SystemX

SystemX Spring Conference

Topic: 
Spring Conference
Abstract / Description: 

REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.


Tuesday, May 17 (Day 1) - starts with a SystemX overview given by Prof. Boris Murmann and Prof. Philip Wong, SystemX's faculty directors. This will be followed by overviews of our Focus Areas by their respective faculty leaders. Breakout sessions for Heterogeneous Integration and Internet of Everything will follow in the afternoon. The day concludes with an FMA student poster session / industry mixer, reception from 4:45 - 6:30 pm.

Wednesday, May 18 (Day 2) - begins with updates from Stanford's Mechanical Eng Department and Neurosciences Institute, followed by technology talks on Nanophotonics and Quantum Encryption. The afternoon will hold breakout sessions for the Computation and Bio Interfaces Focus Areas, after which member company representatives will assemble for our Business Meeting. The day concludes with the SystemX Dinner at the Stanford Faculty Club.

Thursday, November 19 (Day 3) - will hold the breakout sessions for the Energy/Power Management Systems and the Design Productivity Focus Areas. The day will end at noon.

 

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 8:00am to Thursday, May 19, 2016 - 12:00pm

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Batteries Today and Tomorrow
Abstract / Description: 

Increased demands of batteries for applications in consumer electronics, electric vehicle and grid present opportunities and challenges for rechargeable batteries. This lecture will analyze the nature of energy storage, the existing technology and present the promising future batteries, which can have significantly higher energy density, lower cost, better safety and longer life. Novel battery chemistries and materials are key for a revolutionary change.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 21, 2016 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Wireless Power Transfer and the Successful Biomedical Startup
Abstract / Description: 

In the ongoing age of active implantable medical devices there is an ever-present need to safely provide electrical power an exploding number of medical implant technologies. In some cases, such as cardiac pacemakers or deep brain stimulators, single large batteries may be designed to last years before needing to be surgically replaced. However, in other cases such as commercially available cochlear implants and retinal prostheses, power is delivered continuously and transcutaneously via a pair of inductively-coupled coils. The present talk describes the inherent tradeoffs present in the real-world choices an implant designer makes in the construction of a power system, using the Oculeve (a startup spun out of Stanford in 2011) lacrimal stimulator as a case study of a successful implant design effort.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 14, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
A Cross-Layer Approach to Integrated Radios for Future Wireless Communications
Abstract / Description: 

Next generation (xG) wireless communications impose requirements on the data rate, spectral efficiency, and latency (among others) that are higher than those for today's systems by several orders of magnitude. Despite the many different perceptions of xG that exist, I envision that next generation wireless communications built on emergent wireless paradigms will involve unprecedented interactions between the MAC layer and the PHY layer. These transformative wireless paradigms will also necessarily be fueled by circuit design innovations, due to the extreme system requirements.

As an example, full-duplex (FD) wireless is an emergent wireless communication paradigm that can greatly improve wireless network performance but is also fraught with fundamental challenges in the design of integrated radios. FD operation involves simultaneous transmission and reception at the same frequency, resulting in the tremendous transmitter self-interference at the receiver input. This self-interference can be a billion times more powerful than the desired signal to be received.

In this talk, I will present a system design methodology that breaks the boundaries between the traditional functional domains of the radio through novel circuit design. First, I will introduce a noise-cancelling, self-interference-cancelling receiver that uses a co-design between a self-interference canceller and a noise-cancelling receiver to enable antenna interfaces with low transmitter-to-receiver isolation. Next, I will introduce frequency-domain equalization at radio frequencies (RF), a technique that leverages signal processing concepts traditionally implemented in the digital signal-processing block to achieve wideband self-interference cancellation (SIC). After that, I will talk about a joint optimization across the antenna, analog, and digital domains that achieves 85dB overall SIC, enabling a practical FD link. At the end of the talk, I will discuss my collaborative work with network theorists on power allocation algorithms and rate-gain characterization for OFDMA-based FD wireless networks. I will also talk about my collaboration with researcher from the field of MEMS on realizing tunable frequency-division-duplexing RF systems.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 7, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

SystemX Alliance: Panel Discussion

Topic: 
Our Fabless Future, a Panel Discussion
Abstract / Description: 

This panel's intent is to review and discuss the past, present and especilally the future for the fabless model of semiconductor development. There will be 3 short presentations followed by a moderated q&a.

Paul Franklin will drawn upon his extensive experience in Silicon Valley to bring us to the present. His talk will discuss the evolution of our industry, and now its growing consolidation.

Mike Gianfagna, with his perspective anchored in eSilicon, will talk to the emerging model of cloud-based tools, shared fab access and shared logistics management, all keeping the door open to ASIC development for the small to modest scale end product, as well as, for fabless semiconductor companies more generally.

Victor Peng, from Xilinx, will present the alternative model of repurposing of high volume but configurable standard products/platforms. FPGA's, and their programmable platform brethren: PSoCs/MPSoCs represent a faster and more developmentally economical manner of semiconductor product realization.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 31, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Dramatic Improvement in Driving LED Arrays through Resonant Control of Power
Abstract / Description: 

Driver failures may represent more than half of the failures of LED luminaires, especially for higher outputs. Further, a single constant-current driver cannot regulate current throughout parallel columns of LEDs. A solution to these problems is presented using contra-connected pairs of LEDs or "couplets" which can be efficiently driven with AC power. Couplets can be further assembled into "reactive strings" where reactive elements (capacitors or inductors) are distributed throughout the string. Reactive strings can be driven as part of resonant tank circuits where damping is provided by the LEDs and resonance regulated the power. Near-lossless reactances control power both globally and locally. Resonance provides a passive power control mechanism that requires no active components. The distributed reactive elements allow power in each couplet to be independently regulated.

 

This event is co-sponsored by the Stanford SystemX Alliance and the IEEE SCV PES/IAS Chapter.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, March 9, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Rethinking Analog-Digital Boundary from Circuit to System Level towards Reconfigurability of Everything
Abstract / Description: 

The trend of modern electronic systems, such as wireless and wireline applications, demands increasing reconfigurability, bandwidth, and dynamic range, but low power and cost. On the other hand, the technology scaling is slowing down its pace and incurs significant cost particularly for analog designs. Those factors have driven the design community to pursue both new circuit and system architectures towards unprecedented flexibility, performance, and low cost. Wouldn't it be nice to have an electronic system that can be arbitrarily configured based on user's needs? In this talk, we will examine several such attempts recently demonstrated by our group members that show the importance/effectiveness of re-thinking the analog-digital boundary in both circuit and system level towards this goal. Several initial silicon prototypes achieve encouraging performance and flexibility in comparison with the state of the arts. More importantly, they tout the potential for many future extensions, and hopefully allow a different thinking for analog-digital interface circuit architecture to transform future electronic system designs.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 10, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Memory - the N3XT Frontier
Abstract / Description: 

The adoption of Flash in the memory hierarchy (albeit on a separate chip from the processor) inspired the exploration of computing architectures that capitalize on the salient features of Flash: non-volatility and high density. At the same time, new types of non-volatile memory have emerged that can easily be integrated on-chip with the microprocessor cores because they use a different set of materials and require different device fabrication technologies from Flash. Some of them can be programmed and read quickly; others can have very high data storage density. Importantly, all of these memories are free from the limitations of Flash — that is, low endurance, need for high voltage supply, slow write speed and cumbersome erase procedure. Coincidentally, these new memories store information using new types of physics that do not rely on storing charge on a capacitor as is the case for SRAM, DRAM and Flash

I will give an overview of the "new" memory technologies that are being explored currently in industry and in academia: spin-transfer torque magnetic memory, resistive switching metal oxide memory, conductive bridge memory, phase change memory. I will go over the fabrication process, essential device characteristics, and potential applications. To facilitate a connection with circuit designers, a compact model for RRAM has been developed and made available to the public. I will describe our efforts to explore device size scaling below 10 nm as well as 3D stacking of RRAM and the use of nanomaterials such as graphene in RRAM and PCM devices.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Flywheel Energy Storage: The Utility Scale Energy Storage Solution
Abstract / Description: 

Energy storage is now emerging as an essential electric utility resource to effectively enable higher penetration levels of variable renewable generation resources. In California, in response to RPS mandates for increased renewable penetration, Assembly Bill 2514, in conjunction with CPUC rulings, has called for 1.3 GW of flexible energy storage to be incorporated into the energy mix by the three California IOUs during the next few years. Similar actions are being followed in other U.S. states, and worldwide. The talk will review the energy storage landscape, and then focus on the speaker's interests in advancing flywheel energy storage to meet utility scale challenges. In short, a flywheel functions as a battery, with kinetic energy storage replacing conventional electrochemical processes. Based on numerous implementations and products released during the past 20-30 years, there has been a general belief in the power systems community that flywheels are only suited to short term applications, for example in frequency regulation, grid stability enhancement, voltage support, and in UPS and transit system applications. This is not the case, and the talk will outline how flywheels can be economically designed to meet multi-hour energy shifting applications, that are essential for provision of capacity, and extended integration of variable renewable generation. Some details on product and project development at grid scale energy storage start-up Amber Kinetics will be discussed.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Robot Intelligence in a Cloud-Connected World
Abstract / Description: 

Robotics is currently undergoing a dramatic transformation. High-performance networking and cloud computing has radically transformed how individuals and businesses manage data, and is poised to disrupt the state-of-the-art in the development of intelligent machines.

This talk explores the long-term prospects for the future evolution of robot intelligence based on search, distributed computing, and big data. Ongoing research on autonomous cars and humanoid robots will be discussed in the context of how cloud-connectivity will enable future robotic systems to be more capable and useful.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

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