Undergraduate

ChEM-H Special Seminar: Inverse Problems and Unsupervised Learning with applications to Cryo-Electron Microscopy

Topic: 
Inverse Problems and Unsupervised Learning with applications to Cryo-Electron Microscopy
Abstract / Description: 

Cryo-Electron Microscopy (cryo-EM) is an imaging technology that is revolutionizing structural biology; the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2017 was recently awarded to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson "for developing cryo-electron microscopy for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution".

Cryo-electron microscopes produce a large number of very noisy two-dimensional projection images of individual frozen molecules. Unlike related methods, such as computed tomography (CT), the viewing direction of each image is unknown. The unknown directions, together with extreme levels of noise and additional technical factors, make the determination of the structure of molecules challenging.

While other methods for structure determination, such as x-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), measure ensembles of molecules, cryo-electron microscopes produce images of individual molecules. Therefore, cryo-EM could potentially be used to study mixtures of different conformations of molecules. Indeed, current algorithms have been very successful at analyzing homogeneous samples, and can recover some distinct conformations mixed in solutions, but, the determination of multiple conformations, and in particular, continuums of similar conformations (continuous heterogeneity), remains one of the open problems in cryo-EM.

I will discuss a one-dimensional discrete model problem, Heterogeneous Multireference Alignment, which captures many of the properties of the cryo-EM problem. I will then discuss different components which we are introducing in order to address the problem of continuous heterogeneity in cryo-EM: 1. "hyper-molecules," the mathematical formulation of truly continuously heterogeneous molecules, 2. Computational and numerical tools for expressing associated priors, and 3. Bayesian algorithms for inverse problems with an unsupervised-learning component for recovering such hyper-molecules in cryo-EM.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 25, 2018 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

The ATLAS Reverse-GPS System: High-Throughput Wildlife Tracking

Topic: 
The ATLAS Reverse-GPS System: High-Throughput Wildlife Tracking
Abstract / Description: 

ATLAS is a reverse-GPS system that localizes radio transmitters (tags) attached to wild animals. The tags are lightweight (down to less than 1g), inexpensive, and energy-efficient. These properties have allowed us to track animals at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution, leading to a big-data/high-throughput revolution in movement ecology. One ATLAS system with up to 11 receivers has been deployed for over 3 years in Northern Israel, last summer two more were deployed (in the Netherlands and in England), and one more is currently being deployed.

The talk will describe the multifaceted challenges that the system has posed, innovations and engineering efforts that were necessary to meet the challenges, and the impact of the system on wildlife ecology. In particular, I will describe work on localization and clock synchronization, on tag development and production, on receiver hardware and software (base stations), on data collection and visualization, and on system configuration and monitoring. I will also clearly list key remaining challenges and our own future plans.

The talk will also briefly explain the overall context: what other options exist for GPS-quality wildlife tracking and why no other technique can approach the throughput and cost of ATLAS.

This is joint work with Ran Nathan, Yotam Orchan, Tony Weiss, and many other collaborators.

http://www.tau.ac.il/~stoledo/tags/

Date and Time: 
Monday, January 22, 2018 - 10:00am
Venue: 
Gates 219

Intro to Unity Workshop

Topic: 
Intro to Unity Workshop
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Come build your own game from the ground up using Unity, the main game engine used for VR development in the industry. We will go over most aspects necessary for using Unity, including use of the Asset Store, basic programming structures of Unity scripts, creating user interfaces, and building a publishable exe.

The workshop will be lead by Khoi Le, a Rabbit Hole member who has been working with Unity for 2 years. The event will be held Saturday, 1/20 in Lab64 from 6-8 pm. Bring your laptop and make sure to download Unity before coming.

Date and Time: 
Saturday, January 20, 2018 - 6:00pm
Venue: 
lab64 (Packard 064)

Undergraduate Admit Weekend

Topic: 
Welcome undergrads!
Abstract / Description: 

Welcome admitted students! 

Enjoy your time on campus and feel free to stop by the Packard Electrical Engineering Building.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 26, 2018 - 8:30am to Saturday, April 28, 2018 - 12:00pm

Radio Club meeting: Talk on cracking the Enigma Machine, featuring a real, working machine from WWII

Topic: 
Talk on cracking the Enigma Machine, featuring a real, working machine from WWII!
Abstract / Description: 

The Enigma machine was a cunning invention and major advance in cipher technology, which gave the Germans confidence in the secrecy of their messages during World War II. This was a reasonable confidence but proved to be wrong and eventually fatal. The story of the Allies conquering the overwhelming odds against breaking the Nazi code is a story of ingenuity and intrigue. Alan Turing led the Allies efforts to break the Enigma, which significantly shortened the war and ushered in the age of computers.

The success of cracking the Enigma was kept secret for 29 years after the end of WW2, despite 15,000 people working on the effort. This secrecy is especially incredible for us living in the age of the internet, WikiLeaks and Edward Snowden. Over 35,000 Enigma machines were
manufactured, but only 350 are known to exist today. You will see one of these rare machines and have a chance to type in your own secret messages.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, January 9, 2018 - 7:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

Pages

REU Seminar; REU Event

REU Presentation Day

Topic: 
REU Final Presentations
Abstract / Description: 

Please join us for the Electrical Engineering REU Final Presentation Day.

The oral session will begin at 12noon in AllenX Auditorium; the poster session will begin at 2:30pm in Packard Atrium.


Research areas include:

  • Circuits and Physical Systems,
  • Materials and Devices, and
  • Signals and Information Systems

Thank you for supporting the EE REU Program!

Read about Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU)

 

Date and Time: 
Thursday, August 31, 2017 - 12:00pm to 5:00pm
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium; Packard Atrium

REU Seminar: How to Make a Good Poster Workshop

Topic: 
How to Make a Good Poster Workshop
Abstract / Description: 

Learn how to design an effective research poster.

This informative session will provide plenty of insights into poster design for REU students, answer all their questions, and provide helpful tools for future poster making. 

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

REU Seminar: Research-to-Technology-to-Startup and the Internet of Things

Topic: 
Research-to-Technology-to-Startup and the Internet of Things
Abstract / Description: 

Andrew Scheuermann earned a PhD in Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford working on silicon electronics and renewable energy technologies under Professor Paul McIntyre and Chris Chidsey. He subsequently founded and currently leads as CEO Arch Systems, a venture-backed company scaling up a modular platform for the so-called industrial internet of things. Andrew was also one of the early team members that helped build StartX, now one of the top startup accelerators in the world, and was selected as Forbes 30 under 30 in 2016.

In this seminar, Andrew will share his own experience moving from research to technology development to starting a company, and attempt to answer more of your questions than just pontificate about the general case of such transitions. He will also provide a special lens into what is happening with the new set of technologies called the 'industrial internet of things'. Andrew will highlight what challenges remain unsolved for research, what areas require research to technology development, and where new startup ventures may be possible.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

REU Seminar: Dr. Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Enjoy Asking Hard Research Questions

Topic: 
Dr. Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Enjoy Asking Hard Research Questions
Abstract / Description: 

In this seminar we will discuss what it's like to do science & engineering research, how to be a productive researcher, and how to ask (hard) research questions. We will also discuss the importance of creativity, collaborations, and social skills for researchers. We will explore the importance of focused long-term research, what parts of "publish or perish" culture make sense, and why running a research team is a lot like running a small company. Examples will come from Prof. Pop's 20+ year research career and from recent research news, including anecdotes and lessons from Nobel prize-winning discoveries.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, August 8, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

REU Seminar: Quantum nanophotonics

Topic: 
Quantum nanophotonics: from inverse design to implementation
Abstract / Description: 

By completely opening the parameter space in nanophotonics design, new functionalities and better performance relative to traditional optoelectronics can be achieved. We have recently developed an inverse approach to design nanophotonic structures based only on their desired performance. Moreover, constraints including structure robustness, fabrication error, and minimum feature sizes can be incorporated in design, without need to have an optics expert as a designer. Such structures are fully fabricable using modern lithography and nanofabrication techniques. We have also demonstrated devices designed using this approach, including ultra-compact and efficient wavelength and power splitters on the silicon platform. Beyond integrated photonics, this approach can also be applied to design quantum photonic circuits. For example, we are working on inverse design of nanoresonators that can localize photons efficiently into sub-wavelength volumes and lead to studies of new regimes of light-matter interaction, and new applications in computing, communications, and sensing. While our traditional quantum nanophotonics platform is based on quantum dots inside photonic crystal cavities, we have recently focused on color centers in diamond and silicon carbide, which could potentially bring these experiments to room temperature and facilitate scaling to large quantum networks.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

REU Seminar: Soft Electronic Systems for Biomedical Devices

Topic: 
Soft Electronic Systems for Biomedical Devices
Abstract / Description: 

Conventional electronic devices are mechanically stiff and therefore cannot seamlessly interface with the body, which is mechanically soft. In this talk, I will review new advances in the field of stretchable electronics, where advances in materials science, mechanics, and electronics combine to produce mechanically soft and stretchable electronic systems with advanced sensing functionality. This new class of devices can form excellent interfaces with body parts, including the brain, heart, and skin. In this talk, Professor Fan will discuss specifically the use of these electronic platforms as next generation electrodes, skin-like tattoos, catheters, and bio-resorbable sensors

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 18, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

REU Seminar: Engineering Consulting

Topic: 
Engineering Consulting: Solving Other People’s Engineering Problems
Abstract / Description: 

In many industries, engineering consultants are hired to solve challenging technical problems that cannot be solved in-house. But what exactly does this process involve, and how do these professionals find a solution to these problems? In this talk, Dr. Jessica Piper will give an overview of the engineering consulting profession and Exponent Inc, the largest engineering consulting firm in the world. The talk will also cover interesting examples of real cases from the Electrical Engineering & Computer Science group, including example work in optics and consumer electronics.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

REU Orientation 2017

Topic: 
Orientation Begins – Welcome EE Undergrads!
Abstract / Description: 

REU Orientation 

The Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program is 10 weeks long. Orientation provides answers to any questions participating students have, including how to get paid, and requirements for the final presentation.

 

Date and Time: 
Thursday, June 29, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 101 Auditorium

Pages

lab64 makerspace

Intro to Unity Workshop

Topic: 
Intro to Unity Workshop
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Come build your own game from the ground up using Unity, the main game engine used for VR development in the industry. We will go over most aspects necessary for using Unity, including use of the Asset Store, basic programming structures of Unity scripts, creating user interfaces, and building a publishable exe.

The workshop will be lead by Khoi Le, a Rabbit Hole member who has been working with Unity for 2 years. The event will be held Saturday, 1/20 in Lab64 from 6-8 pm. Bring your laptop and make sure to download Unity before coming.

Date and Time: 
Saturday, January 20, 2018 - 6:00pm
Venue: 
lab64 (Packard 064)

lab64 workshop: Circuits, Devices, and Debugging!

Topic: 
Circuits, Devices, and Debugging!
Abstract / Description: 

Come learn about circuits and devices from Ron Quan! Ron is an expert in many things, including analog circuits, audio and video applications, and RF circuits.

 

WHAT IS lab64? We're a community-oriented makerspace designed to give students a free place to work on electronics projects outside the realm of traditional research labs. Our workshops, assistants, and tools are here to support a variety of project and skill levels. Everyone is welcome!

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 15, 2017 - 6:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

lab64 workshop: Mechanical How-To Session 4

Topic: 
Mechanical How-To Session 4
Abstract / Description: 

MECHANICAL HOW-TO FALL QUARTER SESSIONS

This should be tons of fun and save lots of time and effort when you go to work on your projects.

This is Session 4; there will be 6 -7 sessions in all and we hope to get as far as building a simple robotic arm. You can attend any or all of these workshops

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 30, 2017 - 7:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

VR/AR Community presents 'Privacy and VR'

Topic: 
Privacy and VR
Abstract / Description: 

With widespread adoption of VR, what data could we collect about users, and what can we then extrapolate from that data? Where's the line between reasonable and unreasonable knowledge? This talk will cover potential risks and concerns about Privacy and VR and offer suggestions for developers and users.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 16, 2017 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 103

VR/AR Community presents 'Designing Multi-Person Immersive Experiences'

Topic: 
Designing Multi-Person Immersive Experiences
Abstract / Description: 

Immersive interfaces have the potential to enable powerful human-to-human interactions by creating shared spaces. Learn best practices for designing VR and AR experiences around communal interactions to enable collaboration, communication and co-presence. By also considering asymmetric experiences that take place across heterogeneous devices like a headset and a mobile phone, designers can open up new opportunities for participation. Mechanics built around asynchronous interactions can make small communities feel bigger.

This session will discuss findings from dozens of social interaction tests and highlight best practices towards designing fantastic multi-person immersive experiences.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 2, 2017 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 103

lab64 - open lab / office hours

Topic: 
Office Hours - get help with projects
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Tutorials and instructional office hours will be held during Fall quarter for students who are interested in XR but don't have much experience. There will be weekly office hours (Sundays 5 - 6 p.m., lab64) with an experienced core member who will help with weekly assignments starting week 3. The content covered, courtesy of Udacity, is listed below:

Introduction to Virtual Reality
VR Scenes and Objects
VR Software Development

​The pacing of the content will be about 2-3 hours per week. The timeline for these unofficial assignments are listed below.

By week 3: Finish Introduction to Virtual Reality
By week 4: Finish Animations in Scenes and Objects
By week 5: Finish Scenes and Objects
By week 6: Finish Controlling Objects Using Code in Software Development
By week 7: Finish Programming Animations in Software Development
By week 8: Finish Software Development

Basic programming experience is highly recommended. An experience level of having completed CS 106A will suffice for most of the topics covered, and an experience level of having completed CS 106B/X is ideal

Date and Time: 
Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

lab64 - open lab / office hours

Topic: 
Office Hours - get help with projects
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Tutorials and instructional office hours will be held during Fall quarter for students who are interested in XR but don't have much experience. There will be weekly office hours (Sundays 5 - 6 p.m., lab64) with an experienced core member who will help with weekly assignments starting week 3. The content covered, courtesy of Udacity, is listed below:

Introduction to Virtual Reality
VR Scenes and Objects
VR Software Development

​The pacing of the content will be about 2-3 hours per week. The timeline for these unofficial assignments are listed below.

By week 3: Finish Introduction to Virtual Reality
By week 4: Finish Animations in Scenes and Objects
By week 5: Finish Scenes and Objects
By week 6: Finish Controlling Objects Using Code in Software Development
By week 7: Finish Programming Animations in Software Development
By week 8: Finish Software Development

Basic programming experience is highly recommended. An experience level of having completed CS 106A will suffice for most of the topics covered, and an experience level of having completed CS 106B/X is ideal

Date and Time: 
Sunday, November 12, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

lab64 - open lab / office hours

Topic: 
Office Hours - get help with projects
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Tutorials and instructional office hours will be held during Fall quarter for students who are interested in XR but don't have much experience. There will be weekly office hours (Sundays 5 - 6 p.m., lab64) with an experienced core member who will help with weekly assignments starting week 3. The content covered, courtesy of Udacity, is listed below:

Introduction to Virtual Reality
VR Scenes and Objects
VR Software Development

​The pacing of the content will be about 2-3 hours per week. The timeline for these unofficial assignments are listed below.

By week 3: Finish Introduction to Virtual Reality
By week 4: Finish Animations in Scenes and Objects
By week 5: Finish Scenes and Objects
By week 6: Finish Controlling Objects Using Code in Software Development
By week 7: Finish Programming Animations in Software Development
By week 8: Finish Software Development

Basic programming experience is highly recommended. An experience level of having completed CS 106A will suffice for most of the topics covered, and an experience level of having completed CS 106B/X is ideal

Date and Time: 
Sunday, November 5, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

lab64 - open lab / office hours

Topic: 
Office Hours - get help with projects
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Tutorials and instructional office hours will be held during Fall quarter for students who are interested in XR but don't have much experience. There will be weekly office hours (Sundays 5 - 6 p.m., lab64) with an experienced core member who will help with weekly assignments starting week 3. The content covered, courtesy of Udacity, is listed below:

Introduction to Virtual Reality
VR Scenes and Objects
VR Software Development

​The pacing of the content will be about 2-3 hours per week. The timeline for these unofficial assignments are listed below.

By week 3: Finish Introduction to Virtual Reality
By week 4: Finish Animations in Scenes and Objects
By week 5: Finish Scenes and Objects
By week 6: Finish Controlling Objects Using Code in Software Development
By week 7: Finish Programming Animations in Software Development
By week 8: Finish Software Development

Basic programming experience is highly recommended. An experience level of having completed CS 106A will suffice for most of the topics covered, and an experience level of having completed CS 106B/X is ideal.

Date and Time: 
Sunday, October 29, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

VR/AR Community presents 'The Design Language of Mixed Reality'

Topic: 
The Design Language of Mixed Reality
Abstract / Description: 

The Microsoft HoloLens, the first fully untethered holographic Windows computer, brings with it a new wave of holographic development. What are the challenges of Mixed Reality? What kind of apps make sense and work well? Tobiah Zarlez from Microsoft will answer these questions and more, covering the basics of the HoloLens, how it works, and how you can start developing holographic applications today.

 

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 26, 2017 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 103

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Undergraduate