SystemX

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
DC-DC Regulators using MEMS Relay
Abstract / Description: 

A problem not often considered with mobile device chargers and other appliances that use electrical outlets is reducing the quiescent power loss due to solid-state device leakage when the appliance is not in use. Could micro-electromechanical (MEM) relays be used to aid in eliminating this vampire power because of their extremely high off-resistance? Initial work on the use of a single four-terminal MEM relay in conventional buck and boost converters will be presented. This talk will include an overview of electrostatically actuated MEM relay operation, characterization, including typical challenges encountered during probe station testing, and failure mechanisms. In addition, analytical solutions that account for non-idealities, simulated, and measured results will be presented for buck and boost DC-DC converters in both discontinuous conduction mode (DCM) and continuous condition mode (CCM).

Date and Time: 
Thursday, June 2, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
5G Architectures and Circuits – A Path to 10 Gb/s and 100 Radios
Abstract / Description: 

Receiver architectures and circuits for the 5G technologies will be reviewed in this presentation. Two possible architectural directions towards 5G are considered.

From the SNR point of view, we can think of the sensitivity radio (or the long-distance radio) as the one extreme, and the maximum throughput radio (or the short-distance radio) as another extreme.

From the technology point of view, we can think of the co-working cellular radio (or the 3G/4G/4G+ radio) as the one extreme, and the co-working connectivity-cellular radio (4G+/WLAN radio) as the another extreme.

All these cellular and connectivity technologies 'speak' different standardization languages, but from the RF IC design point of view there are many similarities that could be used to build a universal radio working across all the SNRs, distances, throughputs, and technologies from the very same circuits. In this presentation, the receiver architectures and circuits meeting this common goal of 'all-in-1' radio will be put up for a consideration.

An 'imaginary' local very-high throughput personal network (radio-belt) is introduced as a vehicle to build a 5G system with a 10Gb/s data rate. Design trade-offs among different modulation schemes, bandwidths, bands, and MIMO and beamforming signal-processing techniques are discussed throughout the presentation and their impact on the 5G circuit and architecture design outlined.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 26, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Energy-Efficient Hardware for Embedded Vision and Deep Convolutional Neural Networks
Abstract / Description: 

Visual object detection and recognition are needed for a wide range of applications including robotics/drones, self-driving cars, smart Internet of Things, and portable/wearable electronics. For many of these applications, local embedded processing is preferred due to privacy or latency concerns. In this talk, we will describe how joint algorithm and hardware design can be used to reduce the energy consumption of object detection and recognition while delivering real-time and robust performance. We will discuss several energy-efficient techniques that exploit sparsity, reduce data movement and storage costs, and show how they can be applied to popular forms of object detection and recognition, including those that use deep convolutional neural nets (CNNs). We will present results from recently fabricated ASICs (including our deep CNN accelerator named "Eyeriss") that demonstrate these techniques in real-time computer vision systems.

Date and Time: 
Monday, May 23, 2016 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Innovation and Entrepreneurship Opportunities in the IC world
Abstract / Description: 

Phenomenal growth in the use of mobile wireless, and ubiquitous sensor products has fueled a resurgence of excitement in the semiconductor industry. In spite of increasing investment costs and predictions of doom and gloom, these are exciting times in the semiconductor innovation pipeline for those that are willing to adapt and make adjustments.

This seminar will offer a discussion of the important technical and business challenges, and the myriad of opportunities. The focus will be on Innovation and Entrepreneurship opportunities. Leveraging the industry's use of collaborative research and development, and the Fabless Integrated Circuits model provides many opportunities for new ideas. Because the success rate of start-up companies remains relatively low, innovators need to pay attention to a broad spectrum of factors besides their technical idea. This seminar will provide guidelines for innovators to launch companies with increased probabilities of success. Using the Fabless IC startup learnings as a base, this course will offer hope for entrepreneurs, researchers, and designers in fulfilling their dreams.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 19, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Integrated Neural Interfaces
Abstract / Description: 

Large-scale recording of neural signals is essential for gaining a better understanding of the elaborate, dynamic picture of the brain that emerges from interactions involving individual cells and complex neural circuits. Over the past few decades neural recording capabilities have progressed from single unit in vitro recordings to massively multichannel monitoring in vivo. Currently, microwire and microfabricated silicon neural probes are capable of sensing the simultaneous activity of hundreds of neurons. Miniaturized recording systems based on custom CMOS integrated circuits have been developed that can record from around 16-100 channels simultaneously, and these are no bigger than a postage stamp. Another wave of innovation is needed to enable next-generation neural interfaces that will provide high resolution access to 1,000-10,000 neurons and beyond.

Beyond understanding the brain, another "killer app" for neural interfaces is to directly connect prosthetic devices to a patient's nervous system. For example, cochlear implants today provide a sense of sound to over 100,000 patients in the US alone, including congenitally deaf children who now participate in music classes. Retinal prosthetics that provide artificial sight are currently being translated into medical products, with ongoing clinical trials inside and outside the US. Next on the horizon are motor prosthetics that allow paralyzed individuals to interact with the physical and cyber worlds. Bidirectional (read/write) motor prosthetics are being created at University of Utah that provide high degree of freedom control of mechanical prostheses while simultaneously invoking hundreds of different percepts generated by sensors and communicated to the patient through stimulation electrodes. Systems like these are comprised of many hardware and software components stretched to performance limits, offering a wealth opportunity for EE researchers.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Implantable and Wearable Microelectronic Devices to Improve Quality of Life for People with Disabilities
Abstract / Description: 

Implantable microelectronic devices (IMD) and neuroprostheses are finding applications in new therapies thanks to advancements in microelectronics, microsensors, RF communications, and medicine, which have resulted in embedding more functions in IMDs that occupy smaller space and consume less power, while offering therapies for more complex diseases and disabilities. I will address the latest developments in key building blocks for state-of-the-art IMDs, particularly on the analog front-end, RF back-end, and power management.

IMDs have been quite successful in neuroprosthetic devices, such as cochlear implants and deep brain stimulators. They have been recently approved for vision and are being considered for brain-computer interfacing (BCI) to enable individuals with severe physical disabilities to control their environments. I will also talk about the example of a smart cage, which can wirelessly power, communicate with, and track sensors implanted in or attached to small freely behaving animals. Novel minimally-invasive methods will be presented as well, such as wireless and wearable brain-tongue- computer interface (BTCI), also known as the Tongue Drive System (TDS), which enables individuals with tetraplegia to control their environments using their voluntary tongue motion.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 10, 2016 - 10:00am to 11:00am
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
More-than-Moore with Integrated Silicon-Photonics
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk we'll present the latest results on the integration of silicon-photonic interconnects in several fabrication processes. These include the world's first microprocessor communicating to the outside world with monolithically integrated Si- Photonic devices, as well as the first demonstration of photonics in a bulk CMOS process. We also illustrate some critical aspects of this technology that need to be addressed from integration, circuits and systems side. These breakthroughs pave the way for orders of magnitude improvement in performance of photonically-enhanced VLSI systems.

Moreover, just like integrating the inductor into CMOS in 1990s revolutionized the RF design and enabled mobile revolution, integration of silicon-photonic active and passive devices with CMOS is greatly positioned to revolutionize a number of analog and mixed-signal applications – low- phase noise signal sources and large bandwidth, high-resolution ADCs, to name a few.


Join the SystemX mailing list 
Additional questions: Rick Bahr, SystemX Seminar Chair

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 5, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

Claude E. Shannon's 100th Birthday

Topic: 
Centennial year of the 'Father of the Information Age'
Abstract / Description: 

From UCLA Shannon Centennial Celebration website:

Claude Shannon was an American mathematician, electrical engineer, and cryptographer known as "the father of information theory". Shannon founded information theory and is perhaps equally well known for founding both digital computer and digital circuit design theory. Shannon also laid the foundations of cryptography and did basic work on code breaking and secure telecommunications.

 

Events taking place around the world are listed at IEEE Information Theory Society.

Date and Time: 
Saturday, April 30, 2016 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
N/A

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Machine-learning Based Prognostication of Breast Cancer Recurrence Using Digital Histopathology
Abstract / Description: 

More accurate prognosis of hormone-positive early stage breast cancer patients offers the opportunity to make more informed follow-up choices, for example the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy. Traditionally, pathologists have prognosticated these cancers using conventional staging, tumor proliferation index, and a small set of morphological features manually scored from H&E slides. This information may be combined with the immunohistochemical (IHC) protein expression of the tumor. The rich information in these slides is summarized in terms of a simple univariate score such as the proportion of positively staining tumor nuclei. To investigate whether there is additional prognostic information in both the H&E and IHC slides, we constructed a prognostic model to predict recurrence risk from an exhaustive set of automatically calculated image features. On our whole slide cohort, the image-feature based recurrence risk binary classifier outperforms using clinical and expression covariates alone. Prognostic features include nuclei size, nuclear atypia, co-expression of ER and Ki67, lymphocyte density and stromal features. Our machine-learning based approach is a viable way to discover and integrate information holistically from different clinical prognostic data sources including clinical/demographic, H&E slide-based features and, for the first time, IHC stained slides.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 28, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

SystemX Spring Conference

Topic: 
Spring Conference
Abstract / Description: 

REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.


Tuesday, May 17 (Day 1) - starts with a SystemX overview given by Prof. Boris Murmann and Prof. Philip Wong, SystemX's faculty directors. This will be followed by overviews of our Focus Areas by their respective faculty leaders. Breakout sessions for Heterogeneous Integration and Internet of Everything will follow in the afternoon. The day concludes with an FMA student poster session / industry mixer, reception from 4:45 - 6:30 pm.

Wednesday, May 18 (Day 2) - begins with updates from Stanford's Mechanical Eng Department and Neurosciences Institute, followed by technology talks on Nanophotonics and Quantum Encryption. The afternoon will hold breakout sessions for the Computation and Bio Interfaces Focus Areas, after which member company representatives will assemble for our Business Meeting. The day concludes with the SystemX Dinner at the Stanford Faculty Club.

Thursday, November 19 (Day 3) - will hold the breakout sessions for the Energy/Power Management Systems and the Design Productivity Focus Areas. The day will end at noon.

 

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 8:00am to Thursday, May 19, 2016 - 12:00pm

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - SystemX