SystemX

Dynamics of Exponentials in Circuits and Systems [SystemX Seminar]

Topic: 
Dynamics of Exponentials in Circuits and Systems
Abstract / Description: 

Astonishing progress in semiconductor devices, circuits, and manufacturing has prompted an unprecedented revolution in electronics. "Things" are getting smarter and more connected, with higher semiconductor content. Smart personal electronics, autonomous systems, and smart factories are prime examples.

These impressive developments are fueled by the power of exponentials: CMOS scaling, efficiency of semiconductor manufacturing, the bandwidth efficiency of communication systems, and total network capacity have all been doubling almost every two years! The sheer scaling of CMOS has dominated the challenges and promises of advanced IC design. Advanced digital-intensive designs count on denser, faster, and cheaper switches. Along the way, analog and RF designs have creatively embraced the challenge of implementing analog topologies on digitally-optimized processes.

The present slowdown of the CMOS scaling trend brings exciting opportunities for "multidimensional innovations" in circuits and systems: The continuing demand for higher performance, in many applications, will further tilt solutions toward creative system and circuit topologies. Many emerging complementary technologies such as MEMS-based sensors and timing references, III-V devices, high-performance SiGe devices, and silicon photonics, will not necessarily integrate with CMOS monolithically. However, they enable opportunities for system repartitioning and new circuit topologies in applications such as sensing, power, high voltage, high-performance RF, and precision timing.

CMOS is here to stay for the foreseeable future! It will simply coexist synergistically with emerging technologies. This talk will discuss opportunities in "multi-dimensional innovation" that will make the future of the field less predictable.....but even more interesting and exciting!"

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 4, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

Secrets of Successful Technology Start-ups that B-schools may have missed [SystemX Seminar]

Topic: 
Secrets of Successful Technology Start-ups that B-schools may have missed
Abstract / Description: 

Start-up companies offer entrepreneurs fulfillment for their innovative product concepts, not to mention recognition and the promise of monetary rewards. However, no matter how well conceived or financed, most perish. Not because they lack great ideas, or aren't passionate enough or committed to their company and its products. Many of these companies succumb to the inexperience of the founding team and the people they subsequently bring aboard. Business schools have certainly helped distill the lessons of many successes and failures into a formulistic guideline for those intent on venturing forward. One wise sage offered, "A short cut to success is to emulate those who have succeeded". Today we will sample some insights and factors that propelled five consecutive Semiconductor startups towards success. All the companies built sizeable businesses and were rewarded by going public in the market place with an IPO.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 27, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

Carbon Nanotube for Logic Transistor and More than Moore Applications [SystemX Seminar]

Topic: 
Carbon Nanotube for Logic Transistor and More than Moore Applications
Abstract / Description: 

We have witnessed a tremendous information technology revolution originated from the relentless scaling of Si CMOS devices. The conventional homogeneous scaling of silicon devices has become very difficult. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising to replace silicon as the channel material for high-performance electronics near the end of silicon scaling roadmap, with their superb electrical properties, intrinsic ultrathin body, and nearly transparent contact with certain metals. In this talk, I will cover recent CNT progress within IBM Research for extending logic roadmap as well as few examples for beyond logic applications, such as physical unclonable function and mid-IR to THz detection utilizing unique properties from CNTs.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 11, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

Secrets of Successful Technology Start-ups [SystemX Seminar EE310]

Topic: 
Secrets of Successful Technology Start-ups
Abstract / Description: 

Start-up companies offer entrepreneurs fulfillment for their innovative product concepts, not to mention recognition and the promise of monetary rewards. However, no matter how well conceived or financed, most perish. Not because they lack great ideas, or aren't passionate enough or committed to their company and its products. Many of these companies succumb to the inexperience of the founding team and the people they subsequently bring aboard. Business schools have certainly helped distill the lessons of many successes and failures into a formulistic guideline for those intent on venturing forward. One wise sage offered, "A short cut to success is to emulate those who have succeeded". Today we will sample some insights and factors that propelled five consecutive Semiconductor startups towards success. All the companies built sizeable businesses and were rewarded by going public in the market place with an IPO.


The EE310 seminar series is intended to offer students a window onto the research directions of the SystemX industrial affiliates and associated faculty.

Offers a series of talks covering emerging topics in contemporary hardware/software systems design. Attention will be paid to the key building blocks of sensors, processing elements and wired/wireless communications, as well as their foundations in semiconductor technology, SoC construction, and physical assembly as informed by the SystemX Focus Areas. The series will draw upon distinguished engineering speakers from both industry and academia who are involved at all levels of the technology stack and the applications that are only now becoming possible.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 27, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

Wi-Fi The R/Evolution Continues [SystemX Seminar EE310]

Topic: 
Wi-Fi The R/Evolution Continues
Abstract / Description: 

September 2015 marked the 25th anniversary of IEEE 802.11, commonly referred to as Wi-Fi. Over these 25 years, Wi-Fi has ascended from a technology that enabled computers to wirelessly transfer data at 2 Mbps to winning a spot in Maslow's pyramid as the most basic human need. IEEE 802.11 got here, as Lewis Carroll suggested, by running twice as fast. The standard has continuously advanced itself by introducing amendments, such as 802.11n, 802.11ac and 802.11ax. These amendments support higher data rates to meet ever-increasing application demands through the adoption of higher-order modulation schemes such as 64-, 256-, and 1024-QAM, by supporting channel bonding up to 160 MHz and by employing MIMO techniques to transmit multiple streams to single client. In addition to increasing the peak data rate, efforts have been made to improve the spectral efficiency, which characterizes how well the system uses the available spectrum. Multi-user techniques such as MU-MIMO and OFDMA have been introduced in 802.11ac and 802.11ax to improve spectral efficiency and network capacity.

This talk will provide an overview of the upcoming 802.11ax standard, particularly the features that enable it to achieve higher capacity. Given its ubiquitous presence, WiFi, by enabling indoor locationing, has also emerged as a tool to improve operational efficiency and engage with customers like never before. WiFi Alliance recently launched a certification program to deliver high accuracy indoor locationing. We will also provide a survey of WiFi-based indoor locationing technologies,as well as the applications enabled.


 

The EE310 seminar series is intended to offer students a window onto the research directions of the SystemX industrial affiliates and associated faculty.

Offers a series of talks covering emerging topics in contemporary hardware/software systems design. Attention will be paid to the key building blocks of sensors, processing elements and wired/wireless communications, as well as their foundations in semiconductor technology, SoC construction, and physical assembly as informed by the SystemX Focus Areas. The series will draw upon distinguished engineering speakers from both industry and academia who are involved at all levels of the technology stack and the applications that are only now becoming possible.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 20, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

Tactical Grade Gyroscope Performance in a Consumer Grade Process [SystemX Seminar EE310]

Topic: 
Tactical Grade Gyroscope Performance in a Consumer Grade Process
Abstract / Description: 

GPS has transformed navigation but unfortunately does not work in indoor or dense urban environments. The alternative, inertial navigation, is either too inaccurate or too large, power hungry, and costly in all but niche applications.

Gyroscopes are responsible for direction in inertial sensors. Since even small angular offsets can rapidly add up to large location errors, significantly improved gyroscope accuracy is the key to precise indoor navigation.

I will describe a prototype gyroscope with tactical grade performance. Unlike state-of-the-art solutions, the device does not rely on exotic fabrication technology or trimming, and both its size and power dissipation are comparable to existing mobile solutions.

How is this possible? Sensors, in general, compare their input to a reference. A thermometer compares its input to a reference temperature and reports the ratio. Gyroscope sensors have a huge advantage: their input is rate, degrees per second, also known as frequency. Frequency is the physical quantity that we can synthesize and measure with highest accuracy. While ppm-level precision is out-of-the-question for most properties, it is easily achieved for frequency.

Why then are gyroscopes not just as accurate as frequency sources? Oddly, present MEMS gyroscopes immediately turn frequency into force, then displacement, capacitance, voltage. Not only are these quantities difficult to measure with high accuracy, the scaling factors of all these transformations are subject to a myriad of fabrication and environmental variations. Not surprising that present gyroscopes suffer from a few errors.

The path to good gyroscopes is to measure frequency directly, without performance compromising detours. In this presentation, I will show you how.


 

The EE310 seminar series is intended to offer students a window onto the research directions of the SystemX industrial affiliates and associated faculty.

Offers a series of talks covering emerging topics in contemporary hardware/software systems design. Attention will be paid to the key building blocks of sensors, processing elements and wired/wireless communications, as well as their foundations in semiconductor technology, SoC construction, and physical assembly as informed by the SystemX Focus Areas. The series will draw upon distinguished engineering speakers from both industry and academia who are involved at all levels of the technology stack and the applications that are only now becoming possible.

  • April 13: Tactical Grade Gyro in a Consumer Grade Process Bernhard Boser (UC Berkeley)
  • April 20: Wi-Fi The R/Evolution Continues Sundar Sankaran (Ruckus)
  • April 27: Secrets of Successful Technology Start-ups Paul Franklin (Independent)
  • May 04: Dynamics of Exponentials in Circuits and Systems Ahmad Bahai (TI)
Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 13, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

Beneath the Surface – Engineering Innovation inside Microsoft’s Surface Book [SystemX Seminar EE310]

Topic: 
Beneath the Surface – Engineering Innovation inside Microsoft’s Surface Book
Abstract / Description: 

The EE310 seminar series is intended to offer students a window onto the research directions of the SystemX industrial affiliates and associated faculty.

Offers a series of talks covering emerging topics in contemporary hardware/software systems design. Attention will be paid to the key building blocks of sensors, processing elements and wired/wireless communications, as well as their foundations in semiconductor technology, SoC construction, and physical assembly as informed by the SystemX Focus Areas. The series will draw upon distinguished engineering speakers from both industry and academia who are involved at all levels of the technology stack and the applications that are only now becoming possible.

  • April 06: Beneath the Surface, Ed Giaimo (Microsoft)
  • April 13: Tactical Grade Gyro in a Consumer Grade Process Bernhard Boser (UC Berkeley)
  • April 20: Wi-Fi The R/Evolution Continues Sundar Sankaran (Ruckus)
  • April 27: Secrets of Successful Technology Start-ups Paul Franklin (Independent)
  • May 04: Dynamics of Exponentials in Circuits and Systems Ahmad Bahai (TI)
Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 6, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

New Directions in Management Science & Engineering: A Brief History of the Virtual Lab

Topic: 
New Directions in Management Science & Engineering: A Brief History of the Virtual Lab
Abstract / Description: 

Lab experiments have long played an important role in behavioral science, in part because they allow for carefully designed tests of theory, and in part because randomized assignment facilitates identification of causal effects. At the same time, lab experiments have traditionally suffered from numerous constraints (e.g. short duration, small-scale, unrepresentative subjects, simplistic design, etc.) that limit their external validity. In this talk I describe how the web in general—and crowdsourcing sites like Amazon's Mechanical Turk in particular—allow researchers to create "virtual labs" in which they can conduct behavioral experiments of a scale, duration, and realism that far exceed what is possible in physical labs. To illustrate, I describe some recent experiments that showcase the advantages of virtual labs, as well as some of the limitations. I then discuss how this relatively new experimental capability may unfold in the future, along with some implications for social and behavioral science.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 12:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

Brain-machine interfaces as a platform technology for neurological disorders [SystemX Seminar]

Topic: 
Brain-machine interfaces as a platform technology for neurological disorders
Abstract / Description: 

To date, the scope of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) has largely been to restore lost function to people with paralysis stemming from conditions such as neurodegenerative disease and spinal cord injury. These systems interface with the brain using neurosurgically implanted electrodes, measure the voltage of individual and groups of neurons, and translate these measurements via a decoding algorithm to control an end effector such as a computer cursor. I will discuss work performed in preclinical rhesus models that led to the highest performing communication BMI demonstrated to date, as well as recent results of an ongoing clinical trial where these preclinical algorithmic innovations have been successfully translated to a human participant, again yielding the highest communication rates of any known clinical BMI.

The example of prosthetics is just one important application leveraging intracortical BMIs as a platform for accurately assessing and acting on the neural state. However, these measurements could play a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of a wide range of brain-related diseases and disorders. Just as EEG recordings help localize seizures both temporally and spatially, and MRI imaging provides morphological and gross functional evaluations of the brain, BMI systems may reveal previously unrecognized disease-specific adulterations in the neural state. Not only could this aid in forming better prognoses, but may also lead to interventions to prevent or alleviate undesirable symptoms and improve rehabilitation. In this manner, the utility of BMIs could extend beyond communication or motor prosthetics to become an indispensable clinical tool in the treatment of brain disorders. I will discuss the emerging potential and key initial steps of this new class of medical system.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

The Connected Car Revolution: Making Driving Safer and More Efficient [SystemX Seminar]

Topic: 
The Connected Car Revolution: Making Driving Safer and More Efficient
Abstract / Description: 

The automobile is one of the last frontiers of the wireless revolution. We live connected lives: at school, at home, at work. But, as drivers we're isolated, limited to what we can do hands-free, and not at all connected to drivers around us. More importantly, our cars are mobile islands, increasingly equipped with sensors that help the driver "see," but not able to communicate with their surroundings. That is changing. After more than a decade of intensive research, vehicles are poised to enter a new connected reality in which they constantly talk to each other, to pedestrians and bicyclists, and to smart devices at intersections and along the road. In this talk we will explore Dedicated Short Range Communication (DSRC) technology for vehicle-to/from-everything (V2X) connectivity. We will examine the wireless technology itself, including challenges that the research community has had to overcome. We will consider the range of V2X applications for safety, driving efficiency, and automated driving. In the safety sphere alone, the US Department of Transportation estimates that DSRC can help prevent or mitigate 80% of crashes involving non-impaired drivers, which is why they are working to require DSRC as a safety feature in new cars. We will discuss the status of DSRC deployment in the US and around the world. Finally, we will examine some possible barriers to DSRC deployment being advanced by non-DSRC stakeholders. The connected car revolution will bring predictable safety and efficiency benefits. Perhaps just as importantly it is likely to be an innovation platform for benefits we have not yet imagined.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 2, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - SystemX