EE Student Information

EE Student Information, Spring Quarter 19-20: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

Updates will be posted on this page, as well as emailed to the EE student mail list.

Please see Stanford University Health Alerts for course and travel updates.

As always, use your best judgement and consider your own and others' well-being at all times.

Seminar / Colloquium

Workshop in Biostatistics presents "Learning for Never-Before-Seen Biomedicine"

Topic: 
Learning for Never-Before-Seen Biomedicine
Abstract / Description: 

We are all going through a hard time with COVID-19. In fact, COVID-19 is just the tip of the iceberg with many other unsolved biomedical problems, such as cancer early identification and finding side effects of new drugs. These problems seem to be independent of each other and have so far been tackled by different biologists. In this talk, I will argue that, behind these different problems is the same computational challenge, that is, how to understand and predict in never-before-seen situations. In addition to powerful predictive models, what is really needed are tools that generalize well to new drugs, new diseases, and new cohorts.


My talk will focus on our novel machine learning method developed to tackle two kinds of never-before-seen situations: never-before-seen class and never-before-seen cohort. I will first introduce how we classify samples into never-before-seen classes by embedding noisy and large-scale biomedical ontologies, resulting in new discoveries in protein functions, cell types, and rare diseases. Next, I will introduce our solution to understand and characterize a never-before-seen cohort. Instead of finding which features are important, we answer the question of why these features are important using a novel multiscale biomedical knowledge graph. This multiscale knowledge graph is constructed using millions of scientific papers and millions of experimental associations, providing up-to-date and scalable evidence for observations in our multi-scale biomedical world. I will conclude with a vision of future directions for never-before-seen biomedicine.


Contact kkanagaw@stanford.edu for required meeting password.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 9, 2020 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom

Stats Dept. presents "Complex trait genetics through the lens of regulatory networks"

Topic: 
Complex trait genetics through the lens of regulatory networks
Abstract / Description: 

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have cataloged many significant associations between genetic variants and complex traits. However, most of these findings have unclear biological significance, because they often have small effects and occur in non-coding regions. Integration of GWAS with gene regulatory networks addresses both issues by aggregating weak genetic signals within regulatory programs. Here we develop a Bayesian framework that integrates GWAS summary statistics with regulatory networks to infer enrichments and associations simultaneously. Our method improves upon existing approaches by explicitly modeling network topology to assess enrichments, and by automatically leveraging enrichments to identify associations. Applying this method to 18 human traits and 38 regulatory networks shows that genetic signals of complex traits are often enriched in networks specific to trait-relevant tissue or cell types. Prioritizing variants within enriched networks identifies known and new trait-associated genes revealing novel biological and therapeutic insights.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, April 28, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom

Pages

Applied Physics / Physics Colloquium

Q-Farm Quantum Seminar Series presents "Surprises from Time Crystals"

Topic: 
Surprises from Time Crystals
Abstract / Description: 

Time crystals are new states of matter that only exist in an out-of-equilibrium setting. I will review the state of this rapidly evolving field, focusing in particular on some of the remarkable properties of this phase, and the surprises coming out of its study. I will provide a detailed overview of existing experiments, with a view towards identifying the ingredients needed for an unambiguous observation of this phase in the future.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 29, 2020 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Hansen Physics & Astrophysics Building, 102/103

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium: Quantum Optical Control of Levitated Solids: a novel probe for the gravity-quantum interface

Topic: 
Quantum Optical Control of Levitated Solids: a novel probe for the gravity-quantum interface
Abstract / Description: 

The increasing level of control over motional quantum states of massive, solid-state mechanical devices opens the door to a hitherto unexplored parameter regime of macroscopic quantum physics. I will report on our recent progress towards controlling levitated solids in the quantum regime. I will discuss the prospects of using these systems for fundamental tests of physics, including the interface between quantum and gravitational physics.


Winter Qtr. Colloq. committee: M. Schleier-Smith (Chair), B. Cabrera, S. Dimopoulos, T. Heinz, S. Kachru & L. Tompkins
Location: Hewlett Teaching Center, Rm. 200

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, March 3, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Dark Matter halos from parametric resonance and their signatures"

Topic: 
Dark Matter halos from parametric resonance and their signatures
Abstract / Description: 

While there is undisputed evidence for Dark Matter, its nature and properties remain one of the biggest questions of our time. What is Dark Matter (DM)? How is it produced? Does it have interactions other than gravitational? In this talk, I will describe how a large class of bosonic particles can account for the DM of the Cosmos. These particles can be much lighter than those of the Standard Model with Compton wavelengths that are bigger than the size of our solar system or smaller than a millimeter. In the presence of attractive self-interactions, there is a parametric resonance effect in the early universe that can cause growth of structure at small scales, an effect so dramatic that can cause structures to collapse well before matter-radiation equality. The signatures of this effect span several experiments and orders of magnitude in parameter space. When the DM boson is heavy, the dense DM halos can alter the optimal search strategies in direct detection experiments. When the DM boson is light, these halos may leave their imprint in searches for dark matter substructure, primordial gravitational waves and alter the star formation history of the universe.


Winter Qtr. Colloq. committee: M. Schleier-Smith (Chair), B. Cabrera, S. Dimopoulos, T. Heinz, S. Kachru & L. Tompkins
Location: Hewlett Teaching Center, Rm. 200

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 25, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Fracton – elasticity duality"

Topic: 
Fracton – elasticity duality
Abstract / Description: 

I will discuss a recent discovery that elasticity theory of a two-dimensional quantum crystal is dual to a fracton tensor and to a coupled-vector gauge theories, thereby providing a concrete realization of the so-called "fracton quantum order". The disclinations and dislocations respectively map onto charges and dipoles of these gauge theories. The fractionalized mobility of fractons matches the constrained dynamics of crystal's topological defects. These dualities lead to predictions of fractonic phases, and phase transitions to their descendants, that are duals of the commensurate crystal, supersolid, smectic, and hexatic liquid crystals. Extensions of this duality to generalized elasticity theories provide a route to discovery of new fractonic models and their potential experimental realizations.


Winter Qtr. Colloq. committee: M. Schleier-Smith (Chair), B. Cabrera, S. Dimopoulos, T. Heinz, S. Kachru & L. Tompkins
Location: Hewlett Teaching Center, Rm. 200

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 18, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Quantum Science with Tweezer Arrays"

Topic: 
Quantum Science with Tweezer Arrays
Abstract / Description: 

Recently cold atoms in optical tweezer arrays have emerged as a versatile platform for quantum science experiments. I will review some of these developments, specifically, atom-by-atom assembly [1] as a fast and simple method to generate defect-free atomic arrays and Rydberg-based quantum simulation of spin models. While already reaching competitive results, these systems are still in their infancy and limitations in coherence, detection fidelity, and scalability remain. I will outline how we can improve on these issues and open new avenues in quantum metrology by using alkaline earth atoms, followed by an overview of recent results: 1) A record in imaging-fidelity for neutral atoms and demonstration of narrow-line cooling in tweezers [2,3]. 2) High-fidelity Rydberg excitation from a clock state, including a record in entanglement-fidelity for two neutral atoms [4]. 3) Demonstration of an optical clock with single-atom detection in tweezer arrays [5].

 

[1] Endres et al., Science 354, 1024 (2016)

[2] Covey et. al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 122, 173201 (2019)

[3] Cooper et al., Phys. Rev. X 8, 041055 (2018)

[4] Madjarov*, Covey*, et al., arXiv:2001.04455 (2020)

[5] Madjarov et al., Phys. Rev. X 9, 041052 (2019)


Winter Qtr. Colloq. committee: M. Schleier-Smith (Chair), B. Cabrera, S. Dimopoulos, T. Heinz, S. Kachru & L. Tompkins
Location: Hewlett Teaching Center, Rm. 200

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 11, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Quantum Physics from a computational complexity angle"

Topic: 
Quantum Physics from a computational complexity angle
Abstract / Description: 

Quantum computation is just around the corner, maybe; or it may take a few decades to see the true technological revolution it offers. Who knows. 

In any case, the field had already reshaped the way we think of quantum physics. Computational complexity notions such as quantum NP and interactive proofs shed light on old physics questions such as relaxation times and the nature of entanglement in ground states; as well as on how we understand what a quantum measurement really is. I will provide some examples of recent lines of research in quantum computation, which demonstrate how this blending of the computational complexity language into the heart of quantum physics can lead to some interesting new insights and questions. 


Winter Qtr. Colloq. committee: M. Schleier-Smith (Chair), B. Cabrera, S. Dimopoulos, T. Heinz, S. Kachru & L. Tompkins
Location: Hewlett Teaching Center, Rm. 200

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 4, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Twisty fun in 2D materials"

Topic: 
Twisty fun in 2D materials
Abstract / Description: 

A van der Waals bonded solid consists of sheets of two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers with strong bonding in-plane. When these crystals are grown naturally, the stacking order along the out-of-plane dimension is dictated by the van der Waals force, typically leading to all layers of the crystal being oriented in the same in-plane direction. Recently, it has become possible to synthetically create materials where the individual layers have arbitrary in-plane direction relative to each other. These materials are of great interest theoretically since they realize new crystal structures not achievable in nature, with new emergent properties predicted. One of the key experimental findings in one such material last year was the presence of superconductivity and Mott insulating behavior in twisted bilayer graphene, properties that the individual layers do not display by themselves. In this talk, I will describe STM and transport properties of three such materials: (a) twisted bilayer graphene, where we measure the electronic structure of the material that is a Mott insulator (b) twisted bilayer WSe2, where we also observe Mott insulating behavior and (c) twisted double bilayer graphene, where we have evidence from STM for excitonic insulator behavior as well as the presence of chiral topological edge states in the interior of the material.


Winter Qtr. Colloq. committee: M. Schleier-Smith (Chair), B. Cabrera, S. Dimopoulos, T. Heinz, S. Kachru & L. Tompkins
Location: Hewlett Teaching Center, Rm. 200

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, January 28, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Space Observatories of the Highest Energy Particles: POEMMA & EUSO-SPB"

Topic: 
Space Observatories of the Highest Energy Particles: POEMMA & EUSO-SPB
Abstract / Description: 

What are the mysterious sources of the most energetic particles ever observed? What are the sources of energetic cosmic neutrinos? How do particles interact at extreme energies?


Building on the progress achieved by the ground-based Auger Observatory in studying cosmic particles that reach 100 EeV, an international collaboration is working on space and sub-orbital missions to answer these questions. The Extreme Universe Space Observatory (EUSO) on a super pressure balloon (SPB) is designed to detect ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) from above. EUSO-SPB1 flew in 2017 with a fluorescence telescope. EUSO-SPB2 is being built to observe both fluorescence and Cherenkov from UHECRs and neutrinos. These sub-orbital missions lead to POEMMA, the Probe Of Extreme Multi-Messenger Astrophysics, a space mission designed to discover the sources of UHECRs and to observe neutrinos above 20 PeV from energetic transient events. POEMMA will open new Multi-Messenger windows onto the most energetic events in the Universe, enabling the study of new astrophysics and particle physics at these otherwise inaccessible energies


Winter Qtr. Colloq. committee: M. Schleier-Smith (Chair), B. Cabrera, S. Dimopoulos, T. Heinz, S. Kachru & L. Tompkins
Location: Hewlett Teaching Center, Rm. 200

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, January 21, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Quantum oscillations in solids: past, present and future"

Topic: 
Quantum oscillations in solids: past, present and future
Abstract / Description: 

On a visit to Stanford to honor Ted Geballe's centennial, I think it is appropriate to talk about an aspect of condensed matter and materials physics that has spanned his entire professional lifetime. The de Haas – van Alphen effect is one of the most profound and pronounced manifestations of quantum mechanics in solids. Discovered in Leiden fully ninety years ago as a signal in the magnetic torque of bismuth, the effect is now observed in a huge range of physical properties, and often given the general name of 'quantum oscillations'. The quest from discovery to full understanding required seminal contributions from some of the most celebrated names of twentieth century physics, such as Landau, Onsager and Lifshitz. The true hero of the technique, perhaps less well known than the above friends and colleagues with whom he collaborated, was the Cambridge-based Russian experimental physicist David Shoenberg. I had the privilege of knowing David for the last ten years of his life, and of learning about quantum oscillations from him and from his protégé Gil Lonzarich. In this talk I will review the historical development of the field, and try to show how important it has been, as a driver for the development of low temperature-low noise experimental techniques, for the growth of high purity single crystals, and for the introduction of key concepts in the theory of solids. I will close by stressing that the party is far from over. New physics associated with the de Haas – van Alphen effect still at the forefront of condensed matter science to this day, and there is an ongoing search for even more exotic relatives that are predicted to exist in certain special many-body systems.


Winter Qtr. Colloq. committee: M. Schleier-Smith (Chair), B. Cabrera, S. Dimopoulos, T. Heinz, S. Kachru & L. Tompkins
Location: Hewlett Teaching Center, Rm. 200

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, January 14, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Quantum Sensing of Quantum Materials"

Topic: 
Quantum Sensing of Quantum Materials
Abstract / Description: 

The magnetic fields generated by spins and currents provide a unique window into the physics of correlated-electron materials and devices. Proposed only a decade ago, magnetometry based on the electron spin of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defects in diamond is emerging as a platform that is exceptionally suited for probing condensed matter systems: it can be operated from cryogenic temperatures to above room temperature, has a dynamic range spanning from DC to GHz, and allows sensor-sample distances as small as a few nanometers. As such, NV magnetometry provides access to static and dynamic magnetic and electronic phenomena with nanoscale spatial resolution. While pioneering work focused on proof-of-principle demonstrations of its nanoscale imaging resolution and magnetic field sensitivity, now experiments are starting to probe the correlated-electron physics of magnets and superconductors and to explore the current distributions in low-dimensional materials. In this talk, I will review some of our recent work that uses NV center magnetometry to image skyrmions in thin magnetic films, measure the spin chemical potential in magnetic insulators, and image hydrodynamic electron flow in graphene.

 


Winter Qtr. Colloq. committee: M. Schleier-Smith (Chair), B. Cabrera, S. Dimopoulos, T. Heinz, S. Kachru & L. Tompkins
Location: Hewlett Teaching Center, Rm. 200

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, January 7, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

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CS300 Seminar

#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces

Topic: 
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces
Abstract / Description: 

Individuals of all genders invited to be a part of:
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces, where we will feature real stories of harassment at Stanford academic STEM in a conversation with Provost Drell, Dean Minor (SoM), and Dean Graham (SE3). We will have plenty of time for audience discussion on how we can take concrete action to dismantle this culture and actively work towards a more inclusive Stanford for everyone. While our emphasis is on STEM fields, we welcome and encourage participation from students, postdocs, staff, and faculty of all academic disciplines and backgrounds.

Date and Time: 
Friday, April 19, 2019 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
STLC 111

John G. Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology

Topic: 
Internet of Things and Internet of Energy for Connecting at Any Time and Any Place
Abstract / Description: 

In this presentation, I would like to discuss with you how to establish a sustainable and smart society through the internet of energy for connecting at any time and any place. I suspect that you have heard the phrase, "Internet of Energy" less often. The meaning of this phrase is simple. Because of a ubiquitous energy transmission system, you do not need to worry about a shortage of electric power. One of the most important items for establishing a sustainable society is [...]


"Inaugural Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology," EE News, July 2018

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, January 14, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Special Seminar: Formal Methods meets Machine Learning: Explorations in Cyber-Physical Systems Design

Topic: 
Formal Methods meets Machine Learning: Explorations in Cyber-Physical Systems Design
Abstract / Description: 

Cyber-physical systems (CPS) are computational systems tightly integrated with physical processes. Examples include modern automobiles, fly-by-wire aircraft, software-controlled medical devices, robots, and many more. In recent times, these systems have exploded in complexity due to the growing amount of software and networking integrated into physical environments via real-time control loops, as well as the growing use of machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) techniques. At the same time, these systems must be designed with strong verifiable guarantees.

In this talk, I will describe our research explorations at the intersection of machine learning and formal methods that address some of the challenges in CPS design. First, I will describe how machine learning techniques can be blended with formal methods to address challenges in specification, design, and verification of industrial CPS. In particular, I will discuss the use of formal inductive synthesis --- algorithmic synthesis from examples with formal guarantees — for CPS design. Next, I will discuss how formal methods can be used to improve the level of assurance in systems that rely heavily on machine learning, such as autonomous vehicles using deep learning for perception. Both theory and industrial case studies will be discussed, with a special focus on the automotive domain. I will conclude with a brief discussion of the major remaining challenges posed by the use of machine learning and AI in CPS.

Date and Time: 
Monday, December 4, 2017 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Gates 463A

SpaceX's journey on the road to mars

Topic: 
SpaceX's journey on the road to mars
Abstract / Description: 

SSI will be hosting Gwynne Shotwell — President and COO of SpaceX — to discuss SpaceX's journey on the road to mars. The event will be on Wednesday Oct 11th from 7pm - 8pm in Dinkelspiel Auditorium. After the talk, there will be a Q&A session hosted by Steve Jurvetson from DFJ Venture Capital.

Claim your tickets now on eventbright

 

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 11, 2017 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Dinkelspiel Auditorium

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, Subhasish Mitra

5:15-6:00, Silvio Savarese

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, December 7, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, Phil Levis

5:15-6:00, Ron Fedkiw

Date and Time: 
Monday, December 5, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, Dan Boneh

5:15-6:00, Aaron Sidford

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, John Mitchell

5:15-6:00, James Zou

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 28, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, Emma Brunskill

5:15-6:00, Doug James

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 16, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, James Landay

5:15-6:00, Dan Jurafsky

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 14, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

Pages

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "Rebooting the Internet"

Topic: 
Rebooting the Internet
Abstract / Description: 

"Build one and throw it out," so the adage goes. This talk explores the argument for systems architecture revision, including processors, operating systems, and networking--both as a general principle and the ways the Internet in particular is currently in need of a reboot. Assumptions, resources, and goals change with time and experience, and so too does our understanding of architectural principles. Through the eyes of the Internet and other examples, we review what we got right (one ring to rule them all, good enough rather than perfect), what we got wrong (7 layers, name resolution as afterthought), and what we only now are beginning to appreciate (layering and forwarding as one thing). Challenge cases are presented that can help drive this redesign, including single-packet exchanges and recursive layering, and an example given of one direction this approach can lead. Finally, we explore the challenges of evolution and transition to help us prepare for giving the Internet a well-deserved reset.

REMOTE URL SU-EE380-20200311

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, March 11, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
[remote only]

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "Data Analytics at the Exascale for Free Electron Lasers Lasers Project"

Topic: 
Data Analytics at the Exascale for Free Electron Lasers Lasers Project
Abstract / Description: 

The increase in velocity, volume, and complexity of the data generated by the upcoming Linac Coherent Light Source upgrade (LCLS-II) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory presents a considerable challenge for data acquisition, data processing, and data management. These systems face formidable challenges due to the extremely high data throughput, hundreds of GB/s to multi-TB/s, generated by the detectors at the experimental facilities and to the intensive computational demand for data processing and scientific interpretation. The LCLS-II Data System is a fast, powerful, and flexible architecture that includes a feature extraction layer designed to reduce the data volumes by at least one order of magnitude while preserving the science content of the data. Innovative architectures are required to implement this reduction with a configurable approach that can adapt to the multiple science areas served by LCLS. In order to increase the likelihood of experiment success and improve the quality of recorded data, a real-time analysis framework provides visualization and graphically-configurable analysis of a selectable subset of the data on the timescale of seconds. A fast feedback layer offers dedicated processing resources to the running experiment in order to provide experimenters feedback about the quality of acquired data within minutes. We will present an overview of the LCLS-II Data System architecture with an emphasis on the Data Reduction Pipeline (DRP) and online monitoring framework.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, March 4, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "The Soul of a New Machine: Rethinking the Computer"

Topic: 
The Soul of a New Machine: Rethinking the Computer
Abstract / Description: 

While our software systems have become increasingly elastic, the physical substrate available to run that software (that is, the computer!) has remained stuck in a bygone era of PC architecture. Hyperscale infrastructure providers have long since figured this out, building machines that are fit to purpose -- but those advances have been denied to the mass market. In this talk, we will talk about our vision for a new, rack-scale, server-side machine -- and how we anticipate advances like open firmware, RISC-V, and Rust will play a central role in realizing that vision.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 26, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "fastai: A Layered API for Deep Learning"

Topic: 
fastai: A Layered API for Deep Learning
Abstract / Description: 


[speaker photo] Sylvain's research at fast.ai has focused on designing and improving techniques that allow models to train fast with limited resources. He has also been a core developer of the fastai library, including implementing the warping transformations, the preprocessing pipeline, much of fastai.text, and a lot more.
Prior to fastai, Sylvain was a Mathematics and Computer Science teacher in Paris for seven years. He taught CPGE, the 2-year French program that prepares students for graduate programs at France's top engineering schools (the "grandes écoles"). After relocating to the USA in 2015, Sylvain wrote ten textbooks covering the entire CPGE curriculum. Sylvain is an alumni from École Normale Supérieure (Paris, France) and has a Master's Degree in Mathematics from University Paris XI (Orsay, France). He lives in Brooklyn with his husband and two sons.fastai is a deep learning library which provides practitioners with high-level components that can quickly and easily provide state-of-the-art results in standard deep learning domains, and provides researchers with low-level components that can be mixed and matched to build new approaches. It aims to do both things without substantial compromises in ease of use, flexibility, or performance. This is possible thanks to a carefully layered architecture, which expresses common underlying patterns of many deep learning and data processing techniques in terms of decoupled abstractions. These abstractions can be expressed concisely and clearly by leveraging the dynamism of the underlying Python language and the flexibility of the PyTorch library. fastai includes: a new type dispatch system for Python along with a semantic type hierarchy for tensors; a GPU-optimized computer vision library which can be extended in pure Python; an optimizer which refactors out the common functionality of modern optimizers into two basic pieces, allowing optimization algorithms to be implemented in 4-5 lines of code; a novel 2-way callback system that can access any part of the data, model, or optimizer and change it at any point during training; a new data block API; and much more. We have used this library to successfully create a complete deep learning course, which we were able to write more quickly than using previous approaches, and the code was more clear. The library is already in wide use in research, industry, and teaching.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 19, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "Centaur Technology's Deep learning Coprocessor"

Topic: 
Centaur Technology's Deep learning Coprocessor
Abstract / Description: 

This talk will explore Centaur's microprocessor-design technology includes both a new high-performance x86 core AND the industry's FIRST integrated AI Coprocessor for x86 systems. The x86 microprocessor cores deliver high instructions/clock (IPC) for server-class applications and support the latest x86 extensions such as AVX 512 and new instructions for fast transfer of AI data. The AI Coprocessor is a clean-sheet processor designed to deliver high performance and efficiency on deep-learning applications, freeing up the x86 cores for general-purpose computing. Both the x86 and AI Coprocessor technologies have now been proven in silicon using a new scalable SoC platform with eight x86 cores and an AI Coprocessor able to compute 20 trillion AI operations/sec with 20 terabytes/sec memory bandwidth. This SoC architecture requires less than 195mm2 in TSMC 16nm and provides an extensible platform with 44 PCIe lanes and 4 channels of PC3200 DDR4.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 12, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "KUtrace 2020"

Topic: 
KUtrace 2020
Abstract / Description: 

Observation tools for understanding occasionally-slow performance in large-scale distributed transaction systems are not keeping up with the complexity of the environment. The same applies to large database systems, to real-time control systems in cars and airplanes, and to operating system design.

Extremely low-overhead tracing can reveal the true execution and non-execution (waiting) dynamics of such software, running in situ with live traffic. KUtrace is such a tool, based on small Linux kernel patches recording and timestamping every transition between kernel- and user-mode execution across all CPUs of a datacenter or vehicle computer. The resulting displays show exactly what each transaction is doing every nanosecond, and hence shows why unpredictable ones are slow, all with tracing overhead well under 1%. Recent additions to KUtrace also show interference between programs and show profiles within long execution stretches that have no transitions.

The net result is deep insight into the dynamics of complex software, leading to often-simple changes to improve performance.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 5, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "Computer Security: The Mess We're In, How We Got Here, and What to Do About It"

Topic: 
Computer Security: The Mess We're In, How We Got Here, and What to Do About It
Abstract / Description: 

There are dozens of companies selling products to solve your Identity and Access Management (IAM) problems. Why so many? Because IAM is really hard. But why is IAM so hard? I hope to convince you in this talk the reason is that our approach to IAM is fundamentally flawed. The talk includes my personal theory of how we got into this mess and a strategy for getting out of it.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 29, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "A Fight over the Law of Software APIs, and other war stories from the Electronic Frontier Foundation""

Topic: 
A Fight over the Law of Software APIs, and other war stories from the Electronic Frontier Foundation
Abstract / Description: 

Over the past four years, a federal appeals court has upended a basic assumption about software: that while software can be covered by copyright law, software interfaces cannot. The court ruled that Google's re-implementation of Java APIs infringed Oracle's Java copyrights. Now, the Supreme Court will weigh in. The Electronic Frontier Foundation has argued at each stage of the case that copyright in APIs threatens innovation, especially by smaller players. This is part of EFF's work promoting the freedom to tinker, innovate, and research, especially outside the walls of major corporations—work that has also included challenges to overbroad computer crime and "anti-circumvention" laws.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 22, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "Lenia: Biology of Artificial Life"

Topic: 
Lenia: Biology of Artificial Life
Abstract / Description: 

In the field of Artificial Life, we use biochemistry, engineering and computer simulation to answer "what is life" and "what life could be". Starting from Conway's Game of Life, a famous discrete cell simulation, we tried to make everything smooth and continuous, and then something strange emerged. In this new system called "Lenia", we discovered lots of self-organizing, self-regulating dynamic patterns, look and behave much like microscopic life seen in biology class or plankton videos. More than just being amused, we investigated these creatures in details, performed computer experiments, classification, statistical analysis, and probed into the nature of such dynamic and complex system. We see possible links between Lenia, biological life, and artificial intelligence.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 15, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "Algorithmic Extremism: Examining YouTube's Rabbit Hole of Radicalization"

Topic: 
Algorithmic Extremism: Examining YouTube's Rabbit Hole of Radicalization
Abstract / Description: 

YouTube's recommendation algorithm is frequently characterized by journalists and researchers as radicalizing users to the far-right, but the evidence to date has been weak. We used data collected from the YouTube website to analyze the balance in recommendation impressions to see if it is favoring more extreme content. 768 US political channels were categorized into culturally relevant orientations and sub-cultures and 23M recommendations for recent videos were recorded during November-December 2019. We found that the late 2019 recommendation algorithm actively discourages viewers from being presented with fringe content. The algorithm is shown to favor mainstream media and cable news content over independent YouTube channels with a slant towards partisan political channels like Fox News and Last Week Tonight

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 8, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

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Ginzton Lab

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Applications of Precision Motion Control in the Optics and Photonics Industry"

Topic: 
Applications of Precision Motion Control in the Optics and Photonics Industry
Abstract / Description: 

Precision Automation has become a rapidly growing industry as manufacturers must develop ways to achieve ever-tightening tolerances. Likewise, research must push the envelope in order to maintain the increasingly advancing pace of technology. Aerotech has been providing assistance and solutions to researchers within academia and laboratories worldwide for 50 years and continues to empower students and technicians to complete and publish their research. In this seminar, we will discuss why automation and motion control is important as well as the various methods by which Aerotech has helped expand the boundaries of research in the field of optics and photonics. The topics we will cover in this session include:

  • What Precision Motion Control is and why it is important
  • How to choose the right set of motion control
  • How Aerotech has helped further research in:
    • Optics design and manufacturing
    • Light sources and beamlines
    • Optical positioning and ultra-fast spectroscopy
    • Fiber alignment
    • Laser Processing
    • Additive Manufacturing

After the presentation, a round-table discussion will be held during which we'd like to hear from you! Please bring with you any topics and - more importantly - any tough issues that you'd like to pose pertaining to automated motion control within your specific research field.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, March 3, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE present "Applications of Precision Motion Control in the Optics and Photonics Industry"

Topic: 
Applications of Precision Motion Control in the Optics and Photonics Industry
Abstract / Description: 

Refreshments at 4:00

Precision Automation has become a rapidly growing industry as manufacturers must develop ways to achieve ever-tightening tolerances. Likewise, research must push the envelope in order to maintain the increasingly advancing pace of technology. Aerotech has been providing assistance and solutions to researchers within academia and laboratories worldwide for 50 years and continues to empower students and technicians to complete and publish their research. In this seminar, we will discuss why automation and motion control is important as well as the various methods by which Aerotech has helped expand the boundaries of research in the field of optics and photonics. The topics we will cover in this session include:

  • What Precision Motion Control is and why it is important
  • How to choose the right set of motion control
  • How Aerotech has helped further research in:
    • Optics design and manufacturing
    • Light sources and beamlines
    • Optical positioning and ultra-fast spectroscopy
    • Fiber alignment
    • Laser Processing
    • Additive Manufacturing

After the presentation, a round-table discussion will be held during which we'd like to hear from you! Please bring with you any topics and - more importantly - any tough issues that you'd like to pose pertaining to automated motion control within your specific research field.

 

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 26, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Innovation in the Laser Industry"

Topic: 
Innovation in the Laser Industry
Abstract / Description: 
Spectra-Physics was a startup when Prof. Byer was a summer student in 1964.  By the time Alan Petersen and Jim Kafka joined in the early 1980s, the company had matured and aspired to be all things in lasers.  We will discuss the changes in the laser industry since that time and the role of innovation within the company to drive growth and broaden the product offerings from scientific lasers to industrial laser systems.
 
PLEASE RVP TO GUARANTEE A SPOT.
Date and Time: 
Monday, March 9, 2020 - 12:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 299

Q-Farm Quantum Seminar Series presents "Surprises from Time Crystals"

Topic: 
Surprises from Time Crystals
Abstract / Description: 

Time crystals are new states of matter that only exist in an out-of-equilibrium setting. I will review the state of this rapidly evolving field, focusing in particular on some of the remarkable properties of this phase, and the surprises coming out of its study. I will provide a detailed overview of existing experiments, with a view towards identifying the ingredients needed for an unambiguous observation of this phase in the future.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 29, 2020 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Hansen Physics & Astrophysics Building, 102/103

AP 483 Seminar Series presents "Photovoltaic Restoration of Sight in Retinal Degeneration"

Topic: 
Photovoltaic Restoration of Sight in Retinal Degeneration
Abstract / Description: 

Retinal degenerative diseases lead to blindness due to loss of the “image capturing” photoreceptors, while neurons in the “image-processing” inner retinal layers are relatively well-preserved. Information can be reintroduced into the visual system by photovoltaic subretinal implants, which convert incident light into electric current and stimulate the secondary retinal neurons.

 

To provide sufficient light intensity for photovoltaic stimulation while avoiding visual perception by remaining photoreceptors, images captured by a camera are projected onto the retina from augmented-reality glasses using pulsed near-infrared light. This design avoids the use of bulky electronics and wiring, thereby greatly reducing the surgical complexity and enabling scaling the number of photovoltaic pixels to thousands. Many features of the natural retinal signal processing are preserved in this approach, and spatial resolution matches the pixel pitch (so far 100 μm pixels in human patients, and 50 μm in rodents). For a broad acceptance of this technology by patients who lost central vision due to Age-Related Macular Degeneration, visual acuity should exceed 20/100, which requires pixels smaller than 25 μm. I will present a 3-dimensional electro-neural interface scalable to cellular dimensions and discuss the outlook and challenges for future developments.


 AP483 Optics and Electronics Seminar Series 2019-20 (Sponsored by Ginzton Laboratory, SPRC, Applied Physics, Physics, and HEPL).

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 24, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP 483 Seminar Series presents "Taking the Humble FBG on a Voyage of Discovery from the Lab Bench to the Hospital and Beyond"

Topic: 
Taking the Humble FBG on a Voyage of Discovery from the Lab Bench to the Hospital and Beyond
Abstract / Description: 

Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) emerged almost magically in 1978. Since then, they have developed from being primarily of academic interest, to being one of the most versatile photonic components for both telecommunications and sensing. 

I was lucky enough to get introduced to photonics during the early years of discovery and experimentation with FBGs and ended up making FBG components for telecommunications. Jumping forward a few decades, I had moved away from telecommunications and had started to dabble with free space optical sensing. Then, during a chance meeting over a beer in Sydney, I was asked, rather naively, if it was possible to use optical fiber to monitor what goes on in the esophagus when we swallow. This set me off on an entirely new path and, pulling together some ideas from telecoms, and some basic mechanical engineering, my team ended up developing a range of sensors for monitoring pressure in the human digestive tract. 

Being able to detect swallowing disorders quickly led to monitoring in other regions of the gut, like the colon and small bowel, and, together with colleagues from Flinders Medical Center, we provided some details of the inner workings of the human gastrointestinal tract. Thus, the fiber optic catheter was born. This device kept me busy for almost 10 years, during which time we worked closely with clinical research groups to write a whole new chapter on how the gut works.

The next ‘Eureka’ moment came when we had to develop a temperature independent version of our sensor, initially for monitoring pressure beneath bandages. The very simple design that resulted worked well for sub-bandage measurements but has also become a key technology that has moved to applications in aerospace, pipeline monitoring, and mining.

When I started working in optics, I never thought I'd end up monitoring what makes your stomach growl when hungry, how air flows across an airplane wing, or detecting pressure transients in water pipes. 

During this talk I will explain how our basic transducers work and will then describe the applications they are now being applied to, demonstrating how the humble FBG has opened up the scope and reach of fiber-optic sensing.


 

AP483 Optics and Electronics Seminar Series 2019-20 (Sponsored by Ginzton Laboratory, SPRC, Applied Physics, Physics, and HEPL).

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 10, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP 483 Seminar Series presents "Non-Hermitian Photonics: Optics at an Exceptional Point"

Topic: 
Non-Hermitian Photonics: Optics at an Exceptional Point
Abstract / Description: 

In recent years, non-Hermitian degeneracies, also known as exceptional points (EPs), have emerged as a new paradigm for engineering the response of optical systems. At such points, an N-dimensional space can be represented by a single eigenvalue and one eigenvector. As a result, these points are associated with abrupt phase transitions in parameter space. Among many different non-conservative photonic configurations, parity-time (PT) symmetric systems are of particular interest since they provide a powerful platform to explore, and consequently utilize, the physics of exceptional points in a systematic manner. In this talk, I will review some of our recent works in the area of non-Hermitian (mainly PT-symmetric) active photonics. For example, in a series of works, we have demonstrated how the generation and judicial utilization of these points in laser systems can result in unexpected dynamics, unusual linewidth behavior, and improved modal response. On the other hand, biasing a photonic system at an exceptional point can lead to orders of magnitude enhancement in sensitivity, an effect that may enable a new generation of ultrasensitive optical sensors on-chip. Non-Hermiticity can also be used as a means to promote or single out an edge mode in photonic topological insulator lattices. Rotation sensors play a crucial role in a diverse set of applications associated with navigation, positioning, and inertial sensing. Most optical gyroscopes rely on the Sagnac effect induced phase shift that scales linearly with the rotational velocity. In ring laser gyroscopes (RLGs), this shift manifests itself as a resonance splitting in the emission spectrum that can be detected as a beat frequency. The need for evermore precise RLGs has fueled research activities towards devising new approaches aimed to boost the sensitivity beyond what is dictated by geometrical constraints. In this respect, attempts have been made in the past to use either dispersive or nonlinear effects. Here, we propose a new scheme for ultrasensitive laser gyroscopes that utilizes the physics of exceptional points. By exploiting the properties of such non- Hermitian degeneracies, we show that the rotation-induced frequency splitting becomes proportional to the square root of the gyration speed, thus enhancing the sensitivity to low angular rotations by orders of magnitudes. We will then describe a possible modification of a standard RLG to support an exceptional point and measure the resulting enhanced sensitivity in the proposed system.


 

Date and Time: 
Monday, January 27, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP 483 Seminar Series presents "Where Are We Heading: A Brief History and Future of Navigation"

Topic: 
Where Are We Heading: A Brief History and Future of Navigation
Abstract / Description: 

- tba -


 

AP483 Optics and Electronics Seminar Series 2019-20 (Sponsored by Ginzton Laboratory, SPRC, Applied Physics, Physics, and HEPL).

Date and Time: 
Monday, January 13, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP 483 & AMO Seminar Series presents "Quantum Acceleration of Electromagnetic Axion Searches"

Topic: 
Quantum Acceleration of Electromagnetic Axion Searches
Abstract / Description: 

The QCD axion, which solves the strong CP problem in QCD, is one of the best motivated dark-matter candidates. I will discuss efforts to develop electromagnetic searches for QCD axion dark matter with masses below 1 micro-eV, including the Dark Matter Radio Cubic Meter experiment, which will probe the QCD axion band over 1.5 orders of magnitude in axion mass. However, full coverage of the QCD axion band will not be possible without acceleration by using quantum measurement techniques, which can be used to evade the standard quantum limit by the exploitation of quantum correlations in the electromagnetic signals. While photon counting is a useful technique to evade the SQL at masses above 1 micro-eV, it is not a useful technique at lower mass ranges. I will describe Quantum Upconverters, which convert signals from DC up to ~300 MHz to the microwave frequency range. Quantum upconverters can be used to implement techniques including backaction evasion to outperform the Standard Quantum Limit at the RF frequencies probed by DM Radio. They can also be used to improve electromagnetic sensing of nuclear spins for NMR-based detection schemes (including CASPEr).

(This seminar series is sponsored by Ginzton Laboratory, SPRC, Applied Physics, Physics, and HEPL)

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 2, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

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Information Systems Lab (ISL) Colloquium

ISL Colloquium presents "Federated Learning at Google and Beyond"

Topic: 
Federated Learning at Google and Beyond
Abstract / Description: 

Federated Learning enables mobile devices to collaboratively learn a shared prediction model or analytic while keeping all the training data on device, decoupling the ability to do machine learning from the need to store the data in the cloud. It embodies the principles of focused collection and data minimization, and can mitigate many of the systemic privacy risks and costs resulting from traditional, centralized machine learning. In this talk, I will discuss: (1) how federated learning differs from more traditional distributed machine learning paradigms, focusing on the main defining characteristics and challenges of the federated learning setting; (2) practical algorithms for federated learning that address the unique challenges of this setting; (3) extensions to federated learning, including differential privacy, secure aggregation, and compression for model updates, and (4) a range of valuable research directions that could have significant real-world impact.

Date and Time: 
Friday, February 28, 2020 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

RL forum presents "Temporal Abstraction in Reinforcement Learning with the Successor Representation"

Topic: 
Temporal Abstraction in Reinforcement Learning with the Successor Representation
Abstract / Description: 

Reasoning at multiple levels of temporal abstraction is one of the key abilities for artificial intelligence. In the reinforcement learning problem, this is often instantiated with the options framework. Options allow agents to make predictions and to operate at different levels of abstraction within an environment. Nevertheless, when a reasonable set of options is not known beforehand, there are no definitive answers for characterizing which options one should consider. Recently, a new paradigm for option discovery has been introduced. This paradigm is based on the successor representation (SR), which defines state generalization in terms of how similar successor states are. In this talk I'll discuss the existing methods from this paradigm, providing a big picture look at how the SR can be used in the options framework. I'll present methods for discovering "bottleneck" options, as well as options that improve an agent's exploration capabilities. I'll also discuss the option keyboard, which uses the SR to extend a finite set of options to a combinatorially large counterpart without additional learning.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 25, 2020 - 2:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL Colloquium presents "Fully Convolutional Pixelwise Context-Adaptive Denoiser"

Topic: 
Fully Convolutional Pixelwise Context-Adaptive Denoiser
Abstract / Description: 

Denoising is a classical problem in signal processing and information theory, and various different methods have been applied to tackle the problem for several decades. Recently, supervised-trained neural network-based methods have achieved impressive denoising performances, significantly surpassing those of the classical approaches, such as prior- or optimization-based denoisers. However, there are two drawbacks on those methods; they are not adaptive, i.e., the neural- network cannot correct itself when distributional mismatch between training and test data exists, and they require clean source data and exact noise model for training, which is not always possible in some practical scenarios. In this talk, I will introduce a framework that tries to tackle above two drawbacks jointly, based on an unbiased estimate of the loss of a particular class of pixelwise context- adaptive denoisers. Using the framework and neural networks to learn the denoisers, I show the resulting image denoiser can adapt to mismatched distributions in the data solely based on the given noisy images, and achieve the state-of-the-art performances on several benchmark datasets. Moreover, combined with the standard noise transform/estimation techniques, I will show that our denoiser can be completely blindly trained only with the noisy images (and without exact noise model) and yet be very effective for denoising more sophisticated, source-dependent real-world noise, e.g., Poisson- Gaussian noise.

This is a joint work with my students, Sungmin Cha and Jaeseok Byun at SKKU.

Date and Time: 
Friday, February 21, 2020 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL & IT-Forum present "Approaching Capacity at Short Blocklengths"

Topic: 
Approaching Capacity at Short Blockengths
Abstract / Description: 

This talk explores a family of recent results directed to approaching capacity at short blocklengths on the order of 50-500 channel transmissions. Convolutional codes out-perform polar codes and LDPC codes to approach the random coding union bound with low complexity when used with an optimized CRCs and list decoding. This perspective rehabilitates "catastrophic" convolutional codes, which are more properly understood for finite blocklengths as clever expurgation rather than any sort of catastrophe. This approach also provides a low-complexity approach for maximum-likelihood decoding of high-rate BCH codes. The use of variable length coding, i.e. incremental redundancy controlled with simple ACK/NACK feedback, allows capacity to be closely approached by practical codes with fewer than 500 channel uses. This talk reviews the information-theoretic results of Polyanskiy with respect to ACK/NACK feedback, presents new results extending the classic approach of Horstein for full feedback, and shows how to optimize the number and length of incremental redundancy transmissions (and feedback transmissions) for a variable-length code with feedback (i.e. a type-II hybrid ARQ). The talk also shows how to avoid entirely the overhead of a CRC in a hybrid ARQ setting by directly computing the reliability of convolutional codeword decisions. Finally, attendees will learn about a novel communications architecture that allows the use of incremental redundancy even without feedback.

 

Date and Time: 
Friday, January 24, 2020 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL Colloquium presents "Codification Design in Compressive Imaging"

Topic: 
Codification Design in Compressive Imaging
Abstract / Description: 

Compressive imaging enables faster acquisitions by capturing coded projections of the scenes. Codification elements used in compressive imaging systems include lithographic masks, gratings and micro-polarizers, which sense spatial, spectral, and temporal data. Codification plays a key role in compressive imaging as it determines the number of projections needed for correct reconstruction. In general, random coding patterns are sufficient for accurate reconstruction. Still, more recent studies have shown that code design not only yields to improved image reconstructions, but it can also reduce the number of required projections. This talk covers different tools for codification design in compressive imaging, such as the restricted isometry property, geometric and deep learning approaches. Applications in compressive spectral video, compressive X-ray computed tomography, and seismic acquisition will be also discussed.


The Information Systems Laboratory Colloquium (ISLC) is typically held in Packard 101 every Thursday at 4:30 pm during the academic year. Coffee and refreshments are served at 4pm in the second floor kitchen of Packard Bldg.

The Colloquium is organized by graduate students Joachim Neu, Tavor Baharav and Kabir Chandrasekher. To suggest speakers, please contact any of the students.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 5, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

ISL Colloquium presents "Empirical Risk Minimization in High-dimensions: Asymptotics, Optimality and Double Descent"

Topic: 
Empirical Risk Minimization in High-dimensions: Asymptotics, Optimality and Double Descent
Abstract / Description: 

At the heart of contemporary statistical signal processing problems, as well as modern machine-learning practices, lie high-dimensional inference tasks in which the number of unknown parameters is of the same order as (and often larger than) the number of observations.

In this talk, I describe a framework based on Gaussian-process inequalities to sharply characterize the statistical performance of convex empirical risk minimization in high dimensions. By focusing on the simple, yet highly versatile, model of binary linear classification, I will demonstrate that, albeit challenging, sharp results are advantageous over loose order-wise bounds. For instance, they lead to precise answers to the following questions: When are training data linearly separable? Is least-squares bad for binary classification? What is the best convex loss function? Is double descent observed in linear models and how do its features (such as the transition threshold and global minima) depend on the training data and on the learning procedure?

Many of the ideas and technical tools of our work originate from the study of sharp phase-transitions in compressed sensing. Throughout the talk, I will highlight how our results relate to and advance this literature.


The Information Systems Laboratory Colloquium (ISLC) is typically held in Packard 101 every Thursday at 4:30 pm during the academic year. Coffee and refreshments are served at 4pm in the second floor kitchen of Packard Bldg.

The Colloquium is organized by graduate students Joachim Neu, Tavor Baharav and Kabir Chandrasekher. To suggest speakers, please contact any of the students.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 27, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

ISL Colloquium presents "Network Systems, Kuramoto Oscillators, and Synchronous Power Flow"

Topic: 
Network Systems, Kuramoto Oscillators, and Synchronous Power Flow
Abstract / Description: 

Network systems are mathematical models for the study of cooperation, propagation, synchronization and other dynamical phenomena that arise among interconnected agents. Network systems are widespread in science and technology as fundamental modeling tools.

This talk will review established and emerging frameworks for modeling, analysis and design of network systems. Next, I will focus on recent developments on the analysis of security and transmission capacity in power grids. I will review the Kuramoto model of coupled oscillators and present recent results on its synchronization behavior. I will also review recent results on multi-stability and multistable synchronous power flows.


The Information Systems Laboratory Colloquium (ISLC) is typically held in Packard 101 every Thursday at 4:30 pm during the academic year. Coffee and refreshments are served at 4pm in the second floor kitchen of Packard Bldg.

The Colloquium is organized by graduate students Joachim Neu, Tavor Baharav and Kabir Chandrasekher. To suggest speakers, please contact any of the students.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 20, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

ISL Colloquium presents "Recurrent Switching Linear Dynamical Systems for Neural and Behavioral Analysis"

Topic: 
Recurrent Switching Linear Dynamical Systems for Neural and Behavioral Analysis
Abstract / Description: 

The trend in neural recording capabilities is clear: we can record orders of magnitude more neurons now than we could only a few years ago, and technological advances do not seem to be slowing. Coupled with rich behavioral measurements, genetic sequencing, and connectomics, these datasets offer unprecedented opportunities to learn how neural circuits function. But they also pose serious modeling and algorithmic challenges. We need flexible yet interpretable probabilistic models to gain insight from these heterogeneous data and algorithms to efficiently and reliably fit them. I will present some recent work on recurrent switching linear dynamical systems (rSLDS) — models that couple discrete and continuous latent states to model nonlinear processes. I will discuss some approximate Bayesian inference algorithms we've developed to fit these models and infer their latent states, and I will show how these methods can help us gain insight into complex spatiotemporal datasets like those we study in neuroscience.


The Information Systems Laboratory Colloquium (ISLC) is typically held in Packard 101 every Thursday at 4:30 pm during the academic year. Coffee and refreshments are served at 4pm in the second floor kitchen of Packard Bldg.

The Colloquium is organized by graduate students Joachim Neu, Tavor Baharav and Kabir Chandrasekher. To suggest speakers, please contact any of the students.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 13, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

ISL Colloquium presents "How to trap a gradient flow"

Topic: 
How to trap a gradient flow
Abstract / Description: 

I will discuss a new strategy to find stationary points of non-convex functions in low-dimensional spaces. In particular we resolve an open problem from 1993 by Stephen A. Vavasis on the complexity of this problem in 2D.

Joint work with Dan Mikulincer.


The Information Systems Laboratory Colloquium (ISLC) is typically held in Packard 101 every Thursday at 4:30 pm during the academic year. Coffee and refreshments are served at 4pm in the second floor kitchen of Packard Bldg.

The Colloquium is organized by graduate students Joachim Neu, Tavor Baharav and Kabir Chandrasekher. To suggest speakers, please contact any of the students.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 6, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

ISL Colloquium presents "From Feedforward-Designed Convolutional Neural Networks (FF-CNNs) to Successive Subspace Learning (SSL)"

Topic: 
From Feedforward-Designed Convolutional Neural Networks (FF-CNNs) to Successive Subspace Learning (SSL)
Abstract / Description: 

Given a convolutional neural network (CNN) architecture, its network parameters are typically determined by backpropagation (BP). The underlying mechanism remains to be a black-box after a large amount of theoretical investigation. In this talk, I will first describe a new interpretable feedforward (FF) design with the LeNet-5 as an example. The FF-designed CNN is a data-centric approach that derives network parameters based on training data statistics layer by layer in a one-pass feedforward manner. To build the convolutional layers, we develop a new signal transform, called the Saab (Subspace approximation with adjusted bias) transform. The bias in filter weights is chosen to annihilate nonlinearity of the activation function. To build the fully-connected (FC) layers, we adopt a label-guided linear least squared regression (LSR) method. To generalize the FF design idea furthermore, we present the notion of "successive subspace learning (SSL)" and present a couple of concrete methods for image and point cloud classification. Experimental results are given to demonstrate the competitive performance of the SSL-based systems. Similarities and differences between SSL and deep learning (DL) are compared.

 

 


The Information Systems Laboratory Colloquium (ISLC) is typically held in Packard 101 every Thursday at 4:30 pm during the academic year. Coffee and refreshments are served at 4pm in the second floor kitchen of Packard Bldg.

The Colloquium is organized by graduate students Joachim Neu, Tavor Baharav and Kabir Chandrasekher. To suggest speakers, please contact any of the students.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 30, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

Pages

IT-Forum

IT Forum presents "Fundamental barriers to estimation in high-dimensions"

Topic: 
Fundamental barriers to estimation in high-dimensions
Abstract / Description: 

Modern large-scale statistical models require to estimate thousands to millions of parameters. Understanding the tradeoff between statistical optimality and computational tractability in such models remains an outstanding challenge. Under a random design assumption, we establish lower bounds to statistical estimation with two popular classes of tractable estimators in several popular statistical models. First, in high-dimensional linear models we show that a large gap often exists between the optimal statistical error and that achieved by least squares with a convex penalty. Examples of such estimators include the Lasso, ridge regression, and MAP estimation with log-concave priors and Gaussian noise. Second, in generalized linear models and low-rank matrix estimation problems, we introduce the class of 'general first order methods,' examples of which include gradient descent, projected gradient descent, and their accelerated versions. We derive lower bounds for general first order methods which are tight up to asymptotically negligible terms. Our results demonstrate a gap to statistical optimality for general first order methods in both sparse phase retrieval and sparse PCA.

This is joint work with Andrea Montanari and Yuchen Wu.

 

Date and Time: 
Friday, April 3, 2020 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Zoom: stanford.zoom.us/j/516499996

IT Forum presents "What Hockey Teams and Foraging Animals Can Teach Us About Feedback Communication"

Topic: 
What Hockey Teams and Foraging Animals Can Teach Us About Feedback Communication
Abstract / Description: 

Suppose we wish to communicate over a memoryless channel with known statistics. How can the use of a feedback link from the receiver to the transmitter help? We introduce a novel mechanism for using feedback, called timid/bold coding, and we show that for some channels timid/bold coding yields a strict asymptotic improvement over the best non- feedback schemes. We also show that for a broad class of channels, feedback is useful if and only if timid/bold coding is applicable. The talk contains a puzzle (recently featured on the FiveThirtyEight website), a life lesson, a (potential) practical application, and some stochastic calculus.

This is joint work with Nirmal Shende and Yucel Altug.

Date and Time: 
Friday, March 6, 2020 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

RL forum presents "Temporal Abstraction in Reinforcement Learning with the Successor Representation"

Topic: 
Temporal Abstraction in Reinforcement Learning with the Successor Representation
Abstract / Description: 

Reasoning at multiple levels of temporal abstraction is one of the key abilities for artificial intelligence. In the reinforcement learning problem, this is often instantiated with the options framework. Options allow agents to make predictions and to operate at different levels of abstraction within an environment. Nevertheless, when a reasonable set of options is not known beforehand, there are no definitive answers for characterizing which options one should consider. Recently, a new paradigm for option discovery has been introduced. This paradigm is based on the successor representation (SR), which defines state generalization in terms of how similar successor states are. In this talk I'll discuss the existing methods from this paradigm, providing a big picture look at how the SR can be used in the options framework. I'll present methods for discovering "bottleneck" options, as well as options that improve an agent's exploration capabilities. I'll also discuss the option keyboard, which uses the SR to extend a finite set of options to a combinatorially large counterpart without additional learning.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 25, 2020 - 2:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

IT Forum presents "Why should information theorists and probabilists care about blockchains?"

Topic: 
Why should information theorists and probabilists care about blockchains?
Abstract / Description: 

The invention of blockchains in 2008 opened up for the first time the possibility of large scale decentralized trust systems. In the past few years, the design and analysis of blockchains have received significant attention from cryptography, security and distributed systems communities. In this talk, I argue that there are many interesting problems for information theorists and probabilists as well. I will discuss two particular classes of problems: 1) security analysis of blockchains as convergence analysis of random tree processes; 2) the use of coding to efficiently scale blockchains. I will also briefly discuss a course I plan to teach in the Spring on the topic.

Part of this talk is on joint work with Amir Dembo and Ofer Zeitouni.

 

Date and Time: 
Friday, January 31, 2020 - 1:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

Q-Farm Quantum Seminar Series presents "Surprises from Time Crystals"

Topic: 
Surprises from Time Crystals
Abstract / Description: 

Time crystals are new states of matter that only exist in an out-of-equilibrium setting. I will review the state of this rapidly evolving field, focusing in particular on some of the remarkable properties of this phase, and the surprises coming out of its study. I will provide a detailed overview of existing experiments, with a view towards identifying the ingredients needed for an unambiguous observation of this phase in the future.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 29, 2020 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Hansen Physics & Astrophysics Building, 102/103

ISL & IT-Forum present "Approaching Capacity at Short Blocklengths"

Topic: 
Approaching Capacity at Short Blockengths
Abstract / Description: 

This talk explores a family of recent results directed to approaching capacity at short blocklengths on the order of 50-500 channel transmissions. Convolutional codes out-perform polar codes and LDPC codes to approach the random coding union bound with low complexity when used with an optimized CRCs and list decoding. This perspective rehabilitates "catastrophic" convolutional codes, which are more properly understood for finite blocklengths as clever expurgation rather than any sort of catastrophe. This approach also provides a low-complexity approach for maximum-likelihood decoding of high-rate BCH codes. The use of variable length coding, i.e. incremental redundancy controlled with simple ACK/NACK feedback, allows capacity to be closely approached by practical codes with fewer than 500 channel uses. This talk reviews the information-theoretic results of Polyanskiy with respect to ACK/NACK feedback, presents new results extending the classic approach of Horstein for full feedback, and shows how to optimize the number and length of incremental redundancy transmissions (and feedback transmissions) for a variable-length code with feedback (i.e. a type-II hybrid ARQ). The talk also shows how to avoid entirely the overhead of a CRC in a hybrid ARQ setting by directly computing the reliability of convolutional codeword decisions. Finally, attendees will learn about a novel communications architecture that allows the use of incremental redundancy even without feedback.

 

Date and Time: 
Friday, January 24, 2020 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL Colloquium presents "Self-Programming Networks: Applications to Financial Trading Systems"

Topic: 
Self-Programming Networks: Applications to Financial Trading Systems
Abstract / Description: 

We describe Self-Programming Networks (SPNs), an ongoing research effort at Stanford for making cloud computing networks autonomous; that is, to enable the networks to sense and monitor themselves, and program and control themselves. We describe the goals and the architecture of SPNs and present two key outcomes: (i) Huygens, for scalable and accurate clock synchronization, and (ii) Simon, for fine-grained network telemetry using observations from the network’s edge. We also describe the relevance of this work to existing financial trading systems and demonstrate how, in future, it enables financial trading systems in the Cloud.


The Information Systems Laboratory Colloquium (ISLC) is typically held in Packard 101 every Thursday at 4:30 pm during the academic year. Coffee and refreshments are served at 4pm in the second floor kitchen of Packard Bldg.

The Colloquium is organized by graduate students Joachim Neu, Tavor Baharav and Kabir Chandrasekher. To suggest speakers, please contact any of the students.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 23, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

ISL & IT Forum present "Higher Criticism for discriminating frequency-tables and testing authorship"

Topic: 
Higher Criticism for discriminating frequency-tables and testing authorship
Abstract / Description: 

The Higher Criticism (HC) test is a useful tool for detecting the presence of a signal spread across a vast number of features, especially in the sparse setting when only few features are useful while the rest contain only noise. We adapt the HC test to the two-sample setting of detecting changes between two frequency tables. We apply this adaptation to authorship attribution challenges, where the goal is to identify the author of a document using other documents whose authorship is known. The method is simple yet performs well without handcrafting and tuning. Furthermore, as an inherent side effect, the HC calculation identifies a subset of discriminating words, which allow additional interpretation of the results. Our examples include authorship in the Federalist Papers and machine-generated texts.

We take two approaches to analyze the success of our method. First, we show that, in practice, the discriminating words identified by the test: have low variance across documents belonging to a corpus of homogeneous authorship. We conclude that in testing a new document against the corpus of an author, HC is mostly affected by words characteristic of that author and is relatively unaffected by topic structure. Finally, we analyze the power of the test in discriminating two multinomial distributions under sparse and weak perturbations model. We show that our test has maximal power in a wide range of the model parameters, even though these parameters are unknown to the user.

Date and Time: 
Friday, January 10, 2020 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL Colloquium and IT-Forum present "A Notion of Entropy for Sparse Marked Graphs and its Applications in Graphical Data Compression"

Topic: 
A Notion of Entropy for Sparse Marked Graphs and its Applications in Graphical Data Compression
Abstract / Description: 

Many modern data sources arising from social networks, biological data, etc. are best viewed as indexed by combinatorial structures such as graphs, rather than time series. The local weak limit theory for sparse graphs, also known as the objective method, due to Benjamini, Schramm, Aldous, Steele, Lyons and others, provides a framework which enables one to make sense of a stationary process indexed by graphs. The theory of time series is the engine driving an enormous range of applications in areas such as control theory, communications, information theory and signal processing. It is to be expected that a theory of stationary stochastic processes indexed by combinatorial structures, in particular graphs, would eventually have a similarly wide-ranging impact.

Employing the above framework, we introduce a notion of entropy for probability distributions on rooted graphs. This is a generalization of the notion of entropy introduced by Bordenave and Caputo to graphs which carry marks on their vertices and edges. Such marks can represent information on real-world data. For instance, in a social network graph where each node represents an individual and edges represent friendships, a vertex mark represents the type of an individual, while edge marks represent shared data between friends. The above notion of entropy can be considered as a natural counterpart for the Shannon entropy rate in the world of graphical data. We illustrate this by introducing a universal compression scheme for marked graphical data. Furthermore, we introduce an algorithm that can perform such a compression with low complexity.

This talk is based on joint work with Venkat Anantharam.

Date and Time: 
Friday, December 6, 2019 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL & IT Forum present "An information-theoretic solution to random access communication"

Topic: 
An information-theoretic solution to random access communication
Abstract / Description: 

The emergence of networks of many devices in the context of cyber-physical systems underscores the need for novel solutions for communication over random access channels. Most protocols currently in place rely on collision avoidance and are woefully ill-suited to handling high variation in the number and variety of communicators. We ask the question of whether it is possible, in a scenario where no one knows how many transmitters are active, for the receiver to almost always recover the messages sent by all active transmitters. Surprisingly, we find that not only is reliable decoding possible in this regime, but it is possible to attain both the capacity and the dispersion of the multiple access channel in operation. Our strategy relies on ''semi-rateless'' codes: decoding attempts are made at a sparse set of pre-determined decoding times, and the decoder is tasked with recovering from the channel output the messages of the active transmitters. Once the decoder determines that reliable decoding can be made, a positive acknowledgement (ACK) is sent to the encoders, indicating the end of that communication epoch and the start of a new one. The feedback ensures that the collection of active transmitters remains fixed during each epoch. These semi-rateless codes work for both channel and source coding; for source coding, our semi-rateless scheme achieves the optimal performance up to the first three order terms in the Gaussian approximation of the optimal rate. The analysis includes a refinement of the random coding argument ensuring the existence of a deterministic code that meets multiple constraints simultaneously, a random-coding union achievability bound for multiple access, and a sharp converse bound for multiple access source coding via a connection to composite hypothesis testing.

Based on joint works (ArXiv:1801.09018, ArXiv:1902.03366) with M. Effros, R. C. Yavas, S. Chen.

Date and Time: 
Friday, November 22, 2019 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

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Optics and Electronics Seminar

Stanford Photonics Research Center (SPRC) SPECIAL SEMINAR on Global Environmental Measurement and Monitoring Technologies

Topic: 
The Source and Fate of Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions
Abstract / Description: 

Fossil fuel burning is the primary driver of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), which recently passed the landmark 400 parts per million mark. Most nations have committed to reducing their emissions under the Paris Agreement and many sub-national entities have made similar commitments. To ensure that the promised emission reductions are achieved, an understanding of emission rates from fossil fuel point sources, cities, regions and countries, and of uptake of carbon into the land and oceans, is critical.

Traditionally, "bottom-up" economic information has been used to determine fossil fuel emission rates, and biomass estimates are used to evaluate the land carbon sink. In this presentation, I will discuss the use of a "top-down" approach that uses atmospheric measurements and modelling that complements the bottom-up method. In particular, I will focus on the use of radiocarbon (14C) in CO2 as a tracer for the fossil fuel component of atmospheric CO2. I will showcase how the method can be used to quantify fossil fuel CO2 emissions and land carbon uptake, giving examples from USA and New Zealand.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 12, 2020 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Applications of Precision Motion Control in the Optics and Photonics Industry"

Topic: 
Applications of Precision Motion Control in the Optics and Photonics Industry
Abstract / Description: 

Precision Automation has become a rapidly growing industry as manufacturers must develop ways to achieve ever-tightening tolerances. Likewise, research must push the envelope in order to maintain the increasingly advancing pace of technology. Aerotech has been providing assistance and solutions to researchers within academia and laboratories worldwide for 50 years and continues to empower students and technicians to complete and publish their research. In this seminar, we will discuss why automation and motion control is important as well as the various methods by which Aerotech has helped expand the boundaries of research in the field of optics and photonics. The topics we will cover in this session include:

  • What Precision Motion Control is and why it is important
  • How to choose the right set of motion control
  • How Aerotech has helped further research in:
    • Optics design and manufacturing
    • Light sources and beamlines
    • Optical positioning and ultra-fast spectroscopy
    • Fiber alignment
    • Laser Processing
    • Additive Manufacturing

After the presentation, a round-table discussion will be held during which we'd like to hear from you! Please bring with you any topics and - more importantly - any tough issues that you'd like to pose pertaining to automated motion control within your specific research field.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, March 3, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE present "Applications of Precision Motion Control in the Optics and Photonics Industry"

Topic: 
Applications of Precision Motion Control in the Optics and Photonics Industry
Abstract / Description: 

Refreshments at 4:00

Precision Automation has become a rapidly growing industry as manufacturers must develop ways to achieve ever-tightening tolerances. Likewise, research must push the envelope in order to maintain the increasingly advancing pace of technology. Aerotech has been providing assistance and solutions to researchers within academia and laboratories worldwide for 50 years and continues to empower students and technicians to complete and publish their research. In this seminar, we will discuss why automation and motion control is important as well as the various methods by which Aerotech has helped expand the boundaries of research in the field of optics and photonics. The topics we will cover in this session include:

  • What Precision Motion Control is and why it is important
  • How to choose the right set of motion control
  • How Aerotech has helped further research in:
    • Optics design and manufacturing
    • Light sources and beamlines
    • Optical positioning and ultra-fast spectroscopy
    • Fiber alignment
    • Laser Processing
    • Additive Manufacturing

After the presentation, a round-table discussion will be held during which we'd like to hear from you! Please bring with you any topics and - more importantly - any tough issues that you'd like to pose pertaining to automated motion control within your specific research field.

 

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 26, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Innovation in the Laser Industry"

Topic: 
Innovation in the Laser Industry
Abstract / Description: 
Spectra-Physics was a startup when Prof. Byer was a summer student in 1964.  By the time Alan Petersen and Jim Kafka joined in the early 1980s, the company had matured and aspired to be all things in lasers.  We will discuss the changes in the laser industry since that time and the role of innovation within the company to drive growth and broaden the product offerings from scientific lasers to industrial laser systems.
 
PLEASE RVP TO GUARANTEE A SPOT.
Date and Time: 
Monday, March 9, 2020 - 12:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 299

OSA/SPIE present "A revolution in high-performance computing driven by CMOS-integrated photonics"

Topic: 
A revolution in high-performance computing driven by CMOS-integrated photonics
Abstract / Description: 

Recent years have seen an explosive growth in bandwidth requirements at all levels of computing, from consumer-grade GPUs to datacenters and supercomputers. Consensus is growing that traditional interconnect development is reaching its limits. Electrical I/O is limited to line data rates of around 112 Gbps, given physical limits of copper and dielectrics losses, and noise. Proposed approaches to surpass this limit increasingly offer higher rates without providing any real benefit; bandwidth comes with degradation of power consumption, complexity, and cost. Furthermore, the 112 Gbps limit is achievable only over very short distances, constraining the architecture of computer systems.

Photonic I/O is the only viable, near-term path to increasing data rates, and to solving the problems of power consumption, bandwidth, and latency faced by electrical I/O. Its low latency and low propagation loss can enable new "disaggregated" computer architectures, with separate chips of memory and logic linked over larger distances for more efficient utilization.

Ayar labs is pursuing a photonic interconnect solution that involves an external multi-wavelength laser source, an integrated transceiver chip with photonics densely integrated along with CMOS circuits, along with advanced chip packaging and optical-fiber connectivity. The transceiver chip integrates electro-optic modulators and detectors with analog drivers, control logic, and SERDES, taking advantage of dense integration to reduce parasitics, power consumption, latency, and packaging costs. Micro-rings provide wavelength-division multiplexing of many channels needed to achieve high capacity per chip edge at low power consumption. This development comes at an exciting time: the emergence of a large-scale process for CMOS-compatible photonics along with and advanced packaging ecosystem is converging with an acute market need for bandwidth density.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 11, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

Special MSE Colloquium presents "Spatiotemporal Metaphotonics"

Topic: 
Spatiotemporal Metaphotonics
Abstract / Description: 

Materials are often used to manipulate waves. Metamaterials have provided far-reaching possibilities in achieving "extremes" in such wave-matter interaction. Various exciting functionalities have been achieved in exploiting metamaterials and metasurfaces in nanophotonics and nano-optics. We have been exploring how spatiotemporal metamaterials can give us new platforms in metaphotonics for exploiting waves to do certain useful functions for us. Several scenarios are being investigated in my group. As one scenario, we have been developing metastructure platforms that can perform analog computation such as solving integral and differential equations and inverting matrices with waves as waves interact with them. Such "metamaterial machines" can function as wave-based analog computing machines, suitable for micro- and nanoscale integration. Another scenario deals with 4-dimensional metamaterials, in which temporal variation of material parameters is added to the tools of spatial inhomogeneities for manipulating light-matter interaction with spatiotemporal platforms. The third category for metaphotonics is the concept of near-zero-index materials, structures and associated photonic doping that exhibit unique features in light-matter interaction, opening doors to exciting new wave-based and quantum optical features. In this talk, I will present some of our ongoing work on extreme and spatiotemporal material platforms for metaphotonics, and will forecast possible future research directions in these paradigms.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 4, 2020 - 3:00pm
Venue: 
Durand 450

Q-Farm Quantum Seminar Series presents "Surprises from Time Crystals"

Topic: 
Surprises from Time Crystals
Abstract / Description: 

Time crystals are new states of matter that only exist in an out-of-equilibrium setting. I will review the state of this rapidly evolving field, focusing in particular on some of the remarkable properties of this phase, and the surprises coming out of its study. I will provide a detailed overview of existing experiments, with a view towards identifying the ingredients needed for an unambiguous observation of this phase in the future.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 29, 2020 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Hansen Physics & Astrophysics Building, 102/103

OSA/SPIE present "Writing and submitting your papers and How to become an editor"

Topic: 
Preparing your papers for submission+Becoming a journal editor
Abstract / Description: 

Rachel will talk you through the detailed information and guidelines on scientific paper preparation and submission. She will share with you some guidelines and tips for writing an abstract and a paper, as well as the submission, editorial and peer-review processes. Information about how to become an editor will also be provided.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 5, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE present "Nanoscale Foundries: Electronics, Photonics, Ionics, Fluidics"

Topic: 
Nanoscale Foundries: Electronics, Photonics, Ionics, Fluidics
Abstract / Description: 

Modern silicon fabs routinely produce functional electrical components for a few dollars at part counts exceeding billions per year and a complexity rivaling the human genome. The productivity of these fabs is ensured by design rules that govern the structures that constitute these systems. These design rules govern the range of sizes and separations between various materials - from silicon to metals and dielectrics. However, the essential design rules do not dictate function. For example, MEMs structures have been realized in silicon without modification of the design rules (so called zero-change). Here, we show that the manufacturing infrastructure and design rules support a host of functions and applications beyond electronics - to include nanoscale photonics, ionics, and fluidics. We utilize open foundries (such as MOSIS) that support many users sharing the cost of fabrication. Our nanoscale photonics, ionics, and fluidics are realized next to the electronic circuits designed by small and large companies, students from around the world, and people who just like to tinker. They are the machine shops of the nano-era.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 30, 2020 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE present "Gallium Nitride and its Transformation of the Lighting Industry"

Topic: 
Gallium Nitride and its Transformation of the Lighting Industry
Abstract / Description: 

The invention of the transistor in 1947 inspired research in semiconductor materials other than germanium and silicon, including compound III-V "direct-bandgap" semiconductors that could efficiently emit light. It was a student of transistor-inventor John Bardeen, Nick Holonyak, Jr., who explored alloy engineering aspects of these compounds that eventually led to the first demonstration of a practical visible-spectrum light emitting diode (LED) in 1962. Since then, several compound semiconductor materials systems have been developed for LEDs, the most important of which is the (Al,Ga,In)N system which demonstrated blue-emitting LEDs for the first time and for which the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded in 2014. This rather unusual material system is now the backbone of solid-state lighting, which has transformed the flat-planel display industry, and has now penetrated about 50% of the traditional (i.e., incandescent, fluorescent, discharge) general lighting market, delivering enormous savings in energy consumption. This seminar will tell this story, including details of III-Nitride optoelectronic device physics, and look at what we might expect in the future for III-Nitride based photonic devices and their applications.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 23, 2020 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

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SCIEN Talk

SCIEN presents "Codification Design in Compressive Imaging"

Topic: 
Codification Design in Compressive Imaging
Abstract / Description: 

Compressive imaging enables faster acquisitions by capturing coded projections of the scenes. Codification elements used in compressive imaging systems include lithographic masks, gratings and micro-polarizers, which sense spatial, spectral, and temporal data. Codification plays a key role in compressive imaging as it determines the number of projections needed for correct reconstruction. In general, random coding patterns are sufficient for accurate reconstruction. Still, more recent studies have shown that code design not only yields to improved image reconstructions, but it can also reduce the number of required projections. This talk covers different tools for codification design in compressive imaging, such as the restricted isometry property, geometric and deep learning approaches. Applications in compressive spectral video, compressive X-ray computed tomography, and seismic acquisition will be also discussed.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, June 3, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom (join SCIEN mail list to receive meeting ID)

SCIEN presents "Mojo Lens, the First True Smart Contact Lens"

Topic: 
Mojo Lens, the First True Smart Contact Lens
Abstract / Description: 

After working in stealth for over 4 years, Mojo Vision recently unveiled the first working prototype of Mojo Lens, a smart contact lens designed to deliver augmented reality content wherever you look. This talk will provide an overview of the company, its vision of "Invisible Computing", the science behind the world's first contact lens display, and a first-hand account of what it's like to actually wear Mojo Lens.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 27, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom (join SCIEN mail list to receive meeting ID)

SCIEN presents "Learned Image Synthesis for Computational Displays"

Topic: 
Learned Image Synthesis for Computational Displays
Abstract / Description: 

Addressing vergence-accommodation conflict in head-mounted displays (HMDs) requires resolving two interrelated problems. First, the hardware must support viewing sharp imagery over the full accommodation range of the user. Second, HMDs should accurately reproduce retinal defocus blur to correctly drive accommodation. A multitude of accommodation-supporting HMDs have been proposed, with three architectures receiving particular attention: varifocal, multifocal, and light field displays. These designs all extend depth of focus, but rely on computationally expensive rendering and optimization algorithms to reproduce accurate defocus blur (often limiting content complexity and interactive applications). To date, no unified framework has been proposed to support driving these emerging HMDs using commodity content. In this talk, we will present DeepFocus, a generic, end-to-end convolutional neural network designed to efficiently solve the full range of computational tasks for accommodation-supporting HMDs. This network is demonstrated to accurately synthesize defocus blur, focal stacks, multilayer decompositions, and multiview imagery using only commonly available RGB-D images, enabling real-time, near-correct depictions of retinal blur with a broad set of accommodation-supporting HMDs.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 20, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom (join SCIEN mail list to receive meeting ID)

SCIEN welcomes Dr. Adam Rowell, Lucid

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

Adam is the co-founder and CTO of Lucid. His breakthrough research in computer vision and signal processing as a PhD at Stanford powers the technology behind Lucid's 3D Fusion Technology, world's first AI-based 3D and depth capture technology mimicking human vision in dual/multi camera devices which is currently deployed in their own product, the LucidCam, in most of mobile phones, robots, and aiming to be in autonomous cars. He worked for many years in the industry for Exponent as a consultant focused on machine learning and computer vision development, from consumer to business to military applications, coding and leading engineering teams to build the most advanced GPU/NPU based systems in the industry. Afterwards, he joined Maxim Integrated in their Advanced Analytics team, optimizing the organization of the 10,000 employee public company from the ground up. Adam defines the technology direction and leads Lucid's engineering team

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 13, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom (join SCIEN mail list to receive meeting ID)

SCIEN Seminar presents "Bio-inspired depth sensing using computational optics"

Topic: 
Bio-inspired depth sensing using computational optics
Abstract / Description: 

Jumping spiders rely on accurate depth perception for predation and navigation. They accomplish depth perception, despite their tiny brains, by using specialized optics. Each principal eye includes a multitiered retina that simultaneously receives multiple images with different amounts of defocus, and distance is decoded from these images with seemingly little computation. In this talk, I will introduce two depth sensors that are inspired by jumping spiders. They use computational optics and build upon previous depth-from-defocus algorithms in computer vision. Both sensors operate without active illumination, and they are both monocular and computationally efficient.
The first sensor synchronizes an oscillating deformable lens with a photosensor. It produces depth and confidence maps at more than 100 frames per second and has the advantage of being able to extend its working range through optical accommodation. The second sensor uses a custom-designed metalens, which is an ultra-thin device with 2D nano-structures that modulate traversing light. The metalens splits incoming light and simultaneously forms two differently-defocused images on a planar photosensor, allowing the efficient computation of depth and confidence from a single snapshot in time.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 6, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom (join SCIEN mail list to receive meeting ID)

SCIEN Seminar presents "Insight into the inner workings of Intel’s Stereo and Lidar Depth Cameras"

Topic: 
Insight into the inner workings of Intel’s Stereo and Lidar Depth Cameras
Abstract / Description: 

This talk will provide an overview of the technology and capabilities of Intel's RealSense Stereo and Lidar Depth Cameras, and will then progress to describe new features, such as high-speed capture, multi-camera enhancements, optical filtering, and near-range high-resolution depth imaging. Finally, we will introduce a new fast on-chip calibration method that can be used to improve the performance of a stereo camera and help mitigate some common stereo artifacts.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, April 29, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom (join SCIEN mail list to receive meeting ID)

SCIEN Seminar presents "The Extreme Science of Building High-Performing Compact Cameras for Space Applications"

Topic: 
The Extreme Science of Building High-Performing Compact Cameras for Space Applications
Abstract / Description: 

A thickening flock of earth-observing satellites blankets the planet. Over 700 were launched during the past 10 years, and more than 2,200 additional ones are scheduled to go up within the next 10 years. To add to that, year on year, satellite platforms and instruments are being miniaturized to improve cost-efficiency with the same expectations of high spatial and spectral resolutions. But what does it take to build imaging systems that are high-performing in the harsh environment of space but cost-efficient and compact at the same time? This talk will touch upon the technical issues associated with the design, fabrication, and characterisation of such extremely high-performing but still compact and cost-efficient space cameras taking the example of the imager that Pixxel has built as part of its earth-imaging satellite constellations plans.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom (join SCIEN mail list to receive meeting ID)

SCIEN Seminar presents "The Role of Fundamental Limits in 3D Imaging Systems: From Looking around Corners to Fast 3D Cameras"

Topic: 
The Role of Fundamental Limits in 3D Imaging Systems: From Looking around Corners to Fast 3D Cameras
Abstract / Description: 

The knowledge about limits is a precious commodity in computational imaging: By knowing that our imaging device already operates at the physical limit (e.g. of resolution), we can avoid unnecessary investments in better hardware, such as faster detectors, better optics or cameras with higher pixel resolution. Moreover, limits often appear as uncertainty products, making it possible to bargain with nature for a better measurement by sacrificing less important information.

In this talk, the role of physical and information limits in computational imaging will be discussed using examples from two of my recent projects: 'Synthetic Wavelength Holography' and the 'Single-Shot 3D Movie Camera'.

Synthetic Wavelength Holography is a novel method to image hidden objects around corners and through scattering media. While other approaches rely on time-of-flight detectors, which suffer from technical limitations in spatial and temporal resolution, Synthetic Wavelength Holography works at the physical limit of the space-bandwidth product. Full field measurements of hidden objects around corners or through scatterers reaching sub-mm resolution will be presented.

The single-shot 3D movie camera is a highly precise 3D sensor for the measurement of fast macroscopic live scenes. From each 1 Mpix camera frame, the sensor delivers 300,000 independent 3D points with high resolution. The single-shot ability allows for a continuous 3D measurement of fast moving or deforming objects, resulting in a continuous 3D movie. Like a hologram, each movie-frame encompasses the full 3D information about the object surface, and the observation perspective can be varied while watching the 3D movie.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, April 15, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom (join SCIEN mail list to receive meeting ID)

SCIEN Seminar presents "Image recovery with untrained convolutional neural networks"

Topic: 
Image recovery with untrained convolutional neural networks
Abstract / Description: 

Convolutional Neural Networks are highly successful tools for image recovery and restoration. A major contributing factor to this success is that convolutional networks impose strong prior assumptions about natural images—so strong that they enable image recovery without any training data. A surprising observation that highlights those prior assumptions is that one can remove noise from a corrupted natural image by simply fitting (via gradient descent) a randomly initialized, over-parameterized convolutional generator to the noisy image.
In this talk, we discuss a simple un-trained convolutional network, called the deep decoder, that provably enables image denoising and regularization of inverse problems such as compressive sensing with excellent performance. We formally characterize the dynamics of fitting this convolutional network to a noisy signal and to an under-sampled signal, and show that in both cases early-stopped gradient descent provably recovers the clean signal. Finally, we discuss our own numerical results and numerical results from another group demonstrating that un-trained convolutional networks enable magnetic resonance imaging from highly under-sampled measurements.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, April 8, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom (join SCIEN mail list to receive meeting ID)

SCIEN and EE292E present "An Integrated 6DoF Video Camera and System Design"

Topic: 
An Integrated 6DoF Video Camera and System Design
Abstract / Description: 

Designing a fully integrated 360◦ video camera supporting 6DoF head motion parallax requires overcoming many technical hurdles, including camera placement, optical design, sensor resolution, system calibration, real-time video capture, depth reconstruction, and real-time novel view synthesis. While there is a large body of work describing various system components, such as multi-view depth estimation, our paper is the first to describe a complete, reproducible system that considers the challenges arising when designing, building, and deploying a full end-to-end 6DoF video camera and playback environment. Our system includes a computational imaging software pipeline supporting online markerless calibration, high-quality reconstruction, and real-time streaming and rendering. Most of our exposition is based on a professional 16-camera configuration, which will be commercially available to film producers. However, our software pipeline is generic and can handle a variety of camera geometries and configurations. The entire calibration and reconstruction software pipeline along with example datasets is open sourced to encourage follow-up research in high-quality 6DoF video reconstruction and rendering.

More information: An Integrated 6DoF Video Camera and Systems Design

Open source repository: https://github.com/facebook/facebook360_dep

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, March 4, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

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SmartGrid

Bits and Watts presents "Battery Electric Vehicles, Energy Management, and the Smart Grid: An OEM Perspective"

Topic: 
Battery Electric Vehicles, Energy Management, and the Smart Grid: An OEM Perspective
Abstract / Description: 

Ford is pursuing an aggressive electrification of their product portfolio that includes the launch of the all-electric 2021 Mustang Mach-E, all-electric F-150, and all-electric global commercial van. With 100 kWh of electrical capacity, and potentially more, on board, Ford customers will have enough energy to meet their daily driving needs. However, what if there is more than enough energy? Ford is looking closely at how battery electric vehicles can unlock additional value for customers in a world of a dynamic and intelligent electrical energy system.

This talk will briefly cover Ford's electrification strategy and the mission of Greenfield Labs, Ford's Silicon Valley outpost. It will review projects on connected charging infrastructure and hands-free charging and describe the ways that Ford researchers are envisioning smart vehicles in a smart world.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 27, 2020 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

Bits and Watts presents "Towards Transactive Energy: A Common Experimentation with EDF, SMUD, OMEGA Grid and ENEDIS"

Topic: 
Towards Transactive Energy: A Common Experimentation with EDF, SMUD, OMEGA Grid and ENEDIS
Abstract / Description: 

EDF (Électricité de France), Sacramento Municipal Utility district (SMUD) and Omega Grid are partnering to test Transactive Energy. We are creating a blockchain-based local electricity market, based on OG's software, to coordinate electric vehicle (EV) charging with solar generation. This local energy market project will demonstrate the use of blockchain technology to coordinate EV charging with local solar generation and wholesale prices in a blockchain-based incentive program. The program will show how distribution utilities can use a blockchain-based local energy market to add millions of new solar panels, EVs, and batteries to their grids without expensive infrastructure upgrades. The local energy market demonstration will take place near Sacramento, California, and receive support from the EDF Innovation Laboratory team based in Silicon Valley. The project is backed in part by an APPA grant.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 13, 2020 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

SmartGrid Seminar presents "Intelligent Protection Schemes for Renewable Energy Integration"

Topic: 
Intelligent Protection Schemes for Renewable Energy Integration
Abstract / Description: 

By 2050, the costs of an average PV and wind plant are expected to fall by 71% and 58%, respectively. Meanwhile, batteries will further depress market prices, which in turn enable the deeper penetration of renewable energies like PV, wind, and electric vehicles (EVs). However, the transition on primary energy resources can be a double-edged sword. Problems such as protective relay is landing and fault detection, protective relay coordination under environmental uncertainty, topology recovery of secondary distribution networks, and EV charging station planning are critical to the security and resilience of the electric systems. This presentation describes several timely solutions to enable more secure and efficient grid operations by analyzing voluminous power system operation data. The aforementioned solutions include the multifunction intelligent relays, an environment-driven adaptive protection scheme, a transformer connectivity inferencing tool, and an EV charging station planning method. Several types of machine learning algorithms are developed in power systems to support renewable energy integration for sustainability.

 

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 21, 2019 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

EE 292X (CEE 292X) Battery Systems for Transportation and Grid Services - Poster Session

Topic: 
Student Poster Session, EE 292X (CEE 292X)
Abstract / Description: 

Project poster session spanning a very broad range of topics from battery technology and modeling to applications to transportation and the grid.

You are welcome to come and meet our students and learn about their amazing work.

List of EE/CEE 292X projects:
1. Voltage sensing separator for battery fast charging
2. Equivalent circuit models for lithium ion batteries under EV drive cycles
3. Machine learning based models for lithium ion batteries
4. Characterizing error in linear battery dynamics model
5. Homogenized thermal runaway model in Li-ion cells
6. Battery pack design for thermal runaway prevention
7. Smart lithium ion battery pack for small-scale UAV applications
8. Battery-aware intelligence for autonomous robot navigation
9. Battery modeling to optimize range and cycle life for electric aircraft
10. Mileage prediction based on driving profiles
11. Data-driven system modeling of Stanford EV buses
12. Empirical trends in energy consumption of electric buses
13. Quantifying load impact from autonomous electric TNC fleets
14. Data-driven placement of charging station locations
15. Charging station locations via agent based simulation
16. Battery design for resilient decentralized wastewater treatment
17. Low cost, temperature robust batteries for farm applications
18. Battery charge controller for small scale off-grid wind
19. Techno-economic feasibility of a hybrid storage system for a university campus
20. Distributed vs grid scale storage systems for future EV charging stations
21. Ancillary services with vehicle to grid charging
22. Quantifying 2nd life EV battery value for grid applications

Date and Time: 
Thursday, December 5, 2019 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
Packard Atrium

Q-Farm & Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials (GLAM) special seminar: "Operator Growth, Chaos, Complexity, and Hydrodynamics"

Topic: 
Operator Growth, Chaos, Complexity, and Hydrodynamics
Abstract / Description: 

The emergence of ergodic behavior in quantum systems is an old puzzle. Quantum mechanical time-evolution is local and unitary, but many quantum systems are successfully described by irreversible hydrodynamics. I will present a hypothesis for how operators grow in strongly-interacting many-body systems and thence give rise to hydrodynamics. The hypothesis states that the Lanczos coefficients in the continued fraction expansion of the Green's function growth linearly with a "universal growth rate" $\alpha$ in chaotic quantum systems.

I will describe the extensive analytical and numerical evidence for this hypothesis, as well as three of its consequences. (1) Operator growth can diagnose free, integrable, and chaotic dynamics. (2) The growth rate --- an experimental observable --- gives rise to a quantity called the "K-complexity". The K-complexity quantifies the "amount of chaos" in any quantum system, and reduces to the Lyapunov exponent in semiclassical limits. (3) Assuming the hypothesis, one can accurately compute diffusion coefficients and other hydrodynamical data with minimal computational effort.

This talk is based on arXiv: 1812.08657.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 20, 2019 - 3:00pm
Venue: 
McCullough Building Room 335

Bits and Watts meets Buts and Whats: New York State's Policy to Remake the Grid

Topic: 
New York State's Policy to Remake the Grid
Abstract / Description: 

In developing the 20th century grid, George Westinghouse and Nikola Tesla did not design an architecture for distributed or renewable resources. To decarbonize the grid--and to electrify transportation and heating--requires exactly that: a remaking of the grid to accommodate these resources. While doing so will require some new technology solutions, this seminar will explore how existing policy has inhibited innovation in the regulated power sector, and more important, will give an update on New York State's Reforming the Energy Vision (REV) policy, a market-based approach to build the smart grid.

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 11, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
NVIDIA Auditorium

Smart Grid Seminar presents "Finding a Balance: Regulation and Grid Performance"

Topic: 
Finding a Balance: Regulation and Grid Performance
Abstract / Description: 

What is driving our electric power industry to improve performance? How do we, as an industry, make sure we are performing to our customers' expectations? In today's power systems, every technology employed, trend established, and policy or standard implemented, should be done so with the best interests of the customer in mind. The utility sector is economically immense and vast in geographic scope, and it combines ownership, management, and regulation in complex ways to achieve reliable energy service. This lecture provides a broad view on energy market regulation in the US, including a rulemaking process and landmark orders. It addition, it explores how improving bulk power system performance through technology, data, and policies will benefit the customers of electric power.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 31, 2019 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

Smart Grid Seminar welcomes Jessica Bain

Topic: 
TBA - date subject to change
Abstract / Description: 

We invite you to join us in this quarter's Stanford Smart Grid Seminar. The theme of the seminar series is on smart grids and energy systems, scheduled for Thursdays, and with speakers from academic institutions and industry. The seminar room is Room 111 in Y2E2 Building.

The speakers are renowned scholars or industry experts in power and energy systems. We believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T. Interested students can take this seminar course for credit by completing a project based on the topics presented in this course. Please discuss with the faculty in charge before signing up for credit.

Smart Grid Seminar Organization Team:

  • Ram Rajagopal, Associate Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering, and Electrical Engineering
  • Liang Min, Managing Director, Bits and Watts Initiative
  • Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
  • Mohammad Rasouli, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 14, 2019 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

Smart Grid Seminar: Vehicle Grid Integration

Topic: 
Vehicle Grid Integration
Abstract / Description: 

Vehicle Grid Integration (VGI) is the umbrella-concept that encompasses managed charging of electric vehicles (V1G) as well as vehicle-to-grid (V2G) solutions. As more electric vehicles hit the road inCalifornia, PG&E has been leading industry efforts to better clarify and articulate the scope, need, and value of VGI. This talk provides an overview of PG&E's activities in the VGI space, focusing on a recently developed market framework that identifies hundreds of potential VGI use-cases and help quantify their value. Dr. Farhat will also share findings from two of PG&E's VGI pilots: the ChargeForward pilot in collaboration with BMW North America, and the School Bus Renewable Integration pilot with PittsburghUnified School District.


 

We invite you to join us in this quarter's Stanford Smart Grid Seminar. The theme of the seminar series is on smart grids and energy systems, scheduled for Thursdays, and with speakers from academic institutions and industry. The seminar room is Room 111 in Y2E2 Building.

The speakers are renowned scholars or industry experts in power and energy systems. We believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T. Interested students can take this seminar course for credit by completing a project based on the topics presented in this course. Please discuss with the faculty in charge before signing up for credit.

Smart Grid Seminar Organization Team:

  • Ram Rajagopal, Associate Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering, and Electrical Engineering
  • Liang Min, Managing Director, Bits and Watts Initiative
  • Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
  • Mohammad Rasouli, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 7, 2019 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

Smart Grid Seminar: Safety-Constrained Learning Algorithms for Demand Management

Topic: 
Safety-Constrained Learning Algorithms for Demand Management
Abstract / Description: 

In the first part of the talk, we study the problem of designing optimal control actions (e.g., real-time prices) for demand management in power distribution systems given unknown customer response functions. Without exact response information or a market mechanism that extracts this information from customers, the design of demand management initiatives can present economic uncertainty and grid reliability concerns for the aggregator. This highlights the need for safety-constrained learning heuristics that can be applied in power and more broadly safety-critical systems. We showcase "safety-aware" bandit heuristics for designing control actions that constrain the probability of violation of power grid constraints during the learning process. We then highlight the effect of such safety constraints on the growth of regret for special classes of stochastic bandit optimization problems.

In the second part of the talk, we consider the problem of joint routing, battery charging, and pricing problem faced by a profit-maximizing transportation service provider that operates a fleet of autonomous electric vehicles. To accommodate for the time-varying nature of trip demands, renewable energy availability, and electricity prices, a dynamic pricing and control policy is required. We highlight several such policies, including one trained through deep reinforcement learning to develop a near-optimal policy. We also determine the optimal static policy to serve as a baseline for comparison with our dynamic policy and for determining the capacity region of the system. While the static policy provides important insights on optimal pricing and fleet management, we showcase how in a real dynamic setting, it is inefficient to utilize a static policy.


 

We invite you to join us in this quarter's Stanford Smart Grid Seminar. The theme of the seminar series is on smart grids and energy systems, scheduled for Thursdays, and with speakers from academic institutions and industry. The seminar room is Room 111 in Y2E2 Building.

The speakers are renowned scholars or industry experts in power and energy systems. We believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T. Interested students can take this seminar course for credit by completing a project based on the topics presented in this course. Please discuss with the faculty in charge before signing up for credit.

Smart Grid Seminar Organization Team:

  • Ram Rajagopal, Associate Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering, and Electrical Engineering
  • Liang Min, Managing Director, Bits and Watts Initiative
  • Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
  • Mohammad Rasouli, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 24, 2019 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

Pages

Stanford's NetSeminar

#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces

Topic: 
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces
Abstract / Description: 

Individuals of all genders invited to be a part of:
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces, where we will feature real stories of harassment at Stanford academic STEM in a conversation with Provost Drell, Dean Minor (SoM), and Dean Graham (SE3). We will have plenty of time for audience discussion on how we can take concrete action to dismantle this culture and actively work towards a more inclusive Stanford for everyone. While our emphasis is on STEM fields, we welcome and encourage participation from students, postdocs, staff, and faculty of all academic disciplines and backgrounds.

Date and Time: 
Friday, April 19, 2019 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
STLC 111

John G. Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology

Topic: 
Internet of Things and Internet of Energy for Connecting at Any Time and Any Place
Abstract / Description: 

In this presentation, I would like to discuss with you how to establish a sustainable and smart society through the internet of energy for connecting at any time and any place. I suspect that you have heard the phrase, "Internet of Energy" less often. The meaning of this phrase is simple. Because of a ubiquitous energy transmission system, you do not need to worry about a shortage of electric power. One of the most important items for establishing a sustainable society is [...]


"Inaugural Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology," EE News, July 2018

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, January 14, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Claude E. Shannon's 100th Birthday

Topic: 
Centennial year of the 'Father of the Information Age'
Abstract / Description: 

From UCLA Shannon Centennial Celebration website:

Claude Shannon was an American mathematician, electrical engineer, and cryptographer known as "the father of information theory". Shannon founded information theory and is perhaps equally well known for founding both digital computer and digital circuit design theory. Shannon also laid the foundations of cryptography and did basic work on code breaking and secure telecommunications.

 

Events taking place around the world are listed at IEEE Information Theory Society.

Date and Time: 
Saturday, April 30, 2016 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
N/A

NetSeminar

Topic: 
BlindBox: Deep Packet Inspection over Encrypted Traffic
Abstract / Description: 

SIGCOMM 2015, Joint work with: Justine Sherry, Chang Lan, and Sylvia Ratnasamy

Many network middleboxes perform deep packet inspection (DPI), a set of useful tasks which examine packet payloads. These tasks include intrusion detection (IDS), exfiltration detection, and parental filtering. However, a long-standing issue is that once packets are sent over HTTPS, middleboxes can no longer accomplish their tasks because the payloads are encrypted. Hence, one is faced with the choice of only one of two desirable properties: the functionality of middleboxes and the privacy of encryption.

We propose BlindBox, the first system that simultaneously provides both of these properties. The approach of BlindBox is to perform the deep-packet inspection directly on the encrypted traffic. BlindBox realizes this approach through a new protocol and new encryption schemes. We demonstrate that BlindBox enables applications such as IDS, exfiltration detection and parental filtering, and supports real rulesets from both open-source and industrial DPI systems. We implemented BlindBox and showed that it is practical for settings with long-lived HTTPS connections. Moreover, its core encryption scheme is 3-6 orders of magnitude faster than existing relevant cryptographic schemes.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - 12:15pm to 1:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

NetSeminar

Topic: 
Precise localization and high throughput backscatter using WiFi signals
Abstract / Description: 

Indoor localization holds great promise to enable applications like location-based advertising, indoor navigation, inventory monitoring and management. SpotFi is an accurate indoor localization system that can be deployed on commodity WiFi infrastructure. SpotFi only uses information that is already exposed by WiFi chips and does not require any hardware or firmware changes, yet achieves the same accuracy as state-of-the-art localization systems.

We then talk about BackFi, a novel communication system that enables high throughput, long range communication between very low power backscatter IoT sensors and WiFi APs using ambient WiFi transmissions as the excitation signal. We show via prototypes and experiments that it is possible to achieve communication rates of up to 5 Mbps at a range of 1 m and 1 Mbps at a range of 5 meters. Such performance is an order to three orders of magnitude better than the best known prior WiFi backscatter system.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 12:15pm to 1:30pm
Venue: 
Gates 104

NetSeminar

Topic: 
BlindBox: Deep Packet Inspection over Encrypted Traffic
Abstract / Description: 

SIGCOMM 2015, Joint work with: Justine Sherry, Chang Lan, and Sylvia Ratnasamy

Many network middleboxes perform deep packet inspection (DPI), a set of useful tasks which examine packet payloads. These tasks include intrusion detection (IDS), exfiltration detection, and parental filtering. However, a long-standing issue is that once packets are sent over HTTPS, middleboxes can no longer accomplish their tasks because the payloads are encrypted. Hence, one is faced with the choice of only one of two desirable properties: the functionality of middleboxes and the privacy of encryption.

We propose BlindBox, the first system that simultaneously provides both of these properties. The approach of BlindBox is to perform the deep-packet inspection directly on the encrypted traffic. BlindBox realizes this approach through a new protocol and new encryption schemes. We demonstrate that BlindBox enables applications such as IDS, exfiltration detection and parental filtering, and supports real rulesets from both open-source and industrial DPI systems. We implemented BlindBox and showed that it is practical for settings with long-lived HTTPS connections. Moreover, its core encryption scheme is 3-6 orders of magnitude faster than existing relevant cryptographic schemes.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 7, 2015 - 12:15pm to 1:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

Pages

Statistics and Probability Seminars

Stats Dept. presents "Complex trait genetics through the lens of regulatory networks"

Topic: 
Complex trait genetics through the lens of regulatory networks
Abstract / Description: 

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have cataloged many significant associations between genetic variants and complex traits. However, most of these findings have unclear biological significance, because they often have small effects and occur in non-coding regions. Integration of GWAS with gene regulatory networks addresses both issues by aggregating weak genetic signals within regulatory programs. Here we develop a Bayesian framework that integrates GWAS summary statistics with regulatory networks to infer enrichments and associations simultaneously. Our method improves upon existing approaches by explicitly modeling network topology to assess enrichments, and by automatically leveraging enrichments to identify associations. Applying this method to 18 human traits and 38 regulatory networks shows that genetic signals of complex traits are often enriched in networks specific to trait-relevant tissue or cell types. Prioritizing variants within enriched networks identifies known and new trait-associated genes revealing novel biological and therapeutic insights.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, April 28, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom

Stats Dept. presents "Implicit and explicit regularization in deep learning"

Topic: 
Implicit and explicit regularization in deep learning
Abstract / Description: 

The optimizers have an implicit regularization effect in training deep neural networks, which, if understood, can explain the somewhat surprising generalization performance of over-parameterized models. I will first discuss a few recent works on understanding the implicit regularization of various aspects of the stochastic gradient descent, such as small initialization, large initial learning rate, and dropout. Second, towards replacing the implicit regularization, or improving the generalization further, we design stronger explicit regularizers for deep models.

This is based on joint works with Preetum Nakkiran, Prayaag Venkat, Colin Wei, Yuanzhi Li, Sham Kakade, and Hongyang Zhang.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2020 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Zoom

Statistics Department Seminar presents "The blessings of multiple causes"

Topic: 
The blessings of multiple causes
Abstract / Description: 

Causal inference from observational data is a vital problem, but it comes with strong assumptions. Most methods assume that we observe all confounders, variables that affect both the causal variables and the outcome variables. But whether we have observed all confounders is a famously untestable assumption. We describe the deconfounder, a way to do causal inference from observational data allowing for unobserved confounding. How does the deconfounder work? The deconfounder is designed for problems of multiple causal inferences: scientific studies that involve many causes whose effects are simultaneously of interest. The deconfounder uses the correlation among causes as evidence for unobserved confounders, combining unsupervised machine learning and predictive model checking to perform causal inference. We study the theoretical requirements for the deconfounder to provide unbiased causal estimates, along with its limitations and tradeoffs. We demonstrate the deconfounder on real-world data and simulation studies.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 13, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Sloan Mathematics Center, Room 380C

Statistics Department Seminar presents "Fréchet change point detection"

Topic: 
Fréchet change point detection
Abstract / Description: 

Change point detection is a popular tool for identifying locations in a data sequence where an abrupt change occurs in the data distribution and has been widely studied for Euclidean data. Modern data very often is non-Euclidean, for example, distribution valued data or network data. Change point detection is a challenging problem when the underlying data space is a metric space where one does not have basic algebraic operations like addition of the data points and scalar multiplication. 

 
In this talk, I propose a method to infer the presence and location of change points in the distribution of a sequence of independent data taking values in a general metric space. Change points are viewed as locations at which the distribution of the data sequence changes abruptly in terms of either its Fr´echet mean or Fréchet variance or both. The proposed method is based on comparisons of Fréchet variances before and after putative change point locations. First, I will establish that under the null hypothesis of no change point the limit distribution of the proposed scan function is the square of a standardized Brownian Bridge. It is well known that such convergence is rather slow in moderate to high dimensions. For more accurate results in finite sample applications, I will provide a theoretically justified bootstrap-based scheme for testing the presence of change points. Next, I will show that when a change point exists, (1) the proposed test is consistent under contiguous alternatives and (2) the estimated location of the change point is consistent. All of the above results hold for a broad class of metric spaces under mild entropy conditions. Examples include the space of univariate probability distributions and the space of graph Laplacians for networks. I will illustrate the efficacy of the proposed approach in empirical studies and in real-data applications with sequences of maternal fertility distributions. Finally, I will talk about some future extensions and other related research directions, for instance, when one has samples of dynamic metric space data. 
 
This talk is based on joint work with Professor Hans-Georg Müller.
Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 4, 2020 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Sloan Mathematics Center, Room 380C

Statistics Department Seminar welcomes Sourav Chatterjee

Topic: 
Feature Ordering by Conditional Independence
Abstract / Description: 

I will talk about a coefficient of conditional dependence between two random variables Y and Z given a set of other variables X1, . . . , Xp, based on an i.i.d. sample. The coefficient has a long list of desirable properties, the most important of which is that under absolutely no distributional assumptions, it converges to a limit in [0, 1], where the limit is 0 if and only if Y and Z are conditionally independent given X1, . . . , Xp, and is 1 if and only if Y is equal to a measurable function of Z given X1, . . . , Xp. I will then present a new variable selection algorithm based on this statistic, called Feature Ordering by Conditional Independence (FOCI), which is model-free, has no tuning parameters, and is provably consistent under sparsity assumptions.

This is based on joint work with Mona Azadkia


The Statistics Seminars for Winter Quarter will be held in Room 380C of Sloan Mathematics Center in the Main Quad at 4:30pm on Tuesdays. Refreshments are served at 4pm in the Lounge on the first floor of Sequoia Hall.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 25, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Sloan Mathematics Center, Room 380C

Statistics Department Seminar presents "Causal learning: Excursions in double robustness"

Topic: 
Causal learning: Excursions in double robustness
Abstract / Description: 

Recent progress in machine learning provides many potentially effective tools to learn estimates or make predictions from datasets of ever-increasing sizes. Can we trust such tools in clinical and highly-sensitive systems? If a learning algorithm predicts an effect of a new policy to be positive, what guarantees do we have concerning the accuracy of this prediction? The talk introduces new statistical ideas to ensure that the learned estimates satisfy some fundamental properties: especially causality and robustness. The talk will discuss potential connections and departures between causality and robustness.


The Statistics Seminars for Winter Quarter will be held in Room 380C of Sloan Mathematics Center in the Main Quad at 4:30pm on Tuesdays. Refreshments are served at 4pm in the Lounge on the first floor of Sequoia Hall.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 18, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Sloan Mathematics Center, Room 380C

Probability Seminar presents "Fractal geometry in models of random growth"

Topic: 
Fractal geometry in models of random growth
Abstract / Description: 

In last-passage percolation models lying in the Kardar–Parisi–Zhang (KPZ) universality class, geodesics are oriented paths moving through random noise accruing maximum weight. Varying the endpoints of such geodesics gives rise to a random energy field which under proper scaling and centering has been conjectured to converge to a random function termed as the Space-Time Airy sheet. The latter object has been constructed recently as a limit for one particular integrable model in the KPZ universality class. Reporting recent progress in our understanding of this rich universal object, we will discuss results about the coupling structure of the geodesic energy as the endpoints are varied, exhibiting random fractal geometry, via an understanding of coalescence of geodesics, and Brownian regularity properties of the energy profiles. - Probability Seminar

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 2, 2020 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Sequoia Hall Room 200

Probability Seminar presents "On the edge-statistics conjecture"

Topic: 
On the edge-statistics conjecture
Abstract / Description: 

Suppose we are given integers k ≥ 1 and 0 < ` < k 2  . When sampling a k-vertex subset uniformly at random from a (very large) n-vertex graph G, how large can the probability be that there are exactly ` edges within the sampled k-vertex subset? Let ind(k, `) be the limit of this maximum possible probability as n goes to infinity. Alon, Hefetz, Krivelevich and Tyomkyn conjectured that ind(k, `) ≤ e −1 + o(1) for all k ≥ 1 and 0 < ` < k 2  . The constant e −1 in this conjecture is best-possible, since for ` = 1 and ` = k −1 one can easily show that ind(k, `) ≥ e −1 − o(1). Kwan, Sudakov and Tran proved the conjecture in the case Ω(k) ≤ ` ≤ k 2  − Ω(k). In joint work with Jacob Fox, we solved the remaining cases of the conjecture. This talk will discuss our results, as well as our proof for the case ` = 1 (which is one of the cases in which the conjecture is tigh


 

- Probability Seminar

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 24, 2020 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Sequoia Hall Room 200

Pages

SystemX

SystemX presents "Quantum computers from Superconducting qubits"

Topic: 
Quantum computers from superconducting qubits
Abstract / Description: 

Quantum computers powered by hundreds of gate based, superconducting qubits are just over the horizon. Several groups have already announced activities on quantum processors (QP) of 50 qubits or more. The systems containing these processors will be of fundamental importance in quantum algorithm development, on our path toward quantum advantage in the noisy intermediate scale quantum (NISQ) era. Quantum advantage is the point at which quantum computers can solve a problem faster, cheaper, or more accurately than their classical counterparts, which is likely to be accomplished before fully fault tolerant machines are available. This talk will address the trade-offs in the design of hybrid quantum-classical computing systems based on gate based superconducting processors approaching 100 qubits.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 9, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom

SystemX presents "ESD challenges with Semiconductor Integration Increasing in Electronic Systems"

Topic: 
ESD challenges with Semiconductor Integration Increasing in Electronic Systems
Abstract / Description: 

Electrostatic discharge (ESD) is physical phenomenon, inescapable in all environments, and particularly harmful to semiconductor devices. As technology features have scaled over the last decades, from micron to nanometer features, designers have to face the reality that ESD risks don't scale, and increased focus is required to minimize the impact of ESD protection on performance and area. This seminar will give a basic introduction to the different ESD threats, from factory to end-use environment. We will explore the design considerations at both IC and system level, on commercial, automotive, IoT and sensor applications. With knowledge about the ESD risks, and the system requirements, co-design is recognized as the pathway to an optimal solution.


 

This talk is via Zoom only. This is the web address for the audio/video for this class: https://stanford.zoom.us/j/170045505. For the audio, you can use your computer or Telephone: (833) 302-1536 / Webinar ID: 170 045 505

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 12, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
[remote only]

SystemX presents "Semiconductor Startups 2020: Back to the Future"

Topic: 
Semiconductor Startups 2020: Back to the Future
Abstract / Description: 

The climate for semiconductor startups has changed dramatically over the course of the past few years. Technical innovation in the areas of AI/ML, 5G and computing on the edge continue to garner the interest of the investment community, but the sources of capital have changed dramatically since the "gold rush" days of the past, as the venture community has focused on building unicorns, which for the most part is not a characteristic of the semiconductor industry.

What's in store for 2020 and the coming decade? Where is the innovation going to come from? Can government-funded initiatives deliver results in a timely manner? How does the continuing geo-political turmoil impact the near-term and long-term results? What is the impact of corporate venture funding? How can early-stage semiconductor startups break through to achieve business success?

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 5, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Sloan Bldg. Rm. 380X

SystemX presents "Making Impossible Products"

Topic: 
Making Impossible Products
Abstract / Description: 

Caitlin Kalinowski has had the privilege to be on several teams shipping products in new categories or for the first time, from the original unibody MacBook Pros at Apple to the first immersive standalone VR headset, the Oculus Quest.

Caitlin will share how she and her teams have found success attacking new problems in new spaces, including ways to lead others, solve the hardest engineering challenges and achieve things others thought were impossible.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 20, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Sloan Bldg. Rm. 380X

SystemX BONUS LECTURE: Enabling embedded deep neural networks: Co-optimization across processor architectures, schedulers and model cost-functions

Topic: 
Enabling embedded deep neural networks: Co-optimization across processor architectures, schedulers and model cost-functions
Abstract / Description: 

Deep neural network inference comes with significant computational complexity, making their execution until recently only feasible on power-hungry server or GPU platforms. The lab of Prof. Verhelst is pushing the state of the art on embedded neural network processing for edge and mobile devices, through optimized algorithm-processor co-design. The talk will discuss how to exploit and jointly optimize NPU/TPU processor architectures, dataflow schedulers, quantized neural network models, and model training cost for maximum energy efficiency. The talk will quantify the gains of such co-optimization, and illustrate them within a practical examples.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 18, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

SystemX presents "Principles of Molecular Data Storage"

Topic: 
Principles of Molecular Data Storage
Abstract / Description: 

Molecular data systems have the potential to store information at dramatically higher density than existing electronic media. Many valuable experimental demonstrations of this idea have used DNA, but nature also uses smaller non-polymeric molecules to preserve, process, and transmit information. In this talk I will review some of the foundational principles of chemical data representations, discuss their implications for molecular memory, and present some of our recent research in this area. The theoretical limit for molecular information is two orders of magnitude denser by mass than DNA, and we have been building a suite of new theoretical and experimental tools to consider information storage using mixtures of small organic molecules. Our experimental approach combines software-directed chemical synthesis with mass spectrometry and supervised learning to write and read molecular datasets. We have encoded numerous digital files into mixtures of natural metabolites as well as synthetic small molecule libraries.

Writing abstract information in chemical form also allows us to consider new possibilities for chemical-domain computations. Living systems make simultaneous use of electrical, chemical, and mechanical domains for information processing, sensing, actuation, energy, and memory. We hope that by treating chemical systems as abstract and mutable stores of information, we can uncover new ways to interact with the natural world.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 13, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Sloan Bldg. Rm. 380X

SystemX presents "Building the Next Generation of Ubiquitous Computing Platform"

Topic: 
Building the Next Generation of Ubiquitous Computing Platform
Abstract / Description: 

Dr. Sasikanth Manipatruni is the Chief Technology Officer at Kepler Computing. Prior to this he is the founding research director of Intel-FEINMAN center (Functional Electronics Integration and Manufacturing), to build the next room temperature transistor with quantum materials. He received PhD from Cornell working with Prof. Michal Lipson in silicon photonics where he demonstrated ultra-fast silicon electro-optic switches, opto-mechanical non-reciprocity and synchronization of opto- mechanical systems. At Intel, he developed materials & devices for beyond CMOS memory/logic and built 1st industrially adopted spintronic/quantum SPICE tool. He was awarded the US-National Academy of Engineering recognition for young engineers 2019, IEEE/ACM under 40 innovator award at DAC'17, Mahboob Khan outstanding liaison award '16, CSPIN outstanding industry liaison award '16, and serves on several industry panels for US-wide research selections. His work is cited ~4000 times & holds ~ 200 granted/applied patents in spin/photonics/MEMS/CAD/AI/QC. He coaches school students for USA-PHO physics Olympiads.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 6, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Sloan Bldg. Rm. 380X

SystemX presents "Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Buildings"

Topic: 
Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Buildings
Abstract / Description: 

Buildings account for the largest share of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions at 32% of the total, followed by industry at 30%, transportation at 29%, and agriculture at 9%. Clearly, any program to greatly reduce greenhouse gas emissions must include buildings. This talk will explore the opportunities and challenges to greatly reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the building sector, using as a case study a recent solar retrofit of an existing house that rendered it "zero-carbon." Implications for the future of the utility system will be discussed, along with technology developments needed to make "zero carbon" the economic choice.

 

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 30, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Sloan Bldg. Rm. 380X

SystemX presents "Automotive Radar Systems for Autonomous Driving"

Topic: 
Automotive Radar Systems for Autonomous Driving
Abstract / Description: 

The ongoing automation of driving functions in cars results in the evolution of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) into ones capable of highly automated driving, which will in turn progress into fully autonomous, self-driving cars. To work properly, these functions first must be able to perceive the car's surroundings by such means as radar, lidar, camera, and ultrasound sensors. As the complexity of such systems increases along with the level of automation, the demands on environment sensors, including radar, grow as well. Particularly, resolution as well as dynamic range in all four radar dimensions are to be improved. For radar performance to meet the requirements of self-driving cars, straightforward scaling of the radar parameters (e.g. bandwidth, sampling rate, aperture) is not sufficient. Rather, fundamentally different approaches are required, including the use of more sophisticated signal processing algorithms as well as alternative radar waveforms and modulation schemes. In addition, since radar is an active sensor, interference becomes a crucial issue as the number of deployed automotive radar sensors increases.

The talk gives an overview of the challenges that arise for automotive radar from its development as a sensor for ADAS to a core component of self-driving cars. It summarizes the relevant research and discusses topics related to high-performance automotive radar systems, such as novel waveforms and signal processing algorithms, multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar, synthetic aperture radar, and cognitive interference avoidance.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 29, 2020 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

SystemX presents "An introduction & discussion of quantum computing, its applications and opportunities"

Topic: 
An introduction & discussion of quantum computing, its applications and opportunities
Abstract / Description: 

Though early in its development, real quantum computers are now available on the cloud, from IBM and others. This radically new kind of computing offers the possibility of solving some of the world's hardest problems, ones that have always been intractable for "classical" computers. This talk is an introduction to quantum computing, the types of problems it can best solve, its life- and world-changing applications (machine learning, chemistry), and the many opportunities this new business offers for students of computer science, software engineers, and entrepreneurs. And please feel free to ask a lot of questions!

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 23, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

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