SystemX

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Enabling circuit-applications for nanoscale technologies
Abstract / Description: 

At the nanoscale, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have higher carrier mobility and carrier velocity than most incumbent semiconductors (including silicon). Thus CNT based field-effect transistors (FETs) are being considered as strong candidates for replacing CMOS in future digital circuits. The predicted high intrinsic transit frequency has also inspired investigations on analog high-frequency (HF) applications. More recently, it has been realized that CNTFETs may also possess a highly linear transfer characteristic, which is extremely valuable for a more energy efficient usage of the frequency spectrum, particularly in mobile communications. The relaxed technology contraints compared to digital applications, make an entry in the low GHz HF market more probable and feasible than large-scale digital circuit. For medical applications and wearable electronics CNT-based thinfilm transistors have a huge potential due to intrinsically stretchability and high apparent mobility compared to other materials.

This talk presents the state-of-the-art of HF CNTFET technology from an engineering point of view and discusses the incredients needed for enabling CNTFET-based HF applications. The status of the employed multi-scale simulation tools covering physical effects in detail at the atomistic level up to compact models for CNTFET circuit design and simulation will be discussed, along with practical examples for their application, such as the exploration of process and material options for optimizing the transistor toward high device linearity. Furthermore, selected examples for experimental results for important DC and HF characteristics of fabricated devices will be shown. These results also demonstrate the accuracy of a newly developed CNTFET compact model for the design of analog HF circuits. The presentation will conclude with an outlook on the compact modeling of CNT-based thinfilm transistors and related circuit design.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Design Thinking, Basic Research, and the World After the Smartphone
Abstract / Description: 

Design thinking, the human-centered design methodology developed over the last 50 years at Stanford, has been traditionally applied to wicked problems in the product, service, and experience design space. As such, designers are typically working with technologies readily available that have systems for mature manufacturing at-scale. This talk examines the question - "Can design thinking be applied to basic research where the core technologies are still under development and basic material science is still in flux?". And, if so, what is the role of the designer on a basic science research team, and what are the advantages and disadvantages of this approach. We will present a case study using our experience with the Samsung research project in stretchable electronics (Elastronics). The projects goal is to complete basic research into stretchable semiconductor materials, stretchable batteries and and other electronic components potentially leading to advanced configurations of on-skin body area networks (BodyNET) that, going beyond the paradigm of measurement, significant enhanced human capabilities.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Non-Invasive Physiological Sensing and Modulation for Human Health and Performance
Abstract / Description: 

The Precision Medicine Initiative challenges biomedical researchers to reframe health optimization and disease treatment in a patient-specific, personalized manner. Rather than a one-size-fits-all paradigm, the charge is for a particular profile to be fit to each patient, and for disease treatment (or wellness) strategies to then be tailored accordingly. Non-invasive physiological sensing and modulation can play an important role in this effort by augmenting existing research in ‑omics and medical imaging towards better developing such personalized models for patients, and in continuously adjusting such models to optimize therapies in real-time to meet patients' changing needs. While in many instances the focus of such efforts is on disease treatment, optimizing performance for healthy individuals is also a compelling need. This talk will focus on my group's research on non-invasive sensing of the sounds and vibrations of the body, with application to musculoskeletal and cardiovascular monitoring applications. In the first half of the talk, I will discuss our studies that are elucidating mechanisms behind the sounds of the knees, and particularly the characteristics of such sounds that change with acute injuries. We use miniature microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) air-based and piezoelectric contact microphones to capture joint sounds emitted during movement, then apply data analytics techniques to both visualize and quantify differences between healthy and injured knees. In the second half of the talk, I will describe our work studying the vibrations of the body in response to the heartbeat using modified weighing scales and wearable MEMS accelerometers. Our group has extensively studied the timings of such vibrations in relation to the electrophysiology of the heart, and how such timings change for patients with cardiovascular diseases during treatment. Ultimately, we envision that these technologies can enable personalized titration of care and optimization of performance to reduce injuries and rehabilitation time for athletes and soldiers, improve the quality of life for patients with heart disease, and reduce overall healthcare costs.

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 17, 2016 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
A Photovoltaic Diode Array as a Retinal Prosthesis for Patients with Degenerative Retinal Diseases
Abstract / Description: 

Several groups are investigating silicon devices to be implanted near the retina for patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), in which the photoreceptors degrade while other parts of the retina remain mostly functioning.  One class of these devices, subretinal photodiode arrays, aims to replace the degraded photoreceptors and couple to the functioning portions of the eye.  Most implementations rely on a power source external to the eye, requiring complex surgical procedures and creating paths for serious infections.  In our approach the device operates in the photovoltaic mode, so that the external light provides both the signal and the power source.  Each pixel in the two-dimensional array independently converts pulsed infrared light into electrical current that stimulates the retinal neurons. 

After a brief discussion of the overall system, this talk will emphasize the design, fabrication, and optoelectronic performance of the photodiode array.  To enhance charge injection each pixel contains multiple photodiodes connected in series to provide a photovoltage sufficient to stimulate the neurons, but which is limited by the ionization threshold of the fluid in the eye.  An active and a return electrode in each pixel provide localized current flow to improve spatial resolution.  

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
FD-SOI Technology, Advantages for Analog/RF and Mixed-Signal Designs
Abstract / Description: 

Fully Depleted Silicon on Insulator (FD-SOI) is one of the alternatives that permits today to follow the Moore's law of CMOS integration for the 28nm node and beyond, while still dealing with fully planar transistors. Numerous presentations have presented over the several last years the benefits of this technology for an energy efficient integration of digital signal processing cores. This talk will focus on the benefits of FD-SOI technology for analog/RF/millimeter-wave and high-speed mixed signal circuits, by taking full advantage of wide voltage range body biasing tuning. For each category of circuits (analog/RF, mmW and high-speed), concrete design examples are given in order to highlight the main design features specific to FD-SOI.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 13, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
The LIGO detection of real time gravitational wave signals: a personal perspective on the achievement and key technology
Abstract / Description: 

The triumph of LIGO’s confirmation, at this 100th anniversary of Einstein’s prophetic work, both of gravitational wave propagation and their full GR source dynamics is astounding enough to recount. An exciting new field has been launched, and grown in either its experimental or astrophysical scope beyond the compass of one talk. Only briefly, I will first present an overview of the LIGO instruments with insight into their roots in the classic “interferometer of Michelson” (findings so inspirational to Einstein) over 130 years and > 1010 in metric resolution ago. Next, the amazing nature of the binary black hole coalescence events detected will be spotlighted. Rather than due to particular conspicuous technical innovations, I emphasize that human scientific vision sustained this quest from the time of Weber and realization that BHs and GWs should be palpable. Certainly the culmination in LIGO’s discovery 60 years later is essentially due to the perseverance and faith of remarkable visionaries carrying on through much adversity and periods of doubt. Turning from the drama, I’ll take a personal, insider view of a selection of fascinating technical challenges faced in LIGO. The message will be that focused, meticulous engineering carried out by dedicated and ingenious scientists will carry the day. Seemingly unglamorous details such as thorough understanding of materials thermal and mechanical characteristics; vacuum technology; and ultra-low noise servo-mechanical strategies take center stage!

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 6, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Computing: Its History, Foundations, and Lead in to the SystemX Seminar Series
Abstract / Description: 

From Colossus and Eniac to the present world of iPhone and Nest, machine computation has reached from military use, to scientific pursuits, to commercial applications, to office automation, to home use/entertainment, all the way to a continued presence in our daily lives.   This evolution has been propelled by technology advances in semiconductors, but also by advances in mechanical assembly, in communications methods, in sensing capabilities, as well as development practices and the supporting business models.    This talk will trace the arc of these developments, and do so in the spirit of introducing the focus areas of SystemX.  The conclusion of the talk, with its summary of challenges ahead, shapes the organization of the seminar series to follow.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Disruptions in Semiconductor Technology for the Cognitive Era
Abstract / Description: 

Dr Khare is pleased to offer his perspective on what lies ahead for the semiconductor devices and systems roadmap, from scaling and advanced pattering, to novel logic devices, toward new computing devices and architectures for cognitive systems.

Date and Time: 
Friday, September 30, 2016 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Holistic Design In High-Speed Optical Interconnects
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk a 3D-integrated CMOS/Silicon-photonic receiver will be presented. This receiver is designed to effectively take advantage of low-cap silicon photonic photodiodes and advanced 3D-integration technologies. The electronic chip features an integrating receiver based on a low-bandwidth TIA that employs double-sampling and equalization through dynamic offset modulation. This architecture is also implemented in a 4-channel WDM-based parallel optical receiver using a forwarded clock at quarter-rate. Quadrature ILO-based clocking is employed for synchronization and a novel frequency-tracking method that exploits the dynamics of IL in a quadrature ring oscillator to increase the effective locking range.

When electronics and photonics are closely integrated they provide a great promise for improving interconnect performance and reduce cost. Holistic design of co-integrated optical interconnects provides a unique opportunity to design entirely new architectures and bring the performance of current systems to unprecedented levels. In this light, I will cover some future directions for my research beyond data communication such as sensors, computing and networking applications.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, June 22, 2016 - 3:00pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

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