SystemX

GPU Computing: From Computer Games to Deep Learning and Self-Driving Cars [SystemX]

Topic: 
GPU Computing: From Computer Games to Deep Learning and Self-Driving Cars
Abstract / Description: 

This talk will discuss the evolution of GPU computing over the last ten years from computer gaming to high performance and scientific computing to most recently self-driving cars and speech recognition in the data center. Along the way, there have been many challenges and innovations in hardware architecture, memory technology, power efficiency, resiliency and programming models. Most recently, deep learning have emerged as a dominant workload that is driving many of the new applications. This new workload shares many aspects of prior applications while at the same time introducing new and unique computational demands that are driving next-generation design.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 16, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

Low-Energy Embedded Systems and Innovative Differentiated Technologies for Future IoT Applications [SystemX Seminar]

Topic: 
Low-Energy Embedded Systems and Innovative Differentiated Technologies for Future IoT Applications
Abstract / Description: 

Pervasive IoT systems are making our lives easier with an enhanced user experience in a variety of widely deployed applications. Microsystems and features of IoT embedded systems and their key technical requirements will be described. Energy efficiency of the future intelligent IoT systems require balancing of computing and communication locally at the IoT node calling upon both Moore's Law and Shannon's Law in concert. Innovative technologies to create power-differentiated and cost-effective solutions for future IoT applications will be explained; including specialty SONOS eNVM technology, low-power radios and small form-factor system-in-package & interconnect technologies. We compare them with alternative competitive technologies and explore how participants' future innovations can be integrated in IoT systems. eNVM technology is critical in enabling energy autonomous IoT systems that rely on intermittent source of energy for program, data, security and advanced networking protocols. Finally, we will demonstrate a low-energy IoT system for precision agriculture that uses solar energy harvesting and conclude by describing a vision of future IoT systems.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 23, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

Analog Techniques for Ultra-Low-Power Transceiver [SystemX Seminar]

Topic: 
Analog Techniques for Ultra-Low-Power Transceiver
Abstract / Description: 

The talk is divided in two parts, the former dedicated to RF front-end for ultra-low-power wireless transceivers, the latter to the base-band section and the challenging problem of channel selection filtering.

How to transform a simple LC-VCO into complete analog RF front-ends LC harmonic oscillators are widely used in wireless communications to generate reference signals inside the radio. It will be shown how such structures can be transformed into complete RF front-ends with just some minor modifications from the original topology. Initially, the LC oscillator will be transformed into an RX front-end exploiting its intrinsic property to work as a mixer. After that a Class-C LC oscillator will be merged with a power amplifier to realize a TX front-end suitable for FSK and GFSK transmitter. Measurements results on two prototypes tailored to BLE application will be shown.

Adaptive filters and passive switched capacitors In the second part of the talk, two emerging techniques used for the design of channel selection filters in wireless receivers will be discussed. Initially, a novel an adaptive filter architecture will be presented. The filter succeeds to shape the filtering profile as function of the operative scenario without the need of any control loop. After that, passive switched capacitors filters will be analyzed. A new intuitive continuous-time model will be introduced. The model easily allows to design high-order topologies even with complex conjugates poles without the need of any active device. Measurements results on two different prototypes will be provided.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 9, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

DNA Nanotechnology-based Engineering at the Biointerfaces [SystemX Seminar]

Topic: 
DNA Nanotechnology-based Engineering at the Biointerfaces
Abstract / Description: 

Proteins and nucleic acids are dynamically organized in cells to realize their physiological functions with spatial and temporal orderliness. This type of elegant supermolecular assembly has inspired researchers to create molecular/biomolecular structures with dynamic organization outside of the cells. In particular, DNA nanotechnology has proven to possess extraordinary flexibility and convenience for "bottom-up" construction of exquisite nanostructures with high controllability and precision, which holds great promise in a wide range of applications, e.g., nanofabrication and molecular electronics, in-vivo and in-vitro sensing and drug delivery.

In this talk, I will present several examples of using tetrahedral DNA nanostructures (TDNs) for engineering the interfaces of cytoplasmic membranes and biosensors. TDNs are three-dimensional (3D) DNA architecture with high mechanical rigidity and structural stability, which are suitable for organization of higher-ordered nanocomplexes and nanodevices. In one example, we employed single-particle tracking to visualize the internalization of TDNs, and dissect the cell entry pathways of these virus-like nanoparticles. In the second example, we dynamically organized biomolecular receptors at the biosensing interface using TDNs, and performed in-vitro diagnostics for various diseases.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 2, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

5G and Beyond: From Fundamental Research to Startup Innovation [SystemX]

Topic: 
5G and Beyond: From Fundamental Research to Startup Innovation
Abstract / Description: 

With the arrival of 5G we are entering a new phase of communications infrastructure. Today the network is mainly used for moving content, e.g. videos, web data, emails, and audio. However, neither are sensors widely connected to a ubiquitous network, nor can we remote control real and/or virtual objects. In the latter case we require the installation of the "Tactile Internet", i.e. a network which allows for 1-10ms end-to-end response latency. Once this is achieved, humans, machines, as well as robots will be able to interact in real-time with virtual as well as real objects, enabling applications spanning the economies of health & care, manufacturing, mobility, edutainment, events, and energy. Each new economic opportunity on its own is a market of similar value as cellular is today. However, each opportunity comes with differing boundary conditions on the Tactile Internet, as we have learnt from our project fastZwanzig20 and the 5G Lab Germany.

Many applications require that the system operates with a minimum downtime, measured e.g. as outage. For manufacturing this can be as low as 10^-8, which is in stark contrast to well-designed 4G networks that deliver an outage of 3% at the cost of a latency generating HARQ. We can show with first theoretical results that new concepts allow for low latency reliable communications.

To design the Tactile Internet, today's cellular networks with a best-in-class response latency of 25ms must be redesigned from a physical layer up to the application layer. Due to the slow speed of light of 200km/ms over fiber, central web servers must be augmented by a distributed Mobile Edge Cloud, with new server architectures, operating systems, and more.

In this talk some basic ideas will be addressed which have been developed at TU Dresden, showing solutions from silicon hardware architecture, signal processing and modulation, to edge server design. And, also sketching out the huge startup potential waiting for us!

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 26, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

The Arduino Story [SystemX]

Topic: 
The Arduino Story
Abstract / Description: 
  • In the beginning, how the Atmel mega328P won the race
  • Moving to more integrated designs, the Leonardo (32u4)
  • Entering the 32 bit ARM Cortex world with the Arduino Due and its problems
  • Attack of the clones, the Open Hardware issue and creative trademark spoofing
  • 32 bit attempt take 2, the Arduino Zero
  • Dark days – the Arduino divorce
  • A new hope – Reconciliation at Make Faire New York 2016
Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 19, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

Big Steps in Wireless: Applications, Spectrum, and Technology [SystemX Seminar]

Topic: 
Big Steps in Wireless: Applications, Spectrum, and Technology
Abstract / Description: 

We are at an extraordinary time in wireless communications. Major evolutions are occurring in WAN, LAN, and PAN. 3GPP has a major project to develop a new 5G air interface, called NR (New Radio), and a 5G core network, called NGCN (NextGen Core Network). IEEE 802.11 has been developing 802.11ax—its most important amendment since 802.11n. The Bluetooth SIG has been developing Bluetooth 5. The lines between these air interfaces are being blurred with operators that traditionally use licensed spectrum augmenting their networks with 802.11, and, more recently, with the development of LAA (License Assisted Access) and MulteFire, variants of LTE, operating in unlicensed spectrum. The rapid growth of data traffic and 5G developments are putting pressure on countries to identify and allocate additional licensed spectrum such as 600 MHz, 3.4-3.6 GHz, and 4.4-4.8 GHz. In the US, the FCC recently announced that the allocation of mmWave spectrum: a total of 3.85 GHz of licensed spectrum at 28, 37, and 39 GHz and an additional 7 GHz of unlicensed spectrum resulting in 67-71 GHz being available. Since spectrum cannot always be cleared of existing users, more sophisticated approaches to spectrum sharing are being developed, such as the SAS-based approached being used for 3.5 GHz in the US. For years, the goal has been to drive to higher peak data rates. In the early days of 3G—less than 20 years ago—our peak mobile data speeds were the few hundred kilobits per second. Today, as these peak speeds have reached 1 Gbps, the focus is turning towards providing better service through significantly higher minimum data rates. IoT is causing the optimization of existing air interfaces, leading to eMTC and 802.11ah; the development of specialized air interfaces such NB-IoT; and the development of special IoT capabilities in 5G. The specialized needs of the automobile industry are leading to other optimizations such as the V2X work in 3GPP. Service layers, such as oneM2M, are being developed to isolate applications from communications and to provide a common management platform. This presentation will examine and provide a perspective on developments and technologies at this extraordinary time in communications.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

SystemX Seminar: Sustaining Silicon Reliability in High-Performance CPU Design

Topic: 
Sustaining Silicon Reliability in High-Performance CPU Design
Abstract / Description: 

As high-performance CPUs shrink into advanced CMOS process technologies, thinning dielectrics and dwindling wire interconnects demand an ever-increasing complexity of reliability analysis, modeling, and design techniques. This is particularly true for CPUs in notebook and desktop computers, in which to maximize the user experience, it is critical to maximize the voltage and frequency for the small fraction of the lifetime when peak performance is actually needed. An overview of methodologies and design considerations for maintaining the silicon reliability of high-performance CPUs is presented, with particular focus on dielectric breakdown and electromigration as the two most critical limiters. As dynamic voltage and frequency scaling has become pervasive in the mobile and embedded processor space, these techniques will become essential to a broader spectrum of the semiconductor industry as their respective frequencies continue to increase.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

SystemX Seminar: Development of RF Circuits

Topic: 
Development of RF circuits Using Additive Manufacturing Technologies For Wireless Communication Systems and Sensors
Abstract / Description: 

Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies and three dimensional (3-D) printing have recently received increased interest as they enable the development of cost effective, fast production cycle, environmental friendly and complex components. Following broad applications in the areas of bio-engineering, medicine, mechanical parts and tools, consumer goods and so on, additive manufacturing technologies have been progressively expanded into high frequency applications over the last few years. AM technologies have shown great potential in the fabrication of lightweight, flexible low-cost passive RF circuits while avoiding the use of conventional higher cost microfabrication and cleanroom facilities. Also, they enable the design and development of novel circuits that are difficult to achieve using conventional microlithography approaches and micro-machining.

In this presentation, we will discuss some recent advancements and challenges of utilizing Polyjet and Aerosol Jet 3D printing technologies for the development of microwave and mm-wave components that could pave the way for the mass fabrication of low cost wireless communication systems and sensors. Examples include a complete 3D printed RF line, 3D interconnects and transmission lines up to D-band (110-170 GHz), 3D packaging of an X-band low-noise amplifier, Ka-band 3D printed antennas and 3D printed cavity resonators and filters.

Date and Time: 
Monday, December 5, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

SystemX Seminar: hosted by Prof. H. Tom Soh

Topic: 
Engineering Technologies to Monitor and Treat Diabetes
Abstract / Description: 

Diabetes, which affects almost 30 million Americans is the leading cause of kidney failure, lower-limb amputations, and adult-onset blindness. More than 20% of health care spending is for people with diagnosed diabetes. Diabetes technology is a term created in 1999 referring to the interface between the biological sciences and the physical sciences. The term describes engineered technologies applied primarily to monitor and treat diabetes. Currently eight of the most productive engineered technologies that are being applied to diabetes include: 1) blood glucose monitoring; 2) subcutaneous continuous glucose monitoring; 3) wearable and implantable sensors; 4) insulin pumps; 5) closed loop systems (artificial pancreas); 6) telemedicine / mobile health; 7) big data and precision medicine; and 8) cybersecurity of connected devices. This presentation will summarize current advances in these eight technologies and present a major unmet need for each of them. Barriers to achieving maximal benefits from all these technologies can be overcome by creative engineers, to meet the needs of patients with diabetes.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, December 8, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - SystemX