SystemX

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
The Evolution of Computer Graphics Hardware
Abstract / Description: 

Over the past sixty or so years, myriad hardware designs have been developed to visually transfer information from computer to humans. Far more than CPU designs, graphics hardware has had dizzying variety in the problems being solved and the techniques involved. From oscilloscopes to vector displays to bitmaps, from graphics terminals to CPU integration, from 2-D to 3-D, from wireframe to programmable shading, more effective display has been a fast-moving target. This talk will touch on these themes and others, but will not delve deeply into the parallel evolution of graphics software.

As the opening talk of the SystemX Alliance winter quarter's seminars, a moment will be taken to introduce the seminar series as well.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 7, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

Application and Reliability of a 3D Stacked Image Sensor

Topic: 
Application and Reliability of a 3D Stacked Image Sensor
Abstract / Description: 

We developed 3D stacked 16 million pixel CMOS image sensor to achieve ideal image sensor and Global shutter performance, using 4 million micro bump inter-connections at a 7.6-um pitch with wafer bonding technology.  We then evaluated its reliability. This 3D stacked technology was proven to have no negative effect on CIS characteristics and to provide a high density and narrow pitched in-pixel connection with high reliability, no defects, and no deterioration over a 1000-cycle heat cycle test and after a 1000-hour high temperature and high humidity test. This CIS sensor has a set of readout circuits in each substrate, which enable us to detect any connection failure among 4 million micro bumps between substrates individually. These results show that this 3D technology has enough reliability for application to products like multi band imaging.

Date and Time: 
Monday, December 14, 2015 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

SystemX Seminar (bonus seminar)

Topic: 
Multimodal Analytics for Disease Detection: Challenges and Solutions
Abstract / Description: 

In recent years there has been an interest in multimodality data analysis for disease detection. Ideally, multimodal methods should leverage the strengths of each modality and compensate for weaknesses. With this abundance of data types come the issues of limited samples per modality, missing features, spatial registration of different modalities, and feature and classifier selection. In the first half of this talk, I will describe my experience with multiparametirc and multimodality data analysis for prostate cancer detection. This will cover conventional ultrasound imaging methodologies along with my innovations in ultrasound-based cancer detection using RF time series analysis. The second half of the talk will be a deep dive into the issue of handling datasets with a large number of samples with missing features. I describe the newly proposed concept of scandent trees. This is a novel random forest learning method for incomplete multimodal datasets with immediate applications in combining imaging and genomic data. I will show how this approach significantly improves the performance of a classifier designed for genomics plus imaging analysis by enabling the use of large amounts of archival imaging data.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, December 2, 2015 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Technology for Measuring Biomolecules in Real-Time
Abstract / Description: 

If we had the technology than can measure specific biomolecules inside of bodies in "real time", it would transform medicine by providing clinicians with a valuable window into patients' health and their response to therapies. Unfortunately, such real-time measurements are currently not possible, except for a handful of molecules such as glucose. In this presentation, we will discuss recent advancements in "real-time biosensors." As examples, we will present our group's work on continuously measuring anti-cancer and anti-bacterial drugs in live animals with unprecedented time-resolution. Finally, we will discuss the exciting possibility of actively controlling these molecules inside of patients using closed-loop feedback control.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, December 3, 2015 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Can’t See an Exciting Future in CMOS? Time to RETHINK Bipolar
Abstract / Description: 

The reasons why state-of-the-art vertical bipolar circuits dissipate very high power are explained. The merits of SOI symmetric lateral bipolar transistors as a high-speed low-power technology are discussed. SOI lateral bipolar is CMOS-compatible, scalable like CMOS, and arguably much lower cost than CMOS. It not only enables traditional bipolar circuits to run fast at much reduced power, it invites us to totally rethink bipolar. The exciting potentials of SOI lateral bipolar for a wide range of system applications are discussed, including high-performance, ultra-low-power, and THz electronics.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 19, 2015 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
The System Design Challenges for Future Consumer Hardware Devices: from Glass to Chromebooks
Abstract / Description: 

Internet and mobile application have been driving force for semiconductor innovation in the past 10 years. It's commonly known that memory and energy walls have been limiting the end-user's perceivable performance. We will focus on the system requirement for the consumer device, such as laptop, phone, watch or glass. We'll start with the high-level workloads, such as web browsing, YouTube streaming, Gaming or photo application. Then break it down to full-system architecture simulation, performance and power analysis. Finally, a few future research areas in memory architecture, technology and circuit design will be discussed.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Smart Low-Power MEMS Help Usher in the Wearable Era
Abstract / Description: 

Wearable devices are finally transitioning from hype to mainstream, aided by integration of valuable transducers, identification of application and use cases, ramp up of cloud services, and increased public awareness and interest due to Apple's watch introduction. Although still a nascent field, several themes are emerging that this talk will explore. The first is the evolution of capability from performing simple functions such as step count, to becoming contextually aware products. The second theme is the implications of targeting far more than just the wrist for the wearable device's residence. The third arises from the desire for "always on" capability, small size limit, and appeal of charging only every few days. In consequence, power is one of the most important parameters impacting the entire system design.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 5, 2015 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 - 111

Stanford Computer Forum and SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Silicon Engineering at Apple
Abstract / Description: 

The last decade has seen massive improvements in mobile compute performance, along with dramatic improvements in power efficiency. At Apple, custom SoC designs drive multiple product breakthroughs. The CPU inside the Apple A9 chip in iPhone 6s runs up to 70% faster and the GPU up to 90% faster than they did in the A8, delivering both desktop-class and console-class performance that you can hold in your hand. This has all been done without decreasing battery life. In this talk some of the unique technical challenges faced by mobile SoC designers will be discussed, along with some of the complex decisions that are considered when engineering silicon at Apple.

Light refreshments will be provided following the talk. Students seeking permanent or intern positions at Apple are encouraged to bring a resume.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, November 3, 2015 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
Cognitive Layering in Embedded Computing
Abstract / Description: 

Embedded computing is often computing with extremes – extreme low cost, extreme low energy, extreme low latency, extreme high computation rates. Increasingly, it is about extreme responsiveness, connectedness and intelligence. Systems often need to maintain the energy illusion of "always off" and the computational illusion of "always on". This talk addresses this seeming paradox with the notion of 'cognitive layering', a hierarchy of processing subsystems making widely shifting trade-offs between generality and efficiency. Along the way we touch on key emerging embedded computing functions in vision, convolutional neural networks, ultra-low-power processing and distributed software environments.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 - 111

SystemX Seminar

Topic: 
An Introduction to Modern Digital Video Coding Standards
Abstract / Description: 

As more and more online HD video services such as come online, it becomes increasingly important to compress the video efficiently to enable high quality streaming. This talk will present the basic techniques used in modern video compression, with an emphasis on the two next-generation standards HEVC and VP9. Topics covered include YUV colorspace, block-based partitioning, intra prediction, motion compensation, entropy encoding (binary arithmetic coding).

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

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