will suffice for most of the topics covered, and an experience level of having completed CS 106B/X is ideal

Date and Time: 
Sunday, November 12, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

lab64 - open lab / office hours

Topic: 
Office Hours - get help with projects
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Tutorials and instructional office hours will be held during Fall quarter for students who are interested in XR but don't have much experience. There will be weekly office hours (Sundays 5 - 6 p.m., lab64) with an experienced core member who will help with weekly assignments starting week 3. The content covered, courtesy of Udacity, is listed below:

Introduction to Virtual Reality
VR Scenes and Objects
VR Software Development

​The pacing of the content will be about 2-3 hours per week. The timeline for these unofficial assignments are listed below.

By week 3: Finish Introduction to Virtual Reality
By week 4: Finish Animations in Scenes and Objects
By week 5: Finish Scenes and Objects
By week 6: Finish Controlling Objects Using Code in Software Development
By week 7: Finish Programming Animations in Software Development
By week 8: Finish Software Development

Basic programming experience is highly recommended. An experience level of having completed CS 106A will suffice for most of the topics covered, and an experience level of having completed CS 106B/X is ideal

Date and Time: 
Sunday, November 5, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

lab64 - open lab / office hours

Topic: 
Office Hours - get help with projects
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Tutorials and instructional office hours will be held during Fall quarter for students who are interested in XR but don't have much experience. There will be weekly office hours (Sundays 5 - 6 p.m., lab64) with an experienced core member who will help with weekly assignments starting week 3. The content covered, courtesy of Udacity, is listed below:

Introduction to Virtual Reality
VR Scenes and Objects
VR Software Development

​The pacing of the content will be about 2-3 hours per week. The timeline for these unofficial assignments are listed below.

By week 3: Finish Introduction to Virtual Reality
By week 4: Finish Animations in Scenes and Objects
By week 5: Finish Scenes and Objects
By week 6: Finish Controlling Objects Using Code in Software Development
By week 7: Finish Programming Animations in Software Development
By week 8: Finish Software Development

Basic programming experience is highly recommended. An experience level of having completed CS 106A will suffice for most of the topics covered, and an experience level of having completed CS 106B/X is ideal.

Date and Time: 
Sunday, October 29, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

VR/AR Community presents 'The Design Language of Mixed Reality'

Topic: 
The Design Language of Mixed Reality
Abstract / Description: 

The Microsoft HoloLens, the first fully untethered holographic Windows computer, brings with it a new wave of holographic development. What are the challenges of Mixed Reality? What kind of apps make sense and work well? Tobiah Zarlez from Microsoft will answer these questions and more, covering the basics of the HoloLens, how it works, and how you can start developing holographic applications today.

 

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 26, 2017 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 103

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