SmartGrid

Smart grids and energy systems [SmartGrid Seminar]

Topic: 
Smart grids and energy systems
Abstract / Description: 

Semidefinite Programming is met with increasing interest within the power systems community. Its most notable application to-date is a convex formulation of the AC optimal power flow problem. At the same time, semidefinite programs can be applied on LMI conditions to derive Lyapunov functions that guarantee power system stability. In this talk we will report on recent work both on power system stability and optimization. First, we will present a novel robust stability toolbox for power grid with its extensions to inertia mimicking and topology control. In that, the quadratic Lyapunov functions approach is introduced for transient stability assessment. Second, we will propose formulations for the integration of chance constraints for different types of uncertainty in the AC optimal power flow problem. We demonstrate our method with numerical examples, and we investigate the conditions to achieve zero relaxation gap.

 

The theme of this quarter's Stanford SmartGrid seminar series is on smart grids and energy systems, scheduled to be held on Thursdays, with speakers from academic institutions and industry.


This quarter's speakers are renowned experts in power and energy systems, and we believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T for interested students. This course can be repeated for credit for the students.

SmartGrid Seminar Organization Team:

  • Ram Rajagopal, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
  • Wenyuan Tang, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Yuting Ji, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Emre Kara, Associate Staff Scientist, SLAC
Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 13, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

Power System Reliability with Integration of a Diverse Fleet of Generation Resources [SmartGrid Seminar]

Topic: 
Power System Reliability with Integration of a Diverse Fleet of Generation Resources
Abstract / Description: 

The electric power system has been experiencing a shift in its generation resource mix resulting from the retirement of conventional base load synchronous resources and the integration of a more diverse fleet of smaller sized resources with varying generation characteristics. As this transformation continues, there is a fundamental shift in the operational characteristics of the power system as a whole and thus potential reliability implications. In 2014, the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) created a task force on Essential Reliability Services (ERS) to identify the necessary operating characteristics to assure reliable operations of the North American electric grid. By 2015 frequency, voltage, and net demand ramping variability were recognized as the three essential building blocks of reliability. In December 2016, a paper on ERS sufficiency guidelines include frequency response, voltage limits, and ramping models that tend to vary by particular area and Balancing Authority. The ERS task force also studied the potential impact of a substantial penetration of distributed energy resources (DERs) that, in aggregate, could impact the reliability of the BPS. This industry presentation will focus on the measures identified by the ERS working group, and highlight the results from analysis performed using three years of historical data and three years of forward looking data. Additionally, an overview of the analysis performed by DER task force will be provided.


This quarter's speakers are renowned experts in power and energy systems, and we believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T for interested students. This course can be repeated for credit for the students.

SmartGrid Seminar Organization Team:

  • Ram Rajagopal, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
  • Wenyuan Tang, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Yuting Ji, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Emre Kara, Associate Staff Scientist, SLAC
Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 6, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

New Directions in Management Science & Engineering: A Brief History of the Virtual Lab

Topic: 
New Directions in Management Science & Engineering: A Brief History of the Virtual Lab
Abstract / Description: 

Lab experiments have long played an important role in behavioral science, in part because they allow for carefully designed tests of theory, and in part because randomized assignment facilitates identification of causal effects. At the same time, lab experiments have traditionally suffered from numerous constraints (e.g. short duration, small-scale, unrepresentative subjects, simplistic design, etc.) that limit their external validity. In this talk I describe how the web in general—and crowdsourcing sites like Amazon's Mechanical Turk in particular—allow researchers to create "virtual labs" in which they can conduct behavioral experiments of a scale, duration, and realism that far exceed what is possible in physical labs. To illustrate, I describe some recent experiments that showcase the advantages of virtual labs, as well as some of the limitations. I then discuss how this relatively new experimental capability may unfold in the future, along with some implications for social and behavioral science.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 12:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

Vincent Poor, Princeton University [SmartGrid]

Topic: 
Theme: smart grids and energy systems
Abstract / Description: 

Smart grid involves the imposition of an advanced cyber layer atop the physical layer of the electricity grid, in order to improve the efficiency, security and cost of electricity use and distribution, and to allow for greater decentralization of power generation and management. This cyber-physical setting motivates a number of problems in network analysis, and this talk will briefly describe several of these problems together with approaches to solving them. These include competitive privacy in which multiple grid entities seek an optimal trade-off between privacy lost and utility gained from information sharing; distributed inference in which both the cyber and physical network topologies have roles to play in achieving consensus; real-time topology identification which helps in the mitigation of cascading failures; and attack construction which seeks an understanding of optimal strategies for attacking the grid in support of the design of effective countermeasures.


 

The SmartGrid seminar is scheduled at 1:30 pm on various dates throughout the Winter quarter. These speakers are renowned experts in power and energy systems, and we believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T for interested students. This course can be repeated for credit for the students.

 

 

Yours sincerely,

SmartGrid Seminar Organization Team,

Ram Rajagopal, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
Wenyuan Tang, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Emre Kara, Associate Staff Scientist, SLAC

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 300

On Challenges in Wholesale Electricity Market Design [SmartGrid]

Topic: 
On Challenges in Wholesale Electricity Market Design: from Renewables to Strategic Interaction
Abstract / Description: 

Wholesale electricity markets for the bulk power systems are networked marketplaces for buying and selling energy, mediated by an independent system operator (ISO). Market design paradigms are not particularly suited to handle the deepening penetration of renewable supply. I will begin by discussing some challenges in forward market design that stem from the variability characteristics of renewables such as wind and solar resources. Then, I will present recent work on two possible ways to tackle that challenge — a stochastic economic dispatch based contingent pricing scheme and a centralized mechanism for trading cash-settled call options. In the second half of the talk, I will change gears and discuss the challenges in electricity market design that arise due to the strategic interaction among the generators. In this vein, I will discuss some recent results on a networked Cournot/Stackelberg model that offers insights into ways to mitigate the effects of strategic interaction in such networked markets.


 

The SmartGrid seminar is scheduled at 1:30 pm on various dates throughout the Winter quarter. These speakers are renowned experts in power and energy systems, and we believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T for interested students. This course can be repeated for credit for the students.

 

 

Yours sincerely,

SmartGrid Seminar Organization Team,

Ram Rajagopal, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
Wenyuan Tang, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Emre Kara, Associate Staff Scientist, SLAC

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 9, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 300

Understanding the Value of Distributed Energy Resources: New Methods and Insights for Electricity Economics, Planning, and Operations [SmartGrid]

Topic: 
Understanding the Value of Distributed Energy Resources: New Methods and Insights for Electricity Economics, Planning, and Operations
Abstract / Description: 

Distributed energy resources (DERs), including distributed generation, storage, and demand response, create new options for the provision of electricity services. As detailed in the recently released MIT Utility of the Future study, these distributed resources compete with and complement one another as well as conventional generation resources and network assets. In addition, many DERs exhibit tradeoffs between "locational value" (deriving from loss mitigation, network capacity deferral, constraint mitigation, etc.) and economies of unit scale. New electricity system modeling tools are needed to evaluate the value of DERs and provide insights into how, where, and why DERs can be economically attractive contributors to an affordable and reliable electricity system. This seminar will describe a new electricity resource capacity planning tool, "GenX," suitable for analyzing the role and value of DERs in power systems and present insights from initial case studies.


 

The SmartGrid seminar is scheduled at 1:30 pm on various dates throughout the Winter quarter. These speakers are renowned experts in power and energy systems, and we believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T for interested students. This course can be repeated for credit for the students.

Yours sincerely,

SmartGrid Seminar Organization Team,

Ram Rajagopal, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
Wenyuan Tang, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Emre Kara, Associate Staff Scientist, SLAC

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 23, 2017 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

Behind the Integration of DER: Policy, Analytics, and Market Design [SmartGrid]

Topic: 
Behind the Integration of DER: Policy, Analytics, and Market Design
Abstract / Description: 

California utilities are integrating distributed energy resources (DER) into their system planning and operations in new and progressive ways. If successful, they will rely on DER (e.g., solar paired with batteries) when they plan and operate their systems, displacing the need for traditional distribution infrastructure (e.g. conductors, capacitors). If they are unsuccessful, they will likely build redundant systems to serve power if/when DER are not available. The difference between success and failure amounts to a substantial impact on the value of DER and efficiency of investment in the grid. This seminar will introduce the policy, analytics, and market design behind the integration of DER, as well as a discussion of the critical role of technology.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 9, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 300

Breaker to Control Center Integration & Automation: PCO&O [SmartGrid]

Topic: 
Breaker to Control Center Integration & Automation: PCO&O
Abstract / Description: 

Recent technological advances in protection, control and optimization are enabling a more automated power system. Research efforts are focused on integrating these technologies into a seamless and cyber secure infrastructure for protection, control and operation. This infrastructure is the basis for accommodating and providing robust solutions to new problems arising from the integration of renewables, increased uncertainty and steeper ramp rates. The system must be secure against malicious cyber-attacks at every level. We discuss the infrastructure at the substation level where we build upon the dynamic state estimation based protection (EBP) and a centralized substation protection integrated with distributed dynamic state estimation and all substation control, operation and optimization functions. All functions are model based: we discuss an automated creation of the models required at each level of a hierarchical control, operation and optimization functions. The substation level system is extended to a subsystem/agent level for control and optimization at subsystems consisting of extended clusters of substations. At subsystem level, the infrastructure enables full state feedback for optimal control. Issues of time latency are addressed. Finally, the concepts are extended to the control center where all the functions that coordinate substations and subsystems are exercised. At each one of the three levels (substation, subsystem, control center), defenses against malicious cyber-attacks are integrated. We will discuss data attacks as well as insertion of malicious commands and the integrated intrusion detection methods. The proposed approach and infrastructure forms the basis for the next generation of Energy Management Systems.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 26, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 300

The Role of Demand & Storage in an Integrated Energy System [SmartGrid]

Topic: 
The Role of Demand & Storage in an Integrated Energy System
Abstract / Description: 

As energy systems have evolved from small isolated single energy vector systems into continental scale integrated energy systems the supply demand balance principle is a fundamental law underpinning and shaping their evolution. In an integrated energy system, supply demand balance, is across energy vectors (e.g. fuels, heat, and electricity), across scales/infrastructure (e.g. gas, heat, electricity networks) with and/or without storage capability and with all the consequential losses. In particular the demand side in an integrated energy system is no longer seen as a single energy vector consuming entity but rather as an entity that potentially can derive an energy service from a choice of energy vectors (e.g. hybrid cars), can self-supply (e.g. photovoltaic), can supply others and can store energy for later use. This trend is gaining traction but the direction of travel and the end result is very unclear. The component parts of this uncertainty are regulatory, economic, political and technological. Here the potential role in particular of demand and/or storage in a future integrated energy system is explored with some research results. The need for a more comprehensive, inter disciplinary, international and collaborative research and demonstration programme is highlighted and will be illustrated by reference to the Real Value project.


 

About the SmartGrid Seminar:

Our speakers will discuss exciting new ideas and technologies that are changing the electricity industry. The theme of the seminar series is on smart grids and energy systems, with speakers from academic institutions and industry. The hour-long seminars, including ample time for discussion, are held at 1:30 pm every Thursday. Open to all Stanford students, faculty and staff.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 19, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 300

High-Frequency Power Converters [Precourt Institute for Energy Seminar]

Topic: 
Energy Seminar: High-Frequency Power Converters
Abstract / Description: 

Juan's talk will cover how increases in switching frequency enable the miniaturization of power converters and new ways to fabricate and design power converters. It will address how these design techniques can be used in applications spanning biology, healthcare, space propulsion and automotive that use Wide Bandgap Power semiconductors at MHz frequencies. The talk will also discuss losses observed in GaN and SiC devices under high dv/dt conditions.

Date and Time: 
Monday, January 9, 2017 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
NVIDIA Auditorium, Jen-Hsun Huang Engineering Center

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