Seminar / Colloquium

Q-Farm Quantum Seminar Series presents "Universality in the dynamics of quantum information"

Topic: 
Universality in the dynamics of quantum information
Abstract / Description: 

The far-from-equilibrium dynamics of closed quantum systems has become a central topic in condensed matter physics, due to incredible experimental advances in cold atomic and other systems. Concepts of quantum information have taken center stage in this context, with entanglement, in particular, playing a central role in the emergence of thermodynamics. Predicting the behavior of these quantities, however, is notoriously hard as most existing analytical and numerical tools, designed for systems in equilibrium, do not carry over to the dynamical setting. In my talk I will discuss how studying a set solvable minimal models has allowed us to partially conquer this problem and uncover universal features of quantum dynamics. In particular, I will describe some simple hydrodynamic models of how quantum information spreads in time, and discuss a recent prediction for entanglement growth that is particularly relevant for cold atom experiments.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 23, 2019 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Physics/Astrophysics (Varian II) Building, Room 102/103

SCIEN Colloquium and EE 292E present "Fluorescence Lifetime Techniques in Clinical Interventions"

Topic: 
Fluorescence Lifetime Techniques in Clinical Interventions
Abstract / Description: 

This presentation overviews fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy and imaging techniques for label-free in vivo characterization of biological tissues. Emphasis is placed on recently developed devices and methods enabling real-time characterization and diagnosis of diseased tissues during clinical interventions. I will present studies conducted in animal models and human patients demonstrating the ability of these techniques to provide rapid in-situ evaluation of tissue biochemistry and their potential to guide surgical and intravascular procedures. Current results demonstrate that intrinsic fluorescence can provide useful contrast for the diagnosis of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques, intraoperative delineation of brain tumors and head and neck tumors. Finally, I will present results from the first-in-human study that shows the potential of a multispectral fluorescence lifetime method for image-guided augmented reality in trans-oral robotic surgery (TORS).

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 23, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

Workshop in Biostatistics: Models and Algorithms for Understanding Neural and Behavioral Data

Topic: 
Models and Algorithms for Understanding Neural and Behavioral Data
Abstract / Description: 

The trend in neural recording capabilities is clear: we can record orders of magnitude more neurons now than we could only a few years ago, and technological advances do not seem to be slowing. Coupled with rich behavioral measurements, genetic sequencing, and connectomics, these datasets offer unprecedented opportunities to learn how neural circuits function. But they also pose serious modeling and algorithmic challenges. How do we develop probabilistic models for such heterogeneous data? How do we design models that are flexible enough to capture complex spatial and temporal patterns, yet interpretable enough to provide new insight? How do we construct algorithms to efficiently and reliably fit these models? I will present some of our recent work on recurrent switching linear dynamical systems and corresponding Bayesian inference algorithms that aim to overcome these challenges, and I will show how these methods can help us gain insight into complex neural and behavioral data.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 24, 2019 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Medical School Office Building Room x303

Statistics Seminar presents "Robustness meets algorithms"

Topic: 
"Robustness meets algorithms"
Abstract / Description: 

In every corner of machine learning and statistics, there is a need for estimators that work not just in an idealized model but even when their assumptions are violated. Unfortunately, in high-dimensions, being provably robust and efficiently computable are often at odds with each other.

In this talk, we give the first efficient algorithm for estimating the parameters of a highdimensional Gaussian which is able to tolerate a constant fraction of corruptions that is independent of the dimension. Prior to our work, all known estimators either needed time exponential in the dimension to compute, or could tolerate only an inverse polynomial fraction of corruptions. Not only does our algorithm bridge the gap between robustness and algorithms, it turns out to be highly practical in a variety of settings.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, October 22, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
McCullough Building Room 115

Probability Seminar presents "Resource sharing with logarithmic weights"

Topic: 
"Resource sharing with logarithmic weights"
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk, we'll focus on a class of resource allocation algorithms for communication networks: if a node of this network has L requests to transmit and is idle, it tries to access the channel at a rate proportional to log(1 + L). We'll study a simple stochastic model for such an algorithm in the case of a star network, in which J nodes can transmit simultaneously but interfere with a central node 0 in such a way that node 0 cannot transmit when one of the other nodes does. In contrast with the case where the probability of accessing the channel is proportional to L, as the total number of pending requests tends to infinity several timescales interact in a fine way to determine the asymptotic behaviour of the system. In particular, the numbers of pending requests at every node can evolve on very different timescales and have very different orders of magnitude. This is joint work with Philippe Robert (INRIA Paris).

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 21, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Sequoia Hall Room 200

SystemX presents The Principles for Building Moonshots

Topic: 
The Principles for Building Moonshots
Abstract / Description: 

Since the very beginning, X (formerly Google X) has had a single mission: to invent and launch "moonshot" technologies — like energy kites, balloon-powered internet, all-electric deliver drones, and self-driving cars — that we think could make the world a radically better place. Our "Rapid Evaluation" team, led by Phil Watson, is responsible for identifying, investigating, and evaluating these potential moonshots. In this talk, Phil will share what he's learned about finding and shaping promising new moonshots along their journey from outlandish, high-risk ideas into projects that just might have a shot at making it into the real world — and making a difference in the big picture challenges facing society.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 24, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

BONUS LECTURE: Clover the Rover and Anakin Sandwalker: lessons in project management from the Utah dessert

Topic: 
BONUS LECTURE: Clover the Rover and Anakin Sandwalker: lessons in project management from the Utah dessert
Abstract / Description: 

What makes a successful engineering team? Why makes a fun engineering team? How can the two be combined? Following the adventures (and misadventures) of the the Stanford team competing in the University Rover Challenge, the talk will cover how to go about starting a multi person design project, how testing can be approached and we delve into some of the technical details of the two robots.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, October 22, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Hyperscale Data Center Applications of Optoelectronics"

Topic: 
Hyperscale Data Center Applications of Optoelectronics
Abstract / Description: 

From subsea fiber cables to short-reach switch interconnects, opto-electronics is a key technology for hyperscale data center networks. As performance requirements increase, photonics moves deeper into the network replacing copper for shorter distances. The next move for photonics is to distances of less than 3m for in-rack applications. This talk will describe how the scale of data-bandwidth growth has challenged what is possible with traditional networks and where the next opportunities for innovation lie.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 23, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

US-ASIA Tech Center presents “Edge Computing in Autonomous Vehicles” Panel Discussion

Topic: 
Edge Computing in Autonomous Vehicles
Abstract / Description: 

Please see the event detail page at Stanford US-Asia Technology Management Center.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 17, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Skilling Auditorium

QFarm Quantum Seminar Series presents "Quantum Information Processing with Spins in Cold Atomic Ensembles"

Topic: 
Quantum Information Processing with Spins in Cold Atomic Ensembles
Abstract / Description: 

Atomic spins are natural carriers of quantum information given their long coherence time and our capabilities to coherently control and measure them with magneto-optical fields. In this seminar I will describe two paradigms for quantum information processing with ensembles of spin in cold atoms. The strong electric dipole-dipole interactions arising when atoms are excited to high-lying Rydberg states is a powerful method for designing entangling interactions in neutral atoms. I will explore how adiabatic dressing of ground-state atoms with high-lying Rydberg states provides an avenue for further manipulation of nonclassical states based on the techniques of optimal control. By mapping a symmetrically-coupled Rydberg ensemble to the Jaynes-Cummings model, I will show how we can obtain arbitrary control of superpositions of collective Dicke states. Moreover, adiabatic dressing and quantum control can allow us to create high-fidelity entangling two-qubit gates, robust to random atomic motion at finite temperature, and other imperfections. In a second paradigm, atoms can be entangled through their mutual coupling to a common mode of the quantum electromagnetic field which acts as a quantum data bus. I will show how one can use this quantum data bus for measurement-based feedback to simulate nonlinear dynamics, quantum chaos, the quantum-to-classical transition, and quantum simulations of quantum many-body-dynamics.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 9, 2019 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Physics/Astrophysics (Varian II) Building, Room 102/103

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Applied Physics / Physics Colloquium

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium welcomes Joseph Lykken (Fermi National Laboratory)

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

Aut. Qtr. Colloq. committee: R. Blandford (Chair), B. Feldman, A. Kapitulnik, B. Lev and V. Khemani
Location: Hewlett Teaching Center, Rm. 200

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, November 19, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Black Holes in Physics and Astrophysics"

Topic: 
Black Holes in Physics and Astrophysics
Abstract / Description: 

Aut. Qtr. Colloq. committee: R. Blandford (Chair), B. Feldman, A. Kapitulnik, B. Lev and V. Khemani
Location: Hewlett Teaching Center, Rm. 200

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, November 12, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Thermoelectric Hall effect and nonlinear Hall effect"

Topic: 
Thermoelectric Hall effect and nonlinear Hall effect
Abstract / Description: 

Studies of various types of Hall effects have led to great advances in solid state physics. In this talk, I will describe two novel Hall phenomena. The first is thermoelectric Hall effect that describes the generation of a transverse electrical current under a temperature gradient. Under a quantizing magnetic field, thermoelectric Hall conductivity is proportional to thermal entropy which is strongly enhanced by Landau level degeneracy. This leads to an unbounded growth of the thermopower in three- dimensional Dirac/Weyl semimetals, a parametrically large thermoelectric figure of merit in quantum Hall systems at low temperature, and a new experimental way to study neutral collective modes in the fractional quantum Hall liquids.

Second, I will discuss a nonlinear Hall effect in nonmagnetic materials at zero magnetic field, where the transverse current depends quadratically on the applied electric field. This effect arises from anomalous velocity in a current-carrying state, driven by Berry curvature in inversion-breaking systems.


 

Aut. Qtr. Colloq. committee: R. Blandford (Chair), B. Feldman, A. Kapitulnik, B. Lev and V. Khemani
Location: Hewlett Teaching Center, Rm. 200

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, October 22, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Circuit QED: Quantum Sensing, Information Processing and Error Correction with Microwave Photons"

Topic: 
Circuit QED: Quantum Sensing, Information Processing and Error Correction with Microwave Photons
Abstract / Description: 

'Circuit quantum electrodynamics' is the theory of non-linear quantum optics extended to the study of microwave photons strongly interacting with 'artificial atoms' (Josephson junction qubits) embedded in superconducting electrical circuits. Recent remarkable theoretical and experimental progress in our ability to measure and manipulate the quantum states of individual microwave photons is leading to novel applications ranging from accelerating dark matter searches to quantum error correction that, for the first time in any technology, has successfully extended the lifetime of quantum information. This talk will present an elementary introduction to the basic concepts underlying circuit QED and describe several recent novel experiments demonstrating these new found capabilities.


 

Aut. Qtr. Colloq. committee: R. Blandford (Chair), B. Feldman, A. Kapitulnik, B. Lev and V. Khemani
Location: Hewlett Teaching Center, Rm. 200

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, October 15, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Quantum Sensing and Imaging with Diamond Spins"

Topic: 
Quantum Sensing and Imaging with Diamond Spins
Abstract / Description: 

Quantum sensors based on optically addressable solid-state spins are powerful tools that offer high sensitivity, nanoscale spatial resolution, and quantitative field information. The nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond is the most advanced such sensor because of its robust, room-temperature coherence and its high sensitivity to a variety of fields: magnetic, electric, thermal, and strain. Here I discuss an NV-based imaging platform where we have incorporated an NV center into a scanning probe microscope and used it to image skyrmions, nanoscale topological spin textures. I also discuss recent experiments that utilize the NV center's sensitivity to fluctuating magnetic fields to image conductivity with nanoscale spatial resolution. A grand challenge to improving the spatial resolution and magnetic sensitivity of the NV is mitigating surface-induced quantum decoherence, which I will discuss in the second part of this talk. Decoherence at interfaces is a universal problem that affects many quantum technologies, but the microscopic origins are as yet unclear. Our studies guide the ongoing development of quantum control and materials control, pushing towards the ultimate goal of NV-based single nuclear spin imaging.


 

Aut. Qtr. Colloq. committee: R. Blandford (Chair), B. Feldman, A. Kapitulnik, B. Lev and V. Khemani
Location: Hewlett Teaching Center, Rm. 200

 

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Choreographing Quantum Spin Dynamics with Light"

Topic: 
Choreographing Quantum Spin Dynamics with Light
Abstract / Description: 

The power of quantum information lies in its capacity to be non-local, encoded in correlations among two, three, or many entangled particles. Yet our ability to produce, understand, and exploit such correlations is hampered by the fact that the interactions between particles and ordinarily local. I will report on experiments in which we use light to induce long-range interactions among cold atoms, with photons acting either as messengers or as a means of coupling to highly polarizable Rydberg states. The combination of optically programmable interactions with imaging of spin dynamics opens new opportunities in areas ranging from quantum-enhanced sensing to quantum simulation. As an illustrative example, I will touch on prospects for building and probing toy models for information scrambling in black holes.


 

Aut. Qtr. Colloq. committee: R. Blandford (Chair), B. Feldman, A. Kapitulnik, B. Lev and V. Khemani
Location: Hewlett Teaching Center, Rm. 200

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Earthquake and Tsunami Physics"

Topic: 
Earthquake and Tsunami Physics
Abstract / Description: 

Earthquakes are a familiar hazard to those of us in California. This talk explores our understanding of processes governing earthquake occurrence, starting from the basics of elasticity and friction and expanding to encompass behavior of fluid-saturated granular material in fault zones, geometric complexity of faults, shear heating and viscoelastic behavior of rocks, and fluid transport and pore fluid pressure evolution along fault zones. We'll examine why earthquakes are so unpredictable, how frictional sliding occurs without pervasively melting rocks, and some open questions regarding tsunami generation by offshore earthquakes. My group tackles these questions through development of continuum mechanics based models and computer simulations.

 

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, September 24, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Physical Sciences Approaches to Analyze Tumor-Associated ECM Dynamics

Topic: 
Physical Sciences Approaches to Analyze Tumor-Associated ECM Dynamics
Abstract / Description: 

Stanford Center for Cancer Systems Biology (CCSB) presents:

Claudia Fischbach-Teschl, PhD
Professor, Nancy E. and Peter C. Meinig School of Biomedical Engineering
Director, Cornell Center on the Physics of Cancer Metabolism Cornell University

"Physical Sciences Approaches to Analyze Tumor-Associated ECM Dynamics"

ABSTRACT:
Microenvironmental conditions contribute to the pathogenesis of cancer and include altered cellular composition, extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, and mechanical cues. However, our understanding of the specific mechanisms by which these microenvironmental perturbations impact the development, progression, and therapy response of cancer is relatively limited. More intricate models are needed to better understand the complex biochemical and biophysical interactions that drive tumor initiation, growth, metastasis, metabolic adaptation, and immune evasion. The fields of biomaterials and tissue engineering provide increasingly sophisticated tools and strategies to recapitulate and monitor relevant properties of tumor-microenvironment interactions.


These approaches not only bear tremendous potential to advance our current understanding of cancer, but are also increasingly explored for more clinically relevant drug testing. Indeed, combining patient-specific cells with engineered culture systems promises to enhance the predictive power of precision medicine pipelines. This talk will highlight specific examples of how the microenvironment regulates the highly dynamic nature of cancer and will outline opportunities and challenges of the field of tumor engineering.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 23, 2019 - 2:30pm
Venue: 
Clark Center - S360

Pages

CS300 Seminar

#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces

Topic: 
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces
Abstract / Description: 

Individuals of all genders invited to be a part of:
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces, where we will feature real stories of harassment at Stanford academic STEM in a conversation with Provost Drell, Dean Minor (SoM), and Dean Graham (SE3). We will have plenty of time for audience discussion on how we can take concrete action to dismantle this culture and actively work towards a more inclusive Stanford for everyone. While our emphasis is on STEM fields, we welcome and encourage participation from students, postdocs, staff, and faculty of all academic disciplines and backgrounds.

Date and Time: 
Friday, April 19, 2019 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
STLC 111

John G. Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology

Topic: 
Internet of Things and Internet of Energy for Connecting at Any Time and Any Place
Abstract / Description: 

In this presentation, I would like to discuss with you how to establish a sustainable and smart society through the internet of energy for connecting at any time and any place. I suspect that you have heard the phrase, "Internet of Energy" less often. The meaning of this phrase is simple. Because of a ubiquitous energy transmission system, you do not need to worry about a shortage of electric power. One of the most important items for establishing a sustainable society is [...]


"Inaugural Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology," EE News, July 2018

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, January 14, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Special Seminar: Formal Methods meets Machine Learning: Explorations in Cyber-Physical Systems Design

Topic: 
Formal Methods meets Machine Learning: Explorations in Cyber-Physical Systems Design
Abstract / Description: 

Cyber-physical systems (CPS) are computational systems tightly integrated with physical processes. Examples include modern automobiles, fly-by-wire aircraft, software-controlled medical devices, robots, and many more. In recent times, these systems have exploded in complexity due to the growing amount of software and networking integrated into physical environments via real-time control loops, as well as the growing use of machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) techniques. At the same time, these systems must be designed with strong verifiable guarantees.

In this talk, I will describe our research explorations at the intersection of machine learning and formal methods that address some of the challenges in CPS design. First, I will describe how machine learning techniques can be blended with formal methods to address challenges in specification, design, and verification of industrial CPS. In particular, I will discuss the use of formal inductive synthesis --- algorithmic synthesis from examples with formal guarantees — for CPS design. Next, I will discuss how formal methods can be used to improve the level of assurance in systems that rely heavily on machine learning, such as autonomous vehicles using deep learning for perception. Both theory and industrial case studies will be discussed, with a special focus on the automotive domain. I will conclude with a brief discussion of the major remaining challenges posed by the use of machine learning and AI in CPS.

Date and Time: 
Monday, December 4, 2017 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Gates 463A

SpaceX's journey on the road to mars

Topic: 
SpaceX's journey on the road to mars
Abstract / Description: 

SSI will be hosting Gwynne Shotwell — President and COO of SpaceX — to discuss SpaceX's journey on the road to mars. The event will be on Wednesday Oct 11th from 7pm - 8pm in Dinkelspiel Auditorium. After the talk, there will be a Q&A session hosted by Steve Jurvetson from DFJ Venture Capital.

Claim your tickets now on eventbright

 

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 11, 2017 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Dinkelspiel Auditorium

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, Subhasish Mitra

5:15-6:00, Silvio Savarese

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, December 7, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, Phil Levis

5:15-6:00, Ron Fedkiw

Date and Time: 
Monday, December 5, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, Dan Boneh

5:15-6:00, Aaron Sidford

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, John Mitchell

5:15-6:00, James Zou

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 28, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, Emma Brunskill

5:15-6:00, Doug James

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 16, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, James Landay

5:15-6:00, Dan Jurafsky

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 14, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

Pages

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "Tales from the Risks Forum"

Topic: 
Tales from the Risks Forum
Abstract / Description: 

Peter G. Neumann has moderated the ACM Risks Forum (risks.org) since its inception in 1985. RISKS has reported and discussed a broad spectrum of problems in computer systems, misconceptions, and human failings over the years. In an unusual format for EE380, this session will revisit some of more memorable risks discovered and how they were mitigated. Live attendees will have an opportunity to share unpublished risks they have found, as time permits. (Please limit your proposed contribution to 3 PDF slides.)

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 16, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "Neural Networks on Chip Design from the User Perspective"

Topic: 
Neural Networks on Chip Design from the User Perspective
Abstract / Description: 

To apply neural networks to different applications, various customized hardware architectures are proposed in the past a few years to boost the energy efficiency of deep learning inference processing. Meanwhile, the possibilities of adopting emerging NVM (Non-Volatile Memory) technology for efficient learning systems, i.e., in-memory-computing, are also attractive for both academia and industry. We will briefly review our past effort on Deep learning Processing Unit (DPU) design on FPGA in Tsinghua and Deephi, and then talk about some features, i.e. interrupt and virtualization, we are trying to introduce into the accelerators from the user's perspective. Furthermore, we will also talk about the challenges for reliability and security issues in NN accelerators on both FPGA and NVM, and some preliminary solutions for now.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 9, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

CANCELLED - SPECIAL SEMINAR: Recent Advances in Diagnosis and Error Correcting Codes

Topic: 
CANCELLED -- a future date is being explored --
Abstract / Description: 

Cancelled

This talk has been cancelled because EE380 requires a video of the presentation. The speakers talk includes unpublished ideas and results which can be disclosed to a small group but not to a large group over broadcast video.
Hopefully the talk will be rescheduled next week for a small live audience of specialists. Watch for an announcement if you are interested. 


 

This presentation will highlight some of our recent research results in developing new diagnosis techniques as well as constructing new error correcting codes (ECC) well suited for emerging memory technologies. In particular, a fundamentally new approach for extracting diagnostic information from output response data highly compacted in multiple input signature registers (MISRs) will be described. This approach is based on symbolic canceling and can significantly increase the precision of error location information without requiring any additional hardware or data to be collected. Emerging memory technologies (e.g., phase change memories, spin transfer torque magnetic RAM, etc.) have new error mechanisms and higher error rates than traditional memories. New ECCs with more attractive decoding latency and complexity will be presented for addressing these reliability challenges.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 2, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Gates 415

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents MIPS Open

Topic: 
MIPS Open
Abstract / Description: 

During this session, the speakers will provide an overview of Wave Computing's MIPS Open initiative, including details on the program components, how they can be used to design edge SoCs, licensing terms, the design certification process, etc. Mr. Bemanian will also give a demonstration of how to use various program components for real-world example implementations.

Wave Computing released the first MIPS Open program components at the end of March, providing free access to the MIPS RISC architecture without license fees or royalties. The new MIPS Open online environment is live and immediately accessible at www.mipsopen.com. Specific components in the first program release include:

  • MIPS Instruction Set Architecture: A downloadable copy of the latest version of the MIPS 32/64-bit ISA, SIMD, DSP, Multithreading and Virtualization
  • MIPS Open Toolsi: Integrated Development Environment for embedded real-time operating systems and Linux-based systems for embedded products
  • MIPS Open FPGAs: A complete training program including labs, SoC tutorials and sample (non-commercial) RTL code
  • MIPS Open Cores: low power, low footprint microAptiv Microprocessor(MPU) and Microcontroller (MCU) cores targeted for embedded applications

Historical Note The MIPS Architecture and processor was originally developed in the Computer Systems Laboratory at Stanford by a team headed by John Hennessey. MIPS and the UC Berkeley developed SPARC archicture were quintessential RISC architectures: influential, popular, and heavily studied.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 1, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

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Ginzton Lab

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Hyperscale Data Center Applications of Optoelectronics"

Topic: 
Hyperscale Data Center Applications of Optoelectronics
Abstract / Description: 

From subsea fiber cables to short-reach switch interconnects, opto-electronics is a key technology for hyperscale data center networks. As performance requirements increase, photonics moves deeper into the network replacing copper for shorter distances. The next move for photonics is to distances of less than 3m for in-rack applications. This talk will describe how the scale of data-bandwidth growth has challenged what is possible with traditional networks and where the next opportunities for innovation lie.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 23, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "Non-Equilibrium Dynamics and Townes Solitons Formation in Two-Dimensional Bose Gases"

Topic: 
Non-Equilibrium Dynamics and Townes Solitons Formation in Two-Dimensional Bose Gases
Abstract / Description: 

AP 483 Optics and Electronics Seminar

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

 

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, December 2, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "Accelerated Scaling to Rapid Open-Air Fabrication of Durable Perovskite Solar Modules"

Topic: 
Accelerated Scaling to Rapid Open-Air Fabrication of Durable Perovskite Solar Modules
Abstract / Description: 

AP 483 Optics and Electronics Seminar

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

 

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 11, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "A Glimpse into the Dark World of Excitons in Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides via Time Resolved u-ARPES"

Topic: 
A Glimpse into the Dark World of Excitons in Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides via Time Resolved u-ARPES
Abstract / Description: 

AP 483 Optics and Electronics Seminar

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

 

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 28, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "Waves, Modes, Communications and Optics - Just How Many Different Light Beams are There?"

Topic: 
Waves, Modes, Communications and Optics - Just How Many Different Light Beams are There?
Abstract / Description: 

There are many useful ways we can think about optics and waves. “Modes,” like resonator modes or propagating modes in fibers, can give particularly powerful and simple descriptions. We then only need amplitudes of a few functions rather than field values at each of a large number of points. But, for scattering from complex nanophotonic structures or use of multiple beams or waves in space to send more information, these resonator or propagating modes are not enough, and can lead to confusion and even major error (for example, in correctly counting the number of “channels” we have to communicate). We need to think about scattering or communicating waves from some source space to some receiving space. That means we need pairs of functions, one in each space. Fortunately, there are elegant and efficient ways of establishing these pairs, both mathematically and physically. Once we do so, we find many simple heuristic behaviors; we can correctly count numbers of usable channels, establishing clear limits; and we can find the “right” fundamental basis pairs for describing optical systems. That basis is fundamental because it leads, for example, to new “Kirchhoff” radiation laws and a simpler “Einstein A&B” coefficient argument, both of which work mode by mode, but only for these new basis function pairs. Along the way, we establish a new “M-gauge” for electromagnetism and an elegant quantization of the electromagnetic field without arbitrary “boxes.” The talk is summarizing a recent paper [1] that introduces all of the necessary math, physics, and results.


 

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

This seminar series is sponsored by Ginzton Laboratory, SPRC, Applied Physics, Physics, and HEPL. 

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 21, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "Photonics in Computing"

Topic: 
Photonics in Computing
Abstract / Description: 

In the 1980s, optical computing emerged as an extremely active area of research promising immense parallelism and signal processing capabilities. Optical neural networks exploited Fourier transform, convolution, and nonlinear elements to demonstrate matrix multiplication, pattern recognition, and associative memory, capabilities. By the 1990s, however, the field of optical computing died. Psaltis wrote in his 1990 article that optical computing was dead because of (a) the lack of practical devices that can be integrated and because there was (2) insufficient knowledge of complex neural networks. Fast-forwarding to today, we find that (a) integrated circuits can contain heterogeneous nano-scale photonic and electronic components utilizing semiconductor industry ecosystems, and (b) new artificial neural network algorithms can imitate or even surpass the capabilities of humans. We discuss possible new directions in computing exploiting the nonlinearity of nanoelectronics and the parallelism of nanophotonics. We will cover two platforms: (1) brain-inspired spiking-photonic-neuromorphic computing utilizing embedded 3D photonic-electronic integrated circuits and (2) photonic-FPGA utilizing reconfigurable 3D photonics. Prospects of future computing systems including such photonic computing modules will also be discussed.


 

AP 483 Optics and Electronics Seminar

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

 

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 14, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "Splitting a Bose-Einstein Condensate Enables EPR Steering and Simultaneous Readout of Conjugate Observables"

Topic: 
Splitting a Bose-Einstein Condensate Enables EPR Steering and Simultaneous Readout of Conjugate Observables
Abstract / Description: 

AP 483 Optics and Electronics Seminar

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

 

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 7, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "Adventures with Angular Momenta of Near Field Photons"

Topic: 
Adventures with Angular Momenta of Near Field Photons
Abstract / Description: 

AP 483 Optics and Electronics Seminar

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

 

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, September 30, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

Pages

Information Systems Lab (ISL) Colloquium

ISL Colloquium & IT Forum present "Generalized Resilience and Robust Statistics"

Topic: 
Generalized Resilience and Robust Statistics
Abstract / Description: 

Robust statistics traditionally focuses on outliers, or perturbations in total variation distance. However, a dataset could be corrupted in many other ways, such as systematic measurement errors and missing covariates. We generalize the robust statistics approach to consider perturbations under any Wasserstein distance, and show that robust estimation is possible whenever a distribution's population statistics are robust under a certain family of friendly perturbations. This generalizes a property called resilience previously employed in the special case of mean estimation with outliers. We justify the generalized resilience property by showing that it holds under moment or hypercontractive conditions. Even in the total variation case, these subsume conditions in the literature for mean estimation, regression, and covariance estimation; the resulting analysis simplifies and sometimes improves these known results in both population limit and finite-sample rate. Our robust estimators are based on minimum distance (MD) functionals (Donoho and Liu, 1988), which project onto a set of distributions under a discrepancy related to the perturbation. We present two approaches for designing MD estimators with good finite- sample rates: weakening the discrepancy and expanding the set of distributions. We also present connections to Gao et al. (2019)'s recent analysis of generative adversarial networks for robust estimation.

Joint work with Banghua Zhu and Jacob Steinhardt

Date and Time: 
Friday, October 11, 2019 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL Colloquium welcomes Fanny Yang

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

TBA


The Information Systems Laboratory Colloquium (ISLC)

is typically held in Packard 101 every Thursday at 4:30 pm during the academic year. Coffee and refreshments are served at 4pm in the second floor kitchen of Packard Bldg.

The Colloquium is organized by graduate students Joachim Neu, Tavor Baharav and Kabir Chandrasekher. To suggest speakers, please contact any of the students.

To receive email notifications of seminars you can join the ISL mailing list.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, December 5, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

ISL Colloquium welcomes Christopher Metzler

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

TBA


The Information Systems Laboratory Colloquium (ISLC)

is typically held in Packard 101 every Thursday at 4:30 pm during the academic year. Coffee and refreshments are served at 4pm in the second floor kitchen of Packard Bldg.

The Colloquium is organized by graduate students Joachim Neu, Tavor Baharav and Kabir Chandrasekher. To suggest speakers, please contact any of the students.

To receive email notifications of seminars you can join the ISL mailing list.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 21, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

ISL Colloquium welcomes Jaiming Xu

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

TBA


The Information Systems Laboratory Colloquium (ISLC)

is typically held in Packard 101 every Thursday at 4:30 pm during the academic year. Coffee and refreshments are served at 4pm in the second floor kitchen of Packard Bldg.

The Colloquium is organized by graduate students Joachim Neu, Tavor Baharav and Kabir Chandrasekher. To suggest speakers, please contact any of the students.

To receive email notifications of seminars you can join the ISL mailing list.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 14, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

ISL Colloquium welcomes Mert Sabuncu

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

TBA


The Information Systems Laboratory Colloquium (ISLC)

is typically held in Packard 101 every Thursday at 4:30 pm during the academic year. Coffee and refreshments are served at 4pm in the second floor kitchen of Packard Bldg.

The Colloquium is organized by graduate students Joachim Neu, Tavor Baharav and Kabir Chandrasekher. To suggest speakers, please contact any of the students.

To receive email notifications of seminars you can join the ISL mailing list.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 7, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

ISL Colloquium welcomes Christina Lee Yu

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

TBA


The Information Systems Laboratory Colloquium (ISLC)

is typically held in Packard 101 every Thursday at 4:30 pm during the academic year. Coffee and refreshments are served at 4pm in the second floor kitchen of Packard Bldg.

The Colloquium is organized by graduate students Joachim Neu, Tavor Baharav and Kabir Chandrasekher. To suggest speakers, please contact any of the students.

To receive email notifications of seminars you can join the ISL mailing list.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 31, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

ISL Colloquium wpresents "Structure in high-dimensional non-parametric problems: Two modern vignettes"

Topic: 
Structure in high-dimensional non-parametric problems: Two modern vignettes
Abstract / Description: 

Non-parametric estimation problems in high dimensions see applications across scientific disciplines. However, they suffer from the curse of dimensionality: The number of samples required to achieve a prescribed error tolerance grows exponentially in the ambient dimension. It is thus of interest to impose natural structure in such problems to ensure both sample-efficiency and computational tractability. This talk will present two modern takes on classical problems in this space.

The first is the problem of fitting high dimensional convex functions from noisy observations, also known as convex regression. In order to avoid the curse of dimensionality, we study the problem of "max-affine" regression, in which the underlying convex function is equipped with additional structure and can be written as the point-wise maximum of a small number of affine functions. We analyze a well-known alternating minimization heuristic for this task, showing that it converges to the true model, at the optimal rate, under some random design assumptions.

The second vignette concerns the single-index model, which is a widely used semi-parametric model for non-linear dimensionality reduction. We describe a new, computationally efficient methodology for parameter estimation under this model that generalizes known heuristics for special cases, and achieves automatic adaptation to the noise level of the problem. Consequently, when the signal-to-noise to noise ratio in the model is high, we significantly reduce the bias in classical approaches in order to provide much sharper parameter estimates.

Throughout the talk, connections will be made to phase retrieval, which is a widely studied special case of both of these problems. The talk is based on joint work with Dean P. Foster, Avishek Ghosh, Adityanand Guntuboyina, Kannan Ramchandran, and Martin J. Wainwright.


The Information Systems Laboratory Colloquium (ISLC)

is typically held in Packard 101 every Thursday at 4:30 pm during the academic year. Coffee and refreshments are served at 4pm in the second floor kitchen of Packard Bldg.

The Colloquium is organized by graduate students Joachim Neu, Tavor Baharav and Kabir Chandrasekher. To suggest speakers, please contact any of the students.

To receive email notifications of seminars you can join the ISL mailing list.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 24, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

ISL Colloquium presents "Simple Near-Optimal Scheduling for the M/G/1"

Topic: 
Simple Near-Optimal Scheduling for the M/G/1
Abstract / Description: 

We consider the problem of preemptively scheduling jobs to minimize mean response time of an M/G/1 queue. When the scheduler knows each job's size, the shortest remaining processing time (SRPT) policy is optimal. Unfortunately, in many settings we do not have access to each job's size. Instead, we know only the job size distribution. In this setting, the Gittins policy is known to minimize mean response time, but its complex priority structure can be computationally intractable. A much simpler alternative to Gittins is the shortest expected remaining processing time (SERPT) policy. While SERPT is a natural extension of SRPT to unknown job sizes, it is unknown how close SERPT is to optimal.

We present a new variant of SERPT called monotonic SERPT (M-SERPT) which is as simple as SERPT but has provably near-optimal mean response time at all loads for any job size distribution. Specifically, we prove the mean response time ratio between M-SERPT and Gittins is at most 3 for load ρ ≤ 8/9 and at most 5 for any load. This makes M-SERPT the only scheduling policy known to be a constant-factor approximation of Gittins.

 


 

The Information Systems Laboratory Colloquium (ISLC)

is typically held in Packard 101 every Thursday at 4:30 pm during the academic year. Coffee and refreshments are served at 4pm in the second floor kitchen of Packard Bldg.

The Colloquium is organized by graduate students Joachim Neu, Tavor Baharav and Kabir Chandrasekher. To suggest speakers, please contact any of the students.

To receive email notifications of seminars you can join the ISL mailing list.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 17, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

ISL Colloquium presents "Algorithms for robust and heavy-tailed statistics -- theory and experiment"

Topic: 
Algorithms for robust and heavy-tailed statistics -- theory and experiment
Abstract / Description: 

Algorithms for statistics on corrupted or heavy-tailed data have seen a flurry activity in the last few years. (Indeed, even the last few months!) I will survey some recent developments, and then zoom in on joint work with Yihe Dong and Jerry Li in which we focus on translating the progress in polynomial-time algorithms into something practical. In particular, we obtain the first nearly-linear time algorithm for robust mean estimation in high dimensions, where the goal is to estimate the mean of a random vector from independent samples of which a constant fraction have been maliciously corrupted. Our algorithm is sufficiently practical that our implementation scales to thousands of dimensions and tens/hundreds of thousands of samples on laptop hardware; I will discuss some experimental validations of our theoretical results.

Based on "Quantum Entropy Scoring for Fast Robust Mean Estimation and Improved Outlier Detection," to appear in NeurIPS 2019. https://arxiv.org/pdf/1906.11366.pdf 


 

The Information Systems Laboratory Colloquium (ISLC)

is typically held in Packard 101 every Thursday at 4:30 pm during the academic year. Coffee and refreshments are served at 4pm in the second floor kitchen of Packard Bldg.

The Colloquium is organized by graduate students Joachim Neu, Tavor Baharav and Kabir Chandrasekher. To suggest speakers, please contact any of the students.

To receive email notifications of seminars you can join the ISL mailing list.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 10, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

Pages

IT-Forum

ISL Colloquium & IT Forum present "Generalized Resilience and Robust Statistics"

Topic: 
Generalized Resilience and Robust Statistics
Abstract / Description: 

Robust statistics traditionally focuses on outliers, or perturbations in total variation distance. However, a dataset could be corrupted in many other ways, such as systematic measurement errors and missing covariates. We generalize the robust statistics approach to consider perturbations under any Wasserstein distance, and show that robust estimation is possible whenever a distribution's population statistics are robust under a certain family of friendly perturbations. This generalizes a property called resilience previously employed in the special case of mean estimation with outliers. We justify the generalized resilience property by showing that it holds under moment or hypercontractive conditions. Even in the total variation case, these subsume conditions in the literature for mean estimation, regression, and covariance estimation; the resulting analysis simplifies and sometimes improves these known results in both population limit and finite-sample rate. Our robust estimators are based on minimum distance (MD) functionals (Donoho and Liu, 1988), which project onto a set of distributions under a discrepancy related to the perturbation. We present two approaches for designing MD estimators with good finite- sample rates: weakening the discrepancy and expanding the set of distributions. We also present connections to Gao et al. (2019)'s recent analysis of generative adversarial networks for robust estimation.

Joint work with Banghua Zhu and Jacob Steinhardt

Date and Time: 
Friday, October 11, 2019 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL Colloquium presents "Denoising and Regularization via Exploiting the Structural Bias of Convolutional Generators"

Topic: 
Denoising and Regularization via Exploiting the Structural Bias of Convolutional Generators
Abstract / Description: 

Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) have emerged as highly successful tools for image generation, recovery, and restoration. This success is often attributed to large amounts of training data.
On the contrary, a number of recent experimental results suggest that a major contributing factor to this success is that convolutional networks impose strong prior assumptions about natural images. A surprising experiment that highlights this structural bias towards simple, natural images is that one can remove various kinds of noise and corruptions from a corrupted natural image by simply fitting (via gradient descent) a randomly initialized, over-parameterized convolutional generator to this single image. While this over-parameterized model can eventually fit the corrupted image perfectly, surprisingly after a few iterations of gradient descent one obtains the uncorrupted image, without using any training data. This intriguing phenomena has enabled state-of-the-art CNN-based denoising as well as regularization in linear inverse problems such as compressive sensing.
In this talk we take a step towards explaining this experimental phenomena by attributing it to particular architectural choices of convolutional networks. We then characterize the dynamics of fitting a two layer convolutional generator to a noisy signal and prove that early-stopped gradient descent denoises/regularizes. This results relies on showing that convolutional generators fit the structured part of an image significantly faster than the corrupted portion.

Based on joint work with Paul Hand and Mahdi Soltanolkotabi.

 


 

The Information Systems Laboratory Colloquium (ISLC)

is typically held in Packard 101 every Thursday at 4:30 pm during the academic year. Coffee and refreshments are served at 4pm in the second floor kitchen of Packard Bldg.

The Colloquium is organized by graduate students Joachim Neu, Tavor Baharav and Kabir Chandrasekher. To suggest speakers, please contact any of the students.

To receive email notifications of seminars you can join the ISL mailing list.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 3, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

IT Forum & ISL Colloquium present "Proving Coding Theorems using Poisson Processes"

Topic: 
Proving Coding Theorems using Poisson Processes
Abstract / Description: 

In information theory, coding theorems are usually proved in the asymptotic regime where the blocklength tends to infinity. While there are techniques for finite blocklength analysis, they are often more complex than their asymptotic counterparts. In this talk, we study the use of Poisson processes in proving coding theorems, which not only gives sharp finite blocklength results, but also gives significantly shorter proofs than conventional asymptotic techniques in some settings. Instead of using fixed-size random codebooks, we construct the codebook as a Poisson process. We present a lemma, called the Poisson matching lemma, which can replace both packing and covering lemmas in proofs based on typicality. We then demonstrate its use in settings such as channel coding with channel state information at the encoder, lossy source coding with side information at the decoder, joint source-channel coding, broadcast channels, and distributed lossy source coding. This shows that the Poisson matching lemma is a viable alternative to typicality for most problems in network information theory.

The talk is based on a joint work with Prof. Venkat Anantharam (UC Berkeley).

 

Date and Time: 
Friday, September 27, 2019 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL & IT Forum present "Human-Interpretable Concept Learning via Information Lattices"

Topic: 
Human-Interpretable Concept Learning via Information Lattices
Abstract / Description: 

Is it possible to learn the laws of music theory directly from raw sheet music in the same human-interpretable form as a music theory textbook? How little prior knowledge needs to be encoded to do so? We consider these and similar questions in other topical domains, in developing a general framework for automatic concept learning. The basic idea is an iterative discovery algorithm that has a student-teacher architecture and that operates on a generalization of Shannon's information lattice, which itself encodes a hierarchy of abstractions and is algorithmically constructed from group-theoretic foundations. In particular, learning this hierarchy of invariant concepts involves iterative optimization of Bayesian surprise and entropy. This gives a first step towards a principled and cognitive way of automatic concept learning and knowledge discovery. We further discuss applications in computational creativity, and limit theorems for creativity.

Date and Time: 
Friday, September 6, 2019 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

IT Forum & ISL Colloquium present "Learning from Sparse Data"

Topic: 
Learning from Sparse Data
Abstract / Description: 

In many scientific domains, the number of individuals in the population under study is often very large, however the number of observations available per individual is often very limited (sparse). Limited observations prohibit accurate estimation of parameters of interest for any given individual. In this sparse data regime, the key question is, how accurately can we estimate the distribution of parameters over the population? This problem arises in various domains such as epidemiology, psychology, health-care, biology, and social sciences. As an example, suppose for a large random sample of the population we have observations of whether a person caught the flu for each year over the past 5 years. We cannot accurately estimate the probability of any given person catching the flu with only 5 observations, however our goal is to estimate the distribution of these probabilities over the whole population. Such an estimated distribution can be used in downstream tasks, like testing and estimating properties of the distribution.

In this talk, I will present our recent results where we show that the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) is minimax optimal in the sparse observation regime. While the MLE for this problem was proposed as early as the late 1960's, how accurately the MLE recovers the true distribution was not known. Our work closes this gap. In the course of our analysis, we provide novel bounds on the coefficients of Bernstein polynomials approximating Lipschitz-1 functions. Furthermore, the MLE is also efficiently computable in this setting and we evaluate the performance of MLE on both synthetic and real datasets.

Joint work with Weihao Kong, Gregory Valiant, and Sham Kakade.

Date and Time: 
Friday, August 30, 2019 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL & IT Forum present "Feedback capacity of channels with memory via Reinforcement Learning and Graph-based auxiliary random variable""

Topic: 
Feedback capacity of channels with memory via Reinforcement Learning and Graph-based auxiliary random variable
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk we present two novel ideas: the first is novel method to compute the feedback capacity of channels with memory using reinforcement learning (RL). The second is a new technique of using Graph-based auxiliary random variable to convert a multi-letter expression of feedback capacity formula into a single letter expression.

In RL, one seeks to maximize cumulative rewards collected in a sequential decision-making environment. This is done by collecting samples of the underlying environment and using them to learn the optimal decision rule. The main advantage of this approach is its computational efficiency, even in high dimensional problems. Hence, RL can be used to estimate numerically the feedback capacity of unifilar finite state channels (FSCs) with large alphabet size. The outcome of the RL algorithm sheds light on the properties of the optimal decision rule, which in our case, is the optimal input distribution of the channel.

The insights gained from the RL computation can be converted into analytic, single-letter capacity expressions by solving corresponding lower and upper bounds. The bounds are based on another novel idea of using Graph-based auxiliary random variable

We demonstrate the efficiency of this method by analytically solving the feedback capacity of the well-known Ising channel with a large alphabet. We also provide a simple coding scheme that achieves the feedback capacity.

 

Date and Time: 
Friday, August 2, 2019 - 3:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL & IT Forum present "Resource-efficient quantized deep learning"

Topic: 
Resource-efficient quantized deep learning
Abstract / Description: 

Reducing the numerical precision of neural networks is one of the simplest, most effective and most common methods to improve resource efficiency (e.g. by reducing the memory and power requirements). Much research has been invested in finding how to quantize neural nets without significantly degrading performance. I will describe the main bottlenecks and solutions in various settings:
1) 1bit inference (1bit weights and activations), NIPS 2016 - link
2) 8bit training (8bit weights, activations, gradients, and batch-norm), NeurIPS 2018 - link
3) 4bit inference when quantization is done only post-training, Arxiv 2019 - link
4) Calculating the maximum trainable depth as a function of the numerical precision, Arxiv 2019 - link

Date and Time: 
Friday, July 26, 2019 - 2:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL & IT Forum present "Towards Achieving Secure Consensus and Trusted Data Exchange for Multi-Robot Teams""

Topic: 
Towards Achieving Secure Consensus and Trusted Data Exchange for Multi-Robot Teams
Abstract / Description: 

As physical robot networks become more pervasive all around us, in the form of teams of autonomous vehicles, fleets of delivery drones, and smart and mobile IoT, it becomes increasingly critical to question the robustness of their coordination algorithms to security threats and/or corrupted data. Indeed, it has been shown that many multi-robot tasks easily fail in the presence of erroneous or hacked data. We investigate the vulnerabilities of important multi-robot algorithms such as consensus, coverage, and distributed mapping to malicious or erroneous data and we demonstrate the potential of communication to thwart certain attacks, such as the Sybil Attack, on these algorithms. Our key insight is that coordinated mobility can be combined with signal processing of communication signals to allow agents to learn important information about the environment and the nature of other agents in the network (for example the presence of cooperative versus adversarial agents). Along these lines, we will present a theoretical and experimental framework for provably securing multi-robot distributed algorithms through careful use of communication. We will present both theoretical results and experimental results on actual hardware implementations for bounding the influence of a Sybil Attack on consensus and on coverage by using observations over the wireless channels. In some cases, we show that the effect of a Sybil Attack can be nearly eliminated with high probability by deriving the appropriate switching function using a sufficient number of observations over the wireless network. Finally, we will briefly describe promising results on new methods for outlier rejection and active rendezvous in a pose graph optimization framework that exploits feedback gathered from communication channels to arrive at improved accuracy.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 2:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

ISL & IT Forum present "Building a DNA information storage system from the bottom up"

Topic: 
Building a DNA information storage system from the bottom up
Abstract / Description: 

DNA has emerged as a compelling data storage medium due to its density, longevity, and eternal relevance compared to current memory technologies. However, the high price of synthesizing DNA (list price $3,500 per megabyte) remains a major bottleneck for adoption of this promising storage solution. In this talk, I will present our work towards breaking down this barrier using enzymatic DNA synthesize and a tailored codec for robust data retrieval. I will also touch upon some fundamental considerations when designing DNA information storage systems.

Date and Time: 
Friday, June 21, 2019 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

Pages

Optics and Electronics Seminar

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Hyperscale Data Center Applications of Optoelectronics"

Topic: 
Hyperscale Data Center Applications of Optoelectronics
Abstract / Description: 

From subsea fiber cables to short-reach switch interconnects, opto-electronics is a key technology for hyperscale data center networks. As performance requirements increase, photonics moves deeper into the network replacing copper for shorter distances. The next move for photonics is to distances of less than 3m for in-rack applications. This talk will describe how the scale of data-bandwidth growth has challenged what is possible with traditional networks and where the next opportunities for innovation lie.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 23, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "Non-Equilibrium Dynamics and Townes Solitons Formation in Two-Dimensional Bose Gases"

Topic: 
Non-Equilibrium Dynamics and Townes Solitons Formation in Two-Dimensional Bose Gases
Abstract / Description: 

AP 483 Optics and Electronics Seminar

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

 

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, December 2, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "Accelerated Scaling to Rapid Open-Air Fabrication of Durable Perovskite Solar Modules"

Topic: 
Accelerated Scaling to Rapid Open-Air Fabrication of Durable Perovskite Solar Modules
Abstract / Description: 

AP 483 Optics and Electronics Seminar

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

 

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 11, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "A Glimpse into the Dark World of Excitons in Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides via Time Resolved u-ARPES"

Topic: 
A Glimpse into the Dark World of Excitons in Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides via Time Resolved u-ARPES
Abstract / Description: 

AP 483 Optics and Electronics Seminar

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

 

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 28, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "Waves, Modes, Communications and Optics - Just How Many Different Light Beams are There?"

Topic: 
Waves, Modes, Communications and Optics - Just How Many Different Light Beams are There?
Abstract / Description: 

There are many useful ways we can think about optics and waves. “Modes,” like resonator modes or propagating modes in fibers, can give particularly powerful and simple descriptions. We then only need amplitudes of a few functions rather than field values at each of a large number of points. But, for scattering from complex nanophotonic structures or use of multiple beams or waves in space to send more information, these resonator or propagating modes are not enough, and can lead to confusion and even major error (for example, in correctly counting the number of “channels” we have to communicate). We need to think about scattering or communicating waves from some source space to some receiving space. That means we need pairs of functions, one in each space. Fortunately, there are elegant and efficient ways of establishing these pairs, both mathematically and physically. Once we do so, we find many simple heuristic behaviors; we can correctly count numbers of usable channels, establishing clear limits; and we can find the “right” fundamental basis pairs for describing optical systems. That basis is fundamental because it leads, for example, to new “Kirchhoff” radiation laws and a simpler “Einstein A&B” coefficient argument, both of which work mode by mode, but only for these new basis function pairs. Along the way, we establish a new “M-gauge” for electromagnetism and an elegant quantization of the electromagnetic field without arbitrary “boxes.” The talk is summarizing a recent paper [1] that introduces all of the necessary math, physics, and results.


 

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

This seminar series is sponsored by Ginzton Laboratory, SPRC, Applied Physics, Physics, and HEPL. 

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 21, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "Photonics in Computing"

Topic: 
Photonics in Computing
Abstract / Description: 

In the 1980s, optical computing emerged as an extremely active area of research promising immense parallelism and signal processing capabilities. Optical neural networks exploited Fourier transform, convolution, and nonlinear elements to demonstrate matrix multiplication, pattern recognition, and associative memory, capabilities. By the 1990s, however, the field of optical computing died. Psaltis wrote in his 1990 article that optical computing was dead because of (a) the lack of practical devices that can be integrated and because there was (2) insufficient knowledge of complex neural networks. Fast-forwarding to today, we find that (a) integrated circuits can contain heterogeneous nano-scale photonic and electronic components utilizing semiconductor industry ecosystems, and (b) new artificial neural network algorithms can imitate or even surpass the capabilities of humans. We discuss possible new directions in computing exploiting the nonlinearity of nanoelectronics and the parallelism of nanophotonics. We will cover two platforms: (1) brain-inspired spiking-photonic-neuromorphic computing utilizing embedded 3D photonic-electronic integrated circuits and (2) photonic-FPGA utilizing reconfigurable 3D photonics. Prospects of future computing systems including such photonic computing modules will also be discussed.


 

AP 483 Optics and Electronics Seminar

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

 

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 14, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "Splitting a Bose-Einstein Condensate Enables EPR Steering and Simultaneous Readout of Conjugate Observables"

Topic: 
Splitting a Bose-Einstein Condensate Enables EPR Steering and Simultaneous Readout of Conjugate Observables
Abstract / Description: 

AP 483 Optics and Electronics Seminar

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

 

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 7, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "Adventures with Angular Momenta of Near Field Photons"

Topic: 
Adventures with Angular Momenta of Near Field Photons
Abstract / Description: 

AP 483 Optics and Electronics Seminar

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

 

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, September 30, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

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SCIEN Talk

SCIEN Colloquium and EE 292E present "Fluorescence Lifetime Techniques in Clinical Interventions"

Topic: 
Fluorescence Lifetime Techniques in Clinical Interventions
Abstract / Description: 

This presentation overviews fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy and imaging techniques for label-free in vivo characterization of biological tissues. Emphasis is placed on recently developed devices and methods enabling real-time characterization and diagnosis of diseased tissues during clinical interventions. I will present studies conducted in animal models and human patients demonstrating the ability of these techniques to provide rapid in-situ evaluation of tissue biochemistry and their potential to guide surgical and intravascular procedures. Current results demonstrate that intrinsic fluorescence can provide useful contrast for the diagnosis of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques, intraoperative delineation of brain tumors and head and neck tumors. Finally, I will present results from the first-in-human study that shows the potential of a multispectral fluorescence lifetime method for image-guided augmented reality in trans-oral robotic surgery (TORS).

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 23, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SCIEN presents "A proposed range compensating lens for non-imaging active optical systems"

Topic: 
A proposed range compensating lens for non-imaging active optical systems
Abstract / Description: 

In many active optical systems where the light is supplied such as a range finder or optical radar (LiDAR), there is a possibility that the detector (pixel) can be destroyed if significant signal is returned or at the very least blinded for a period of time. This is because the designer struggles with the "one over range squared" loss which can amount to significant attenuation in the return signal given the range requirements. When pushing the range limit requirement, the sensor is in need of a large dynamic range detector and/or some form of detector protection when the target is quite close. This work proposes a lens that attempts to compensate for range signal loss passively and instantaneously by combining lens elements in parallel rather than in series as is typically done [Mudge Appl. Opt. 58, (2019)]. The proposed lens is relatively simple and compensates for range albeit not perfectly. Additionally, a discussion is provided to implement this approach along with a variety of examples of a range compensating lens [Phenis et al. Proc. of SPIE, 11125, (2019)]. These designs cover techniques and include some of the penalties incurred.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 30, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SCIEN presents "Light Fields: From Shape Recovery to Sparse Reconstruction"

Topic: 
Light Fields: From Shape Recovery to Sparse Reconstruction
Abstract / Description: 

The availability of academic and commercial light field camera systems has spurred significant research into the use of light fields and multi-view imagery in computer vision and computer graphics. In this talk, we discuss our results over the past few years, focusing on a few themes. First, we describe our work on a unified formulation of shape from light field cameras, combining cues such as defocus, correspondence, and shading. Then, we go beyond photoconsistency, addressing non-Lambertian objects, occlusions, and an SVBRDF-invariant shape recovery algorithm. Finally, we show that advances in machine learning can be used to interpolate light fields from very sparse angular samples, in the limit a single 2D image, and create light field videos from sparse temporal samples. We also discuss recent work on combining machine learning with plenoptic sampling theory to create virtual explorations of real scenes from a very sparse set of input images captured on a handheld mobile phone.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 6, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SCIEN presents " Optical 3D scanning in a X-ray microscope"

Topic: 
Optical 3D scanning in a X-ray microscope
Abstract / Description: 

The Zeiss Group develops, produces and distributes measuring technology, microscopes, medical technology, eyeglass lenses, camera and cinema lenses, binoculars and semiconductor manufacturing equipment. In this talk, I will present a novel webcam based optical 3D scanning method that allows independent surface mesh generation inside X-ray microscopes. These surface models can be used for collision avoidance and improved ease of use.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 16, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SCIEN presents "Training academy for autonomous vehicles and mobile robots"

Topic: 
Training academy for autonomous vehicles and mobile robots
Abstract / Description: 

Autonomous mobile robots (e.g., self-driving cars, delivery trucks) are emerging and reshaping the world. However, there is one critical problem blocking the entire industry: how can mobile robots drive safely and naturally in the complex 3D world, and how do we know? In this talk, I will discuss our solution, called "training academy", to the aforementioned problem. We apply 3D vision, deep learning, and reinforcement learning techniques to generate real-world, high-fidelity driving scenarios and train the autonomous systems to develop human-like intelligence in a simulated environment.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 9, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SCIEN presents "Inverse Rendering for Realistic Computer Graphics"

Topic: 
Inverse Rendering for Realistic Computer Graphics
Abstract / Description: 

Rendering refers to a process of creating digital images of an object or a scene from 3D data using computers and algorithms. Inverse rendering is the inverse process of rendering, i.e., reconstructing 3D data from 2D images. The 3D data to be recovered can be 3D geometry, reflectance of a surface, camera viewpoints, or lighting conditions.
In this talk, we will discuss three inverse rendering problems. First, inverse rendering using flash photography captures 3D geometry and reflectance of a static object using a single camera and a flashlight attached to the camera. An alternating and iterative optimization framework is proposed to jointly solve for several unknown properties. Second, inverse rendering at microscale reconstructs 3D normals and reflectance of a surface at microscale. A specially designed acquisition system, as well as an inverse rendering algorithm for microscale material appearance, are proposed. Lastly, inverse rendering for human hair describes a novel 3D reconstruction algorithm for modeling high-quality human hair geometry. We hope that our work on these advanced inverse rendering problems boosts hyper-realism in computer graphics

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 2, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SCIEN presents "High-speed 3D fluorescence microscopy with digital adaptive optics"

Topic: 
High-speed 3D fluorescence microscopy with digital adaptive optics
Abstract / Description: 

Observing large-scale three-dimensional subcellular dynamics in vivo at high spatiotemporal resolution has long been a pursuit for biology. However, both the signal-to-noise ratio and resolution degradation in multicellular organisms pose great challenges. In this talk, I will discuss our recent work in in vivo aberration-free 3D fluorescence imaging at millisecond scale by scanning light-field microscopy with digital adaptive optics. Specifically, we propose scanning light-field microscopy to achieve diffraction-limited 3D synthetic aperture for incoherent conditions, which facilitates real-time digital adaptive optics for every pixel in post-processing. Various fast subcellular processes are observed, including mitochondrial dynamics in cultured neurons, membrane dynamics in zebrafish embryos, and calcium propagations in cardiac cells, human cerebral organoids, and Drosophila larval neurons, enabling simultaneous in vivo studies of morphological and functional dynamics in 3D.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, September 25, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SCIEN presents "Robotic Imaging, Machine Learning and Augmented Reality for Computer Assisted Interventions"

Topic: 
Robotic Imaging, Machine Learning and Augmented Reality for Computer Assisted Interventions
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk, I will present an overview of our most recent advancements in Robotic Imaging, Machine Leaning and Medical Augmented Reality. I will first discuss the particular requirements for intra-operative imaging and visualization. I will then present some of our latest results in intra-operative multimodal robotic imaging and its translation to clinical applications. I will then discuss the impact of research advancement in machine learning on medical imaging and computer assisted intervention. I will finally present some applications of virtual and augmented reality in the medical domain. Starting by the current deployment of AR and VR technology within medical education, I discuss its current and future impact on surgical education and training. I will then review the first deployment of augmented reality into operating rooms in the last two decades and present some of our latest achievements in this field (see also: www.medicalaugmentedreality.org.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, September 18, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Richard M. Lucas Center for Imaging, Room P083

SCIEN Colloquium and EE 292E present "Snapshot multispectral imaging from a different angle"

Topic: 
Snapshot multispectral imaging from a different angle
Abstract / Description: 

Combining photography and spectroscopy, spectral imaging enables us to see what no traditional color camera has seen before. The current trend is to miniaturize the technology and bring it towards industry. In this talk, I will first give a general introduction to the most common pitfalls of spectral imaging and the challenges that come with miniaturization. Major pitfalls include balancing cross-talk, quantum efficiency, illumination and the optics. Miniaturization has become possible thanks to the monolithic per-pixel integration of thin-film Fabry-Pérot filters on CMOS imaging sensors. I will explain the difficulty of using these cameras with non- telecentric lenses. This is a major concern because of the angular dependency of the thin-film filters. I will demonstrate how this important issue can be solved using a model-based approach.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SCIEN Colloquium and EE 292E present "Towards intelligent computational microscopes"

Topic: 
Towards intelligent computational microscopes
Abstract / Description: 

Deep learning algorithms offer a powerful means to automatically analyze the content of biomedical images. However, many biological samples of interest are difficult to resolve with a standard optical microscope. Either they are too large to fit within the microscope's field-of-view, or too thick, or are quickly moving around. In this talk, I will discuss our recent work in addressing these challenges by using deep learning algorithms to design new experimental strategies for microscopic imaging. Specifically, we use deep neural networks to jointly optimize the physical parameters of our computational microscopes - their illumination settings, lens layouts and data transfer pipelines, for example - for specific tasks. Examples include learning specific illumination patterns that can improve classification of the malaria parasite by up to 15%, and establishing fast methods to automatically track moving specimens across gigapixel-sized images.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 22, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

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SmartGrid

Smart Grid Seminar welcomes Jessica Bain

Topic: 
TBA - date subject to change
Abstract / Description: 

We invite you to join us in this quarter's Stanford Smart Grid Seminar. The theme of the seminar series is on smart grids and energy systems, scheduled for Thursdays, and with speakers from academic institutions and industry. The seminar room is Room 111 in Y2E2 Building.

The speakers are renowned scholars or industry experts in power and energy systems. We believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T. Interested students can take this seminar course for credit by completing a project based on the topics presented in this course. Please discuss with the faculty in charge before signing up for credit.

Smart Grid Seminar Organization Team:

  • Ram Rajagopal, Associate Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering, and Electrical Engineering
  • Liang Min, Managing Director, Bits and Watts Initiative
  • Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
  • Mohammad Rasouli, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 14, 2019 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

Smart Grid Seminar: Vehicle Grid Integration

Topic: 
Vehicle Grid Integration
Abstract / Description: 

We invite you to join us in this quarter's Stanford Smart Grid Seminar. The theme of the seminar series is on smart grids and energy systems, scheduled for Thursdays, and with speakers from academic institutions and industry. The seminar room is Room 111 in Y2E2 Building.

The speakers are renowned scholars or industry experts in power and energy systems. We believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T. Interested students can take this seminar course for credit by completing a project based on the topics presented in this course. Please discuss with the faculty in charge before signing up for credit.

Smart Grid Seminar Organization Team:

  • Ram Rajagopal, Associate Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering, and Electrical Engineering
  • Liang Min, Managing Director, Bits and Watts Initiative
  • Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
  • Mohammad Rasouli, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 7, 2019 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

Smart Grid Seminar: Safety-Constrained Learning Algorithms for Demand Management

Topic: 
Safety-Constrained Learning Algorithms for Demand Management
Abstract / Description: 

In the first part of the talk, we study the problem of designing optimal control actions (e.g., real-time prices) for demand management in power distribution systems given unknown customer response functions. Without exact response information or a market mechanism that extracts this information from customers, the design of demand management initiatives can present economic uncertainty and grid reliability concerns for the aggregator. This highlights the need for safety-constrained learning heuristics that can be applied in power and more broadly safety-critical systems. We showcase "safety-aware" bandit heuristics for designing control actions that constrain the probability of violation of power grid constraints during the learning process. We then highlight the effect of such safety constraints on the growth of regret for special classes of stochastic bandit optimization problems.

In the second part of the talk, we consider the problem of joint routing, battery charging, and pricing problem faced by a profit-maximizing transportation service provider that operates a fleet of autonomous electric vehicles. To accommodate for the time-varying nature of trip demands, renewable energy availability, and electricity prices, a dynamic pricing and control policy is required. We highlight several such policies, including one trained through deep reinforcement learning to develop a near-optimal policy. We also determine the optimal static policy to serve as a baseline for comparison with our dynamic policy and for determining the capacity region of the system. While the static policy provides important insights on optimal pricing and fleet management, we showcase how in a real dynamic setting, it is inefficient to utilize a static policy.


 

We invite you to join us in this quarter's Stanford Smart Grid Seminar. The theme of the seminar series is on smart grids and energy systems, scheduled for Thursdays, and with speakers from academic institutions and industry. The seminar room is Room 111 in Y2E2 Building.

The speakers are renowned scholars or industry experts in power and energy systems. We believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T. Interested students can take this seminar course for credit by completing a project based on the topics presented in this course. Please discuss with the faculty in charge before signing up for credit.

Smart Grid Seminar Organization Team:

  • Ram Rajagopal, Associate Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering, and Electrical Engineering
  • Liang Min, Managing Director, Bits and Watts Initiative
  • Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
  • Mohammad Rasouli, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 24, 2019 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

Smart Grid Seminar: Real World AI Applications at Scale

Topic: 
Real World AI Applications at Scale
Abstract / Description: 

Artificial intelligence (AI) may be the key to unlocking humanity's problem-solving capabilities but engaging with AI is not necessarily intuitive. Industrial enterprises find it difficult to understand how specific AI advances can be applied to their organizations and how to begin integrating AI technology at scale. Starting to work with AI is no different than with any other technology: Understand the problem you are trying to solve, understand the capabilities of the technology, and reconcile the two. We distilled the steps from our application of AI across a variety of real-world projects. To make the steps tangible, we will deepdive into one: Google data center energy efficiency. Google wanted to reduce the energy consumed by its data centers while maintaining a temperature that was safe for operations. The team started this project with one of Google's newest, most optimized data centers. This provided a data-rich environment with the most up-to-date sensors and equipment, which helped baseline performance (and later measure impact). The result was an AI system that achieved 30% reduction in energy consumption while continuing to operate the data center in a safe, effective manner. The benefit was clear: Google reduced its data center energy consumption, environmental impact, and bottomline cost while improving the efficiency of the system. Google is now looking to expand the scale and application of this technology.


We invite you to join us in this quarter's Stanford Smart Grid Seminar. The theme of the seminar series is on smart grids and energy systems, scheduled for Thursdays, and with speakers from academic institutions and industry. The seminar room is Room 111 in Y2E2 Building.

The speakers are renowned scholars or industry experts in power and energy systems. We believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T. Interested students can take this seminar course for credit by completing a project based on the topics presented in this course. Please discuss with the faculty in charge before signing up for credit.

Smart Grid Seminar Organization Team:

  • Ram Rajagopal, Associate Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering, and Electrical Engineering
  • Liang Min, Managing Director, Bits and Watts Initiative
  • Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
  • Mohammad Rasouli, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 3, 2019 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

Smart Grid Seminar: Utility Work on DER Integration

Topic: 
Utility Work on DER Integration
Abstract / Description: 

We invite you to join us in this quarter's Stanford Smart Grid Seminar. The theme of the seminar series is on smart grids and energy systems, scheduled for Thursdays, and with speakers from academic institutions and industry. The seminar room is Room 111 in Y2E2 Building.

The speakers are renowned scholars or industry experts in power and energy systems. We believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T. Interested students can take this seminar course for credit by completing a project based on the topics presented in this course. Please discuss with the faculty in charge before signing up for credit.

Smart Grid Seminar Organization Team:

  • Ram Rajagopal, Associate Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering, and Electrical Engineering
  • Liang Min, Managing Director, Bits and Watts Initiative
  • Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
  • Mohammad Rasouli, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Date and Time: 
Thursday, September 26, 2019 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

Pages

Stanford's NetSeminar

#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces

Topic: 
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces
Abstract / Description: 

Individuals of all genders invited to be a part of:
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces, where we will feature real stories of harassment at Stanford academic STEM in a conversation with Provost Drell, Dean Minor (SoM), and Dean Graham (SE3). We will have plenty of time for audience discussion on how we can take concrete action to dismantle this culture and actively work towards a more inclusive Stanford for everyone. While our emphasis is on STEM fields, we welcome and encourage participation from students, postdocs, staff, and faculty of all academic disciplines and backgrounds.

Date and Time: 
Friday, April 19, 2019 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
STLC 111

John G. Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology

Topic: 
Internet of Things and Internet of Energy for Connecting at Any Time and Any Place
Abstract / Description: 

In this presentation, I would like to discuss with you how to establish a sustainable and smart society through the internet of energy for connecting at any time and any place. I suspect that you have heard the phrase, "Internet of Energy" less often. The meaning of this phrase is simple. Because of a ubiquitous energy transmission system, you do not need to worry about a shortage of electric power. One of the most important items for establishing a sustainable society is [...]


"Inaugural Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology," EE News, July 2018

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, January 14, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Claude E. Shannon's 100th Birthday

Topic: 
Centennial year of the 'Father of the Information Age'
Abstract / Description: 

From UCLA Shannon Centennial Celebration website:

Claude Shannon was an American mathematician, electrical engineer, and cryptographer known as "the father of information theory". Shannon founded information theory and is perhaps equally well known for founding both digital computer and digital circuit design theory. Shannon also laid the foundations of cryptography and did basic work on code breaking and secure telecommunications.

 

Events taking place around the world are listed at IEEE Information Theory Society.

Date and Time: 
Saturday, April 30, 2016 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
N/A

NetSeminar

Topic: 
BlindBox: Deep Packet Inspection over Encrypted Traffic
Abstract / Description: 

SIGCOMM 2015, Joint work with: Justine Sherry, Chang Lan, and Sylvia Ratnasamy

Many network middleboxes perform deep packet inspection (DPI), a set of useful tasks which examine packet payloads. These tasks include intrusion detection (IDS), exfiltration detection, and parental filtering. However, a long-standing issue is that once packets are sent over HTTPS, middleboxes can no longer accomplish their tasks because the payloads are encrypted. Hence, one is faced with the choice of only one of two desirable properties: the functionality of middleboxes and the privacy of encryption.

We propose BlindBox, the first system that simultaneously provides both of these properties. The approach of BlindBox is to perform the deep-packet inspection directly on the encrypted traffic. BlindBox realizes this approach through a new protocol and new encryption schemes. We demonstrate that BlindBox enables applications such as IDS, exfiltration detection and parental filtering, and supports real rulesets from both open-source and industrial DPI systems. We implemented BlindBox and showed that it is practical for settings with long-lived HTTPS connections. Moreover, its core encryption scheme is 3-6 orders of magnitude faster than existing relevant cryptographic schemes.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - 12:15pm to 1:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

NetSeminar

Topic: 
Precise localization and high throughput backscatter using WiFi signals
Abstract / Description: 

Indoor localization holds great promise to enable applications like location-based advertising, indoor navigation, inventory monitoring and management. SpotFi is an accurate indoor localization system that can be deployed on commodity WiFi infrastructure. SpotFi only uses information that is already exposed by WiFi chips and does not require any hardware or firmware changes, yet achieves the same accuracy as state-of-the-art localization systems.

We then talk about BackFi, a novel communication system that enables high throughput, long range communication between very low power backscatter IoT sensors and WiFi APs using ambient WiFi transmissions as the excitation signal. We show via prototypes and experiments that it is possible to achieve communication rates of up to 5 Mbps at a range of 1 m and 1 Mbps at a range of 5 meters. Such performance is an order to three orders of magnitude better than the best known prior WiFi backscatter system.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 12:15pm to 1:30pm
Venue: 
Gates 104

NetSeminar

Topic: 
BlindBox: Deep Packet Inspection over Encrypted Traffic
Abstract / Description: 

SIGCOMM 2015, Joint work with: Justine Sherry, Chang Lan, and Sylvia Ratnasamy

Many network middleboxes perform deep packet inspection (DPI), a set of useful tasks which examine packet payloads. These tasks include intrusion detection (IDS), exfiltration detection, and parental filtering. However, a long-standing issue is that once packets are sent over HTTPS, middleboxes can no longer accomplish their tasks because the payloads are encrypted. Hence, one is faced with the choice of only one of two desirable properties: the functionality of middleboxes and the privacy of encryption.

We propose BlindBox, the first system that simultaneously provides both of these properties. The approach of BlindBox is to perform the deep-packet inspection directly on the encrypted traffic. BlindBox realizes this approach through a new protocol and new encryption schemes. We demonstrate that BlindBox enables applications such as IDS, exfiltration detection and parental filtering, and supports real rulesets from both open-source and industrial DPI systems. We implemented BlindBox and showed that it is practical for settings with long-lived HTTPS connections. Moreover, its core encryption scheme is 3-6 orders of magnitude faster than existing relevant cryptographic schemes.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 7, 2015 - 12:15pm to 1:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

Pages

Statistics and Probability Seminars

Workshop in Biostatistics: Models and Algorithms for Understanding Neural and Behavioral Data

Topic: 
Models and Algorithms for Understanding Neural and Behavioral Data
Abstract / Description: 

The trend in neural recording capabilities is clear: we can record orders of magnitude more neurons now than we could only a few years ago, and technological advances do not seem to be slowing. Coupled with rich behavioral measurements, genetic sequencing, and connectomics, these datasets offer unprecedented opportunities to learn how neural circuits function. But they also pose serious modeling and algorithmic challenges. How do we develop probabilistic models for such heterogeneous data? How do we design models that are flexible enough to capture complex spatial and temporal patterns, yet interpretable enough to provide new insight? How do we construct algorithms to efficiently and reliably fit these models? I will present some of our recent work on recurrent switching linear dynamical systems and corresponding Bayesian inference algorithms that aim to overcome these challenges, and I will show how these methods can help us gain insight into complex neural and behavioral data.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 24, 2019 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Medical School Office Building Room x303

Statistics Seminar presents "Robustness meets algorithms"

Topic: 
"Robustness meets algorithms"
Abstract / Description: 

In every corner of machine learning and statistics, there is a need for estimators that work not just in an idealized model but even when their assumptions are violated. Unfortunately, in high-dimensions, being provably robust and efficiently computable are often at odds with each other.

In this talk, we give the first efficient algorithm for estimating the parameters of a highdimensional Gaussian which is able to tolerate a constant fraction of corruptions that is independent of the dimension. Prior to our work, all known estimators either needed time exponential in the dimension to compute, or could tolerate only an inverse polynomial fraction of corruptions. Not only does our algorithm bridge the gap between robustness and algorithms, it turns out to be highly practical in a variety of settings.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, October 22, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
McCullough Building Room 115

Probability Seminar presents "Resource sharing with logarithmic weights"

Topic: 
"Resource sharing with logarithmic weights"
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk, we'll focus on a class of resource allocation algorithms for communication networks: if a node of this network has L requests to transmit and is idle, it tries to access the channel at a rate proportional to log(1 + L). We'll study a simple stochastic model for such an algorithm in the case of a star network, in which J nodes can transmit simultaneously but interfere with a central node 0 in such a way that node 0 cannot transmit when one of the other nodes does. In contrast with the case where the probability of accessing the channel is proportional to L, as the total number of pending requests tends to infinity several timescales interact in a fine way to determine the asymptotic behaviour of the system. In particular, the numbers of pending requests at every node can evolve on very different timescales and have very different orders of magnitude. This is joint work with Philippe Robert (INRIA Paris).

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 21, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Sequoia Hall Room 200

Workshop in Biostatistics presents "Breaking the tradeoff between interpretability and accuracy of machine learning algorithms"

Topic: 
Breaking the tradeoff between interpretability and accuracy of machine learning algorithms
Abstract / Description: 

Machine learning algorithms that are both interpretable and accurate are essential in applications such as medicine where errors can have a dire consequence. Unfortunately, there is currently a tradeoff between accuracy and interpretability among state-of-the-art machine learning methods. Decision trees or Linear models are interpretable and are therefore used extensively throughout medicine. They are, however, consistently outperformed in accuracy by other, less-interpretable algorithms, such as ensemble methods or neural networks. Here we present three algorithms that aim to address the tradeoff between interpretability and accuracy: 1) The Additive Tree (AddTree); a novel framework for constructing decision trees with the same architecture as CART but with improved accuracy, 2) The Conditional Super Learner (CSL), an algorithm which selects the best model candidate from a library conditional on the covariates, 3) Expert Augmented Machine Learning (EAML), an algorithms that automatically extracts clinical priors and combine it with machine-learned models to detect hidden confounders and build robust models with significantly less data. Extensive empirical evidence to illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of these three algorithms will be presented. Theoretical results will be also highlighted. Finally, we will choose the prediction of hospital mortality for Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients to highlight the points discussed throughout the presentation.

Date and Time: 
Monday, September 30, 2019 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Medical School Office Building, Room x303

Statistics Seminar presents "Optimal singular value thresholding in correlated noise"

Topic: 
Optimal singular value thresholding in correlated noise
Abstract / Description: 

We consider the problem of recovering a low-rank signal matrix in the presence of a general, unknown additive noise; more specifically, noise where the eigenvalues of the sample covariance matrix have a general bulk distribution. We assume given an upper bound for the rank of the assumed orthogonally invariant signal, and develop a selector for hard thresholding of singular values, which adapts to the unknown correlation structure of the noise. Our selector asymptotically achieves the the lowest squared error loss achievable by any hard threshold selector on the data at hand, namely the square error achievable by an oracle with access to the (in principle unknowable) low-rank signal matrix. This selector generalizes to the correlated noise case the 4/√ 3 threshold rule previously published for the case of white noise. Our approach develops stable and asymptotically unbiased empirical estimates of the noise bulk from signal+noise, and shows that these estimates can be used inside formulas deriving from work by Benaych–Georges and Rao–Nadakuditi. This is assumed to be a mathematically sophisticated audience, so we'll spend more time on the arguments underlying the proofs, than we would if we were discussing such things to end-users.

This is joint work with Matan Gavish and Elad Romanov.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
McCullough Building Room 115

Probability Seminar presents "Maximum height of low-temperature 3D Ising interfaces"

Topic: 
Maximum height of low-temperature 3D Ising interfaces
Abstract / Description: 

Consider the random surface given by the interface separating the plus and minus phases in a low-temperature Ising model in dimensions d ≥ 3. Dobrushin (1972) famously showed that in cubes of side-length n the horizontal interface is rigid, typically exhibiting orderone height fluctuations. We study the large deviations of this interface and obtain a shape theorem for its pillar, conditionally on it reaching an atypically large height. We use this to analyze the law of the maximum height of the interface, Mn: we prove that for every β large, Mn/ log n → cβ in probability, and (Mn−E[Mn])n forms a tight sequence. Moreover, even though the centered sequence does not converge, all its subsequential limits satisfy uniform Gumbel tail bounds. 

 

This is joint work with Eyal Lubetzky.

Date and Time: 
Monday, September 30, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Sequoia Hall Room 200

Statistics Department Seminar presents "The relevance problem: 50 years on"

Topic: 
"The relevance problem: 50 years on"
Abstract / Description: 

Given a large cohort of "similar" cases Z1, . . . , ZN one can construct an efficient statistical inference procedure by 'learning from the experience of others' (also known as "borrowing strength" from the ensemble). But what if, instead, we observe a massive database where each case is accompanied with extra contextual information (usually in the form of covariates), making the Zi's non-exchangeable? It's not obvious how we go about gathering strength when each piece of information is fuzzy and heterogeneous. Moreover, if we include irrelevant cases, borrowing information can heavily damage the quality of the inference! This raises some fundamental questions: when (not) to borrow? whom (not) to borrow? how (not) to borrow? These questions are at the heart of the "Problem of Relevance" in statistical inference – a puzzle that remained too little addressed since its inception nearly half a century ago (Efron and Morris, 1971,1972; Efron 2019). The purpose of this talk is to present an attempt to develop basic principles and practical guidelines in order to tackle some of the unsettled issues that surround the relevance problem. Through examples, we will demonstrate how our new statistical perspective answers previously unanswerable questions in a realistic and feasible way.


This is a joint work with my previous student Kaijun Wang, who is currently a postdoctoral research fellow at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, July 25, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Sequoia Hall Room 200

Statistics Department Seminar presents "Augmented minimax linear estimation"

Topic: 
Augmented minimax linear estimation
Abstract / Description: 

Many statistical estimands can expressed as continuous linear functionals of a conditional expectation function. This includes the average treatment effect under unconfoundedness and generalizations for continuous-valued and personalized treatments. In this talk, we discuss a general approach to estimating such quantities: we begin with a simple plug-in estimator based on an estimate of the conditional expectation function, and then correct the plug-in estimator by subtracting a minimax linear estimate of its error. We show that our method is semiparametrically efficient under weak conditions and observe promising performance on both real and simulated data.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, August 6, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Sloan Mathematics Center, Room 380C

Statistics Department Seminar presents "Analytical nonlinear shrinkage of large-dimensional covariance matrices"

Topic: 
Analytical nonlinear shrinkage of large-dimensional covariance matrices
Abstract / Description: 

This paper establishes the first analytical formula for optimal nonlinear shrinkage of largedimensional covariance matrices. We achieve this by identifying and mathematically exploiting a deep connection between nonlinear shrinkage and nonparametric estimation of the Hilbert transform of the sample spectral density. Previous nonlinear shrinkage methods were numerical: QuEST requires numerical inversion of a complex equation from random matrix theory whereas NERCOME is based on a sample-splitting scheme. The new analytical approach is more elegant and also has more potential to accommodate future variations or extensions. Immediate benefits are that it is typically 1,000 times faster with the same accuracy and accommodates covariance matrices of dimension up to 10,000. The difficult case where the matrix dimension exceeds the sample size is also covered.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 30, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Sloan Mathematics Center, Room 380C

Statistics Department Seminar presents "A geometric perspective on false discovery control"

Topic: 
A geometric perspective on false discovery control
Abstract / Description: 

A common approach to statistical model selection — particularly in scientific domains in which it is of interest to draw inferences about an underlying phenomenon — is to develop powerful procedures that provide control on false discoveries. Such methods are widely used in inferential settings involving variable selection, graph estimation, and others in which a discovery is naturally regarded as a discrete concept. However, this view of a discovery is ill-suited to many model selection and structured estimation problems in which the underlying decision space is not discrete. We describe a geometric reformulation of the notion of a discovery, which enables the development of model selection methodology for a broader class of problems. We highlight the utility of this viewpoint in problems involving subspace selection and low-rank estimation, with a specific algorithm to control for false discoveries in these settings.

 


This is joint work with Parikshit Shah and Venkat Chandrasekaran.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 23, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Sloan Mathematics Center, Room 380C

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SystemX

SystemX presents The Principles for Building Moonshots

Topic: 
The Principles for Building Moonshots
Abstract / Description: 

Since the very beginning, X (formerly Google X) has had a single mission: to invent and launch "moonshot" technologies — like energy kites, balloon-powered internet, all-electric deliver drones, and self-driving cars — that we think could make the world a radically better place. Our "Rapid Evaluation" team, led by Phil Watson, is responsible for identifying, investigating, and evaluating these potential moonshots. In this talk, Phil will share what he's learned about finding and shaping promising new moonshots along their journey from outlandish, high-risk ideas into projects that just might have a shot at making it into the real world — and making a difference in the big picture challenges facing society.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 24, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

BONUS LECTURE: Clover the Rover and Anakin Sandwalker: lessons in project management from the Utah dessert

Topic: 
BONUS LECTURE: Clover the Rover and Anakin Sandwalker: lessons in project management from the Utah dessert
Abstract / Description: 

What makes a successful engineering team? Why makes a fun engineering team? How can the two be combined? Following the adventures (and misadventures) of the the Stanford team competing in the University Rover Challenge, the talk will cover how to go about starting a multi person design project, how testing can be approached and we delve into some of the technical details of the two robots.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, October 22, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

SystemX presents "Superconducting and Photonic Transducers via Millimeter-Wave Quantum Channels"

Topic: 
Superconducting and Photonic Transducers via Millimeter-Wave Quantum Channels
Abstract / Description: 

Quantum transduction is the manipulation coherent quantum states at the boundaries of quantum systems, and it lies at the heart of engineering these "systems" into networks, sensors or computers. Coherent transduction of quantum states between microwave and optical frequencies is an essential component of many emerging quantum information science (QIS) applications, as it provides an effective way for linking the classical and quantum world or transporting information on macroscopic scales. The performance of quantum systems that require microwave-optical transduction in practical applications will be determined by the achievable data rates and fidelity in transferring quantum information between these two extreme wavelengths. Unfortunately, direct transduction from microwave to optical frequencies is inherently dissipative, leading to thermal losses which limit the achievable performance of microwave quantum sensors and circuits operating at millikelvin (mK) temperatures. To overcome this limitation, a fundamentally new approach is needed.

Rather than direct transduction to optical frequencies, we are utilizing the mm-wave regime as an intermediate state in a two-step transduction scheme. Our "quantum bus" would perform the microwave to mm-wave transduction with a superconducting resonator at mK temperatures before transporting the photon and its quantum information to higher temperatures and potentially being up-converted into the optical range. Converting to mm-wave frequencies can be achieved with much lower dissipation, and even at these intermediate photon energies coherence can be maintained at elevated temperatures. While optical links are the best solution for long-range massively-parallel networks, low-loss mm-wave photonics would also allow preservation of quantum information at room temperature for a simpler network at laboratory scales.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 10, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

SystemX presents "Engineering the World’s Smallest Spacecraft"

Topic: 
Engineering the World’s Smallest Spacecraft
Abstract / Description: 

Rapid miniaturization of electronic devices, driven in recent years by the emergence of smartphones, has made many of the key components needed onboard aerospace systems available in very small, low-cost, and light-weight packages. This trend is behind the growing popularity of small consumer “drones,” as well as the recent emergence of the “ChipSat” concept – centimeter-scale spacecraft built with the same parts and processes used in the consumer electronics industry. This talk will focus on pushing the limits of size, mass, and capability in space systems. I will discuss the technical challenges associated with building and flying satellites at this size scale, along with several ongoing flight projects, including the crowd-funded KickSat missions to deploy over one hundred Sprite spacecraft in low-Earth orbit. I will also share some recent work on the Breakthrough Starshot project, which has the goal of sending small spacecraft to our nearest neighboring stars in the coming decades.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 3, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

SystemX presents "Electronic-photonic co-design; from imaging to optical phase control"

Topic: 
Electronic-photonic co-design; from imaging to optical phase control
Abstract / Description: 

Integrated electronic-photonic co-design can profoundly impact both fields resulting in advances in several areas such as energy efficient communication, signal processing, imaging, and sensing. Examples of integrated electronic-photonic co-design may be categorized into two groups: (a) electronic assisted photonics, where integrated analog, RF, mm-wave, and THz circuits are employed to improve the performance of photonic systems, and (b) photonic assisted electronics, where photonic systems and devices are used to improve the performance of integrated RF, mm-wave, and THz systems. In this talk, examples of electronic-photonic co-design such optical synthesis and low power laser stabilization and laser linewidth reduction will be presented.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, September 26, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

EE237: Solar Energy Conversion Seminar presents "Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Buildings"

Topic: 
Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Buildings
Abstract / Description: 

Buildings account for the largest share of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions at 32% of the total, followed by industry at 30%, transportation at 29%, and agriculture at 9%. Clearly, any program to greatly reduce greenhouse gas emissions must include buildings. This talk will explore the opportunities and challenges to greatly reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the building sector, using as a case study a recent solar retrofit of an existing house that rendered it "zero-carbon." Implications for the future of the utility system will be discussed.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

SystemX presents Accelerating Deep Learning with Tensor Processing Units

Topic: 
Accelerating Deep Learning with Tensor Processing Units
Abstract / Description: 

Google's Tensor Processing Unit (TPU), first deployed in 2015, provides services today for more than one billion people and provides more than an order of magnitude improvement in performance and performance/W compared to contemporary platforms. Inspired by the success of the first TPU for neural network inference, Google developed multiple generations of machine learning supercomputers for neural network training that allow near linear scaling of ML workloads running on TPUv2 and TPUv3 processors. TPUs extend research frontiers and benefit a growing number of Google services.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 30, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Huang 018

SystemX BONUS LECTURE: The ARM Microprocessor: My part in its downfall

Topic: 
The ARM Microprocessor: My part in its downfall
Abstract / Description: 

By the end of 1990 the Acorn RISC Machine, which was designed in Britain, was practically extinct. The parent company, Acorn, was down a very dark financial alley, and the remnants of the design team were cast out to fend for themselves, equipped with about 18 months of financial rations from Apple, and a really rather odd microprocessor design. When Dave Jaggar joined ARM a few months later, with the ink not quite dry on his Master's Thesis, he thought perhaps he'd made a dreadful mistake. However, after twelve months he was given free range to start the ARM architecture afresh, and the new Advanced RISC Machine, as the company was now named, was born. Over the next 8 years he worked out a little bit about computer architecture, in the same way that a 17th century surgeon understands anatomy, then he was made the first ARM Fellow, so he promptly retired back to New Zealand to raise his children. As it's the 25th anniversary of his quite successful Thumb compressed instruction set, and his children have all left home, he's been told it's about time he explained himself.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

Material challenges and opportunities in next generation electronics: from non-silicon electronics to artificial neural networks

Topic: 
Material challenges and opportunities in next generation electronics: from non-silicon electronics to artificial neural networks
Abstract / Description: 

The current electronics industry has been completely dominated by Si-based devices due to its exceptionally low materials cost. However, demand for non-Si electronics is becoming substantially high because current/next generation electronics requires novel functionalities that can never be achieved by Si-based materials. Unfortunately, the extremely high cost of non-Si semiconductor materials prohibits the progress in this field. Recently our team has invented a new crystalline growth concept, termed as "remote epitaxy", which can copy/paste crystalline information of the wafer remotely through graphene, thus generating single-crystalline films on graphene [1,2]. These single-crystalline films are easily released from the slippery graphene surface and the graphene-coated substrates can be infinitely reused to generate single-crystalline films. Thus, the remote epitaxy technique can cost-efficiently produce freestanding single-crystalline films. This allows unprecedented functionality of flexible device functionality required for current ubiquitous electronics. In addition, we have recently demonstrated a manufacturing method to manipulate wafer-scale 2D materials with atomic precision to form monolayer-by-monolayer stacks of wafer-scale 2D material heterostructures [3]. In this talk, I will discuss the implication of this new technology for revolutionary design of next generation electronic/photonic devices with combination of 3D/2D materials.

Lastly, I will discuss about an ultimate alternative computing solution that does not follow the conventional von Neuman method. As Moore's law approaches its physical limits, brain-inspired neuromorphic computing has recently emerged as a promising alternative because of its compatibility with AI. In the neuromorphic computing system, resistive random access memory (RRAM) can be used as an artificial synapse for weight elements in neural network algorithms. RRAM typically utilizes a defective amorphous solid as a switching medium. However, due to the random nature of amorphous phase, it has been challenging to precisely control weights in artificial synapses, thus resulting in poor learning accuracy. Our team recently demonstrated single-crystalline-based artificial synapses that show precise control of synaptic weights, promising superior online learning accuracy of 95.1% – a key step paving the way towards post von Neumann computing [4]. I will discuss about how we design the materials and devices for this new neuromorphic hardware.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 23, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Huang Building, Room 018

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