Seminar / Colloquium

Canary Cancer Research Education Summer Training (CREST) Program presents "Nanomaterials and Nanosystems for Biomedical Applications"

Topic: 
Nanomaterials and Nanosystems for Biomedical Applications
Abstract / Description: 

Nanotechnology allows for the unique design and functionalization of materials and devices at the nanometer scale for a variety of applications. Our laboratory has synthesized organic and inorganic nanoparticles and nanocomposites for advanced drug delivery, antimicrobial, antifouling, stem cell culture, tissue engineering, and biosensing applications.

We have also fabricated nanofluidic systems for drug screening, in vitro toxicology, clinical sample preparation, and diagnostic applications. The nanosystems allow for the rapid and automated processing of drug candidates and clinical samples in tiny volumes, greatly facilitating drug testing, genotyping assays, infectious disease detection, point-of-care monitoring, as well as cancer diagnosis and prognosis.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, August 6, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
1651 Page Mill Road, Room 0500

ISL & IT Forum present "Feedback capacity of channels with memory via Reinforcement Learning and Graph-based auxiliary random variable""

Topic: 
Feedback capacity of channels with memory via Reinforcement Learning and Graph-based auxiliary random variable
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk we present two novel ideas: the first is novel method to compute the feedback capacity of channels with memory using reinforcement learning (RL). The second is a new technique of using Graph-based auxiliary random variable to convert a multi-letter expression of feedback capacity formula into a single letter expression.

In RL, one seeks to maximize cumulative rewards collected in a sequential decision-making environment. This is done by collecting samples of the underlying environment and using them to learn the optimal decision rule. The main advantage of this approach is its computational efficiency, even in high dimensional problems. Hence, RL can be used to estimate numerically the feedback capacity of unifilar finite state channels (FSCs) with large alphabet size. The outcome of the RL algorithm sheds light on the properties of the optimal decision rule, which in our case, is the optimal input distribution of the channel.

The insights gained from the RL computation can be converted into analytic, single-letter capacity expressions by solving corresponding lower and upper bounds. The bounds are based on another novel idea of using Graph-based auxiliary random variable

We demonstrate the efficiency of this method by analytically solving the feedback capacity of the well-known Ising channel with a large alphabet. We also provide a simple coding scheme that achieves the feedback capacity.

 

Date and Time: 
Friday, August 2, 2019 - 3:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

Seminar: Microwave Imaging Systems (MIS), opportunities and challenges

Topic: 
Microwave Imaging Systems (MIS), opportunities and challenges
Abstract / Description: 

Microwave Imaging Systems (MIS) have witnessed huge progress during the last few years; thanks to the advances in the semiconductor miniaturization, for both analogue as well as digital circuits. Notwithstanding the ever-increasing demands for imaging solutions serving in the industrial, security, and medical domains. Many efforts are accomplished to move microwave imaging methods from their conventional lab environment to the real applications space. Many more methods are still yet struggling to see the light away from the lab bench and the computer simulators. Collaboration between academia and industry is essential to advance microwave imaging in the benefit of the general public. Monitoring this over the years, it is obvious that educational and research gaps are hindering the progress of this challenging technology. This talk aims to be a first step to raise awareness on the topic and to envision a dedicated research focused initiative in academia.
Microwave imaging has proved to be of a great benefit to many applications and one can surely say that: we just scratched the surface!

Date and Time: 
Monday, August 12, 2019 - 11:00am
Venue: 
Allen 101

ISL & IT Forum present "Resource-efficient quantized deep learning"

Topic: 
Resource-efficient quantized deep learning
Abstract / Description: 

Reducing the numerical precision of neural networks is one of the simplest, most effective and most common methods to improve resource efficiency (e.g. by reducing the memory and power requirements). Much research has been invested in finding how to quantize neural nets without significantly degrading performance. I will describe the main bottlenecks and solutions in various settings:
1) 1bit inference (1bit weights and activations), NIPS 2016 - link
2) 8bit training (8bit weights, activations, gradients, and batch-norm), NeurIPS 2018 - link
3) 4bit inference when quantization is done only post-training, Arxiv 2019 - link
4) Calculating the maximum trainable depth as a function of the numerical precision, Arxiv 2019 - link

Date and Time: 
Friday, July 26, 2019 - 2:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

Statistics Department Seminar presents "The relevance problem: 50 years on"

Topic: 
"The relevance problem: 50 years on"
Abstract / Description: 

Given a large cohort of "similar" cases Z1, . . . , ZN one can construct an efficient statistical inference procedure by 'learning from the experience of others' (also known as "borrowing strength" from the ensemble). But what if, instead, we observe a massive database where each case is accompanied with extra contextual information (usually in the form of covariates), making the Zi's non-exchangeable? It's not obvious how we go about gathering strength when each piece of information is fuzzy and heterogeneous. Moreover, if we include irrelevant cases, borrowing information can heavily damage the quality of the inference! This raises some fundamental questions: when (not) to borrow? whom (not) to borrow? how (not) to borrow? These questions are at the heart of the "Problem of Relevance" in statistical inference – a puzzle that remained too little addressed since its inception nearly half a century ago (Efron and Morris, 1971,1972; Efron 2019). The purpose of this talk is to present an attempt to develop basic principles and practical guidelines in order to tackle some of the unsettled issues that surround the relevance problem. Through examples, we will demonstrate how our new statistical perspective answers previously unanswerable questions in a realistic and feasible way.


This is a joint work with my previous student Kaijun Wang, who is currently a postdoctoral research fellow at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, July 25, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Sequoia Hall Room 200

ISL & IT Forum present "Towards Achieving Secure Consensus and Trusted Data Exchange for Multi-Robot Teams""

Topic: 
Towards Achieving Secure Consensus and Trusted Data Exchange for Multi-Robot Teams
Abstract / Description: 

As physical robot networks become more pervasive all around us, in the form of teams of autonomous vehicles, fleets of delivery drones, and smart and mobile IoT, it becomes increasingly critical to question the robustness of their coordination algorithms to security threats and/or corrupted data. Indeed, it has been shown that many multi-robot tasks easily fail in the presence of erroneous or hacked data. We investigate the vulnerabilities of important multi-robot algorithms such as consensus, coverage, and distributed mapping to malicious or erroneous data and we demonstrate the potential of communication to thwart certain attacks, such as the Sybil Attack, on these algorithms. Our key insight is that coordinated mobility can be combined with signal processing of communication signals to allow agents to learn important information about the environment and the nature of other agents in the network (for example the presence of cooperative versus adversarial agents). Along these lines, we will present a theoretical and experimental framework for provably securing multi-robot distributed algorithms through careful use of communication. We will present both theoretical results and experimental results on actual hardware implementations for bounding the influence of a Sybil Attack on consensus and on coverage by using observations over the wireless channels. In some cases, we show that the effect of a Sybil Attack can be nearly eliminated with high probability by deriving the appropriate switching function using a sufficient number of observations over the wireless network. Finally, we will briefly describe promising results on new methods for outlier rejection and active rendezvous in a pose graph optimization framework that exploits feedback gathered from communication channels to arrive at improved accuracy.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 2:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) 2019 Seminar

Topic: 
“How to Make a Good Poster” Workshop
Abstract / Description: 

The REU Seminar Series and Grad Student Panel Discussion are educational and developmental opportunities for REU Interns. Attendance is required for all REU interns. Social events such as Exploring downtown Palo Alto and REU Social are intended to give REU interns an opportunity to relax, mingle, and network with each other as well as mentors and faculty.

Attendance is highly recommended. The "How to Make a Good Poster" workshop offers participants a unique opportunity to develop important poster-making skills. It will be very helpful in preparation for Presentation Day. Attendance is required for all REU interns. The REU program culminates in Presentation Day, when interns will share and enjoy their accomplishments over the ten-week program.

 

Questions: reu2019@ee.stanford.edu

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, August 20, 2019 - 10:00am
Venue: 
Allen 101X

Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) 2019 Seminar

Topic: 
REU 2019 Seminar welcomes Christopher Marki, Ph.D.
Abstract / Description: 

The REU Seminar Series and Grad Student Panel Discussion are educational and developmental opportunities for REU Interns. Attendance is required for all REU interns. Social events such as Exploring downtown Palo Alto and REU Social are intended to give REU interns an opportunity to relax, mingle, and network with each other as well as mentors and faculty.

Attendance is highly recommended. The "How to Make a Good Poster" workshop offers participants a unique opportunity to develop important poster-making skills. It will be very helpful in preparation for Presentation Day. Attendance is required for all REU interns. The REU program culminates in Presentation Day, when interns will share and enjoy their accomplishments over the ten-week program.

 

Questions: reu2019@ee.stanford.edu

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, August 13, 2019 - 10:00am
Venue: 
Allen 101X

Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) 2019 Seminar

Topic: 
REU 2019 Seminar welcomes Professor Juan Rivas
Abstract / Description: 

The REU Seminar Series and Grad Student Panel Discussion are educational and developmental opportunities for REU Interns. Attendance is required for all REU interns. Social events such as Exploring downtown Palo Alto and REU Social are intended to give REU interns an opportunity to relax, mingle, and network with each other as well as mentors and faculty.

Attendance is highly recommended. The "How to Make a Good Poster" workshop offers participants a unique opportunity to develop important poster-making skills. It will be very helpful in preparation for Presentation Day. Attendance is required for all REU interns. The REU program culminates in Presentation Day, when interns will share and enjoy their accomplishments over the ten-week program.

 

Questions: reu2019@ee.stanford.edu

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, August 6, 2019 - 10:00am
Venue: 
Allen 101X

Research Experience for Undergraduates Lunch Social

Topic: 
REU Social (Lunch will be provided)
Abstract / Description: 

The REU Seminar Series and Grad Student Panel Discussion are educational and developmental opportunities for REU Interns. Attendance is required for all REU interns. Social events such as Exploring downtown Palo Alto and REU Social are intended to give REU interns an opportunity to relax, mingle, and network with each other as well as mentors and faculty.

Attendance is highly recommended. The "How to Make a Good Poster" workshop offers participants a unique opportunity to develop important poster-making skills. It will be very helpful in preparation for Presentation Day. Attendance is required for all REU interns. The REU program culminates in Presentation Day, when interns will share and enjoy their accomplishments over the ten-week program.

 

Questions: reu2019@ee.stanford.edu

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 30, 2019 - 11:30am
Venue: 
Allen 101X

Pages

Applied Physics / Physics Colloquium

Physical Sciences Approaches to Analyze Tumor-Associated ECM Dynamics

Topic: 
Physical Sciences Approaches to Analyze Tumor-Associated ECM Dynamics
Abstract / Description: 

Stanford Center for Cancer Systems Biology (CCSB) presents:

Claudia Fischbach-Teschl, PhD
Professor, Nancy E. and Peter C. Meinig School of Biomedical Engineering
Director, Cornell Center on the Physics of Cancer Metabolism Cornell University

"Physical Sciences Approaches to Analyze Tumor-Associated ECM Dynamics"

ABSTRACT:
Microenvironmental conditions contribute to the pathogenesis of cancer and include altered cellular composition, extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, and mechanical cues. However, our understanding of the specific mechanisms by which these microenvironmental perturbations impact the development, progression, and therapy response of cancer is relatively limited. More intricate models are needed to better understand the complex biochemical and biophysical interactions that drive tumor initiation, growth, metastasis, metabolic adaptation, and immune evasion. The fields of biomaterials and tissue engineering provide increasingly sophisticated tools and strategies to recapitulate and monitor relevant properties of tumor-microenvironment interactions.


These approaches not only bear tremendous potential to advance our current understanding of cancer, but are also increasingly explored for more clinically relevant drug testing. Indeed, combining patient-specific cells with engineered culture systems promises to enhance the predictive power of precision medicine pipelines. This talk will highlight specific examples of how the microenvironment regulates the highly dynamic nature of cancer and will outline opportunities and challenges of the field of tumor engineering.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 23, 2019 - 2:30pm
Venue: 
Clark Center - S360

KIPAC welcomes Professor Jo Dunkley

Topic: 
Our Universe
Abstract / Description: 

Most of us have heard of black holes and supernovas, galaxies and the Big Bang. But few of us understand more than the bare facts about the universe we call home. What is really out there? How did it all begin? Where are we going? Jo Dunkley begins in Earth's neighborhood, explaining the nature of the Solar System, the stars in our night sky, and the Milky Way. She then moves out past nearby galaxies and back in time to the horizon of the observable universe, which contains over a hundred billion galaxies, each with billions of stars, many orbited by planets, some of which may host life. Dunkley traces the evolution of the universe from the Big Bang fourteen billion years ago, past the birth of the Sun and our planets, to today and beyond.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 9, 2019 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Hewlett Building

#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces

Topic: 
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces
Abstract / Description: 

Individuals of all genders invited to be a part of:
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces, where we will feature real stories of harassment at Stanford academic STEM in a conversation with Provost Drell, Dean Minor (SoM), and Dean Graham (SE3). We will have plenty of time for audience discussion on how we can take concrete action to dismantle this culture and actively work towards a more inclusive Stanford for everyone. While our emphasis is on STEM fields, we welcome and encourage participation from students, postdocs, staff, and faculty of all academic disciplines and backgrounds.

Date and Time: 
Friday, April 19, 2019 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
STLC 111

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Testing DAMA's long-standing claim for dark matter detection"

Topic: 
Testing DAMA's long-standing claim for dark matter detection
Abstract / Description: 

Astrophysical observations give overwhelming evidence for the existence of dark matter. Several theoretical particles have been proposed as dark matter candidates, including weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), axions, and more recently, their much lighter counterparts. However there has not yet been a definitive detection of dark matter. One group, the DAMA collaboration, has asserted for years that they observe a dark matter-induced annual modulation signal in their NaI(Tl)-based detectors. Their observations seem to be inconsistent with those from other direct detection dark matter experiments under most assumptions of dark matter. In this talk I will describe the current status of the debate and the world-wide experimental effort to test this extraordinary claim. I will report the recent results from the COSINE-100 experiment and our progress toward resolving the current stalemate in the field.

 

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, June 4, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents The Dawn of Superconducting Quantum Processors"

Topic: 
The Dawn of Superconducting Quantum Processors
Abstract / Description: 

Quantum coherence can now be observed for longer than 100 microseconds in superconducting chips containing tens of physical qubits comprised of Josephson tunnel junctions embedded in resonant microwave circuitry. Combining such long-lived coherence with quantum-noise-limited, broadband detection of weak microwave signals has enabled the realization of nascent quantum processors suitable for executing shallow-circuit quantum algorithms with modest gate counts and minimal error mitigation. As an example, I will describe the implementation of a hybrid quantum-classical variational eigensolver with superconducting transmon qubits to determine the ground and excited states of simple molecules with near-chemical accuracy, and a teleportation protocol using ternary logic to simulate scrambling processes in black holes.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 28, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Strongly Interacting Synthetic Topological Insulators in High Dimensions"

Topic: 
Strongly Interacting Synthetic Topological Insulators in High Dimensions
Abstract / Description: 

Although our physical world is 3+1 dimensional, curiosity has always driven scientists to study higher dimensional physics. The classic examples of such studies include the 4+1 dimensional generalization of quantum Hall state, and the "periodic table" of topological insulators in all dimensions. These studies are of pure theoretical interests only until last year, when a 4+1 dimensional topological insulator was realized in cold atom systems using the "synthetic techniques". The same technique allows us to explore even higher dimensional states of matter experimentally. In this talk we will discuss the interaction effects in these "synthetic topological insulators" in high dimensions. We realize that the generic interaction in this system takes a special form which is very different from ordinary condensed matter systems, and it has strong implications on the classification and phenomena of these synthetic topological insulators.

 

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 21, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Physicists and Evolution: Puzzles and Expectations"

Topic: 
Physicists and Evolution: Puzzles and Expectations
Abstract / Description: 

To most physicists, almost everything about evolution is puzzling. What determines how much complexity can — and has — evolved? Why is there so much biological diversity on all scales of differences? How could evolution select for future "evolvability"? Why doesn't evolution get slower and slower? One of the roles of theory is to frame questions — or at least limited versions of them — more precisely. And another is to reduce — or redirect — puzzlement by developing and analyzing simple caricature models to see what should be expected rather than be surprising. This talk will outline some recent progress in these directions, particularly by statistical physics ways of thinking.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 14, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "From Nonlinear Optics to High-Intensity Laser Physics"

Topic: 
From Nonlinear Optics to High-Intensity Laser Physics
Abstract / Description: 

The laser increased the intensity of light that can be generated by orders of magnitude and thus brought about nonlinear optical interactions with matter. Chirped pulse amplification, also known as CPA, changed the intensity level by a few more orders of magnitude and helped usher in a new type of laser-matter interaction that is referred to as high-intensity laser physics. In this talk, I will discuss the differences between nonlinear optics and high-intensity laser physics. The development of CPA and why short, intense laser pulses can cut transparent material will also be included. I will also discuss future applications.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 7, 2019 - 11:20am
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents Imaging at the genomic-scale: from 3D organization of the genome to cell atlas of the brain

Topic: 
Imaging at the genomic-scale: from 3D organization of the genome to cell atlas of the brain
Abstract / Description: 

Inside a cell, thousands of different genes function collectively to give rise to cellular behavior. Understanding the emergent behaviors of cells requires imaging at the genomic scale, which promises to transform our understanding in many areas of biology, such as regulation of gene expression, development of cell fate, and organization of distinct cell types in complex tissues. We developed a genomic-scale imaging method, MERFISH, which allows simultaneous imaging of hundreds to thousands of genes in individual cells and facilitates the delineation of gene regulatory networks, the mapping of molecular distribution inside cells, and the mapping of distinct cell types in complex tissues. We have also extended this approach to image numerous genomic loci and trace the 3D structure of chromosomes in single cells. I will describe the technology development of MERFISH and its applications, focusing on generating the cell atlas of complex tissues and mapping the 3D organization of the genome. 

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, April 30, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents Matter made of Light: Mott Insulators and Topological Fields

Topic: 
Matter made of Light: Mott Insulators and Topological Fields
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk I will describe our ongoing effort at the University of Chicago to explore exotic models of condensed matter using materials made of light. Starting with a quick discussion of "light as matter," I will then explain how we imbue photons with the essential attributes of a material particle: mass, charge, and interactions. Along the way, I will introduce the two "flavors" of photons that we employ for our photonic matter: optical photons trapped in Fabry-Perot cavities, and microwave photons trapped in superconducting resonators or transmon qubits. Finally, I will describe the first two materials that have emerged from our interacting photons: a Mott insulator of microwave photons and a topological fluid of optical photons. More broadly, building materials from light impacts both (a) the kinds of matter that can be assembled, and (b) the assembly process itself, providing a new window on the physics of correlated quantum matter.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, April 23, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

Pages

CS300 Seminar

#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces

Topic: 
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces
Abstract / Description: 

Individuals of all genders invited to be a part of:
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces, where we will feature real stories of harassment at Stanford academic STEM in a conversation with Provost Drell, Dean Minor (SoM), and Dean Graham (SE3). We will have plenty of time for audience discussion on how we can take concrete action to dismantle this culture and actively work towards a more inclusive Stanford for everyone. While our emphasis is on STEM fields, we welcome and encourage participation from students, postdocs, staff, and faculty of all academic disciplines and backgrounds.

Date and Time: 
Friday, April 19, 2019 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
STLC 111

John G. Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology

Topic: 
Internet of Things and Internet of Energy for Connecting at Any Time and Any Place
Abstract / Description: 

In this presentation, I would like to discuss with you how to establish a sustainable and smart society through the internet of energy for connecting at any time and any place. I suspect that you have heard the phrase, "Internet of Energy" less often. The meaning of this phrase is simple. Because of a ubiquitous energy transmission system, you do not need to worry about a shortage of electric power. One of the most important items for establishing a sustainable society is [...]


"Inaugural Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology," EE News, July 2018

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, January 14, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Special Seminar: Formal Methods meets Machine Learning: Explorations in Cyber-Physical Systems Design

Topic: 
Formal Methods meets Machine Learning: Explorations in Cyber-Physical Systems Design
Abstract / Description: 

Cyber-physical systems (CPS) are computational systems tightly integrated with physical processes. Examples include modern automobiles, fly-by-wire aircraft, software-controlled medical devices, robots, and many more. In recent times, these systems have exploded in complexity due to the growing amount of software and networking integrated into physical environments via real-time control loops, as well as the growing use of machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) techniques. At the same time, these systems must be designed with strong verifiable guarantees.

In this talk, I will describe our research explorations at the intersection of machine learning and formal methods that address some of the challenges in CPS design. First, I will describe how machine learning techniques can be blended with formal methods to address challenges in specification, design, and verification of industrial CPS. In particular, I will discuss the use of formal inductive synthesis --- algorithmic synthesis from examples with formal guarantees — for CPS design. Next, I will discuss how formal methods can be used to improve the level of assurance in systems that rely heavily on machine learning, such as autonomous vehicles using deep learning for perception. Both theory and industrial case studies will be discussed, with a special focus on the automotive domain. I will conclude with a brief discussion of the major remaining challenges posed by the use of machine learning and AI in CPS.

Date and Time: 
Monday, December 4, 2017 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Gates 463A

SpaceX's journey on the road to mars

Topic: 
SpaceX's journey on the road to mars
Abstract / Description: 

SSI will be hosting Gwynne Shotwell — President and COO of SpaceX — to discuss SpaceX's journey on the road to mars. The event will be on Wednesday Oct 11th from 7pm - 8pm in Dinkelspiel Auditorium. After the talk, there will be a Q&A session hosted by Steve Jurvetson from DFJ Venture Capital.

Claim your tickets now on eventbright

 

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 11, 2017 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Dinkelspiel Auditorium

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, Subhasish Mitra

5:15-6:00, Silvio Savarese

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, December 7, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, Phil Levis

5:15-6:00, Ron Fedkiw

Date and Time: 
Monday, December 5, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, Dan Boneh

5:15-6:00, Aaron Sidford

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, John Mitchell

5:15-6:00, James Zou

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 28, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, Emma Brunskill

5:15-6:00, Doug James

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 16, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, James Landay

5:15-6:00, Dan Jurafsky

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 14, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

Pages

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents MIPS Open

Topic: 
MIPS Open
Abstract / Description: 

During this session, the speakers will provide an overview of Wave Computing's MIPS Open initiative, including details on the program components, how they can be used to design edge SoCs, licensing terms, the design certification process, etc. Mr. Bemanian will also give a demonstration of how to use various program components for real-world example implementations.

Wave Computing released the first MIPS Open program components at the end of March, providing free access to the MIPS RISC architecture without license fees or royalties. The new MIPS Open online environment is live and immediately accessible at www.mipsopen.com. Specific components in the first program release include:

  • MIPS Instruction Set Architecture: A downloadable copy of the latest version of the MIPS 32/64-bit ISA, SIMD, DSP, Multithreading and Virtualization
  • MIPS Open Toolsi: Integrated Development Environment for embedded real-time operating systems and Linux-based systems for embedded products
  • MIPS Open FPGAs: A complete training program including labs, SoC tutorials and sample (non-commercial) RTL code
  • MIPS Open Cores: low power, low footprint microAptiv Microprocessor(MPU) and Microcontroller (MCU) cores targeted for embedded applications

Historical Note The MIPS Architecture and processor was originally developed in the Computer Systems Laboratory at Stanford by a team headed by John Hennessey. MIPS and the UC Berkeley developed SPARC archicture were quintessential RISC architectures: influential, popular, and heavily studied.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 1, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces

Topic: 
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces
Abstract / Description: 

Individuals of all genders invited to be a part of:
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces, where we will feature real stories of harassment at Stanford academic STEM in a conversation with Provost Drell, Dean Minor (SoM), and Dean Graham (SE3). We will have plenty of time for audience discussion on how we can take concrete action to dismantle this culture and actively work towards a more inclusive Stanford for everyone. While our emphasis is on STEM fields, we welcome and encourage participation from students, postdocs, staff, and faculty of all academic disciplines and backgrounds.

Date and Time: 
Friday, April 19, 2019 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
STLC 111

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "A Superscalar Out-of-Order x86 Soft Processor for FPGA"

Topic: 
A Superscalar Out-of-Order x86 Soft Processor for FPGA
Abstract / Description: 

Although FPGAs continue to grow in capacity, FPGA-based soft processors have grown little because of the difficulty of achieving higher performance in exchange for area. Superscalar out-of-order processor microarchitectures have been used successfully for hard processors for many years, but have so far been avoided for FPGAs due to the area increase and the expectation that a loss in clock frequency would more than offset the instructions-per-cycle (IPC) gains.

This talk summarizes my attempt at designing an out-of-order x86 CPU for FPGA. With careful microarchitectural choices and circuit design, I show that it is possible to build a complex microarchitecture on an FPGA, getting about 2.7x performance per clock and 0.8x clock frequency of Altera's Nios II/f single-issue in-order processor. This talk will cover a high-level overview of the microarchitecture and some of the interesting LUT-based circuits used in the processor.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "SMILE: Synchronized, Multi-sensory Integrated Learning Environment"

Topic: 
SMILE: Synchronized, Multi-sensory Integrated Learning Environment
Abstract / Description: 

Wirelessly-enabled sensing technologies offer the hope of enabling economically and socially important applications including intelligent transportation systems and other so-called smart city initiatives, home automation, improvements in manufacturing, and tools for humanitarian assistance and disaster response. Importantly, the value may only be realizable through the integration of a number of dis-similar, separately-built, separately-owned, and separately-controlled sensing sub-systems. SMILE -- the Synchronized Multi-sensory Integrated Learning Environment -- is a CMU project that aims to create, deploy and validate a framework that addresses key challenges that arise in such a system-of-systems.

In this talk, we present early results of the SMILE project. We begin with an examination of some practical barriers in a typical smart city application. From this, we develop themes related to low-power operation, programmability, synchronization, federation, and the interplay between them. Within this context, we discuss four sub-projects: (1) a synchronization approach for low-power devices, (2) a family of visual sensing techniques that explore the domain of real-time learning onboard small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS), (3) a demonstration system that combines information from such sUAS with intelligent ground-based sensors, and (4) the sketch of a new language framework, called TickTalk, that seeks to ease the programmer's burden in creating software for such complex, heterogeneous, distributed, fault-prone systems.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "Fingerprinting the Climate System"

Topic: 
Fingerprinting the Climate System
Abstract / Description: 

Fingerprint research seeks to improve understanding of the nature and causes of climate change. The basic strategy is to search for model-predicted patterns of climate change ("fingerprints") in observed climate records. Such studies exploit the fact that different factors affecting climate have different characteristic signatures. These unique attributes are clearer in detailed patterns of climate change than in global-mean climate information. Fingerprinting is a powerful tool for separating human and natural climate-change signals. Results from fingerprint research provide scientific support for findings of a "discernible human influence" on global climate.

Twenty-four years ago, at the time of publication of the Second Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, most fingerprint studies relied on surface temperature. Critics of this work argued that a human-caused fingerprint should be identifiable in many different aspects of the climate system, and not in surface thermometer records alone. Climate scientists responded to this justifiable criticism by moving beyond early "temperature only" ingerprint studies, interrogating modeled and observed changes in rainfall, water vapor, river runoff, snowpack depth, atmospheric circulation, salinity, and many other climate variables. The message of this body of work is that human-caused fingerprints are ubiquitous in the climate system.

My lecture looks back at over two decades of efforts to identify human effects on global climate. It will also address some personal lessons learned since publication of the "discernible human influence finding".

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 22, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium: Jupyter Notebooks and Academic Publication

Topic: 
Jupyter Notebooks and Academic Publication
Abstract / Description: 

Jupyter Notebooks are a emerging way to express and present research results. Notebooks are a kind of IDE Framework for doing science, one which is better suited to presenting algorithms and data than the ad hoc frameworks currently used.

The creator of Jupyter Notebooks (Fernando) and the creator of the Pythons language (Guido) will help you understand why you should use Jupyter Notebooks for your next paper.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "Virtual and Mixed Reality for Security of Critical City-Scale Cyber-Physical Systems"

Topic: 
Virtual and Mixed Reality for Security of Critical City-Scale Cyber-Physical Systems
Abstract / Description: 

VVateR is a virtual three-dimensional world for visualizing Cyber-Physical Systems such as a city-wide water treatment and water distribution plant. A key novelty of VVateR is its ability to enable visualization of cyber- attacks, the resulting process anomalies, and whether or not the anomaly is detected. VVateR is currently operational in iTrust. It is connected to two plants, namely a water treatment plant named SWaT, and a water distribution plant named WADI. Both SWaT and WADI are fully operational plants. VVateR is accessed by wearing a virtual reality headset where the user/gamer can move about and interact with the plant in the virtual space. This opens up the plants for remote worldwide research collaboration and aids in capturing context from the plant that Mixed Reality promises to bring to industrial settings. VVateR helps visualise the interconnectedness of various infrastructures and the effects of cyber-physical attacks through complex and dangerous scenarios that can be safely tested in a virtual setting. Observing slow historical plant operation and path of attacks at varying timelapse rates makes the process of reconnaissance and incident-analysis arguably faster and more visually engaging than an analysis of the database logs. By acting as a Digital Twin when connected to a simulator, one can come up with numerous attack/defense scenarios and serious gamified challenges for training purposes. All these factors increase the preparedness of operators, policymakers, governments, and other relevant stakeholders in strengthening their cities and Critical Infrastructures through security by design. Other relevant projects being done at iTrust will also be discussed in this talk.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 8, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium welcomes Mendel Rosenblum

Topic: 
Nanosecond-level Clock Synchronization in a Data Center
Abstract / Description: 

Computers connected by networks have long used protocols like Network Time Protocol (NTP) to adjust the clocks of the computers to show the same time of day. With machines connected by a high performance network in a data center, NTP can keep the clocks within a few hundred microseconds of each other, a clock skew that is fine for humans but not useful for distributed system software that can communicate between machines in a few tens of microseconds. In this talk I will describe the challenge of tightly synchronizing clocks in a data center and present Huygens, a new algorithm developed with my colleague Balaji Prabhakar's research group that can synchronized data center clocks within few 10s of nanoseconds. Like NTP, Huygens requires no special hardware and simply exchanges messages between machines but uses a number of techniques that exploit the high-performance networks in data centers. The techniques include sending many more probe messages and then using sophisticated machine learning techniques and global knowledge to compute the clock adjustment operations to keep the clock synchronized.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, April 24, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents Deep Learning for Medical Diagnoses

Topic: 
Deep Learning for Medical Diagnoses
Abstract / Description: 

The use of algorithms in clinical care demands a very high performance level for accurate detection and classification of disease. Deep learning (DL) offers a powerful toolkit necessary to handle the complex variations present in medical data, which traditional statistical or machine learning approaches have historically been unable to capture. In this talk, I will describe the challenges and approaches for the development of high-performance DL algorithms and curation of datasets for problems in diagnostic radiology and cardiology. I will also discuss the use of these algorithms as diagnostic support tools for clinicians, and challenges for the potential translation of these algorithms from the lab setting to clinical practice.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, April 17, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

Pages

Ginzton Lab

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Effective medium approach towards topological photonics"

Topic: 
Pandora and Prometheus: Science, Scientists, and Society
Abstract / Description: 

As researchers in photonics we have both opportunities to positively impact people's lives and responsibilities to assist in ethical integration of these important new and disruptive technologies into modern society. While photonics provides solutions to critical global issues, such as key technology for measuring the environment and mitigating the impact of climate change, we are also developing new capabilities, which test society's legal and moral frameworks. Photonics enables the internet and social networking, high throughput sequencing of the human genome, pre-implantation testing of human embryos, measurement and control of neural networks in vivo—advances which present significant ethical challenges.

In addition, as scientists we are part of a global research community with the common goal of openly sharing our knowledge world-wide. Knowledge gives competitive and strategic advantages to those having access to it, leading to government pressure to limit free access to and unrestricted dissemination of scientific research. How do we reconcile our national responsibilities and loyalties with our responsibilities as members of the global scientific community to openly share our knowledge? These pressures become particularly acute when most of our research funding comes from federal/national sources.

Both students and faculty are welcome and encouraged to participate in an open discussion of these topics over lunch.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, June 6, 2019 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Ultrafast Multidimensional Coherent Spectroscopy of Color Centers in Diamond"

Topic: 
Ultrafast Multidimensional Coherent Spectroscopy of Color Centers in Diamond
Abstract / Description: 

Color centers in diamond are point defects within the diamond host lattice that absorb and emit light at optical frequencies. Besides contributing to the striking visual characteristics of "fancy colored diamond" gemstones, the centers—particularly the negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center and silicon-vacancy (SiV-) center—offer a number of possibilities for quantum computation and quantum information processing. In this talk, I will summarize recent work investigating the properties of negatively charged silicon-vacancy centers in diamond using the optical multidimensional coherent spectroscopy (MDCS). Finding suggest a strong influence of strain in determining the presence or absence of radiative coupling in the centers. By extension, the results reveal a new knob for tuning color-center-based photonic devices.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 30, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Recent Advances in Submarine Fiber Optical Systems"

Topic: 
Recent Advances in Submarine Fiber Optical Systems
Abstract / Description: 

Undersea fiber optical systems have shown tremendous advances over the past one or two decades. Capacities have increased by 20x while the cost per bit of submarine transmission has decreased by 250 times. These advances have been primarily a result of coherent transmission and I will highlight all of the main points regarding these advances. This has led to the recent deployment of 16-QAM transmission on a trans-Atlantic link! Future directions in submarine fiber optic transmission systems, such as SDM, will also be discussed.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 23, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Hot Topics in Optics and Photonics"

Topic: 
Hot Topics in Optics and Photonics
Abstract / Description: 

Optics and photonics is a diverse field, spanning dynamic commercial successes to slowly-moving niche markets to speculative research and fundamental science. But most people only work in small spaces of the field at a given time, whether they are working in industry or academia. It can be difficult to visualize the entire field and understand it. How do you forecast where the technology is going? What is the Next Big Thing? How do you know what is a hot topic and what is a buzzword? This talk will provide ways of looking at current hot topics in photonics, in both the research funding and commercial markets. It will also give some perspectives on selected topics and where they are going. The talk will give "market perspectives," which is to say that it's about the overall environment and near- to mid-term future, rather than recent scientific results.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 16, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE present "Measuring Everything You've Always Wanted to Know About a Light Pulse"

Topic: 
Measuring Everything You've Always Wanted to Know About a Light Pulse
Abstract / Description: 

The vast majority of the greatest scientific discoveries of all time have resulted directly from more powerful techniques for measuring light. Indeed, our most important source of information about our universe is light, and our ability to extract information from it is limited only by our ability to measure it.


Interestingly, most of the light in our universe remains immeasurable, involving long pulses of relatively broadband light, necessarily involving ultrafast and extremely complex temporal variations in their intensity and phase. As a result, it is important to develop techniques for measuring, ever more completely, light with ever more complex submicron detail in space and ever more complex ultrafast variations in time. The problem is severely complicated by the fact that the timescales involved correspond to the shortest events ever created, and measuring an event in time seems to require a shorter one, which, by definition, doesn't exist!
Nevertheless, we have developed simple, elegant techniques for completely measuring such light, using the light to measure itself and yielding a light pulse's intensity and phase vs. time and space. One technique involves making an optical spectrogram of the pulse using a nonlinear optical medium and whose mathematics is equivalent to the two-dimensional phase-retrieval problem—a problem that's solvable only because the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra fails for polynomials of two variables. In addition, we have recently developed simple methods for measuring the complete spatio-temporal electric field [E(x,y,z,t)] of an arbitrary, potentially complex light pulse without the need to average over multiple pulses.

Date and Time: 
Friday, May 10, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Effective medium approach towards topological photonics"

Topic: 
Effective medium approach towards topological photonics
Abstract / Description: 

Metamaterials have attracted tremendous attention due to their exotic optical properties and functionalities that are not attainable from naturally occurring materials. In particular, metamaterials can be designed to introduce strong spin-orbit coupling for light and consequently nontrivial topological properties. In this talk, I will start with a brief introduction to the concepts of Berry curvature, Chern number and topological photonics. I will show that combination of chirality and hyperbolicity – an extreme form of anisotropy, can result in nontrivial topological orders in metamaterials and consequently topologically protected photonic surface states that are immune from scattering by defects and sharp edges. The Weyl points in such systems result from the crossing between the bulk longitudinal plasmon mode and the transverse circularly polarized propagating modes. The photonic 'Fermi arcs' were directly observed in the microwave regime, which showed Riemann-surface like helicoid configuration in the energy-momentum space. I will further show that by designing the Weyl metamaterials with inhomogeneous unit cells, artificial magnetic field can be introduced which leads to the first observation of chiral zero Landau mode in photonic systems.

Date and Time: 
Monday, May 6, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 299

AP483 & AMO Seminar welcomes Tomas Cizmar, "Harnessing Multimode Propagation for Deep-tissue Imaging"

Topic: 
Harnessing Multimode Propagation for Deep-tissue Imaging
Abstract / Description: 

The turbid nature of refractive index distribution within living tissues introduces severe aberrations to light propagation thereby severely compromising image reconstruction using currently available non-invasive techniques. Numerous approaches of endoscopy, based mainly on fibre bundles or GRIN-lenses, allow imaging within extended depths of turbid tissues, however their footprint causes profound mechanical damage to all overlying regions and their imaging performance is limited.

Progress in the domain of complex photonics enabled a new generation of minimally invasive, high-resolution endoscopes by substitution of the Fourier-based image relays with a holographic control of light propagating through apparently randomizing multimode optical waveguides. This form of endo-microscopy became recently a very attractive way to provide minimally invasive insight into hard-to-access locations within living objects.

Professor Čižmár will review our fundamental and technological progression in this domain and introduce several applications of this concept in bio-medically relevant environments.


 

 

AP 483 & AMO Seminar Series
Time:
4:15 pm, every Monday (Refreshments begin at 4 pm)

Location:
Spilker Building Room 232

Date and Time: 
Monday, May 20, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "Computational Microscopy in Multiple-Scattering Samples"

Topic: 
Computational Microscopy in Multiple-Scattering Samples
Abstract / Description: 

Computational imaging involves the joint design of imaging system hardware and software, optimizing across the entire pipeline from acquisition to reconstruction. Computers can replace bulky and expensive optics by solving computational inverse problems. This talk will describe new microscopes that use computational imaging to enable 3D fluorescence and phase imaging in samples that incur multiple scattering. Our reconstruction algorithms are based on large-scale nonlinear non-convex optimization. Applications span optical bioimaging, X-ray and electron microscopy.


 

AP 483 & AMO Seminar Series

Time:
4:15 pm, every Monday (Refreshments begin at 4 pm)

Location:
Spilker Building Room 232

Date and Time: 
Monday, May 13, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

Pages

Information Systems Lab (ISL) Colloquium

ISL & IT Forum present "Feedback capacity of channels with memory via Reinforcement Learning and Graph-based auxiliary random variable""

Topic: 
Feedback capacity of channels with memory via Reinforcement Learning and Graph-based auxiliary random variable
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk we present two novel ideas: the first is novel method to compute the feedback capacity of channels with memory using reinforcement learning (RL). The second is a new technique of using Graph-based auxiliary random variable to convert a multi-letter expression of feedback capacity formula into a single letter expression.

In RL, one seeks to maximize cumulative rewards collected in a sequential decision-making environment. This is done by collecting samples of the underlying environment and using them to learn the optimal decision rule. The main advantage of this approach is its computational efficiency, even in high dimensional problems. Hence, RL can be used to estimate numerically the feedback capacity of unifilar finite state channels (FSCs) with large alphabet size. The outcome of the RL algorithm sheds light on the properties of the optimal decision rule, which in our case, is the optimal input distribution of the channel.

The insights gained from the RL computation can be converted into analytic, single-letter capacity expressions by solving corresponding lower and upper bounds. The bounds are based on another novel idea of using Graph-based auxiliary random variable

We demonstrate the efficiency of this method by analytically solving the feedback capacity of the well-known Ising channel with a large alphabet. We also provide a simple coding scheme that achieves the feedback capacity.

 

Date and Time: 
Friday, August 2, 2019 - 3:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL & IT Forum present "Resource-efficient quantized deep learning"

Topic: 
Resource-efficient quantized deep learning
Abstract / Description: 

Reducing the numerical precision of neural networks is one of the simplest, most effective and most common methods to improve resource efficiency (e.g. by reducing the memory and power requirements). Much research has been invested in finding how to quantize neural nets without significantly degrading performance. I will describe the main bottlenecks and solutions in various settings:
1) 1bit inference (1bit weights and activations), NIPS 2016 - link
2) 8bit training (8bit weights, activations, gradients, and batch-norm), NeurIPS 2018 - link
3) 4bit inference when quantization is done only post-training, Arxiv 2019 - link
4) Calculating the maximum trainable depth as a function of the numerical precision, Arxiv 2019 - link

Date and Time: 
Friday, July 26, 2019 - 2:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL & IT Forum present "Towards Achieving Secure Consensus and Trusted Data Exchange for Multi-Robot Teams""

Topic: 
Towards Achieving Secure Consensus and Trusted Data Exchange for Multi-Robot Teams
Abstract / Description: 

As physical robot networks become more pervasive all around us, in the form of teams of autonomous vehicles, fleets of delivery drones, and smart and mobile IoT, it becomes increasingly critical to question the robustness of their coordination algorithms to security threats and/or corrupted data. Indeed, it has been shown that many multi-robot tasks easily fail in the presence of erroneous or hacked data. We investigate the vulnerabilities of important multi-robot algorithms such as consensus, coverage, and distributed mapping to malicious or erroneous data and we demonstrate the potential of communication to thwart certain attacks, such as the Sybil Attack, on these algorithms. Our key insight is that coordinated mobility can be combined with signal processing of communication signals to allow agents to learn important information about the environment and the nature of other agents in the network (for example the presence of cooperative versus adversarial agents). Along these lines, we will present a theoretical and experimental framework for provably securing multi-robot distributed algorithms through careful use of communication. We will present both theoretical results and experimental results on actual hardware implementations for bounding the influence of a Sybil Attack on consensus and on coverage by using observations over the wireless channels. In some cases, we show that the effect of a Sybil Attack can be nearly eliminated with high probability by deriving the appropriate switching function using a sufficient number of observations over the wireless network. Finally, we will briefly describe promising results on new methods for outlier rejection and active rendezvous in a pose graph optimization framework that exploits feedback gathered from communication channels to arrive at improved accuracy.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 2:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL & IT Forum present "Building a DNA information storage system from the bottom up"

Topic: 
Building a DNA information storage system from the bottom up
Abstract / Description: 

DNA has emerged as a compelling data storage medium due to its density, longevity, and eternal relevance compared to current memory technologies. However, the high price of synthesizing DNA (list price $3,500 per megabyte) remains a major bottleneck for adoption of this promising storage solution. In this talk, I will present our work towards breaking down this barrier using enzymatic DNA synthesize and a tailored codec for robust data retrieval. I will also touch upon some fundamental considerations when designing DNA information storage systems.

Date and Time: 
Friday, June 21, 2019 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL & IT Forum present "Tensor networks and quantum Markov chain"

Topic: 
Tensor networks and quantum Markov chain
Abstract / Description: 

Tensor networks can often accurately approximate various systems that are of interest to physicists, but the computational cost of contracting the network is often prohibitively demanding. Quantum computer can resolve this bottleneck, but because the size of the computation scales with the size of the network, the existing quantum computers may appear to be far too noisy for this task. We prove a nontrivial error bound on the outcome of the computation that does not scale with the size of the network. This is possible because certain tensor networks are secretly implementing a quantum analogue of a (classical) Markovian dynamics. The long-time stability of the Markovian dynamics gives rise to a nontrivial error bound on the outcome of the computation. This suggests that there may be practical problems of interest that are amenable to relatively noisy quantum computers.

Date and Time: 
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL & Stats present Stability and uncertainty quantification

Topic: 
Bridging convex and nonconvex optimization in noisy matrix completion: Stability and uncertainty quantification
Abstract / Description: 

This talk is concerned with noisy matrix completion: given partial and corrupted entries of a large low-rank matrix, how to estimate and infer the underlying matrix? Arguably one of the most popular paradigms to tackle this problem is convex relaxation, which achieves remarkable efficacy in practice. However, the statistical stability guarantees of this approach is still far from optimal in the noisy setting, falling short of explaining the empirical success. Moreover, it is generally very challenging to pin down the distributions of the convex solution, which presents a major roadblock in assessing the uncertainty, or "confidence", for the obtained estimates–a crucial task at the core of statistical inference. 

Our recent work makes progress towards understanding stability and uncertainty quantification for noisy matrix completion. When the rank of the unknown matrix is a constant: (1) we demonstrate that convex programming achieves near-optimal estimation errors vis-'avis random noise; (2) we develop a de-biased estimator that admits accurate distributional characterizations, thus enabling asymptotically optimal inference. All of this is enabled by bridging convex relaxation with the nonconvex approach, a seemingly distinct algorithmic paradigm that is provably robust against noise.


This is joint work with Cong Ma, Yuling Yan, Yuejie Chi, and Jianqing Fan.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 28, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Herrin Hall Room T175

Reinforcement Learning & ISL present "Do Deep Generative Models Know What They Don't Know?"

Topic: 
Do Deep Generative Models Know What They Don't Know?
Abstract / Description: 

A neural network deployed in the wild may be asked to make predictions for inputs that were drawn from a different distribution than that of the training data. A plethora of work has demonstrated that it is easy to find or synthesize inputs for which a neural network is highly confident yet wrong. Generative models are widely viewed to be robust to such mistaken confidence as modeling the density of the input features can be used to detect novel, out-of-distribution inputs.

In this talk, we challenge this assumption. We find that the density learned by deep generative models (flow-based models, VAEs, and PixelCNNs) cannot distinguish images of common objects such as dogs, trucks, and horses (i.e. CIFAR-10) from those of house numbers (i.e. SVHN), assigning a higher likelihood to the latter when the model is trained on the former. Moreover, we find evidence of this phenomenon when pairing several popular image data sets: FashionMNIST vs MNIST, CelebA vs SVHN, ImageNet vs CIFAR-10 / CIFAR-100 / SVHN. To investigate this curious behavior, we focus analysis on flow-based generative models in particular since they are trained and evaluated via the exact marginal likelihood. We find such behavior persists even when we restrict the flows to constant-volume transformations. These transformations admit some theoretical analysis, and we show that the difference in likelihoods can be explained by the location and variances of the data and the model curvature. Our results caution against using the density estimates from deep generative models to identify inputs similar to the training distribution until their behavior for out-of-distribution inputs is better understood.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 28, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

ISL & IT Forum present "String reconstruction problems inspired by problems in multiomics data processing"

Topic: 
String reconstruction problems inspired by problems in multiomics data processing
Abstract / Description: 

String reconstruction problems frequently arise in many areas of genomic data processing molecular storage, and synthetic biology. In the most general setting, they may be described as follows: one is given a single or multiple copies of a coded or uncoded string, and the copies are subsequently subjected to some form of (random) processing such as fragmentation or repeated transmission through a noise-inducing channel. The goal of the reconstruction method is to obtain an exact or approximate version of the string based on the processed outputs. Examples of string reconstruction questions include reconstruction from noisy traces, reconstruction from substrings and k-decks and reconstruction from compositional substring information. We review the above and some related problems and then proceed to describe coding methods that lead to strings that can be reconstructed exactly from their noisy traces, substrings and compositions. In particular, we focus on DNA profile codes, hybrid reconstruction from traces and uniquely reconstructable code designs. In the process, we introduce new questions in the areas of restricted de Bruin graphs, counting of rational points in polytopes, and string replacement methods.

This is a joint work with Ryan Gabrys, Han Mao Kiah, Srilakshmi Pattabiraman and Gregory Puleo.

Date and Time: 
Friday, May 31, 2019 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

IT Forum & ISL Colloquium present "Extracting information from cells"

Topic: 
Extracting information from cells
Abstract / Description: 

Genomic approaches to studying the molecular biology of the cell have advanced considerably over the pas few years, and it is now possible to make high-throughput measurements of molecules in individual cells. I will discuss some of the considerations that must be taken into account in designing experiments, and subsequently in extracting the maximum information from them (optimally).

Date and Time: 
Friday, May 24, 2019 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL Colloquium presents "A structural result for Personalized PageRank and its algorithmic consequences"

Topic: 
A structural result for Personalized PageRank and its algorithmic consequences
Abstract / Description: 

Many systems, including the Internet, social networks, and the power grid, can be represented as graphs. When analyzing graphs, it is often useful to compute scores describing the relative importance or distance between nodes. One example is Personalized PageRank (PPR), which assigns to each node v a vector whose i-th entry describes the importance of the i-th node from the perspective of v. PPR has proven useful in many applications, such as recommending who users should follow on social networks (if this i-th entry is large, v may be interested in following the i-th user). Unfortunately, computing n such PPR vectors (where n is the number of nodes) is infeasible for many graphs of interest.

In this work, we argue that the situation is not so dire. Our main result shows that the dimensionality of the set of PPR vectors scales sublinearly in n with high probability, for a certain class of random graphs and for a notion of dimensionality similar to rank. Put differently, we argue that the effective dimension of this set is much less than n, despite the fact that the matrix containing these vectors has rank n. Furthermore, we show this dimensionality measure relates closely to the complexity of a PPR estimation scheme that was proposed (but not analyzed) by Jeh and Widom. This allows us to argue that accurately estimating all n PPR vectors amounts to computing a vanishing fraction of the n^2 vector elements (when the technical assumptions of our main result are satisfied). Finally, we demonstrate empirically that similar conclusions hold when considering real-world networks, despite the assumptions of our theory not holding.

This is joint work with Daniel Vial, University of Michigan and will appear in ACM Sigmetrics 2019.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 16, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

Pages

IT-Forum

ISL & IT Forum present "Feedback capacity of channels with memory via Reinforcement Learning and Graph-based auxiliary random variable""

Topic: 
Feedback capacity of channels with memory via Reinforcement Learning and Graph-based auxiliary random variable
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk we present two novel ideas: the first is novel method to compute the feedback capacity of channels with memory using reinforcement learning (RL). The second is a new technique of using Graph-based auxiliary random variable to convert a multi-letter expression of feedback capacity formula into a single letter expression.

In RL, one seeks to maximize cumulative rewards collected in a sequential decision-making environment. This is done by collecting samples of the underlying environment and using them to learn the optimal decision rule. The main advantage of this approach is its computational efficiency, even in high dimensional problems. Hence, RL can be used to estimate numerically the feedback capacity of unifilar finite state channels (FSCs) with large alphabet size. The outcome of the RL algorithm sheds light on the properties of the optimal decision rule, which in our case, is the optimal input distribution of the channel.

The insights gained from the RL computation can be converted into analytic, single-letter capacity expressions by solving corresponding lower and upper bounds. The bounds are based on another novel idea of using Graph-based auxiliary random variable

We demonstrate the efficiency of this method by analytically solving the feedback capacity of the well-known Ising channel with a large alphabet. We also provide a simple coding scheme that achieves the feedback capacity.

 

Date and Time: 
Friday, August 2, 2019 - 3:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL & IT Forum present "Resource-efficient quantized deep learning"

Topic: 
Resource-efficient quantized deep learning
Abstract / Description: 

Reducing the numerical precision of neural networks is one of the simplest, most effective and most common methods to improve resource efficiency (e.g. by reducing the memory and power requirements). Much research has been invested in finding how to quantize neural nets without significantly degrading performance. I will describe the main bottlenecks and solutions in various settings:
1) 1bit inference (1bit weights and activations), NIPS 2016 - link
2) 8bit training (8bit weights, activations, gradients, and batch-norm), NeurIPS 2018 - link
3) 4bit inference when quantization is done only post-training, Arxiv 2019 - link
4) Calculating the maximum trainable depth as a function of the numerical precision, Arxiv 2019 - link

Date and Time: 
Friday, July 26, 2019 - 2:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL & IT Forum present "Towards Achieving Secure Consensus and Trusted Data Exchange for Multi-Robot Teams""

Topic: 
Towards Achieving Secure Consensus and Trusted Data Exchange for Multi-Robot Teams
Abstract / Description: 

As physical robot networks become more pervasive all around us, in the form of teams of autonomous vehicles, fleets of delivery drones, and smart and mobile IoT, it becomes increasingly critical to question the robustness of their coordination algorithms to security threats and/or corrupted data. Indeed, it has been shown that many multi-robot tasks easily fail in the presence of erroneous or hacked data. We investigate the vulnerabilities of important multi-robot algorithms such as consensus, coverage, and distributed mapping to malicious or erroneous data and we demonstrate the potential of communication to thwart certain attacks, such as the Sybil Attack, on these algorithms. Our key insight is that coordinated mobility can be combined with signal processing of communication signals to allow agents to learn important information about the environment and the nature of other agents in the network (for example the presence of cooperative versus adversarial agents). Along these lines, we will present a theoretical and experimental framework for provably securing multi-robot distributed algorithms through careful use of communication. We will present both theoretical results and experimental results on actual hardware implementations for bounding the influence of a Sybil Attack on consensus and on coverage by using observations over the wireless channels. In some cases, we show that the effect of a Sybil Attack can be nearly eliminated with high probability by deriving the appropriate switching function using a sufficient number of observations over the wireless network. Finally, we will briefly describe promising results on new methods for outlier rejection and active rendezvous in a pose graph optimization framework that exploits feedback gathered from communication channels to arrive at improved accuracy.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 2:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL & IT Forum present "Building a DNA information storage system from the bottom up"

Topic: 
Building a DNA information storage system from the bottom up
Abstract / Description: 

DNA has emerged as a compelling data storage medium due to its density, longevity, and eternal relevance compared to current memory technologies. However, the high price of synthesizing DNA (list price $3,500 per megabyte) remains a major bottleneck for adoption of this promising storage solution. In this talk, I will present our work towards breaking down this barrier using enzymatic DNA synthesize and a tailored codec for robust data retrieval. I will also touch upon some fundamental considerations when designing DNA information storage systems.

Date and Time: 
Friday, June 21, 2019 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL & IT Forum present "Tensor networks and quantum Markov chain"

Topic: 
Tensor networks and quantum Markov chain
Abstract / Description: 

Tensor networks can often accurately approximate various systems that are of interest to physicists, but the computational cost of contracting the network is often prohibitively demanding. Quantum computer can resolve this bottleneck, but because the size of the computation scales with the size of the network, the existing quantum computers may appear to be far too noisy for this task. We prove a nontrivial error bound on the outcome of the computation that does not scale with the size of the network. This is possible because certain tensor networks are secretly implementing a quantum analogue of a (classical) Markovian dynamics. The long-time stability of the Markovian dynamics gives rise to a nontrivial error bound on the outcome of the computation. This suggests that there may be practical problems of interest that are amenable to relatively noisy quantum computers.

Date and Time: 
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

IT-Forum Student Talks

Topic: 
Student Talks
Abstract / Description: 

Jesse Gibson
Title: Information Theory in Next-Generation DNA Sequencing Technologies
The completion of the first human genome sequence in the early 2000's represented a major success for the scientific community. It also represented the return on a significant investment - billions of dollars and a little over a decade's worth of work. DNA sequencing costs have since fallen at a rate even faster than the exponential improvements predicted by Moore's Law in computing. Today, a complete human genome can be sequenced for closer to a few thousand dollars in about a week. A major factor in this improvement was the shift from the serial reads used in the human genome project to massively parallel sequencing technologies. These new technologies however present new problems - how can we understand a genome given millions of short reads drawn randomly from the underlying sequence and potentially degraded by noise in the process? Bioinformatics boasts a plethora of algorithms that meet this challenge in practice but it's not immediately obvious what 'optimal' analyses might look like. This talk will focus on the work of David Tse and others that have used the perspective of information theory to establish fundamental bounds on our ability to interpret next generation sequencing output. In particular, I will focus on the problems of assembling an unknown sequence de novo and of variant calling when the population of molecules being sequenced is not homogenous.

Tony Ginart
Title: Towards a Compression Theory for Metric Embeddings
Embedding matrices are widely used in diverse domains such as NLP, recommendation systems, information retrieval, and computer vision. For large-scale datasets, embedding matrices can consume large amounts of memory, and compression for these objects is desirable. However, the relevant distortion metrics applicable to embeddings make them significantly more compressible than classical sources considered in information theory. Furthermore, related results such as the Johnson-Lindenstrauss theorem are formulated in terms of reduction in dimension rather than codelength. Additionally, embeddings come with certain query-time constraints, such as in the sense of a succinct data structure. In this talk, we formulate the problem of metric embedding compression from the information theoretic lense and review related literature in information theory, signal processing, and dimensionality reduction. We adapt pre-existing results to establish some lower and upper bound in some regimes. Finally, we cover some of the state-of-the-art compression algorithms used to compress embeddings in practice.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, June 4, 2019 - 10:00am
Venue: 
Packard 214

ISL & IT Forum present "String reconstruction problems inspired by problems in multiomics data processing"

Topic: 
String reconstruction problems inspired by problems in multiomics data processing
Abstract / Description: 

String reconstruction problems frequently arise in many areas of genomic data processing molecular storage, and synthetic biology. In the most general setting, they may be described as follows: one is given a single or multiple copies of a coded or uncoded string, and the copies are subsequently subjected to some form of (random) processing such as fragmentation or repeated transmission through a noise-inducing channel. The goal of the reconstruction method is to obtain an exact or approximate version of the string based on the processed outputs. Examples of string reconstruction questions include reconstruction from noisy traces, reconstruction from substrings and k-decks and reconstruction from compositional substring information. We review the above and some related problems and then proceed to describe coding methods that lead to strings that can be reconstructed exactly from their noisy traces, substrings and compositions. In particular, we focus on DNA profile codes, hybrid reconstruction from traces and uniquely reconstructable code designs. In the process, we introduce new questions in the areas of restricted de Bruin graphs, counting of rational points in polytopes, and string replacement methods.

This is a joint work with Ryan Gabrys, Han Mao Kiah, Srilakshmi Pattabiraman and Gregory Puleo.

Date and Time: 
Friday, May 31, 2019 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

IT Forum & ISL Colloquium present "Extracting information from cells"

Topic: 
Extracting information from cells
Abstract / Description: 

Genomic approaches to studying the molecular biology of the cell have advanced considerably over the pas few years, and it is now possible to make high-throughput measurements of molecules in individual cells. I will discuss some of the considerations that must be taken into account in designing experiments, and subsequently in extracting the maximum information from them (optimally).

Date and Time: 
Friday, May 24, 2019 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

IT Forum welcomes Jiantao Jiao (UC Berkeley)

Topic: 
Deconstructing Generative Adversarial Networks
Abstract / Description: 

We deconstruct the Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) to its three fundamental problems to study: formulation, generalization, and optimization. We propose systematic principles to formulate the population goals of GANs (when infinite samples are available), and reveal and further develop connections between GANs and robust statistics. We provide principled methods to achieve the population formulations of GANs given finite samples with small generalization error, and demonstrate the intricacy of moving from infinite samples to finite samples in statistical error. We show through examples the importance of solving the inner maximization problem before the outer minimization problem, and demonstrate embedding the knowledge of the solution of the inner maximization problem could make a locally unstable algorithm globally stable. Joint work with Banghua Zhu and David Tse.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 21, 2019 - 10:00am
Venue: 
Packard 214

Pages

Optics and Electronics Seminar

SCIEN Colloquium and EE 292E present "Snapshot multispectral imaging from a different angle"

Topic: 
Snapshot multispectral imaging from a different angle
Abstract / Description: 

Combining photography and spectroscopy, spectral imaging enables us to see what no traditional color camera has seen before. The current trend is to miniaturize the technology and bring it towards industry. In this talk, I will first give a general introduction to the most common pitfalls of spectral imaging and the challenges that come with miniaturization. Major pitfalls include balancing cross-talk, quantum efficiency, illumination and the optics. Miniaturization has become possible thanks to the monolithic per-pixel integration of thin-film Fabry-Pérot filters on CMOS imaging sensors. I will explain the difficulty of using these cameras with non- telecentric lenses. This is a major concern because of the angular dependency of the thin-film filters. I will demonstrate how this important issue can be solved using a model-based approach.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Effective medium approach towards topological photonics"

Topic: 
Pandora and Prometheus: Science, Scientists, and Society
Abstract / Description: 

As researchers in photonics we have both opportunities to positively impact people's lives and responsibilities to assist in ethical integration of these important new and disruptive technologies into modern society. While photonics provides solutions to critical global issues, such as key technology for measuring the environment and mitigating the impact of climate change, we are also developing new capabilities, which test society's legal and moral frameworks. Photonics enables the internet and social networking, high throughput sequencing of the human genome, pre-implantation testing of human embryos, measurement and control of neural networks in vivo—advances which present significant ethical challenges.

In addition, as scientists we are part of a global research community with the common goal of openly sharing our knowledge world-wide. Knowledge gives competitive and strategic advantages to those having access to it, leading to government pressure to limit free access to and unrestricted dissemination of scientific research. How do we reconcile our national responsibilities and loyalties with our responsibilities as members of the global scientific community to openly share our knowledge? These pressures become particularly acute when most of our research funding comes from federal/national sources.

Both students and faculty are welcome and encouraged to participate in an open discussion of these topics over lunch.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, June 6, 2019 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Ultrafast Multidimensional Coherent Spectroscopy of Color Centers in Diamond"

Topic: 
Ultrafast Multidimensional Coherent Spectroscopy of Color Centers in Diamond
Abstract / Description: 

Color centers in diamond are point defects within the diamond host lattice that absorb and emit light at optical frequencies. Besides contributing to the striking visual characteristics of "fancy colored diamond" gemstones, the centers—particularly the negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center and silicon-vacancy (SiV-) center—offer a number of possibilities for quantum computation and quantum information processing. In this talk, I will summarize recent work investigating the properties of negatively charged silicon-vacancy centers in diamond using the optical multidimensional coherent spectroscopy (MDCS). Finding suggest a strong influence of strain in determining the presence or absence of radiative coupling in the centers. By extension, the results reveal a new knob for tuning color-center-based photonic devices.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 30, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Recent Advances in Submarine Fiber Optical Systems"

Topic: 
Recent Advances in Submarine Fiber Optical Systems
Abstract / Description: 

Undersea fiber optical systems have shown tremendous advances over the past one or two decades. Capacities have increased by 20x while the cost per bit of submarine transmission has decreased by 250 times. These advances have been primarily a result of coherent transmission and I will highlight all of the main points regarding these advances. This has led to the recent deployment of 16-QAM transmission on a trans-Atlantic link! Future directions in submarine fiber optic transmission systems, such as SDM, will also be discussed.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 23, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Hot Topics in Optics and Photonics"

Topic: 
Hot Topics in Optics and Photonics
Abstract / Description: 

Optics and photonics is a diverse field, spanning dynamic commercial successes to slowly-moving niche markets to speculative research and fundamental science. But most people only work in small spaces of the field at a given time, whether they are working in industry or academia. It can be difficult to visualize the entire field and understand it. How do you forecast where the technology is going? What is the Next Big Thing? How do you know what is a hot topic and what is a buzzword? This talk will provide ways of looking at current hot topics in photonics, in both the research funding and commercial markets. It will also give some perspectives on selected topics and where they are going. The talk will give "market perspectives," which is to say that it's about the overall environment and near- to mid-term future, rather than recent scientific results.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 16, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE present "Measuring Everything You've Always Wanted to Know About a Light Pulse"

Topic: 
Measuring Everything You've Always Wanted to Know About a Light Pulse
Abstract / Description: 

The vast majority of the greatest scientific discoveries of all time have resulted directly from more powerful techniques for measuring light. Indeed, our most important source of information about our universe is light, and our ability to extract information from it is limited only by our ability to measure it.


Interestingly, most of the light in our universe remains immeasurable, involving long pulses of relatively broadband light, necessarily involving ultrafast and extremely complex temporal variations in their intensity and phase. As a result, it is important to develop techniques for measuring, ever more completely, light with ever more complex submicron detail in space and ever more complex ultrafast variations in time. The problem is severely complicated by the fact that the timescales involved correspond to the shortest events ever created, and measuring an event in time seems to require a shorter one, which, by definition, doesn't exist!
Nevertheless, we have developed simple, elegant techniques for completely measuring such light, using the light to measure itself and yielding a light pulse's intensity and phase vs. time and space. One technique involves making an optical spectrogram of the pulse using a nonlinear optical medium and whose mathematics is equivalent to the two-dimensional phase-retrieval problem—a problem that's solvable only because the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra fails for polynomials of two variables. In addition, we have recently developed simple methods for measuring the complete spatio-temporal electric field [E(x,y,z,t)] of an arbitrary, potentially complex light pulse without the need to average over multiple pulses.

Date and Time: 
Friday, May 10, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Effective medium approach towards topological photonics"

Topic: 
Effective medium approach towards topological photonics
Abstract / Description: 

Metamaterials have attracted tremendous attention due to their exotic optical properties and functionalities that are not attainable from naturally occurring materials. In particular, metamaterials can be designed to introduce strong spin-orbit coupling for light and consequently nontrivial topological properties. In this talk, I will start with a brief introduction to the concepts of Berry curvature, Chern number and topological photonics. I will show that combination of chirality and hyperbolicity – an extreme form of anisotropy, can result in nontrivial topological orders in metamaterials and consequently topologically protected photonic surface states that are immune from scattering by defects and sharp edges. The Weyl points in such systems result from the crossing between the bulk longitudinal plasmon mode and the transverse circularly polarized propagating modes. The photonic 'Fermi arcs' were directly observed in the microwave regime, which showed Riemann-surface like helicoid configuration in the energy-momentum space. I will further show that by designing the Weyl metamaterials with inhomogeneous unit cells, artificial magnetic field can be introduced which leads to the first observation of chiral zero Landau mode in photonic systems.

Date and Time: 
Monday, May 6, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 299

AP483 & AMO Seminar welcomes Tomas Cizmar, "Harnessing Multimode Propagation for Deep-tissue Imaging"

Topic: 
Harnessing Multimode Propagation for Deep-tissue Imaging
Abstract / Description: 

The turbid nature of refractive index distribution within living tissues introduces severe aberrations to light propagation thereby severely compromising image reconstruction using currently available non-invasive techniques. Numerous approaches of endoscopy, based mainly on fibre bundles or GRIN-lenses, allow imaging within extended depths of turbid tissues, however their footprint causes profound mechanical damage to all overlying regions and their imaging performance is limited.

Progress in the domain of complex photonics enabled a new generation of minimally invasive, high-resolution endoscopes by substitution of the Fourier-based image relays with a holographic control of light propagating through apparently randomizing multimode optical waveguides. This form of endo-microscopy became recently a very attractive way to provide minimally invasive insight into hard-to-access locations within living objects.

Professor Čižmár will review our fundamental and technological progression in this domain and introduce several applications of this concept in bio-medically relevant environments.


 

 

AP 483 & AMO Seminar Series
Time:
4:15 pm, every Monday (Refreshments begin at 4 pm)

Location:
Spilker Building Room 232

Date and Time: 
Monday, May 20, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "Computational Microscopy in Multiple-Scattering Samples"

Topic: 
Computational Microscopy in Multiple-Scattering Samples
Abstract / Description: 

Computational imaging involves the joint design of imaging system hardware and software, optimizing across the entire pipeline from acquisition to reconstruction. Computers can replace bulky and expensive optics by solving computational inverse problems. This talk will describe new microscopes that use computational imaging to enable 3D fluorescence and phase imaging in samples that incur multiple scattering. Our reconstruction algorithms are based on large-scale nonlinear non-convex optimization. Applications span optical bioimaging, X-ray and electron microscopy.


 

AP 483 & AMO Seminar Series

Time:
4:15 pm, every Monday (Refreshments begin at 4 pm)

Location:
Spilker Building Room 232

Date and Time: 
Monday, May 13, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces

Topic: 
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces
Abstract / Description: 

Individuals of all genders invited to be a part of:
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces, where we will feature real stories of harassment at Stanford academic STEM in a conversation with Provost Drell, Dean Minor (SoM), and Dean Graham (SE3). We will have plenty of time for audience discussion on how we can take concrete action to dismantle this culture and actively work towards a more inclusive Stanford for everyone. While our emphasis is on STEM fields, we welcome and encourage participation from students, postdocs, staff, and faculty of all academic disciplines and backgrounds.

Date and Time: 
Friday, April 19, 2019 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
STLC 111

Pages

SCIEN Talk

SCIEN Colloquium and EE 292E present "Snapshot multispectral imaging from a different angle"

Topic: 
Snapshot multispectral imaging from a different angle
Abstract / Description: 

Combining photography and spectroscopy, spectral imaging enables us to see what no traditional color camera has seen before. The current trend is to miniaturize the technology and bring it towards industry. In this talk, I will first give a general introduction to the most common pitfalls of spectral imaging and the challenges that come with miniaturization. Major pitfalls include balancing cross-talk, quantum efficiency, illumination and the optics. Miniaturization has become possible thanks to the monolithic per-pixel integration of thin-film Fabry-Pérot filters on CMOS imaging sensors. I will explain the difficulty of using these cameras with non- telecentric lenses. This is a major concern because of the angular dependency of the thin-film filters. I will demonstrate how this important issue can be solved using a model-based approach.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SCIEN Colloquium and EE 292E present "Towards intelligent computational microscopes"

Topic: 
Towards intelligent computational microscopes
Abstract / Description: 

Deep learning algorithms offer a powerful means to automatically analyze the content of biomedical images. However, many biological samples of interest are difficult to resolve with a standard optical microscope. Either they are too large to fit within the microscope's field-of-view, or too thick, or are quickly moving around. In this talk, I will discuss our recent work in addressing these challenges by using deep learning algorithms to design new experimental strategies for microscopic imaging. Specifically, we use deep neural networks to jointly optimize the physical parameters of our computational microscopes - their illumination settings, lens layouts and data transfer pipelines, for example - for specific tasks. Examples include learning specific illumination patterns that can improve classification of the malaria parasite by up to 15%, and establishing fast methods to automatically track moving specimens across gigapixel-sized images.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 22, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces

Topic: 
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces
Abstract / Description: 

Individuals of all genders invited to be a part of:
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces, where we will feature real stories of harassment at Stanford academic STEM in a conversation with Provost Drell, Dean Minor (SoM), and Dean Graham (SE3). We will have plenty of time for audience discussion on how we can take concrete action to dismantle this culture and actively work towards a more inclusive Stanford for everyone. While our emphasis is on STEM fields, we welcome and encourage participation from students, postdocs, staff, and faculty of all academic disciplines and backgrounds.

Date and Time: 
Friday, April 19, 2019 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
STLC 111

SCIEN presents "Augmented Reality Handbooks"

Topic: 
Augmented Reality Handbooks
Abstract / Description: 

Handbooks are an essential requirement for understanding and using many artifacts found in our daily life. We use handbooks to understand how things work and how to maintain them. Most handbooks still exist on paper relying on graphical illustrations and accompanying textual explanations to convey the relevant information to the reader. With the success of video sharing platforms a large body of video tutorials available for nearly every aspect of life became available. Video tutorials can often expand printed handbooks with the demonstrations of actions required to solve certain tasks. However, interpreting printed manuals and video tutorials often requires a certain mental effort since users have to match printed images or video frames with the physical object in their environment.


Augmented Reality (AR) has been demonstrated to be effective of presenting information traditionally provided in printed handbooks and video tutorials. However, creating interactive illustrative graphics for AR is costly and requires specially trained authors. In this this talk, I will present research towards the automation of the authoring process of AR handbooks by interactively retargeting conventional, two-dimensional image and video data into three-dimensional AR handbooks. In addition, I will present interaction, visualization and rendering techniques tailored for AR handbooks.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SCIEN presents "Computational Imaging at Light"

Topic: 
Computational Imaging at Light
Abstract / Description: 

Light develops computational imaging technologies that utilize heterogenous constellations of small cameras to create sophisticated imaging effects. This enables the company to provide hardware solutions that are compact – they can easily fit into a cell phone, or a similar small form factor. In this talk, I will review the recent progress of computational imaging research done at the company.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SCIEN presents "Phase change materials as functional photonic elements in future computing and displays"

Topic: 
Phase change materials as functional photonic elements in future computing and displays
Abstract / Description: 

Photonics has always been the technology of the future. Light is faster, can multiplex etc. have all been "good" arguments for several decades and the ushering in of optical computing has perpetually been just a few years away. However, over the last decade, with the advent of micro-and nanofabrication techniques and phenomenal advances in photonics, that era seems to have finally arrived. The ability to create integrated optical circuits on a chip is near. But (and yes, there's always a but) you need "functional" materials that can be used to control and manipulate this flow of information. In electronics, doping silicon results in one of the most versatile functional materials ever employed by humanity. And that can used to efficiently route electrical signals. How do you do that optically? I hope to convince you that whatever route photonics takes, a class of materials known as phase change materials, will play a key role in its commercialization. These materials can be addressed electrically, and whilst this can be used to control optical signals on photonic circuits this can also be used to create displays and smart windows. In this talk, I hope to give a whistle-stop tour of these applications of these materials with a view towards their near-term applications in displays, and their longer-term potential ranging from integrated photonic memories to machine-learning hardware components.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SCIEN presents "Computational Imaging with Single-Photon Detectors"

Topic: 
Computational Imaging with Single-Photon Detectors
Abstract / Description: 

Active 3D imaging systems, such as LIDAR, are becoming increasingly prevalent for applications in autonomous vehicle navigation, remote sensing, human-computer interaction, and more. These imaging systems capture distance by directly measuring the time it takes for short pulses of light to travel to a point and return. With emerging sensor technology we can detect down to single arriving photons and identify their arrival at picosecond timescales, enabling new and exciting imaging modalities. In this talk, I discuss trillion-frame-per-second imaging, efficient depth imaging with sparse photon detections, and imaging objects hidden from direct line of sight.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 8, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SCIEN presents "3D Computer Vision: Challenges and Beyond"

Topic: 
3D Computer Vision: Challenges and Beyond
Abstract / Description: 

3D Computer Vision (3D Vision) techniques have been the key solutions to various scene perception problems such as depth from image(s), camera/object pose estimation, localization and 3D reconstruction of a scene. These solutions are the major part of many AI applications including AR/VR, autonomous driving and robotics. In this talk, I will first review several categories of 3D Vision problems and their challenges. Given the category of static scene perception, I will introduce several learning-based depth estimation methods such as PlaneRCNN, Neural RGBD, and camera pose estimation methods including MapNet as well as few registration algorithms deployed in NVIDIA's products. I will then introduce more challenging real world scenarios where scenes contain non-stationary rigid changes, non-rigid motions, or varying appearance due to the reflectance and lighting changes, which can cause scene reconstruction to fail due to the view dependent properties. I will discuss several solutions to these problems and conclude by summarizing the future directions for 3D Vision research that are being conducted by NVIDIA's learning and perception research (LPR) team.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 1, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SCIEN presents "Challenges in surgical imaging: Surgical and pathological devices"

Topic: 
Challenges in surgical imaging: Surgical and pathological devices
Abstract / Description: 

Cancer is a surgically treated disease; almost 80% of early stage solid tumors undergo surgery at some point in their treatment course. The biggest gap in quality remains the high rate of tumor-positive margins in surgical resections. The biggest barrier is that only a limited amount of the tissue can be sampled for frozen section analysis (< 5%). The biggest challenge is to develop equipment to direct frozen section analysis to the most area on the specimen most likely to contain a positive margin. To this end, we developed intraoperative devices to leverage molecular imaging during and immediately after cancer resections.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, April 24, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SCIEN presents "Imaging a Black Hole with the Event Horizon Telescope"

Topic: 
Imaging a Black Hole with the Event Horizon Telescope
Abstract / Description: 

This talk will present the methods and procedures used to produce the first results from the Event Horizon Telescope. It is theorized that a black hole will leave a "shadow" on a background of hot gas. Taking a picture of this black hole shadow could help to address a number of important scientific questions, both on the nature of black holes and the validity of general relativity. Unfortunately, due to its small size, traditional imaging approaches require an Earth-sized radio telescope. In this talk, I discuss techniques we have developed to photograph a black hole using the Event Horizon Telescope, a network of telescopes scattered across the globe. Imaging a black hole's structure with this computational telescope requires us to reconstruct images from sparse measurements, heavily corrupted by atmospheric error.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, April 17, 2019 - 4:45pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Pages

SmartGrid

EE237: Solar Energy Conversion Seminar presents "Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Buildings"

Topic: 
Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Buildings
Abstract / Description: 

Buildings account for the largest share of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions at 32% of the total, followed by industry at 30%, transportation at 29%, and agriculture at 9%. Clearly, any program to greatly reduce greenhouse gas emissions must include buildings. This talk will explore the opportunities and challenges to greatly reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the building sector, using as a case study a recent solar retrofit of an existing house that rendered it "zero-carbon." Implications for the future of the utility system will be discussed.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

EE237: Solar Energy Conversion Seminar

Topic: 
An Introduction to Metal Halide Perovskite Solar Cells, Scalable Architectures for Enabling Terawatt-Level Solar Energy
Abstract / Description: 

Thin-film solar cells, which use light-weight, highly-absorbing semiconductors, have the potential to dramatically lower manufacturing costs and accelerate deployment of solar energy via mechanically flexible architectures. Hybrid metal halide perovskites are the leading materials for this next-generation solar technology by virtue of their unprecedented optoelectronic properties and their synthesis from earth-abundant elements. The groundbreaking promise of perovskites is that they can be manufactured by scalable solution-coating methods, making them a potentially low-cost and high-performance energy technology with projected levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) below 3¢ / kWh.

This talk will discuss the current understanding of the optoelectronic properties of perovskites as well as how these properties inform the design of single-junction and tandem perovskite-silicon cell architectures. We will consider routes to upscaling perovskite module fabrication and look at challenges related to the fundamental thermomechanical reliability of these material systems.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX 338

Smart Grid Seminar: Electric Vehicle Market

Topic: 
Electric Vehicle Market
Abstract / Description: 

Competing standards often proliferate in early stages of product markets and may lead to socially inefficient investment. This paper studies the effect of unifying three incompatible standards for charging electric vehicles in the U.S. from 2011 to 2015. I develop and estimate a structural model of vehicle demand and charging network investment to quantify the impact of a uniform charging standard. Variation in federal and state subsidies identify the demand elasticities. Counterfactual simulations show moving to a uniform charging standard increases consumer surplus by $500 million; car manufacturers build 2.8% fewer charging locations and sell 20.8% more electric vehicles.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 30, 2019 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

Smart Grid Seminar: From Grid Eye to Grid Mind

Topic: 
From Grid Eye to Grid Mind -Data-driven Autonomous Grid Dispatch and Control Based on PMU Measurements
Abstract / Description: 

Power systems are facing grand challenges from increasing dynamics and stochastics from both the generation and the demand sides. This has caused great difficulty in designing and implementing optimal control for the grid in real time. Tremendous efforts have been spent in the past on computational methods and advanced modeling techniques that provide faster and better situational awareness, based on measurements from advanced grid sensors, PMU as an example. However, as grid operators are heavily involved in the decision-making process, the entire procedure has not been made fully automated, limiting the potential of such applications. That is, not only does the 'grid' need to perceive faster, it also needs to think and act faster. Towards this end, sub-second autonomous control schemes need to be developed. Over the past years, the PMU & System Analytics Group at GEIRI North America has built up an autonomous grid dispatch and control platform using deep reinforcement learning, the Grid Mind. Combined with Grid Eye, the grid monitoring and situational awareness platform, Grid Mind has demonstrated promise in helping address the pressing issues modern power systems faces. This talk will summarize this developmental effort while focusing on the key technologies utilized for the Grid Mind framework.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 9, 2019 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

Smart Grid Seminar: Integration of Electric Vehicles

Topic: 
Engineering System Integration of Renewable Energy, Water, and Electric Vehicles: Perspectives from New England & Abu Dhabi
Abstract / Description: 

Recently, the academic and industrial literature has arrived at a consensus in which the electric power grid evolves to a more intelligent, responsive, and dynamic system that propels the sustainable energy transition. This evolution is caused by several drivers including decarbonization, growing electricity demand, deregulation of electricity markets, active end-user participation, and digital innovations in energy technologies. On the supply side, the introduction of variable energy resources (VERs), like solar and wind, necessitates fundamental changes in the power grid's dynamic operation. VER forecasts are uncertain and their profiles are intermittent thus requiring greater quantities of operating reserves. In such a case, fast-ramping natural gas and hydro-electric power plants take on a prominent grid balancing role. At higher levels of solar PV and wind generation, dispatchable demand-side resources become the only remaining option for grid balancing. These devices are not just energy artifacts, but also exist within other engineering systems. Consequently, their integration gives rise to new multi-disciplinary challenges such as electrified transportation and the energy-water nexus. This presentation seeks to shed light on the increasingly intertwined futures of energy, water, and transportation resources. It draws upon three full-scale case studies: The ISO New England System Operational Analysis and Renewable Energy Integration Study, New England Energy-Water Nexus Study, and Abu Dhabi Electric Vehicle Integration Study. Together, these studies show that while all three types of resources have the potential to disrupt the other, they can also be harmonized to create sustainable synergies across all three engineering systems

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 18, 2019 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces

Topic: 
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces
Abstract / Description: 

Individuals of all genders invited to be a part of:
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces, where we will feature real stories of harassment at Stanford academic STEM in a conversation with Provost Drell, Dean Minor (SoM), and Dean Graham (SE3). We will have plenty of time for audience discussion on how we can take concrete action to dismantle this culture and actively work towards a more inclusive Stanford for everyone. While our emphasis is on STEM fields, we welcome and encourage participation from students, postdocs, staff, and faculty of all academic disciplines and backgrounds.

Date and Time: 
Friday, April 19, 2019 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
STLC 111

SmartGrid Seminar presents "New Hope for Smart Meter Data Analytics"

Topic: 
New Hope for Smart Meter Data Analytics
Abstract / Description: 

The deployment of smart meters throughout California a decade ago resulted in a host of startups with ideas to leverage the new wealth of data to reduce energy consumption and customer bills. But few if any profitable businesses emerged. More recently, new state legislation and regulatory changes support a "pay for performance" approach to energy efficiency that holds great promise for innovative data analytics. This talk will focus on the opportunity, HEA's participation, and the remaining barriers. needs, without needing reformulations of existing scheduling approaches, and therefore to be able to use them in actual system operation.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 11, 2019 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

John G. Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology

Topic: 
Internet of Things and Internet of Energy for Connecting at Any Time and Any Place
Abstract / Description: 

In this presentation, I would like to discuss with you how to establish a sustainable and smart society through the internet of energy for connecting at any time and any place. I suspect that you have heard the phrase, "Internet of Energy" less often. The meaning of this phrase is simple. Because of a ubiquitous energy transmission system, you do not need to worry about a shortage of electric power. One of the most important items for establishing a sustainable society is [...]


"Inaugural Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology," EE News, July 2018

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, January 14, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

SmartGrid Seminar presents "Electricity Network Design and Operation in an Era of Solar and Storage"

Topic: 
Electricity Network Design and Operation in an Era of Solar and Storage
Abstract / Description: 

As prices for solar photovoltaics and battery energy storage plummet, grids around the globe are undergoing tremendous changes. How should we design and operate grids in the future in the presence of these technologies? This talk will cover some of my group's recent efforts to answer this question, focusing on a new approach to decentralized network optimization – a variant of the primal-dual subgradient method — that can be used to enable grid-integration of distributed energy resources such as solar photovoltaics, batteries and electric vehicles. I will then discuss how grids should be built in the future when distributed energy resource costs are so low. Using a simple concept called an iso-reliability curve, I will explain a method to identify cost-optimal fully decentralized systems – i.e. standalone solar home systems. After applying this method to a large solar resource dataset, I will present results indicating that in many unelectrified parts of the world, future decentralized systems will be able to deliver electricity at costs and reliabilities better than existing centralized grids.


The seminars are scheduled for 1:30 pm on the dates listed above. The speakers are renowned scholars or industry experts in power and energy systems. We believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T. Interested students can take this seminar course for credit by completing a project based on the topics presented in this course.

 

Yours sincerely,
Smart Grid Seminar Organization Team,

Ram Rajagopal, Associate Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering, and Electrical Engineering
Sila Kiliccote, Managing Director of Grid Innovations, Bits & Watts 
Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab 
Yuting Ji, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Date and Time: 
Thursday, December 6, 2018 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

SmartGrid Seminar: Battery storage

Topic: 
Battery storage: New Applications, Markets and Business Models
Abstract / Description: 

Since 2015, Tesla has installed a total of over one gigawatt-hour of energy storage that is critical for using renewable energy at scale. Over 20,000 customers across 40 countries are using Tesla stationary storage products for a variety of sustainable energy applications: powering filtration systems for clean water in Puerto Rico, stabilizing the grid in Australia, cooling classrooms in Hawaii, and powering entire islands in the South Pacific, etc. This talk will introduce the general efforts of Tesla's Energy Optimization Team, which develops the "brain" of its energy storage products. Optimization and machine learning techniques are utilized on all different products. A few recent projects will also be presented.


The seminars are scheduled for 1:30 pm on the dates listed above. The speakers are renowned scholars or industry experts in power and energy systems. We believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T. Interested students can take this seminar course for credit by completing a project based on the topics presented in this course.

 

Yours sincerely,
Smart Grid Seminar Organization Team,

Ram Rajagopal, Associate Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering, and Electrical Engineering
Sila Kiliccote, Managing Director of Grid Innovations, Bits & Watts 
Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab 
Yuting Ji, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 15, 2018 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

Pages

Stanford's NetSeminar

#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces

Topic: 
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces
Abstract / Description: 

Individuals of all genders invited to be a part of:
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces, where we will feature real stories of harassment at Stanford academic STEM in a conversation with Provost Drell, Dean Minor (SoM), and Dean Graham (SE3). We will have plenty of time for audience discussion on how we can take concrete action to dismantle this culture and actively work towards a more inclusive Stanford for everyone. While our emphasis is on STEM fields, we welcome and encourage participation from students, postdocs, staff, and faculty of all academic disciplines and backgrounds.

Date and Time: 
Friday, April 19, 2019 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
STLC 111

John G. Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology

Topic: 
Internet of Things and Internet of Energy for Connecting at Any Time and Any Place
Abstract / Description: 

In this presentation, I would like to discuss with you how to establish a sustainable and smart society through the internet of energy for connecting at any time and any place. I suspect that you have heard the phrase, "Internet of Energy" less often. The meaning of this phrase is simple. Because of a ubiquitous energy transmission system, you do not need to worry about a shortage of electric power. One of the most important items for establishing a sustainable society is [...]


"Inaugural Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology," EE News, July 2018

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, January 14, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Claude E. Shannon's 100th Birthday

Topic: 
Centennial year of the 'Father of the Information Age'
Abstract / Description: 

From UCLA Shannon Centennial Celebration website:

Claude Shannon was an American mathematician, electrical engineer, and cryptographer known as "the father of information theory". Shannon founded information theory and is perhaps equally well known for founding both digital computer and digital circuit design theory. Shannon also laid the foundations of cryptography and did basic work on code breaking and secure telecommunications.

 

Events taking place around the world are listed at IEEE Information Theory Society.

Date and Time: 
Saturday, April 30, 2016 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
N/A

NetSeminar

Topic: 
BlindBox: Deep Packet Inspection over Encrypted Traffic
Abstract / Description: 

SIGCOMM 2015, Joint work with: Justine Sherry, Chang Lan, and Sylvia Ratnasamy

Many network middleboxes perform deep packet inspection (DPI), a set of useful tasks which examine packet payloads. These tasks include intrusion detection (IDS), exfiltration detection, and parental filtering. However, a long-standing issue is that once packets are sent over HTTPS, middleboxes can no longer accomplish their tasks because the payloads are encrypted. Hence, one is faced with the choice of only one of two desirable properties: the functionality of middleboxes and the privacy of encryption.

We propose BlindBox, the first system that simultaneously provides both of these properties. The approach of BlindBox is to perform the deep-packet inspection directly on the encrypted traffic. BlindBox realizes this approach through a new protocol and new encryption schemes. We demonstrate that BlindBox enables applications such as IDS, exfiltration detection and parental filtering, and supports real rulesets from both open-source and industrial DPI systems. We implemented BlindBox and showed that it is practical for settings with long-lived HTTPS connections. Moreover, its core encryption scheme is 3-6 orders of magnitude faster than existing relevant cryptographic schemes.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - 12:15pm to 1:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

NetSeminar

Topic: 
Precise localization and high throughput backscatter using WiFi signals
Abstract / Description: 

Indoor localization holds great promise to enable applications like location-based advertising, indoor navigation, inventory monitoring and management. SpotFi is an accurate indoor localization system that can be deployed on commodity WiFi infrastructure. SpotFi only uses information that is already exposed by WiFi chips and does not require any hardware or firmware changes, yet achieves the same accuracy as state-of-the-art localization systems.

We then talk about BackFi, a novel communication system that enables high throughput, long range communication between very low power backscatter IoT sensors and WiFi APs using ambient WiFi transmissions as the excitation signal. We show via prototypes and experiments that it is possible to achieve communication rates of up to 5 Mbps at a range of 1 m and 1 Mbps at a range of 5 meters. Such performance is an order to three orders of magnitude better than the best known prior WiFi backscatter system.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 12:15pm to 1:30pm
Venue: 
Gates 104

NetSeminar

Topic: 
BlindBox: Deep Packet Inspection over Encrypted Traffic
Abstract / Description: 

SIGCOMM 2015, Joint work with: Justine Sherry, Chang Lan, and Sylvia Ratnasamy

Many network middleboxes perform deep packet inspection (DPI), a set of useful tasks which examine packet payloads. These tasks include intrusion detection (IDS), exfiltration detection, and parental filtering. However, a long-standing issue is that once packets are sent over HTTPS, middleboxes can no longer accomplish their tasks because the payloads are encrypted. Hence, one is faced with the choice of only one of two desirable properties: the functionality of middleboxes and the privacy of encryption.

We propose BlindBox, the first system that simultaneously provides both of these properties. The approach of BlindBox is to perform the deep-packet inspection directly on the encrypted traffic. BlindBox realizes this approach through a new protocol and new encryption schemes. We demonstrate that BlindBox enables applications such as IDS, exfiltration detection and parental filtering, and supports real rulesets from both open-source and industrial DPI systems. We implemented BlindBox and showed that it is practical for settings with long-lived HTTPS connections. Moreover, its core encryption scheme is 3-6 orders of magnitude faster than existing relevant cryptographic schemes.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 7, 2015 - 12:15pm to 1:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

Pages

Statistics and Probability Seminars

Statistics Department Seminar presents "The relevance problem: 50 years on"

Topic: 
"The relevance problem: 50 years on"
Abstract / Description: 

Given a large cohort of "similar" cases Z1, . . . , ZN one can construct an efficient statistical inference procedure by 'learning from the experience of others' (also known as "borrowing strength" from the ensemble). But what if, instead, we observe a massive database where each case is accompanied with extra contextual information (usually in the form of covariates), making the Zi's non-exchangeable? It's not obvious how we go about gathering strength when each piece of information is fuzzy and heterogeneous. Moreover, if we include irrelevant cases, borrowing information can heavily damage the quality of the inference! This raises some fundamental questions: when (not) to borrow? whom (not) to borrow? how (not) to borrow? These questions are at the heart of the "Problem of Relevance" in statistical inference – a puzzle that remained too little addressed since its inception nearly half a century ago (Efron and Morris, 1971,1972; Efron 2019). The purpose of this talk is to present an attempt to develop basic principles and practical guidelines in order to tackle some of the unsettled issues that surround the relevance problem. Through examples, we will demonstrate how our new statistical perspective answers previously unanswerable questions in a realistic and feasible way.


This is a joint work with my previous student Kaijun Wang, who is currently a postdoctoral research fellow at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, July 25, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Sequoia Hall Room 200

Statistics Department Seminar presents "Augmented minimax linear estimation"

Topic: 
Augmented minimax linear estimation
Abstract / Description: 

Many statistical estimands can expressed as continuous linear functionals of a conditional expectation function. This includes the average treatment effect under unconfoundedness and generalizations for continuous-valued and personalized treatments. In this talk, we discuss a general approach to estimating such quantities: we begin with a simple plug-in estimator based on an estimate of the conditional expectation function, and then correct the plug-in estimator by subtracting a minimax linear estimate of its error. We show that our method is semiparametrically efficient under weak conditions and observe promising performance on both real and simulated data.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, August 6, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Sloan Mathematics Center, Room 380C

Statistics Department Seminar presents "Analytical nonlinear shrinkage of large-dimensional covariance matrices"

Topic: 
Analytical nonlinear shrinkage of large-dimensional covariance matrices
Abstract / Description: 

This paper establishes the first analytical formula for optimal nonlinear shrinkage of largedimensional covariance matrices. We achieve this by identifying and mathematically exploiting a deep connection between nonlinear shrinkage and nonparametric estimation of the Hilbert transform of the sample spectral density. Previous nonlinear shrinkage methods were numerical: QuEST requires numerical inversion of a complex equation from random matrix theory whereas NERCOME is based on a sample-splitting scheme. The new analytical approach is more elegant and also has more potential to accommodate future variations or extensions. Immediate benefits are that it is typically 1,000 times faster with the same accuracy and accommodates covariance matrices of dimension up to 10,000. The difficult case where the matrix dimension exceeds the sample size is also covered.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 30, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Sloan Mathematics Center, Room 380C

Statistics Department Seminar presents "A geometric perspective on false discovery control"

Topic: 
A geometric perspective on false discovery control
Abstract / Description: 

A common approach to statistical model selection — particularly in scientific domains in which it is of interest to draw inferences about an underlying phenomenon — is to develop powerful procedures that provide control on false discoveries. Such methods are widely used in inferential settings involving variable selection, graph estimation, and others in which a discovery is naturally regarded as a discrete concept. However, this view of a discovery is ill-suited to many model selection and structured estimation problems in which the underlying decision space is not discrete. We describe a geometric reformulation of the notion of a discovery, which enables the development of model selection methodology for a broader class of problems. We highlight the utility of this viewpoint in problems involving subspace selection and low-rank estimation, with a specific algorithm to control for false discoveries in these settings.

 


This is joint work with Parikshit Shah and Venkat Chandrasekaran.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 23, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Sloan Mathematics Center, Room 380C

Statistics Department Seminar presents "Reproducible localization of causal variants across the genome"

Topic: 
Reproducible localization of causal variants across the genome
Abstract / Description: 

We present a powerful and flexible statistical method for the genetic mapping of complex traits. This method, which we call KnockoffZoom, provably controls the false discovery rate using knockoff genotypes as negative controls, while trying to localize causal variants as precisely as possible. Our inferences are equally valid for quantitative and binary phenotypes, making no assumptions about their genetic architectures. Instead, we leverage well-established genetic models to account for linkage disequilibrium and population structure. We demonstrate that this method detects more associations than mixed effects models and achieves fine-mapping precision, at comparable computational cost. Lastly, we apply KnockoffZoom to data from the UK Biobank and report many new findings.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 16, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Sloan Mathematics Center, Room 380C

Statistics Department Seminar presents "Metropolized knockoff sampling"

Topic: 
Metropolized knockoff sampling
Abstract / Description: 

Model-X knockoffs is a wrapper that transforms essentially any feature importance measure into a variable selection algorithm, which can discover true effects while rigorously controlling the expected fraction of false positives. A remaining challenge to apply this method is to construct knockoff variables, which are synthetic variables obeying a crucial exchangeability property with the explanatory variables under study. This paper introduces techniques for knockoff generation in great generality: we provide a sequential characterization of all possible knockoff distributions, which leads to a Metropolis-Hastings formulation of an exact knockoff sampler. We further show how to use conditional independence structure to speed up computations. Combining these two threads, we introduce an explicit set of sequential algorithms and empirically demonstrate their effectiveness. Our theoretical analysis proves that our algorithms achieve near-optimal computational complexity in certain cases. The techniques we develop are sufficiently rich to enable knockoff sampling in challenging models including cases where the covariates are continuous and heavy-tailed, and follow a graphical model such as the Ising model.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Sloan Mathematics Center, Room 380C

ISL & Stats present Stability and uncertainty quantification

Topic: 
Bridging convex and nonconvex optimization in noisy matrix completion: Stability and uncertainty quantification
Abstract / Description: 

This talk is concerned with noisy matrix completion: given partial and corrupted entries of a large low-rank matrix, how to estimate and infer the underlying matrix? Arguably one of the most popular paradigms to tackle this problem is convex relaxation, which achieves remarkable efficacy in practice. However, the statistical stability guarantees of this approach is still far from optimal in the noisy setting, falling short of explaining the empirical success. Moreover, it is generally very challenging to pin down the distributions of the convex solution, which presents a major roadblock in assessing the uncertainty, or "confidence", for the obtained estimates–a crucial task at the core of statistical inference. 

Our recent work makes progress towards understanding stability and uncertainty quantification for noisy matrix completion. When the rank of the unknown matrix is a constant: (1) we demonstrate that convex programming achieves near-optimal estimation errors vis-'avis random noise; (2) we develop a de-biased estimator that admits accurate distributional characterizations, thus enabling asymptotically optimal inference. All of this is enabled by bridging convex relaxation with the nonconvex approach, a seemingly distinct algorithmic paradigm that is provably robust against noise.


This is joint work with Cong Ma, Yuling Yan, Yuejie Chi, and Jianqing Fan.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 28, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Herrin Hall Room T175

#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces

Topic: 
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces
Abstract / Description: 

Individuals of all genders invited to be a part of:
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces, where we will feature real stories of harassment at Stanford academic STEM in a conversation with Provost Drell, Dean Minor (SoM), and Dean Graham (SE3). We will have plenty of time for audience discussion on how we can take concrete action to dismantle this culture and actively work towards a more inclusive Stanford for everyone. While our emphasis is on STEM fields, we welcome and encourage participation from students, postdocs, staff, and faculty of all academic disciplines and backgrounds.

Date and Time: 
Friday, April 19, 2019 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
STLC 111

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Frequency comb-based nonlinear spectroscopy"

Topic: 
Frequency comb-based nonlinear spectroscopy
Abstract / Description: 

Rapid and precise measurements are and always have been of interest in science and technology partly because of their numerous practical applications. Since their development, frequency comb-based methods have revolutionized optical measurements. They simultaneously provide high resolution, high sensitivity, and rapid acquisition times. These methods are being developed for use in many fields, from atomic and molecular spectroscopy, to precision metrology, to spectral LIDAR and even atmospheric monitoring. However they cannot address the issues of inhomogeneously broadened transitions or sample heterogeneity. This is especially important for remote chemical sensing applications.

In this talk I will discuss a novel optical method, that I recently developed, which overcomes these limitations. I will demonstrate its capabilities for probing extremely weak fundamental processes as well as its applications for rapid and high resolution chemical sensing.

 

References:

B. Lomsadze, B. Smith and S. T. Cundiff. "Tri-comb spectroscopy". Nature Photonics 12, 676, 2018.
B. Lomsadze and S. T. Cundiff. "Frequency-comb based double-quantum two-dimensional spectrum identifies collective hyperfine resonances in atomic vapor induced by dipole-dipole interactions." Physical Review Letters 120, 233401, 2018.
B. Lomsadze and S. T. Cundiff. "Frequency combs enable rapid and high-resolution multidimensional coherent spectroscopy". Science 357, 1389, 2017
B. Lomsadze and S. T. Cundiff. "Frequency comb-based four-wave-mixing spectroscopy". Optics letters 42, 2346, 2017

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

RESCHEDULED: OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Frequency comb-based nonlinear spectroscopy"

Topic: 
RESCHEDULED: Frequency comb-based nonlinear spectroscopy: Bridging the gap between fundamental science and cutting-edge technology
Abstract / Description: 

RESCHEDULED for June 12

Rapid and precise measurements are and always have been of interest in science and technology partly because of their numerous practical applications. Since their development, frequency comb-based methods have revolutionized optical measurements. They simultaneously provide high resolution, high sensitivity, and rapid acquisition times. These methods are being developed for use in many fields, from atomic and molecular spectroscopy, to precision metrology, to spectral LIDAR and even atmospheric monitoring. However they cannot address the issues of inhomogeneously broadened transitions or sample heterogeneity. This is especially important for remote chemical sensing applications.

In this talk I will discuss a novel optical method, that I recently developed, which overcomes these limitations. I will demonstrate its capabilities for probing extremely weak fundamental processes as well as its applications for rapid and high resolution chemical sensing.

 

References:

B. Lomsadze, B. Smith and S. T. Cundiff. "Tri-comb spectroscopy". Nature Photonics 12, 676, 2018.
B. Lomsadze and S. T. Cundiff. "Frequency-comb based double-quantum two-dimensional spectrum identifies collective hyperfine resonances in atomic vapor induced by dipole-dipole interactions." Physical Review Letters 120, 233401, 2018.
B. Lomsadze and S. T. Cundiff. "Frequency combs enable rapid and high-resolution multidimensional coherent spectroscopy". Science 357, 1389, 2017
B. Lomsadze and S. T. Cundiff. "Frequency comb-based four-wave-mixing spectroscopy". Optics letters 42, 2346, 2017

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, March 20, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

Pages

SystemX

EE237: Solar Energy Conversion Seminar presents "Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Buildings"

Topic: 
Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Buildings
Abstract / Description: 

Buildings account for the largest share of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions at 32% of the total, followed by industry at 30%, transportation at 29%, and agriculture at 9%. Clearly, any program to greatly reduce greenhouse gas emissions must include buildings. This talk will explore the opportunities and challenges to greatly reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the building sector, using as a case study a recent solar retrofit of an existing house that rendered it "zero-carbon." Implications for the future of the utility system will be discussed.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

SystemX presents Accelerating Deep Learning with Tensor Processing Units

Topic: 
Accelerating Deep Learning with Tensor Processing Units
Abstract / Description: 

Google's Tensor Processing Unit (TPU), first deployed in 2015, provides services today for more than one billion people and provides more than an order of magnitude improvement in performance and performance/W compared to contemporary platforms. Inspired by the success of the first TPU for neural network inference, Google developed multiple generations of machine learning supercomputers for neural network training that allow near linear scaling of ML workloads running on TPUv2 and TPUv3 processors. TPUs extend research frontiers and benefit a growing number of Google services.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 30, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Huang 018

SystemX BONUS LECTURE: The ARM Microprocessor: My part in its downfall

Topic: 
The ARM Microprocessor: My part in its downfall
Abstract / Description: 

By the end of 1990 the Acorn RISC Machine, which was designed in Britain, was practically extinct. The parent company, Acorn, was down a very dark financial alley, and the remnants of the design team were cast out to fend for themselves, equipped with about 18 months of financial rations from Apple, and a really rather odd microprocessor design. When Dave Jaggar joined ARM a few months later, with the ink not quite dry on his Master's Thesis, he thought perhaps he'd made a dreadful mistake. However, after twelve months he was given free range to start the ARM architecture afresh, and the new Advanced RISC Machine, as the company was now named, was born. Over the next 8 years he worked out a little bit about computer architecture, in the same way that a 17th century surgeon understands anatomy, then he was made the first ARM Fellow, so he promptly retired back to New Zealand to raise his children. As it's the 25th anniversary of his quite successful Thumb compressed instruction set, and his children have all left home, he's been told it's about time he explained himself.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

Material challenges and opportunities in next generation electronics: from non-silicon electronics to artificial neural networks

Topic: 
Material challenges and opportunities in next generation electronics: from non-silicon electronics to artificial neural networks
Abstract / Description: 

The current electronics industry has been completely dominated by Si-based devices due to its exceptionally low materials cost. However, demand for non-Si electronics is becoming substantially high because current/next generation electronics requires novel functionalities that can never be achieved by Si-based materials. Unfortunately, the extremely high cost of non-Si semiconductor materials prohibits the progress in this field. Recently our team has invented a new crystalline growth concept, termed as "remote epitaxy", which can copy/paste crystalline information of the wafer remotely through graphene, thus generating single-crystalline films on graphene [1,2]. These single-crystalline films are easily released from the slippery graphene surface and the graphene-coated substrates can be infinitely reused to generate single-crystalline films. Thus, the remote epitaxy technique can cost-efficiently produce freestanding single-crystalline films. This allows unprecedented functionality of flexible device functionality required for current ubiquitous electronics. In addition, we have recently demonstrated a manufacturing method to manipulate wafer-scale 2D materials with atomic precision to form monolayer-by-monolayer stacks of wafer-scale 2D material heterostructures [3]. In this talk, I will discuss the implication of this new technology for revolutionary design of next generation electronic/photonic devices with combination of 3D/2D materials.

Lastly, I will discuss about an ultimate alternative computing solution that does not follow the conventional von Neuman method. As Moore's law approaches its physical limits, brain-inspired neuromorphic computing has recently emerged as a promising alternative because of its compatibility with AI. In the neuromorphic computing system, resistive random access memory (RRAM) can be used as an artificial synapse for weight elements in neural network algorithms. RRAM typically utilizes a defective amorphous solid as a switching medium. However, due to the random nature of amorphous phase, it has been challenging to precisely control weights in artificial synapses, thus resulting in poor learning accuracy. Our team recently demonstrated single-crystalline-based artificial synapses that show precise control of synaptic weights, promising superior online learning accuracy of 95.1% – a key step paving the way towards post von Neumann computing [4]. I will discuss about how we design the materials and devices for this new neuromorphic hardware.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 23, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Huang Building, Room 018

SystemX presents Nanoscale Devices based on Two-dimensional Materials and Ferroelectric Materials

Topic: 
Nanoscale Devices based on Two-dimensional Materials and Ferroelectric Materials
Abstract / Description: 

Further scaling of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) dimensions will soon lead to a tremendous rise in power consumption while limited gain in the performance of integrated circuits. "Beyond-CMOS" devices, based on new materials, device concepts and architectures, can potentially overcome these limitations and further improve the performance, reduce energy consumption, and add novel functionalities to the CMOS platform. In this talk, I will present nanoscale electronic and photonic devices based on two-dimensional (2D) materials and ferroelectric materials. In particular, I will discuss the logic devices, RF devices, photodetectors, plasmonic devices, and tunneling devices based on graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides. I will also present our recent results on non-volatile memories and ferroelectric tunneling junctions (FTJs) based on ferroelectric hafnium oxide and 2D ferroelectric indium selenides.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 8, 2019 - 10:00am
Venue: 
AllenX 338

SystemX presents Artificial Intelligence for Augmenting Human Capabilities

Topic: 
Artificial Intelligence for Augmenting Human Capabilities
Abstract / Description: 

The field of AI was motivated originally by the objective of automating tasks performed by humans. While advances in machine learning have enabled impressive capabilities such as self-driving vehicles, more cognitive tasks such as planning and design have resisted full automation because of the vast amounts of knowledge and commonsense reasoning that they require. This talk describes a line of research aimed at developing AI systems that are designed to augment rather than replace human capabilities, leveraging automated planning, machine learning, and natural language understanding technologies. It also presents several successful applications of the research in deployed systems.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 9, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Huang Building, Room 018

SystemX BONUS LECTURE: History and Future of 3D Mapping

Topic: 
History and Future of 3D Mapping
Abstract / Description: 

From the beginning of recording history, mapping the world has been critical to human growth and exploration. Today, mapping the world in 3D is equally critical to the future of AR and how we all will experience the world around us.

Date and Time: 
Monday, May 6, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

EE237: Solar Energy Conversion presents "What Really Matters in PV and What are Potential Disruptive Drivers?"

Topic: 
What Really Matters in PV and What are Potential Disruptive Drivers?
Abstract / Description: 

To usher Solar 2.0 beyond incremental solar module cost and efficiency improvement, it is critical to understand true metrics for solar projects that impact the ultimate cost of electricity. This talk is divided in three parts. The first part discusses the system's and project relevant metrics which constitute the bottom line for customers. It also sets the stage for the importance of a multi-dimensional advancement of solar module technology as apposed to conventional incremental improvements in cost and efficiency areas only. The second part discusses Solar 1.0, the historical drivers which contributed to the dramatic cost reduction and the rapid commoditization of solar PV over the last decade. The final part of the talk delves into potential disruptive ideas both related to dramatic efficiency improvement and system's level smartness, which will drive the next wave in advancement, the Solar 2.0.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 1, 2019 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
Allen 380X

SystemX presents Quantum Computing at Microsoft

Topic: 
Quantum Computing at Microsoft
Abstract / Description: 

Quantum computing holds the promise to transform many industries, by rendering some of todays intractable problems feasible. To do so, quantum computers are built upon fundamentally different rules from standard computers, harnessing the bizarre but beautiful quantum mechanical laws that underpin the behavior of atoms and molecules. This will transform cryptography, material and chemical design, among other key areas. I will attempt to demystify some key aspects of quantum computing, highlight some of the key industrial applications, and will outline Microsoft's full-stack approach to overcome the challenges to build scalable quantum computers.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 2, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Huang 018

SystemX presents Quantum Computing at Microsoft

Topic: 
Quantum Computing at Microsoft
Abstract / Description: 

Quantum computing holds the promise to transform many industries, by rendering some of todays intractable problems feasible. To do so, quantum computers are built upon fundamentally different rules from standard computers, harnessing the bizarre but beautiful quantum mechanical laws that underpin the behavior of atoms and molecules. This will transform cryptography, material and chemical design, among other key areas. I will attempt to demystify some key aspects of quantum computing, highlight some of the key industrial applications, and will outline Microsoft's full-stack approach to overcome the challenges to build scalable quantum computers.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 2, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Huang 018

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