SmartGrid

SmartGrid Seminar: Adam Wierman

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

The speakers are renowned scholars or industry experts in power and energy systems. We believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T. Interested students can take this seminar course for credit by completing a project based on the topics presented in this course.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 18, 2018 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

SmartGrid Seminar welcomes Saurabh Amin

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

The seminars are scheduled for 1:30 pm on the dates listed above. The speakers are renowned scholars or industry experts in power and energy systems. We believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions
to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T. Interested students can take this seminar course for credit by completing a project based on the topics presented in this course.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 16, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

SmartGrid Seminar: Optimization, Inference and Learning for District-Energy Systems

Topic: 
Optimization, Inference and Learning for District-Energy Systems
Abstract / Description: 

We discuss how Optimization, Inference and Learning (OIL) methodology is expected to re-shape future demand-response technologies acting across interdependent energy, i.e. power, natural gas andheating/cooling, infrastructures at the district/metropolitan/distribution level. We describe hierarchy ofdeterministic and stochastic planning and operational problems emerging in the context of physical flows over networks associated with the laws of electricity, gas-, fluid- and heat-mechanics. We proceed to illustratedevelopment and challenges of the physics-informed OIL methodology on examples of: a) Graphical Models approach applied to a broad spectrum of the energy flow problems, including online reconstruction of the grid(s) topology from measurements; b) Direct and inverse dynamical problems for timely delivery of services in the district heating/cooling systems; c) Ensemble Control of the phase-space cycling energy loads via Markov Decision Process (MDP) and related reinforcement learning approaches.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 2, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

SmartGrid Seminar: Emerging Technologies and Their Impact on the Grid

Topic: 
Emerging Technologies and Their Impact on the Grid
Abstract / Description: 

As rooftop solar, electric vehicles, and residential battery storage continue to become more and more commonplace, they can have significant impacts in the way the Energy Grid operates. By embracing these new technologies, PG&E is helping to create a vision for what a next generation energy company will look like and seeking to answer key questions such as: Is energy storage changing the way in which utilities operate the grid? What is needed for new technologies, such as residential battery energy storage, to go mainstream? What are some of the key factors driving the inevitable transition from a one-way grid to a two-way grid?

This presentation will focus on both the technology changes happening to the energy space as well as some of the technology advancements helping to reshape how the energy grid engages with these changes. It will cover these topics while exploring a case study of a recent pilot projects where PG&E, Tesla, GE & Green Charge teamed up on a project in San Jose to demonstrate how battery storage and rooftop solar connected to smart inverters can be used to support the electric grid during periods of high demand while providing participating residents and businesses with backup power and bill reduction. The project is a microcosm of what the grid will look like in the near future with the rapid adoption of distributed energy resources such as solar, battery storage & EVs.


 

The seminars are scheduled for 1:30 pm on the dates listed above. The speakers are renowned scholars or industry experts in power and energy systems. We believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions
to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T. Interested students can take this seminar course for credit by completing a project based on the topics presented in this course.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 9, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

SmartGrid Seminar: Smart Distribution Systems Research at Future Renewable Electric Energy Delivery and Management Systems Center

Topic: 
Smart Distribution Systems Research at Future Renewable Electric Energy Delivery and Management Systems Center
Abstract / Description: 

This talk will first highlight the challenges associated with upgrading the current electric power distribution system infrastructure towards a smart distribution system that can accommodate high levels of distributed energy resources (DERs). Then, an overview of the research efforts that has been undertaken at the FREEDM center will be provided. The focus will be on the new monitoring and control methods needed for the future smart distribution systems.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 12, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

Design, stability and control of ad-hoc microgrids [SmartGrid Seminar]

Topic: 
Design, stability and control of ad-hoc microgrids
Abstract / Description: 

Microgrids are a promising and viable solution for integrating the distributed generation resources in future power systems. Similar to large-scale power systems, microgrids are prone to a range of instability mechanisms and are naturally fragile with respect to disturbances. However, existing planning and operation practices employed in large scale transmission grids usually cannot be downscaled to small low-voltage microgrids. This talk will discuss the concept of ad-hoc microgrids that allow for arbitrary interconnection and switching with guaranteed stability. Although the problem of microgrid stability and control has received a lot of attention in the last years, vast majority of existing works assumed that the network configuration is given and fixed. Moreover, only few works have accounted for electromagnetic delays that will be shown to play a critical role in the context of stability.

The talk will introduce a new mathematical framework for characterization and certification of stability in an ad-hoc setting and derive the formal design constraints for both DC and AC networks. In the context of low-voltage DC network, the corresponding derivations will employ the Brayton-Moser potential theory and result in simple conditions on load capacitances that guarantee both small-signal and transient stability. Whereas for AC microgrids, the singular perturbation analysis will be used to derive simple relations for the droop coefficient of neighboring networks. The talk will conclude with a discussion of key open problems and challenges.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 101

Research Perspectives on Smart Electric Distribution Systems [SLAC-Stanford SmartGrid]

Topic: 
Research Perspectives on Smart Electric Distribution Systems
Abstract / Description: 

Electric distribution systems are transforming from a traditionally passive element to an active component of the Smart Grid with a hitherto unprecedented availability of new technologies, data, control, and options for end-users to participate in the daily operations of the grid. To realize the full potential of this transformation there is a dire need for new architectures, markets, tools, techniques, and testbeds. In that regard, this talk presents a comprehensive approach based on cyber-physical-social system to energy management in the emerging smart distribution system with new research results from on-going efforts. Topics of aggregators, incentive pricing, customer-side intelligence, and sustainability metrics as well as aspects of current and future trends in this research will be addressed.

Date and Time: 
Friday, June 16, 2017 - 2:00pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 101

The New Utility: Basic Enabler of Sustainable and Resilient Electric Energy Services? [SmartGrid Seminar]

Topic: 
The New Utility: Basic Enabler of Sustainable and Resilient Electric Energy Services?
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk, we consider problems concerning the role of future utilities. Innovative operations and financial mechanisms are needed to transform utilities into future enablers of sustainable and resilient electric energy service providers. Both technical and financial issues on the road to modernizing today's utilities.

First, we illustrate on real-world operating problems limiting the penetration and utilization of distributed energy resources (DERs) and how these problems can be systematically solved using advanced automation and control. Automation represents a fundamental opportunity to overcome today's worst-case approach to electric energy services and offer more sustainable and resilient services. Mechanisms for better voltage support, power-electronics-based automation for stable operations systems and fast storage systems during abnormal conditions must be introduced. Although utilities should consider this approach as an alternative to building strong grids, some of these solutions are too complex for end users. Fortunately, there exists a win-win range of technological solutions by both utilities and end users. This is particularly the case when solutions are needed to operate these grids during natural disasters and cyber-attacks.

Second, we discuss financial roadblocks to deploy these promising technological innovations. We assess electricity markets in terms of their ability to enable DER integration at value. We also show how DERs can participate in electricity markets for energy and regulation during normal operations, but stress that there are no good mechanisms to value automation and storage. Utilities should move forward as providers of the last resort at value and be paid for taking the financial risks. If end users require uninterrupted clean services, market mechanisms must be put in place to give incentives to utilities to deploy effective technological solutions.


 

This quarter's speakers are renowned experts in power and energy systems, and we believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T for interested students. This course can be repeated for credit for the students.

SmartGrid Seminar Organization Team:

  • Ram Rajagopal, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
  • Wenyuan Tang, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Yuting Ji, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Emre Kara, Associate Staff Scientist, SLAC
Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 18, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

Electric Vehicles in the Smart Grid: Optimization & Control [SmartGrid Seminar]

Topic: 
Electric Vehicles in the Smart Grid: Optimization & Control
Abstract / Description: 

The rapid electrification of the transportation fleet imposes unprecedented demands on the electric grid. If controlled, however, these electric vehicles (EVs) provide an immense opportunity for smart grid services that enable renewable penetration and increased reliability. In this talk we discuss paradigms for aggregating and optimally controlling EV charging. Specifically, we discuss (i) aggregate modeling via partial differential equations, (ii) distributed optimization of large-scale EV fleets, (iii) and plug-and-play model predictive control in distribution networks. The talk closes with future perspectives for EVs in the Smart Grid.


This quarter's speakers are renowned experts in power and energy systems, and we believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T for interested students. This course can be repeated for credit for the students.

SmartGrid Seminar Organization Team:

  • Ram Rajagopal, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
  • Wenyuan Tang, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Yuting Ji, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Emre Kara, Associate Staff Scientist, SLAC
Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 11, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

Toward Real-Time Monitoring, Look-Ahead Assessment and Forecasting Engine for Active Distribution Networks [SmartGrid Seminar]

Topic: 
Toward Real-Time Monitoring, Look-Ahead Assessment and Forecasting Engine for Active Distribution Networks
Abstract / Description: 

United Kingdom Power Networks (UKPN) provides power to a quarter of the UK's population via its electricity distribution networks in London that span to the east and southeast of England. This talk will present an advanced distribution analytics power network tool (ADAPT) codeveloped by BSI and UKPN. ADAPT is an advanced real-time monitoring, state estimation platform, contingency analysis, corrective control. In addition, look ahead platform (30 minutes to 2 hours ahead) offers look-ahead assessment of the network taking the uncertainties of renewable energy into account. ADAPT completes with energy forecasting tools which provide input into forecasting future system cases (e.g. 1 hour ahead to 24 hours ahead). ADAPT has several key features such as: State Estimation, Power flow, Contingency Analysis, Interactive Single Line Diagram (132 kV, 33 kV, and external connections), Energy forecaster for load, solar, and wind, Corrective control for removing violations in the system. The ADAPT platform provides operators and engineers real-time situational awareness and facilitates network reliability management as new distributed generation comes online. It also enhances the capability of outage planners to minimize constraints placed on the output from distributed generators during the summer maintenance season and during any major construction and reconfiguration activities. The Look-Ahead mode allows engineers to include the uncertainty of renewable output as well as energy forecasting to produce cases with new renewable contingencies and alternate dispatch cases. Some challenges faced during the development of ADAPT will also be presented. A by-product of the tool's analysis capabilities can also identify root causes of system and component power losses as well as ways to minimize them. Some challenges and theoretical issues faced during the development of ADAPT will also be presented.


This quarter's speakers are renowned experts in power and energy systems, and we believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T for interested students. This course can be repeated for credit for the students.

SmartGrid Seminar Organization Team:

  • Ram Rajagopal, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
  • Wenyuan Tang, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Yuting Ji, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Emre Kara, Associate Staff Scientist, SLAC
Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 4, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

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