SystemX

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Implantable and Wearable Microelectronic Devices to Improve Quality of Life for People with Disabilities
Abstract / Description: 

Implantable microelectronic devices (IMD) and neuroprostheses are finding applications in new therapies thanks to advancements in microelectronics, microsensors, RF communications, and medicine, which have resulted in embedding more functions in IMDs that occupy smaller space and consume less power, while offering therapies for more complex diseases and disabilities. I will address the latest developments in key building blocks for state-of-the-art IMDs, particularly on the analog front-end, RF back-end, and power management.

IMDs have been quite successful in neuroprosthetic devices, such as cochlear implants and deep brain stimulators. They have been recently approved for vision and are being considered for brain-computer interfacing (BCI) to enable individuals with severe physical disabilities to control their environments. I will also talk about the example of a smart cage, which can wirelessly power, communicate with, and track sensors implanted in or attached to small freely behaving animals. Novel minimally-invasive methods will be presented as well, such as wireless and wearable brain-tongue- computer interface (BTCI), also known as the Tongue Drive System (TDS), which enables individuals with tetraplegia to control their environments using their voluntary tongue motion.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 10, 2016 - 10:00am to 11:00am
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
More-than-Moore with Integrated Silicon-Photonics
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk we'll present the latest results on the integration of silicon-photonic interconnects in several fabrication processes. These include the world's first microprocessor communicating to the outside world with monolithically integrated Si- Photonic devices, as well as the first demonstration of photonics in a bulk CMOS process. We also illustrate some critical aspects of this technology that need to be addressed from integration, circuits and systems side. These breakthroughs pave the way for orders of magnitude improvement in performance of photonically-enhanced VLSI systems.

Moreover, just like integrating the inductor into CMOS in 1990s revolutionized the RF design and enabled mobile revolution, integration of silicon-photonic active and passive devices with CMOS is greatly positioned to revolutionize a number of analog and mixed-signal applications – low- phase noise signal sources and large bandwidth, high-resolution ADCs, to name a few.


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Additional questions: Rick Bahr, SystemX Seminar Chair

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 5, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

Claude E. Shannon's 100th Birthday

Topic: 
Centennial year of the 'Father of the Information Age'
Abstract / Description: 

From UCLA Shannon Centennial Celebration website:

Claude Shannon was an American mathematician, electrical engineer, and cryptographer known as "the father of information theory". Shannon founded information theory and is perhaps equally well known for founding both digital computer and digital circuit design theory. Shannon also laid the foundations of cryptography and did basic work on code breaking and secure telecommunications.

 

Events taking place around the world are listed at IEEE Information Theory Society.

Date and Time: 
Saturday, April 30, 2016 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
N/A

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Machine-learning Based Prognostication of Breast Cancer Recurrence Using Digital Histopathology
Abstract / Description: 

More accurate prognosis of hormone-positive early stage breast cancer patients offers the opportunity to make more informed follow-up choices, for example the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy. Traditionally, pathologists have prognosticated these cancers using conventional staging, tumor proliferation index, and a small set of morphological features manually scored from H&E slides. This information may be combined with the immunohistochemical (IHC) protein expression of the tumor. The rich information in these slides is summarized in terms of a simple univariate score such as the proportion of positively staining tumor nuclei. To investigate whether there is additional prognostic information in both the H&E and IHC slides, we constructed a prognostic model to predict recurrence risk from an exhaustive set of automatically calculated image features. On our whole slide cohort, the image-feature based recurrence risk binary classifier outperforms using clinical and expression covariates alone. Prognostic features include nuclei size, nuclear atypia, co-expression of ER and Ki67, lymphocyte density and stromal features. Our machine-learning based approach is a viable way to discover and integrate information holistically from different clinical prognostic data sources including clinical/demographic, H&E slide-based features and, for the first time, IHC stained slides.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 28, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

SystemX Spring Conference

Topic: 
Spring Conference
Abstract / Description: 

REGISTRATION is REQUIRED.


Tuesday, May 17 (Day 1) - starts with a SystemX overview given by Prof. Boris Murmann and Prof. Philip Wong, SystemX's faculty directors. This will be followed by overviews of our Focus Areas by their respective faculty leaders. Breakout sessions for Heterogeneous Integration and Internet of Everything will follow in the afternoon. The day concludes with an FMA student poster session / industry mixer, reception from 4:45 - 6:30 pm.

Wednesday, May 18 (Day 2) - begins with updates from Stanford's Mechanical Eng Department and Neurosciences Institute, followed by technology talks on Nanophotonics and Quantum Encryption. The afternoon will hold breakout sessions for the Computation and Bio Interfaces Focus Areas, after which member company representatives will assemble for our Business Meeting. The day concludes with the SystemX Dinner at the Stanford Faculty Club.

Thursday, November 19 (Day 3) - will hold the breakout sessions for the Energy/Power Management Systems and the Design Productivity Focus Areas. The day will end at noon.

 

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 8:00am to Thursday, May 19, 2016 - 12:00pm

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Batteries Today and Tomorrow
Abstract / Description: 

Increased demands of batteries for applications in consumer electronics, electric vehicle and grid present opportunities and challenges for rechargeable batteries. This lecture will analyze the nature of energy storage, the existing technology and present the promising future batteries, which can have significantly higher energy density, lower cost, better safety and longer life. Novel battery chemistries and materials are key for a revolutionary change.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 21, 2016 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Wireless Power Transfer and the Successful Biomedical Startup
Abstract / Description: 

In the ongoing age of active implantable medical devices there is an ever-present need to safely provide electrical power an exploding number of medical implant technologies. In some cases, such as cardiac pacemakers or deep brain stimulators, single large batteries may be designed to last years before needing to be surgically replaced. However, in other cases such as commercially available cochlear implants and retinal prostheses, power is delivered continuously and transcutaneously via a pair of inductively-coupled coils. The present talk describes the inherent tradeoffs present in the real-world choices an implant designer makes in the construction of a power system, using the Oculeve (a startup spun out of Stanford in 2011) lacrimal stimulator as a case study of a successful implant design effort.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 14, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
A Cross-Layer Approach to Integrated Radios for Future Wireless Communications
Abstract / Description: 

Next generation (xG) wireless communications impose requirements on the data rate, spectral efficiency, and latency (among others) that are higher than those for today's systems by several orders of magnitude. Despite the many different perceptions of xG that exist, I envision that next generation wireless communications built on emergent wireless paradigms will involve unprecedented interactions between the MAC layer and the PHY layer. These transformative wireless paradigms will also necessarily be fueled by circuit design innovations, due to the extreme system requirements.

As an example, full-duplex (FD) wireless is an emergent wireless communication paradigm that can greatly improve wireless network performance but is also fraught with fundamental challenges in the design of integrated radios. FD operation involves simultaneous transmission and reception at the same frequency, resulting in the tremendous transmitter self-interference at the receiver input. This self-interference can be a billion times more powerful than the desired signal to be received.

In this talk, I will present a system design methodology that breaks the boundaries between the traditional functional domains of the radio through novel circuit design. First, I will introduce a noise-cancelling, self-interference-cancelling receiver that uses a co-design between a self-interference canceller and a noise-cancelling receiver to enable antenna interfaces with low transmitter-to-receiver isolation. Next, I will introduce frequency-domain equalization at radio frequencies (RF), a technique that leverages signal processing concepts traditionally implemented in the digital signal-processing block to achieve wideband self-interference cancellation (SIC). After that, I will talk about a joint optimization across the antenna, analog, and digital domains that achieves 85dB overall SIC, enabling a practical FD link. At the end of the talk, I will discuss my collaborative work with network theorists on power allocation algorithms and rate-gain characterization for OFDMA-based FD wireless networks. I will also talk about my collaboration with researcher from the field of MEMS on realizing tunable frequency-division-duplexing RF systems.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 7, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

SystemX Alliance: Panel Discussion

Topic: 
Our Fabless Future, a Panel Discussion
Abstract / Description: 

This panel's intent is to review and discuss the past, present and especilally the future for the fabless model of semiconductor development. There will be 3 short presentations followed by a moderated q&a.

Paul Franklin will drawn upon his extensive experience in Silicon Valley to bring us to the present. His talk will discuss the evolution of our industry, and now its growing consolidation.

Mike Gianfagna, with his perspective anchored in eSilicon, will talk to the emerging model of cloud-based tools, shared fab access and shared logistics management, all keeping the door open to ASIC development for the small to modest scale end product, as well as, for fabless semiconductor companies more generally.

Victor Peng, from Xilinx, will present the alternative model of repurposing of high volume but configurable standard products/platforms. FPGA's, and their programmable platform brethren: PSoCs/MPSoCs represent a faster and more developmentally economical manner of semiconductor product realization.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 31, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Dramatic Improvement in Driving LED Arrays through Resonant Control of Power
Abstract / Description: 

Driver failures may represent more than half of the failures of LED luminaires, especially for higher outputs. Further, a single constant-current driver cannot regulate current throughout parallel columns of LEDs. A solution to these problems is presented using contra-connected pairs of LEDs or "couplets" which can be efficiently driven with AC power. Couplets can be further assembled into "reactive strings" where reactive elements (capacitors or inductors) are distributed throughout the string. Reactive strings can be driven as part of resonant tank circuits where damping is provided by the LEDs and resonance regulated the power. Near-lossless reactances control power both globally and locally. Resonance provides a passive power control mechanism that requires no active components. The distributed reactive elements allow power in each couplet to be independently regulated.

 

This event is co-sponsored by the Stanford SystemX Alliance and the IEEE SCV PES/IAS Chapter.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, March 9, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

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