EE Student Information

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EE Student Information, Spring Quarter through Academic Year 2020-2021: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

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SmartGrid

Toward Real-Time Monitoring, Look-Ahead Assessment and Forecasting Engine for Active Distribution Networks [SmartGrid Seminar]

Topic: 
Toward Real-Time Monitoring, Look-Ahead Assessment and Forecasting Engine for Active Distribution Networks
Abstract / Description: 

United Kingdom Power Networks (UKPN) provides power to a quarter of the UK's population via its electricity distribution networks in London that span to the east and southeast of England. This talk will present an advanced distribution analytics power network tool (ADAPT) codeveloped by BSI and UKPN. ADAPT is an advanced real-time monitoring, state estimation platform, contingency analysis, corrective control. In addition, look ahead platform (30 minutes to 2 hours ahead) offers look-ahead assessment of the network taking the uncertainties of renewable energy into account. ADAPT completes with energy forecasting tools which provide input into forecasting future system cases (e.g. 1 hour ahead to 24 hours ahead). ADAPT has several key features such as: State Estimation, Power flow, Contingency Analysis, Interactive Single Line Diagram (132 kV, 33 kV, and external connections), Energy forecaster for load, solar, and wind, Corrective control for removing violations in the system. The ADAPT platform provides operators and engineers real-time situational awareness and facilitates network reliability management as new distributed generation comes online. It also enhances the capability of outage planners to minimize constraints placed on the output from distributed generators during the summer maintenance season and during any major construction and reconfiguration activities. The Look-Ahead mode allows engineers to include the uncertainty of renewable output as well as energy forecasting to produce cases with new renewable contingencies and alternate dispatch cases. Some challenges faced during the development of ADAPT will also be presented. A by-product of the tool's analysis capabilities can also identify root causes of system and component power losses as well as ways to minimize them. Some challenges and theoretical issues faced during the development of ADAPT will also be presented.


This quarter's speakers are renowned experts in power and energy systems, and we believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T for interested students. This course can be repeated for credit for the students.

SmartGrid Seminar Organization Team:

  • Ram Rajagopal, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
  • Wenyuan Tang, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Yuting Ji, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Emre Kara, Associate Staff Scientist, SLAC
Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 4, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

Smart grids and energy systems [SmartGrid Seminar]

Topic: 
Smart grids and energy systems
Abstract / Description: 

As the share of renewable energy becomes an increasing part of electricity generation, electric vehicles (EVs) have the potential to be used as virtual power plants (VPP) to provide reliable back-up power. This could generate additional profits for EV carsharing rental firms. We design a computational control mechanism for VPPs that decide whether EVs should be charging, discharging, or rented out. We validate our computational design by developing a discrete-event simulation platform based on real-time GPS information from 1,100 electric cars from Daimler's carsharing service Car2Go in San Diego, Amsterdam, and Stuttgart. We compute trading prices (bids and asks) for participating in secondary control reserve markets and investigate what effect the density of charging infrastructure, battery technology, and rental demand for vehicles have on the pay-off for the carsharing fleet. We show that VPPs can create sustainable revenue streams for electric vehicle carsharing fleets without compromising their rental business.

The theme of this quarter's Stanford SmartGrid seminar series is on smart grids and energy systems, scheduled to be held on Thursdays, with speakers from academic institutions and industry.


This quarter's speakers are renowned experts in power and energy systems, and we believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T for interested students. This course can be repeated for credit for the students.

SmartGrid Seminar Organization Team:

  • Ram Rajagopal, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
  • Wenyuan Tang, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Yuting Ji, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Emre Kara, Associate Staff Scientist, SLAC
Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 27, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

Online Optimization of Virtual Power Plant [SmartGrid Seminar]

Topic: 
Online Optimization of Virtual Power Plant
Abstract / Description: 

Traditional approaches for regulating and maintaining system frequency in power transmission systems leverage primary frequency response, automatic generation control (AGC), and regulation services provided by synchronous generators. In the future, on the other hand, distributed energy resources (DERs) at both utility level and in commercial/residential settings are envisioned to complement traditional generation-side capabilities at multiple time scales to aid frequency regulation and maintaining a reliable system operation. Aligned with this emerging vision, this talk considers a distribution system featuring DERs, and presents a system-theoretic optimization strategy for DERs that enables a distribution feeder to emulate a virtual power plant effectively providing services to the main grid at multiple temporal scales. An online distributed algorithm for DERs is designed to enable the active and reactive power at the feeder head to track given setpoints (e.g, dispatch, ramp, or AGC signals), while concurrently ensuring that electrical quantities are within given limits throughout the feeder. The design of the online algorithm leverages primal-dual gradient methods applied to pertinent minimax problems, and its stability is analyzed under a time-varying optimization formalism. The talk will also demonstrates how individual DERs can provide primary frequency response; particularly, power-frequency droop slopes for individual DERs can be designed so that the distribution feeder presents a guaranteed frequency-regulation characteristic at the feeder head.

 

The theme of this quarter's Stanford SmartGrid seminar series is on smart grids and energy systems, scheduled to be held on Thursdays, with speakers from academic institutions and industry.


This quarter's speakers are renowned experts in power and energy systems, and we believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T for interested students. This course can be repeated for credit for the students.

SmartGrid Seminar Organization Team:

  • Ram Rajagopal, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
  • Wenyuan Tang, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Yuting Ji, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Emre Kara, Associate Staff Scientist, SLAC
Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 20, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

Smart grids and energy systems [SmartGrid Seminar]

Topic: 
Smart grids and energy systems
Abstract / Description: 

Semidefinite Programming is met with increasing interest within the power systems community. Its most notable application to-date is a convex formulation of the AC optimal power flow problem. At the same time, semidefinite programs can be applied on LMI conditions to derive Lyapunov functions that guarantee power system stability. In this talk we will report on recent work both on power system stability and optimization. First, we will present a novel robust stability toolbox for power grid with its extensions to inertia mimicking and topology control. In that, the quadratic Lyapunov functions approach is introduced for transient stability assessment. Second, we will propose formulations for the integration of chance constraints for different types of uncertainty in the AC optimal power flow problem. We demonstrate our method with numerical examples, and we investigate the conditions to achieve zero relaxation gap.

 

The theme of this quarter's Stanford SmartGrid seminar series is on smart grids and energy systems, scheduled to be held on Thursdays, with speakers from academic institutions and industry.


This quarter's speakers are renowned experts in power and energy systems, and we believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T for interested students. This course can be repeated for credit for the students.

SmartGrid Seminar Organization Team:

  • Ram Rajagopal, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
  • Wenyuan Tang, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Yuting Ji, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Emre Kara, Associate Staff Scientist, SLAC
Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 13, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

Power System Reliability with Integration of a Diverse Fleet of Generation Resources [SmartGrid Seminar]

Topic: 
Power System Reliability with Integration of a Diverse Fleet of Generation Resources
Abstract / Description: 

The electric power system has been experiencing a shift in its generation resource mix resulting from the retirement of conventional base load synchronous resources and the integration of a more diverse fleet of smaller sized resources with varying generation characteristics. As this transformation continues, there is a fundamental shift in the operational characteristics of the power system as a whole and thus potential reliability implications. In 2014, the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) created a task force on Essential Reliability Services (ERS) to identify the necessary operating characteristics to assure reliable operations of the North American electric grid. By 2015 frequency, voltage, and net demand ramping variability were recognized as the three essential building blocks of reliability. In December 2016, a paper on ERS sufficiency guidelines include frequency response, voltage limits, and ramping models that tend to vary by particular area and Balancing Authority. The ERS task force also studied the potential impact of a substantial penetration of distributed energy resources (DERs) that, in aggregate, could impact the reliability of the BPS. This industry presentation will focus on the measures identified by the ERS working group, and highlight the results from analysis performed using three years of historical data and three years of forward looking data. Additionally, an overview of the analysis performed by DER task force will be provided.


This quarter's speakers are renowned experts in power and energy systems, and we believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T for interested students. This course can be repeated for credit for the students.

SmartGrid Seminar Organization Team:

  • Ram Rajagopal, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
  • Wenyuan Tang, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Yuting Ji, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Emre Kara, Associate Staff Scientist, SLAC
Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 6, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

New Directions in Management Science & Engineering: A Brief History of the Virtual Lab

Topic: 
New Directions in Management Science & Engineering: A Brief History of the Virtual Lab
Abstract / Description: 

Lab experiments have long played an important role in behavioral science, in part because they allow for carefully designed tests of theory, and in part because randomized assignment facilitates identification of causal effects. At the same time, lab experiments have traditionally suffered from numerous constraints (e.g. short duration, small-scale, unrepresentative subjects, simplistic design, etc.) that limit their external validity. In this talk I describe how the web in general—and crowdsourcing sites like Amazon's Mechanical Turk in particular—allow researchers to create "virtual labs" in which they can conduct behavioral experiments of a scale, duration, and realism that far exceed what is possible in physical labs. To illustrate, I describe some recent experiments that showcase the advantages of virtual labs, as well as some of the limitations. I then discuss how this relatively new experimental capability may unfold in the future, along with some implications for social and behavioral science.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 12:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

Vincent Poor, Princeton University [SmartGrid]

Topic: 
Theme: smart grids and energy systems
Abstract / Description: 

Smart grid involves the imposition of an advanced cyber layer atop the physical layer of the electricity grid, in order to improve the efficiency, security and cost of electricity use and distribution, and to allow for greater decentralization of power generation and management. This cyber-physical setting motivates a number of problems in network analysis, and this talk will briefly describe several of these problems together with approaches to solving them. These include competitive privacy in which multiple grid entities seek an optimal trade-off between privacy lost and utility gained from information sharing; distributed inference in which both the cyber and physical network topologies have roles to play in achieving consensus; real-time topology identification which helps in the mitigation of cascading failures; and attack construction which seeks an understanding of optimal strategies for attacking the grid in support of the design of effective countermeasures.


 

The SmartGrid seminar is scheduled at 1:30 pm on various dates throughout the Winter quarter. These speakers are renowned experts in power and energy systems, and we believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T for interested students. This course can be repeated for credit for the students.

 

 

Yours sincerely,

SmartGrid Seminar Organization Team,

Ram Rajagopal, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
Wenyuan Tang, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Emre Kara, Associate Staff Scientist, SLAC

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 300

On Challenges in Wholesale Electricity Market Design [SmartGrid]

Topic: 
On Challenges in Wholesale Electricity Market Design: from Renewables to Strategic Interaction
Abstract / Description: 

Wholesale electricity markets for the bulk power systems are networked marketplaces for buying and selling energy, mediated by an independent system operator (ISO). Market design paradigms are not particularly suited to handle the deepening penetration of renewable supply. I will begin by discussing some challenges in forward market design that stem from the variability characteristics of renewables such as wind and solar resources. Then, I will present recent work on two possible ways to tackle that challenge — a stochastic economic dispatch based contingent pricing scheme and a centralized mechanism for trading cash-settled call options. In the second half of the talk, I will change gears and discuss the challenges in electricity market design that arise due to the strategic interaction among the generators. In this vein, I will discuss some recent results on a networked Cournot/Stackelberg model that offers insights into ways to mitigate the effects of strategic interaction in such networked markets.


 

The SmartGrid seminar is scheduled at 1:30 pm on various dates throughout the Winter quarter. These speakers are renowned experts in power and energy systems, and we believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T for interested students. This course can be repeated for credit for the students.

 

 

Yours sincerely,

SmartGrid Seminar Organization Team,

Ram Rajagopal, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
Wenyuan Tang, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Emre Kara, Associate Staff Scientist, SLAC

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 9, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 300

Understanding the Value of Distributed Energy Resources: New Methods and Insights for Electricity Economics, Planning, and Operations [SmartGrid]

Topic: 
Understanding the Value of Distributed Energy Resources: New Methods and Insights for Electricity Economics, Planning, and Operations
Abstract / Description: 

Distributed energy resources (DERs), including distributed generation, storage, and demand response, create new options for the provision of electricity services. As detailed in the recently released MIT Utility of the Future study, these distributed resources compete with and complement one another as well as conventional generation resources and network assets. In addition, many DERs exhibit tradeoffs between "locational value" (deriving from loss mitigation, network capacity deferral, constraint mitigation, etc.) and economies of unit scale. New electricity system modeling tools are needed to evaluate the value of DERs and provide insights into how, where, and why DERs can be economically attractive contributors to an affordable and reliable electricity system. This seminar will describe a new electricity resource capacity planning tool, "GenX," suitable for analyzing the role and value of DERs in power systems and present insights from initial case studies.


 

The SmartGrid seminar is scheduled at 1:30 pm on various dates throughout the Winter quarter. These speakers are renowned experts in power and energy systems, and we believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T for interested students. This course can be repeated for credit for the students.

Yours sincerely,

SmartGrid Seminar Organization Team,

Ram Rajagopal, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
Wenyuan Tang, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Emre Kara, Associate Staff Scientist, SLAC

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 23, 2017 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

Behind the Integration of DER: Policy, Analytics, and Market Design [SmartGrid]

Topic: 
Behind the Integration of DER: Policy, Analytics, and Market Design
Abstract / Description: 

California utilities are integrating distributed energy resources (DER) into their system planning and operations in new and progressive ways. If successful, they will rely on DER (e.g., solar paired with batteries) when they plan and operate their systems, displacing the need for traditional distribution infrastructure (e.g. conductors, capacitors). If they are unsuccessful, they will likely build redundant systems to serve power if/when DER are not available. The difference between success and failure amounts to a substantial impact on the value of DER and efficiency of investment in the grid. This seminar will introduce the policy, analytics, and market design behind the integration of DER, as well as a discussion of the critical role of technology.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 9, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 300

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