SystemX

5G and Beyond: From Fundamental Research to Startup Innovation [SystemX]

Topic: 
5G and Beyond: From Fundamental Research to Startup Innovation
Abstract / Description: 

With the arrival of 5G we are entering a new phase of communications infrastructure. Today the network is mainly used for moving content, e.g. videos, web data, emails, and audio. However, neither are sensors widely connected to a ubiquitous network, nor can we remote control real and/or virtual objects. In the latter case we require the installation of the "Tactile Internet", i.e. a network which allows for 1-10ms end-to-end response latency. Once this is achieved, humans, machines, as well as robots will be able to interact in real-time with virtual as well as real objects, enabling applications spanning the economies of health & care, manufacturing, mobility, edutainment, events, and energy. Each new economic opportunity on its own is a market of similar value as cellular is today. However, each opportunity comes with differing boundary conditions on the Tactile Internet, as we have learnt from our project fastZwanzig20 and the 5G Lab Germany.

Many applications require that the system operates with a minimum downtime, measured e.g. as outage. For manufacturing this can be as low as 10^-8, which is in stark contrast to well-designed 4G networks that deliver an outage of 3% at the cost of a latency generating HARQ. We can show with first theoretical results that new concepts allow for low latency reliable communications.

To design the Tactile Internet, today's cellular networks with a best-in-class response latency of 25ms must be redesigned from a physical layer up to the application layer. Due to the slow speed of light of 200km/ms over fiber, central web servers must be augmented by a distributed Mobile Edge Cloud, with new server architectures, operating systems, and more.

In this talk some basic ideas will be addressed which have been developed at TU Dresden, showing solutions from silicon hardware architecture, signal processing and modulation, to edge server design. And, also sketching out the huge startup potential waiting for us!

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 26, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

The Arduino Story [SystemX]

Topic: 
The Arduino Story
Abstract / Description: 
  • In the beginning, how the Atmel mega328P won the race
  • Moving to more integrated designs, the Leonardo (32u4)
  • Entering the 32 bit ARM Cortex world with the Arduino Due and its problems
  • Attack of the clones, the Open Hardware issue and creative trademark spoofing
  • 32 bit attempt take 2, the Arduino Zero
  • Dark days – the Arduino divorce
  • A new hope – Reconciliation at Make Faire New York 2016
Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 19, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

Big Steps in Wireless: Applications, Spectrum, and Technology [SystemX Seminar]

Topic: 
Big Steps in Wireless: Applications, Spectrum, and Technology
Abstract / Description: 

We are at an extraordinary time in wireless communications. Major evolutions are occurring in WAN, LAN, and PAN. 3GPP has a major project to develop a new 5G air interface, called NR (New Radio), and a 5G core network, called NGCN (NextGen Core Network). IEEE 802.11 has been developing 802.11ax—its most important amendment since 802.11n. The Bluetooth SIG has been developing Bluetooth 5. The lines between these air interfaces are being blurred with operators that traditionally use licensed spectrum augmenting their networks with 802.11, and, more recently, with the development of LAA (License Assisted Access) and MulteFire, variants of LTE, operating in unlicensed spectrum. The rapid growth of data traffic and 5G developments are putting pressure on countries to identify and allocate additional licensed spectrum such as 600 MHz, 3.4-3.6 GHz, and 4.4-4.8 GHz. In the US, the FCC recently announced that the allocation of mmWave spectrum: a total of 3.85 GHz of licensed spectrum at 28, 37, and 39 GHz and an additional 7 GHz of unlicensed spectrum resulting in 67-71 GHz being available. Since spectrum cannot always be cleared of existing users, more sophisticated approaches to spectrum sharing are being developed, such as the SAS-based approached being used for 3.5 GHz in the US. For years, the goal has been to drive to higher peak data rates. In the early days of 3G—less than 20 years ago—our peak mobile data speeds were the few hundred kilobits per second. Today, as these peak speeds have reached 1 Gbps, the focus is turning towards providing better service through significantly higher minimum data rates. IoT is causing the optimization of existing air interfaces, leading to eMTC and 802.11ah; the development of specialized air interfaces such NB-IoT; and the development of special IoT capabilities in 5G. The specialized needs of the automobile industry are leading to other optimizations such as the V2X work in 3GPP. Service layers, such as oneM2M, are being developed to isolate applications from communications and to provide a common management platform. This presentation will examine and provide a perspective on developments and technologies at this extraordinary time in communications.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

SystemX Seminar: Sustaining Silicon Reliability in High-Performance CPU Design

Topic: 
Sustaining Silicon Reliability in High-Performance CPU Design
Abstract / Description: 

As high-performance CPUs shrink into advanced CMOS process technologies, thinning dielectrics and dwindling wire interconnects demand an ever-increasing complexity of reliability analysis, modeling, and design techniques. This is particularly true for CPUs in notebook and desktop computers, in which to maximize the user experience, it is critical to maximize the voltage and frequency for the small fraction of the lifetime when peak performance is actually needed. An overview of methodologies and design considerations for maintaining the silicon reliability of high-performance CPUs is presented, with particular focus on dielectric breakdown and electromigration as the two most critical limiters. As dynamic voltage and frequency scaling has become pervasive in the mobile and embedded processor space, these techniques will become essential to a broader spectrum of the semiconductor industry as their respective frequencies continue to increase.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

SystemX Seminar: Development of RF Circuits

Topic: 
Development of RF circuits Using Additive Manufacturing Technologies For Wireless Communication Systems and Sensors
Abstract / Description: 

Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies and three dimensional (3-D) printing have recently received increased interest as they enable the development of cost effective, fast production cycle, environmental friendly and complex components. Following broad applications in the areas of bio-engineering, medicine, mechanical parts and tools, consumer goods and so on, additive manufacturing technologies have been progressively expanded into high frequency applications over the last few years. AM technologies have shown great potential in the fabrication of lightweight, flexible low-cost passive RF circuits while avoiding the use of conventional higher cost microfabrication and cleanroom facilities. Also, they enable the design and development of novel circuits that are difficult to achieve using conventional microlithography approaches and micro-machining.

In this presentation, we will discuss some recent advancements and challenges of utilizing Polyjet and Aerosol Jet 3D printing technologies for the development of microwave and mm-wave components that could pave the way for the mass fabrication of low cost wireless communication systems and sensors. Examples include a complete 3D printed RF line, 3D interconnects and transmission lines up to D-band (110-170 GHz), 3D packaging of an X-band low-noise amplifier, Ka-band 3D printed antennas and 3D printed cavity resonators and filters.

Date and Time: 
Monday, December 5, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

SystemX Seminar: hosted by Prof. H. Tom Soh

Topic: 
Engineering Technologies to Monitor and Treat Diabetes
Abstract / Description: 

Diabetes, which affects almost 30 million Americans is the leading cause of kidney failure, lower-limb amputations, and adult-onset blindness. More than 20% of health care spending is for people with diagnosed diabetes. Diabetes technology is a term created in 1999 referring to the interface between the biological sciences and the physical sciences. The term describes engineered technologies applied primarily to monitor and treat diabetes. Currently eight of the most productive engineered technologies that are being applied to diabetes include: 1) blood glucose monitoring; 2) subcutaneous continuous glucose monitoring; 3) wearable and implantable sensors; 4) insulin pumps; 5) closed loop systems (artificial pancreas); 6) telemedicine / mobile health; 7) big data and precision medicine; and 8) cybersecurity of connected devices. This presentation will summarize current advances in these eight technologies and present a major unmet need for each of them. Barriers to achieving maximal benefits from all these technologies can be overcome by creative engineers, to meet the needs of patients with diabetes.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, December 8, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

SystemX Seminar: Architectures and Topologies for High-Frequency, High-Density Power Conversion

Topic: 
Architectures and Topologies for High-Frequency, High-Density Power Conversion
Abstract / Description: 

Power electronics are a key element in all kinds of systems and are important for addressing the world's energy challenges. This talk describes emerging approaches in the design of power electronics that seek to address the twin challenges of miniaturization and improved performance. Through architectures and topologies that minimize magnetic energy storage, the scaling limitations of magnetic components can be offset, leading to smaller, higher-performance power converters. One such approach is the use of hybrid switched-capacitor/magnetic conversion. To illustrate this, the talk describes a hybrid "multi-track" converter for telecom applications that provides a 5:1 input voltage range while achieving a power density of > 450 W/in3, over 3 times that of the best comparable commercial design. The use of greatly increased switching frequencies to provide miniaturization is also explored. We demonstrate this in the context of ac-dc converters for supplying low voltage from the grid, and show a prototype design operating in the 3-10 MHz range that achieves greatly improved power density as compared to conventional converters.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, December 1, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Applying Open Community Innovation to Semiconductor Product Creation
Abstract / Description: 

We live in the era of the sharing economy, with open innovation and the rise of community collaboration in open source software and 3D design. Even though, with the stimulation of the Maker movement and hardware startup accelerators, hardware innovation is heading in the same direction, it still has not caught up.

Why? There are technical and economic challenges that are specific to hardware that must be addressed. Mr. Kassem will share how efabless is blazing the trail to stimulate a medium where engineers and creative product developers worldwide are connected and enabled to collaborate in defining, designing and making new hardware products customized to the countless application and markets.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 17, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Millimeter-Wave Sensors Using Ultrasound
Abstract / Description: 

One of the long-standing challenges in the RF community has been the creation of inexpensive millimeter-wave sensors, primarily due to the need for extremely high frequencies (typically in excess of 60-100 GHz). By switching from electromagnetic waves to ultrasound, the wave velocity and associated frequencies decrease by five orders of magnitude, hence allowing the creation of inexpensive CMOS-based sensor ASIC's employing sonar-like techniques to achieve extremely high accuracy sensors.

We show the application of such an ultrasound sensor to the problem of multitouch and force sensing, demonstrating the ability to sense multiple fingers and per-finger force/pressure levels. Unlike conventional capacitive touch sensors, an ultrasound-based sensor is not restricted to planar glass surfaces; it can sense equally well on complex curved surfaces, as well as metal or plastic substrates.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 10, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Innovations for Enabling Scalable Wireless Capacity
Abstract / Description: 

Wireless technologies are steadily approaching Shannon limits. Network densification (reuse), unlocking swathes of new spectrum, and spatial multiplexing gains via multiple antennas are key to delivering higher network capacity. Enabling these concepts to coherently work together - while also achieving practical, lower cost networks - is itself a key challenge. Dr Barratt will share perspectives on technologies that enable more efficient use of spectrum and greater network capacity to support the future growth of the wireless Internet.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 3, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

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