EE Student Information

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EE Student Information, Spring Quarter through Academic Year 2020-2021: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

Updates will be posted on this page, as well as emailed to the EE student mail list.

Please see Stanford University Health Alerts for course and travel updates.

As always, use your best judgement and consider your own and others' well-being at all times.

Seminar / Colloquium

SystemX presents "From Brain Drain to Brain Linkage"

Topic: 
From Brain Drain to Brain Linkage
Abstract / Description: 

The flow of professional talent, both permanent and temporary, is a prevalent aspect of globalization. High-skilled talent moves across national borders in search of better academic, professional, and social opportunities. But the concept of talent flow is not narrowly confined to the physical relocation of talented individuals. In the era of the knowledge economy, mobile talent contributes to the creation and diffusion of knowledge, and one cannot disregard the social capital value of talent that incorporates the connections between cultures and the potential for transnational collaboration.

The migration of high-skilled professionals is not a zero-sum game in which the host country receives a net inflow of human capital from the home country. A phenomenon commonly referred to as "brain drain" for the home country and "brain gain" for the host country can in fact offer opportunities for brain circulation or brain linkage—that is, home-host interactions that create a win-win, positive-sum situation for both sides. When high-skilled migrant talent stays engaged with the home country, both home and host countries gain from the productive capacity embodied in the ties and networks linking many individuals and organization.

Transnational social capital and ties spanning geographic and cultural distance remain vital to today's global market economy, even more so in a time of political tensions at home and abroad. Speakers Gi-Wook Shin and Dexter Simpson will discuss the positive gains of global talent flows and how migrant talent can create mutually beneficial ties—or "brain linkages"—between the United States and their home countries, even during the times of heightened political tension and rising anti-immigrant sentiment in the United States.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 4, 2021 - 4:30pm

ISL Colloquium presents "Exploiting symmetries in Inference and Learning"

Topic: 
Exploiting symmetries in Inference and Learning
Abstract / Description: 

Symmetries play a crucial role in much of mathematics and physics. In this talk I will explore the role that symmetries are playing in machine learning. In particular I will discuss the concept of equivariance and apply it to neural networks. After the introduction I will discuss two newer works: first E(n) equivariant graph neural networks that are equivariant to both permutations of the nodes and global E(n) transformations of the node features. These models are ideal for predicting molecular properties in biology and chemistry and to model objects as point clouds in computer vision. Secondly I will show how invariance if probability densities result in very efficient deterministic mcmc samplers with better convergence behavior. We show that by modeling the sampler as a push-forward of the density according to an ODE, and by identifying a very large set of symmetries for an arbitrary density characterized divergence free vector fields, we can indeed design highly efficient samplers. Finally we extend these ideas to discrete sampling spaces, such as the Ising model.

Joint work with Kirill Neklyudov and Roberto Bondesan.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 4, 2021 - 9:00am
Venue: 
Registration required

TomKat Series: Reducing Plastic Waste and Recovering Value

Topic: 
Reducing Plastic Waste and Recovering Value
Abstract / Description: 

A quarterly lecture series where you will hear from industry experts about pressing sustainability challenges so you can apply your expertise and ingenuity to develop solutions that will make an impact.

PLASTIC: The 2020-21 Tackling Global Challenges speaker series will bring in experts who will speak to the sustainability challenges and opportunities that exist around plastic manufacturing, recycling, and pollution.

Episode 2: Reducing Plastic Waste and Recovering Value

Through a proactive, solutions-focused lens, the speakers will provide insights into plastic recycling and energy recovery, highlighted by discussions of persistent challenges and examples of emerging innovations. There will be opportunities for Q&A from attendees.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 25, 2021 - 4:00pm

ISL Colloquium presents "Chasing the Long Tail: What Neural Networks Memorize and Why"

Topic: 
Chasing the Long Tail: What Neural Networks Memorize and Why
Abstract / Description: 

Deep learning algorithms that achieve state-of-the-art results on image and text recognition tasks tend to fit the entire training dataset (nearly) perfectly including mislabeled examples and outliers. This propensity to memorize seemingly useless data and the resulting large generalization gap have puzzled many practitioners and is not explained by existing theories of machine learning. We provide a simple conceptual explanation and a theoretical model demonstrating that memorization of outliers and mislabeled examples is necessary for achieving close-to-optimal generalization error when learning from long-tailed data distributions. Image and text data are known to follow such distributions and therefore our results establish a formal link between these empirical phenomena. We then demonstrate the utility of memorization and support our explanation empirically. These results rely on a new technique for efficiently estimating memorization and influence of training data points.

Based on a joint work with Chiyuan Zhang.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 25, 2021 - 4:30pm

Q-FARM presents "Coupling diamond defects to high-finesse optical microcavities"

Topic: 
Coupling diamond defects to high-finesse optical microcavities
Abstract / Description: 

Defect centers in diamond can offer atomic-like optical transitions and long-lived spin degrees of freedom. Integrating them into high quality optical resonators opens a route toward realizing a cavity quantum electrodynamics system combining atomic-like coherence with a robust solid-state platform. While approaches based on diamond nanophotonics have been pursued for more than a decade, Fabry-Perot microcavities present a complementary approach that has recently received significant attention. This talk will consider the potential benefits and challenges to open micro-cavities, and examine progress toward coupling them to diamond defect centers

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 24, 2021 - 12:00pm

SystemX presents "Towards General Purpose Specialization"

Topic: 
Towards General Purpose Specialization
Abstract / Description: 

With slowing technology scaling, specialized accelerators are increasingly attractive, but naive specialization limits accelerators to narrow domains. This is problematic practically because algorithms are constantly evolving, and intellectually as innovations are often siloed into their respective domains.

We believe this problem can be solved jointly by, 1. making accelerators more general, and 2. automating their design. I'll first overview a "general purpose accelerator ISA" that can abstract the typical behaviors of domain-specific accelerators. Our evaluation shows accelerators with these can achieve order-of-magnitude improvements over GPUs, without sacrificing programmability. However, many of their features are expensive and not useful for every workload. Therefore, our second direction is automated codesign: We developed a framework, DSAGEN, that enables users to search for the best programmable architecture given a set of input C/C++ kernels, using principles of modular hardware and compilation. Our overall vision is that hardware and ISA design can be nearly completely automated.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 25, 2021 - 4:30pm

Algorithms & Friends Seminar presents "How fast do algorithms improve?"

Topic: 
How fast do algorithms improve?
Abstract / Description: 

Algorithms are one of the fundamental building blocks of computing. But current evidence about how fast algorithms improve is anecdotal, using small numbers of case studies to extrapolate. In this work, we gather data from 57 textbooks and more than 1,137 research papers to present the first systematic view of algorithm progress ever assembled. There is enormous variation. Around half of all algorithm families experience little or no improvement. At the other extreme, 13% experience transformative improvements, radically changing how and where they can be used. Overall, we find that, for moderate-sized problems, 30% to 45% of algorithmic families had improvements comparable or greater than those that users experienced from Moore's Law and other hardware advances.

Joint work with Yash M. Sherry.

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 22, 2021 - 12:00pm

ISL Colloquium presents "Enabling Fast and Robust Federated Learning"

Topic: 
Enabling Fast and Robust Federated Learning
Abstract / Description: 

In many large-scale machine learning applications, data is acquired and processed at the edge nodes of the network such as mobile devices, users' devices, and IoT sensors. Federated learning is a recent distributed learning paradigm according to which a model is trained over a set of edge devices. While federated learning can enable a variety of new applications, it faces major bottlenecks that severely limit its reliability and scalability including communications bottleneck as well as data and system's heterogeneity bottleneck. In this talk, we first focus on communication-efficient federated learning, and present FedPAQ, a communication-efficient and scalable Federated learning method with Periodic Averaging and Quantization. FedPAQ is provably near-optimal in the following sense. Under the problem setup of expected risk minimization with independent and identically distributed data points, when the loss function is strongly convex the proposed method converges to the optimal solution with near-optimal rate, and when the loss function is non-convex it finds a first-order stationary point. In the second part of the talk, we develop a robust federated learning algorithm that achieves strong performance against distribution shifts in users' samples. Throughout, we show several numerical results to empirically support our theoretical results.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 18, 2021 - 4:30pm

Phonon Light Switches: Leveraging Vibrations to Create Actively Tunable IR Devices

Topic: 
Phonon Light Switches: Leveraging Vibrations to Create Actively Tunable IR Devices
Abstract / Description: 

Light possesses a wave nature. Phonons do too. Within the infrared portion of the spectrum, these waves have comparable energies leading to their interaction. Here, the interaction is leveraged to create tunable infrared filters that control transmission and reflection with no moving parts at the "push of a button" for applications in next generation imaging and on-chip spectroscopy. Practically, waferscale tunable infrared filters are first demonstrated by altering graphene's plasmonic dispersion using the dielectrics surrounding it resulting in gate-tunable variations (V < 10V) of reflectance by over 1 μm. These same filters are then integrated directly atop a broadband infrared detector in a proof-of-principle demonstration of a dynamically tunable pixel. Second, field induced changes in the phonons energies of lead zirconate titante (PZT) ferroelectric bilayers result in a tunable IR filter possessing high speed, latchable operation, and scalable fabrication. Taken together, the case studies highlight the utility of harnessing phonons to sculpt the spectral response of IR elements.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 25, 2021 - 1:30pm

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Applied Physics / Physics Colloquium

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Active Topology"

Topic: 
Active Topology
Abstract / Description: 

Topology plays a key role in condensed matter physics, underlying much of our understanding of equilibrium matter in terms of defects in ordered media and topologically protected states. In active systems – collections of entities that consume energy to generate their own motion and forces – topological phenomena can take on new and surprising roles. I will describe some of these behaviors focusing on liquid-crystalline active matter in two dimensions, specifically active nematic liquid crystals, where defects become motile particles, drive spatio-temporally chaotic flows, and can themselves organize in emergent ordered states.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 16, 2021 - 4:30pm

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Getting to a Fusion Pilot Plant"

Topic: 
Getting to a Fusion Pilot Plant
Abstract / Description: 

One hundred years ago Arthur Stanley Eddington conjectured that stars are powered by fusion reactions and speculated that one day humans would generate power by fusion. Not yet. However, private capital is flooding into fusion research driven by the lure of fusion's promise of sustainable "firm" power and optimism about new technologies. I will discuss the benefits of these technologies including high temperature superconducting magnets, permanent magnets and liquid metal systems. I will also discuss the advances in understanding the physics of confined plasmas and the growing efforts to find optimal fusion configurations. There is increasing confidence that, with these advances, an electricity producing Fusion Pilot Plant could be operational before the middle of the century. The fusion community is calling for a concentrated effort to design such a plant.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 9, 2021 - 4:30pm

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Searching for Axion Dark Matter Below 1 micro-eV: the Dark Matter Radio"

Topic: 
Searching for Axion Dark Matter Below 1 micro-eV: the Dark Matter Radio
Abstract / Description: 

One of the most enduring mysteries in particle physics is the nature of the non-baryonic dark matter that makes up 85% of the matter in the universe. The QCD axion, originally proposed as a solution to the strong CP problem in QCD, is one of the most strongly motivated candidates for dark matter. In this talk, I will describe the search for QCD axion dark matter with mass below ~1 micro-eV. I will discuss fundamental limits on searches for QCD axion dark matter coupled to electromagnetism, subject to the Standard Quantum Limit, and the Dark Matter Radio, an optimized electromagnetic experiment to probe the QCD axion. I will highlight the role of quantum sensors in completing this search.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 2, 2021 - 4:30pm

AP483 Optics & Electronics Seminar presents "Exploiting Solar and Thermal Radiation Conversion for Large-Scale Energy and Sustainability Uses"

Topic: 
Exploiting Solar and Thermal Radiation Conversion for Large-Scale Energy and Sustainability Uses
Abstract / Description: 

Details TBA

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 15, 2021 - 4:15pm

AP483 Optics & Electronics Seminar presents "My Experiences and Science at the ISS"

Topic: 
My Experiences and Science at the ISS
Abstract / Description: 

Details TBA


Ellen Ochoa, American engineer, former astronaut and former director of the Johnson Space Center

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 8, 2021 - 4:15pm

AP483 Optics & Electronics Seminar presents "Grating Based Differential Phase Contrast X-ray Imaging and Recent Applications to Medical Imaging"

Topic: 
Grating Based Differential Phase Contrast X-ray Imaging and Recent Applications to Medical Imaging
Abstract / Description: 

When we think of X-ray imaging, we imagine a photon view as particles are absorbed or scattered in materials. This provides the imaging contrast in many important applications such as dental, chest X-rays, airport scanners. The application of X-ray diffraction gratings enables additional contrast modalities using conventional off-the-shelf X-ray sources. Specifically, the differential phase contrast mode can provide direct access to electron density, and the dark field (fringe visibility) contrast can give texture details well below the resolution limit of the detector – opening the door to exciting imaging possibilities, for example, in lung imaging. The standard Grating Based X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging (GBXPCI) technique uses three gratings G0, G1, G2. The first grating G0 provides the partial coherence needed for X-ray interference; the second grating G1 provides the interference of waves that generates a spatially modulated set of fringes at some distance away; the final grating G2 provides the means to interrogate the fringes before the detector. We will review the basic theory, implementation challenges, and some recent developments in literature.

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 1, 2021 - 4:15pm

AP483 Optics & Electronics Seminar: Continuous measurements of biomolecules in live subjects

Topic: 
Continuous measurements of biomolecules in live subjects
Abstract / Description: 

A biosensor capable of continuously measuring specific molecules in vivo would provide a valuable window into patients' health status and their response to therapeutics. Unfortunately, continuous, real-time molecular measurement is currently limited to a handful of analytes (i.e. glucose and oxygen) and these sensors cannot be generalized to measure other analytes. In this talk, we will present a biosensor technology that can be generalized to measure a wide range of biomolecules in living subjects. To achieve this, we develop synthetic antibodies (aptamers) that change its structure upon binding to its target analyte and produce an electrochemical current or emit light. Our real-time biosensor requires no exogenous reagents and can be readily reconfigured to measure different target analytes by exchanging the aptamer probes in a modular manner. Using our real-time biosensor, we demonstrate the first closed loop feedback control of drug concentration in live animals and discuss potential applications of this technology. Finally, we will discuss methods for generating the aptamer probes which are at the heart of this biosensor technology.


This seminar is sponsored by the Department of Applied Physics and the Ginzton Laboratory

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 22, 2021 - 12:00pm

AP483 Optics & Electronics Seminar presents "A Photonics Perspective on Data Center Interconnects"

Topic: 
A Photonics Perspective on Data Center Interconnects
Abstract / Description: 

The optical networks interconnecting datacenters (DCI) have grown the last decade more than any other transport network and have motivated the evolution of the original Internet architecture and of the global fiber infrastructure [1, 2, 3]. The current growth is also projected to continue strong by at least 2 more orders of magnitude [3, 4], placing DCI at the frontier of optical fiber communications. This presentation offers an industry perspective on DCI-motivated innovations and challenges in optical systems and photonics technology. Notably, photonic integration combined with coherent WDM and advancements in DSP and Moore's law, is enabling current DCI systems to operate ever closer to the fiber Shannon limit by exceeding 6 b/s/Hz spectral-efficiency in transatlantic deployments or reaching 25 Gb/s per Watt power-efficiency in metro DCI 400GE pluggable coherent WDM transceivers [1, 3].

1. L. Paraschis et al "Innovations in Inter Data Center Transport Networks", Chapter 15 (pp. 673 - 718) in Optical Fiber
Telecommunications VII, Edited by Alan E. Willner, Elsevier, ISBN 978-0128165027 (2019).
2. L. Paraschis, "Advancements in Metro Regional and Core Transport Network Architectures for the Next-Generation
Internet", Chapter 18 (pp. 793–817) in Optical Fiber Telecommunications VI Volume B, Systems and Networks, Edited by
Ivan Kaminow, Tingye Li, Alan E. Willner, Elsevier, ISBN 978-0123969606 (2016).
3. U. Holzle, "A Ubiquitous Cloud Requires a Transparent Network", IEEE/OSA Conference on Optical Fiber Communications
(OFC), Plenary (2017), and V. Vusirikala, "SDN Enabled Programmable, Dynamic Optical Layer", European Conference on
Communications (ECOC), Plenary (2017).
4. James Hamilton, "How Many Data Centers Needed World-Wide", https://perspectives.mvdirona.com/2017/04/how- manydata-centers-needed-world-wide (last accessed 2021/01/24).

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 8, 2021 - 12:00pm

AP483 Optics & Electronics Seminar presents "Extreme optics with zero-index and flat-band metamaterials"

Topic: 
Extreme optics with zero-index and flat-band metamaterials
Abstract / Description: 

Nanotechnology has enabled the development of nanostructured composite materials (metamaterials) with exotic optical properties not found in nature. In the most extreme case, we can create materials which support light waves that propagate with infinite phase velocity, corresponding to a refractive index of zero. We have developed a variety of in-plane metamaterial designs that permit obtaining a refractive index of zero in the optical regime. We will report on some of the exotic physics of zero-index metamaterials, including strong enhancement of nonlinear optical phenomena, and on flat-bands generated by twisted bilayer photonic crystals.

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 1, 2021 - 4:15pm

AP 483 Seminar presents "Laser Lightsails"

Topic: 
Laser Lightsails
Abstract / Description: 

We are exploring the nanophotonic design principles to enable self-stabilizing optical manipulation, levitation and propulsion of ultralight macroscopic-sized (i.e., mm, cm, or even meter-scale) 'lightsails' via radiation pressure. Reaching this goal requires the conception and design of new ultralight photonic structures composed of materials with extreme optical, mechanical and thermal properties. The design approach for such structures balances the need for sufficiently high reflectivity, required for efficient photon momentum transfer, very low absorption and very low areal mass density. We show that nanophotonic structures including planar dielectric slabs, two-dimensional photonic crystals and metasurfaces can yield designs that minimize mass while maximizing photon momentum transfer.

Nanoscale control of light scattering across a lightsail creates mechanical stability by tailoring the scattered phase, without the need to shape or focus the incident light beam or excessively constrain the shape, size or material composition of the object. We have developed a general, scale-independent theory for the light-induced manipulation of macroscopic objects with patterned nanoscale components that impart optical anisotropy. We investigated specific designs that features semiconductor resonators on dielectric substrates, identifying nanophotonic structures that self-stabilize when rotated and/or translated relative to the optical axis. We also discuss a proof-of-concept experimental prototype, that integrates optomechanical elements into a single structure, yielding restoring behavior along the different rotational (roll-pitch-yaw) and translational degrees of freedom. Our approach is expected to lead to new platforms for optical manipulation of macroscopic objects, with applications ranging from contactless wafer-scale fabrication and assembly, to trajectory control for next-generation ultralight ultrahigh altitude aircraft and spacecraft, and even laser-propelled lightsails for outer planet and interstellar space exploration, such as the effort underway by the Breakthrough Starshot program.

Date and Time: 
Monday, January 25, 2021 - 4:15pm

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CS300 Seminar

#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces

Topic: 
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces
Abstract / Description: 

Individuals of all genders invited to be a part of:
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces, where we will feature real stories of harassment at Stanford academic STEM in a conversation with Provost Drell, Dean Minor (SoM), and Dean Graham (SE3). We will have plenty of time for audience discussion on how we can take concrete action to dismantle this culture and actively work towards a more inclusive Stanford for everyone. While our emphasis is on STEM fields, we welcome and encourage participation from students, postdocs, staff, and faculty of all academic disciplines and backgrounds.

Date and Time: 
Friday, April 19, 2019 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
STLC 111

John G. Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology

Topic: 
Internet of Things and Internet of Energy for Connecting at Any Time and Any Place
Abstract / Description: 

In this presentation, I would like to discuss with you how to establish a sustainable and smart society through the internet of energy for connecting at any time and any place. I suspect that you have heard the phrase, "Internet of Energy" less often. The meaning of this phrase is simple. Because of a ubiquitous energy transmission system, you do not need to worry about a shortage of electric power. One of the most important items for establishing a sustainable society is [...]


"Inaugural Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology," EE News, July 2018

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, January 14, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Special Seminar: Formal Methods meets Machine Learning: Explorations in Cyber-Physical Systems Design

Topic: 
Formal Methods meets Machine Learning: Explorations in Cyber-Physical Systems Design
Abstract / Description: 

Cyber-physical systems (CPS) are computational systems tightly integrated with physical processes. Examples include modern automobiles, fly-by-wire aircraft, software-controlled medical devices, robots, and many more. In recent times, these systems have exploded in complexity due to the growing amount of software and networking integrated into physical environments via real-time control loops, as well as the growing use of machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) techniques. At the same time, these systems must be designed with strong verifiable guarantees.

In this talk, I will describe our research explorations at the intersection of machine learning and formal methods that address some of the challenges in CPS design. First, I will describe how machine learning techniques can be blended with formal methods to address challenges in specification, design, and verification of industrial CPS. In particular, I will discuss the use of formal inductive synthesis --- algorithmic synthesis from examples with formal guarantees — for CPS design. Next, I will discuss how formal methods can be used to improve the level of assurance in systems that rely heavily on machine learning, such as autonomous vehicles using deep learning for perception. Both theory and industrial case studies will be discussed, with a special focus on the automotive domain. I will conclude with a brief discussion of the major remaining challenges posed by the use of machine learning and AI in CPS.

Date and Time: 
Monday, December 4, 2017 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Gates 463A

SpaceX's journey on the road to mars

Topic: 
SpaceX's journey on the road to mars
Abstract / Description: 

SSI will be hosting Gwynne Shotwell — President and COO of SpaceX — to discuss SpaceX's journey on the road to mars. The event will be on Wednesday Oct 11th from 7pm - 8pm in Dinkelspiel Auditorium. After the talk, there will be a Q&A session hosted by Steve Jurvetson from DFJ Venture Capital.

Claim your tickets now on eventbright

 

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 11, 2017 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Dinkelspiel Auditorium

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, Subhasish Mitra

5:15-6:00, Silvio Savarese

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, December 7, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, Phil Levis

5:15-6:00, Ron Fedkiw

Date and Time: 
Monday, December 5, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, Dan Boneh

5:15-6:00, Aaron Sidford

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, John Mitchell

5:15-6:00, James Zou

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 28, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, Emma Brunskill

5:15-6:00, Doug James

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 16, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

CS Department Lecture Series (CS300)

Topic: 
Faculty speak about their research to new PhD students
Abstract / Description: 

Offered to incoming first-year PhD students in the Autumn quarter.

The seminar gives CS faculty the opportunity to speak about their research, which allows new CS PhD students the chance to learn about the professors and their research before permanently aligning.

4:30-5:15, James Landay

5:15-6:00, Dan Jurafsky

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 14, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
200-305 Lane History Corner, Main Quad

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EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium

SystemX presents "Quantum Computing – Where does the Hope meet the Hype?"

Topic: 
Quantum Computing – Where does the Hope meet the Hype?
Abstract / Description: 

Quantum computers exploit the bizarre features of quantum physics -- uncertainty, entanglement, and measurement -- to perform tasks that are impossible using conventional means, such as computing over ungodly amounts of data, and communicating via teleportation. I will describe the architecture of a quantum computer based on individual atomic clock qubits, suspended and isolated with electric fields, perfectly replicable with no idle errors, and individually addressed with laser beams. This leading physical representation of a quantum computer has allowed unmatched demonstrations of small algorithms and emulations of hard quantum problems with more than 50 quantum bits. While this system can solve some esoteric tasks that cannot be accomplished in conventional devices, it remains a great engineering challenge to build a quantum computer big enough to be generally useful for society. But the good news is that this is not a scientific challenge, as we know the technology needed and it's not quantum.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 8, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom ID: 920 2334 9868; +passcode

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "Coming Attractions: Death or Utopia in the Next Three Decades"

Topic: 
Coming Attractions: Death or Utopia in the Next Three Decades
Abstract / Description: 

Today the data suggests that we are near the beginning of a chaotic mess of global proportions. Things are fairly simple: a global pandemic with no tools to fight the virus. a global economy in disarray, climate change and other existential risks beginning to intrude into our daily lives, and a total lack of a plan as to what to do. On the other hand, we are at the pinnacle of human capabilities and have, if we choose to do so, the capability create a Utopian egalitarian world without conflict or want.

In this two hour program a group of experts will explore the future, focusing on 2030 and 2050. Where are we now? What is trending? What if anything can be done about it?


Sponsors: The invitational Asilomar Microcomputer Workshop is one of the iconic gatherings which supported the growth of computing. This is the first mini-conference which replaces the 46th Asilomar Microcomputer Workshop which was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. www.amw.org.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, June 4, 2020 - 11:00am
Venue: 
REGISTER to receive access

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "Rebooting the Internet"

Topic: 
Rebooting the Internet
Abstract / Description: 

"Build one and throw it out," so the adage goes. This talk explores the argument for systems architecture revision, including processors, operating systems, and networking--both as a general principle and the ways the Internet in particular is currently in need of a reboot. Assumptions, resources, and goals change with time and experience, and so too does our understanding of architectural principles. Through the eyes of the Internet and other examples, we review what we got right (one ring to rule them all, good enough rather than perfect), what we got wrong (7 layers, name resolution as afterthought), and what we only now are beginning to appreciate (layering and forwarding as one thing). Challenge cases are presented that can help drive this redesign, including single-packet exchanges and recursive layering, and an example given of one direction this approach can lead. Finally, we explore the challenges of evolution and transition to help us prepare for giving the Internet a well-deserved reset.

REMOTE URL SU-EE380-20200311

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, March 11, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
[remote only]

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "Data Analytics at the Exascale for Free Electron Lasers Lasers Project"

Topic: 
Data Analytics at the Exascale for Free Electron Lasers Lasers Project
Abstract / Description: 

The increase in velocity, volume, and complexity of the data generated by the upcoming Linac Coherent Light Source upgrade (LCLS-II) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory presents a considerable challenge for data acquisition, data processing, and data management. These systems face formidable challenges due to the extremely high data throughput, hundreds of GB/s to multi-TB/s, generated by the detectors at the experimental facilities and to the intensive computational demand for data processing and scientific interpretation. The LCLS-II Data System is a fast, powerful, and flexible architecture that includes a feature extraction layer designed to reduce the data volumes by at least one order of magnitude while preserving the science content of the data. Innovative architectures are required to implement this reduction with a configurable approach that can adapt to the multiple science areas served by LCLS. In order to increase the likelihood of experiment success and improve the quality of recorded data, a real-time analysis framework provides visualization and graphically-configurable analysis of a selectable subset of the data on the timescale of seconds. A fast feedback layer offers dedicated processing resources to the running experiment in order to provide experimenters feedback about the quality of acquired data within minutes. We will present an overview of the LCLS-II Data System architecture with an emphasis on the Data Reduction Pipeline (DRP) and online monitoring framework.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, March 4, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "The Soul of a New Machine: Rethinking the Computer"

Topic: 
The Soul of a New Machine: Rethinking the Computer
Abstract / Description: 

While our software systems have become increasingly elastic, the physical substrate available to run that software (that is, the computer!) has remained stuck in a bygone era of PC architecture. Hyperscale infrastructure providers have long since figured this out, building machines that are fit to purpose -- but those advances have been denied to the mass market. In this talk, we will talk about our vision for a new, rack-scale, server-side machine -- and how we anticipate advances like open firmware, RISC-V, and Rust will play a central role in realizing that vision.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 26, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "fastai: A Layered API for Deep Learning"

Topic: 
fastai: A Layered API for Deep Learning
Abstract / Description: 


[speaker photo] Sylvain's research at fast.ai has focused on designing and improving techniques that allow models to train fast with limited resources. He has also been a core developer of the fastai library, including implementing the warping transformations, the preprocessing pipeline, much of fastai.text, and a lot more.
Prior to fastai, Sylvain was a Mathematics and Computer Science teacher in Paris for seven years. He taught CPGE, the 2-year French program that prepares students for graduate programs at France's top engineering schools (the "grandes écoles"). After relocating to the USA in 2015, Sylvain wrote ten textbooks covering the entire CPGE curriculum. Sylvain is an alumni from École Normale Supérieure (Paris, France) and has a Master's Degree in Mathematics from University Paris XI (Orsay, France). He lives in Brooklyn with his husband and two sons.fastai is a deep learning library which provides practitioners with high-level components that can quickly and easily provide state-of-the-art results in standard deep learning domains, and provides researchers with low-level components that can be mixed and matched to build new approaches. It aims to do both things without substantial compromises in ease of use, flexibility, or performance. This is possible thanks to a carefully layered architecture, which expresses common underlying patterns of many deep learning and data processing techniques in terms of decoupled abstractions. These abstractions can be expressed concisely and clearly by leveraging the dynamism of the underlying Python language and the flexibility of the PyTorch library. fastai includes: a new type dispatch system for Python along with a semantic type hierarchy for tensors; a GPU-optimized computer vision library which can be extended in pure Python; an optimizer which refactors out the common functionality of modern optimizers into two basic pieces, allowing optimization algorithms to be implemented in 4-5 lines of code; a novel 2-way callback system that can access any part of the data, model, or optimizer and change it at any point during training; a new data block API; and much more. We have used this library to successfully create a complete deep learning course, which we were able to write more quickly than using previous approaches, and the code was more clear. The library is already in wide use in research, industry, and teaching.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 19, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "Centaur Technology's Deep learning Coprocessor"

Topic: 
Centaur Technology's Deep learning Coprocessor
Abstract / Description: 

This talk will explore Centaur's microprocessor-design technology includes both a new high-performance x86 core AND the industry's FIRST integrated AI Coprocessor for x86 systems. The x86 microprocessor cores deliver high instructions/clock (IPC) for server-class applications and support the latest x86 extensions such as AVX 512 and new instructions for fast transfer of AI data. The AI Coprocessor is a clean-sheet processor designed to deliver high performance and efficiency on deep-learning applications, freeing up the x86 cores for general-purpose computing. Both the x86 and AI Coprocessor technologies have now been proven in silicon using a new scalable SoC platform with eight x86 cores and an AI Coprocessor able to compute 20 trillion AI operations/sec with 20 terabytes/sec memory bandwidth. This SoC architecture requires less than 195mm2 in TSMC 16nm and provides an extensible platform with 44 PCIe lanes and 4 channels of PC3200 DDR4.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 12, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "KUtrace 2020"

Topic: 
KUtrace 2020
Abstract / Description: 

Observation tools for understanding occasionally-slow performance in large-scale distributed transaction systems are not keeping up with the complexity of the environment. The same applies to large database systems, to real-time control systems in cars and airplanes, and to operating system design.

Extremely low-overhead tracing can reveal the true execution and non-execution (waiting) dynamics of such software, running in situ with live traffic. KUtrace is such a tool, based on small Linux kernel patches recording and timestamping every transition between kernel- and user-mode execution across all CPUs of a datacenter or vehicle computer. The resulting displays show exactly what each transaction is doing every nanosecond, and hence shows why unpredictable ones are slow, all with tracing overhead well under 1%. Recent additions to KUtrace also show interference between programs and show profiles within long execution stretches that have no transitions.

The net result is deep insight into the dynamics of complex software, leading to often-simple changes to improve performance.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 5, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "Computer Security: The Mess We're In, How We Got Here, and What to Do About It"

Topic: 
Computer Security: The Mess We're In, How We Got Here, and What to Do About It
Abstract / Description: 

There are dozens of companies selling products to solve your Identity and Access Management (IAM) problems. Why so many? Because IAM is really hard. But why is IAM so hard? I hope to convince you in this talk the reason is that our approach to IAM is fundamentally flawed. The talk includes my personal theory of how we got into this mess and a strategy for getting out of it.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 29, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "A Fight over the Law of Software APIs, and other war stories from the Electronic Frontier Foundation""

Topic: 
A Fight over the Law of Software APIs, and other war stories from the Electronic Frontier Foundation
Abstract / Description: 

Over the past four years, a federal appeals court has upended a basic assumption about software: that while software can be covered by copyright law, software interfaces cannot. The court ruled that Google's re-implementation of Java APIs infringed Oracle's Java copyrights. Now, the Supreme Court will weigh in. The Electronic Frontier Foundation has argued at each stage of the case that copyright in APIs threatens innovation, especially by smaller players. This is part of EFF's work promoting the freedom to tinker, innovate, and research, especially outside the walls of major corporations—work that has also included challenges to overbroad computer crime and "anti-circumvention" laws.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 22, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

Pages

Ginzton Lab

OSA/SPIE present "Observing Ocean Health With A Global Network of Chemical and Biological Sensors on Robotic Platforms: Biogeochemical-Argo"

Topic: 
Observing Ocean Health With A Global Network of Chemical and Biological Sensors on Robotic Platforms: Biogeochemical-Argo
Abstract / Description: 

The ocean is under threat from a variety of processes driven by increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide such as ocean warming, changing winds and currents, decreasing pH and oxygen, and less ice cover at high latitudes. However, vast areas of the open ocean are sampled from research ships for chemical and biological properties only once per decade or less, with sampling occurring mainly in summer. Our ability to detect changes in ocean chemical and biological processes that may be occurring are greatly hindered by this undersampling. Robotic platforms carrying chemical and biological sensors that can monitor ocean metabolism, such as rates of oxygen production, nutrient uptake, accumulation of plankton biomass, and respiration, are required. The platforms and sensors must operate for the 5 to 10 year period between research vessel visits with no direct human intervention and little or no chance for sensor recalibration. Here, I'll describe the BGC-Argo network, which is being implemented to meet this mission. The BGC-Argo array is based on profiling floats that cycle through the upper 2 kilometers of the ocean every 10 days for 4 to 6 years. These floats carry optical sensors for oxygen, nitrate, chlorophyll, and particles, as well as electrochemical sensors for pH and physical sensors for temperature, pressure and salinity. The nitrate and pH sensors used in the array were developed at MBARI. With funding from NSF, NOAA, and NASA, we have deployed 200 floats in the Southern Ocean over the past 6 years. A recent research infrastructure grant from the NSF will extend the Southern Ocean array to the globe with 500 floats additional floats.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, January 26, 2021 - 1:30pm

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Next Generation Photonics"

Topic: 
Next Generation Photonics
Abstract / Description: 

Over the past few decades, silicon photonics has revolutionized photonic integrated circuits by leveraging the semiconductor CMOS manufacturing infrastructure for low cost, high performance devices and systems. However, key fundamental challenges of the field remain unsolved: packaging the devices with optical fibers and generating light on chip.

We developed a novel approach for fiber packaging based on fusing the fiber and chip together. Connecting a silicon photonic chip across long distances requires attaching optical fibers to the chip. In practice, the packaging of optical fibers to photonic devices is time consuming, lossy, and expensive. This process is usually done by gluing the fiber and chip together using optical adhesives. By fusion splicing the chip and fiber together we have demonstrated losses as low as 1dB for single fibers and 2.5dB for an array of four fibers.

Imagine a laser as thick as an atom that is compatible with silicon photonics. Silicon based materials are passive. Since silicon is an indirect band gap material it is a poor light emitter. To generate light on a silicon photonic integrated circuit, you need to integrate active materials, which are usually not compatible with CMOS, with the device. Two-dimensional materials are excellent candidates for light sources, modulators, and detectors; and they are compatible with CMOS electronic manufacturing in the back end. We recently demonstrated the first fully on-chip 2D laser. Due to their thickness and transfer process, we envision electronic-photonic devices with many optical layers, each with their own lasers, modulators, and detectors based on 2D materials. Our recent demonstration completes the set of active devices completely based on 2D materials.


Password: 017994

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 6, 2020 - 1:00pm
Venue: 
Zoom ID: 991 2584 9377

OSA/SPIE with SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Next Generation Photonics"

Topic: 
Next Generation Photonics
Abstract / Description: 

Over the past few decades, silicon photonics has revolutionized photonic integrated circuits by leveraging the semiconductor CMOS manufacturing infrastructure for low cost, high performance devices and systems. However, key fundamental challenges of the field remain unsolved: packaging the devices with optical fibers and generating light on chip.

We developed a novel approach for fiber packaging based on fusing the fiber and chip together. Connecting a silicon photonic chip across long distances requires attaching optical fibers to the chip. In practice, the packaging of optical fibers to photonic devices is time consuming, lossy, and expensive. This process is usually done by gluing the fiber and chip together using optical adhesives. By fusion splicing the chip and fiber together we have demonstrated losses as low as 1dB for single fibers and 2.5dB for an array of four fibers.

Imagine a laser as thick as an atom that is compatible with silicon photonics. Silicon based materials are passive. Since silicon is an indirect band gap material it is a poor light emitter. To generate light on a silicon photonic integrated circuit, you need to integrate active materials, which are usually not compatible with CMOS, with the device. Two-dimensional materials are excellent candidates for light sources, modulators, and detectors; and they are compatible with CMOS electronic manufacturing in the back end. We recently demonstrated the first fully on-chip 2D laser. Due to their thickness and transfer process, we envision electronic-photonic devices with many optical layers, each with their own lasers, modulators, and detectors based on 2D materials. Our recent demonstration completes the set of active devices completely based on 2D materials.

Date and Time: 
Monday, May 4, 2020 - 12:05pm
Venue: 
Zoom ID: 991 2584 9377 (contact organizers for password)

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Applications of Precision Motion Control in the Optics and Photonics Industry"

Topic: 
Applications of Precision Motion Control in the Optics and Photonics Industry
Abstract / Description: 

Precision Automation has become a rapidly growing industry as manufacturers must develop ways to achieve ever-tightening tolerances. Likewise, research must push the envelope in order to maintain the increasingly advancing pace of technology. Aerotech has been providing assistance and solutions to researchers within academia and laboratories worldwide for 50 years and continues to empower students and technicians to complete and publish their research. In this seminar, we will discuss why automation and motion control is important as well as the various methods by which Aerotech has helped expand the boundaries of research in the field of optics and photonics. The topics we will cover in this session include:

  • What Precision Motion Control is and why it is important
  • How to choose the right set of motion control
  • How Aerotech has helped further research in:
    • Optics design and manufacturing
    • Light sources and beamlines
    • Optical positioning and ultra-fast spectroscopy
    • Fiber alignment
    • Laser Processing
    • Additive Manufacturing

After the presentation, a round-table discussion will be held during which we'd like to hear from you! Please bring with you any topics and - more importantly - any tough issues that you'd like to pose pertaining to automated motion control within your specific research field.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, March 3, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE present "Applications of Precision Motion Control in the Optics and Photonics Industry"

Topic: 
Applications of Precision Motion Control in the Optics and Photonics Industry
Abstract / Description: 

Refreshments at 4:00

Precision Automation has become a rapidly growing industry as manufacturers must develop ways to achieve ever-tightening tolerances. Likewise, research must push the envelope in order to maintain the increasingly advancing pace of technology. Aerotech has been providing assistance and solutions to researchers within academia and laboratories worldwide for 50 years and continues to empower students and technicians to complete and publish their research. In this seminar, we will discuss why automation and motion control is important as well as the various methods by which Aerotech has helped expand the boundaries of research in the field of optics and photonics. The topics we will cover in this session include:

  • What Precision Motion Control is and why it is important
  • How to choose the right set of motion control
  • How Aerotech has helped further research in:
    • Optics design and manufacturing
    • Light sources and beamlines
    • Optical positioning and ultra-fast spectroscopy
    • Fiber alignment
    • Laser Processing
    • Additive Manufacturing

After the presentation, a round-table discussion will be held during which we'd like to hear from you! Please bring with you any topics and - more importantly - any tough issues that you'd like to pose pertaining to automated motion control within your specific research field.

 

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 26, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Innovation in the Laser Industry"

Topic: 
Innovation in the Laser Industry
Abstract / Description: 
Spectra-Physics was a startup when Prof. Byer was a summer student in 1964.  By the time Alan Petersen and Jim Kafka joined in the early 1980s, the company had matured and aspired to be all things in lasers.  We will discuss the changes in the laser industry since that time and the role of innovation within the company to drive growth and broaden the product offerings from scientific lasers to industrial laser systems.
 
PLEASE RVP TO GUARANTEE A SPOT.
Date and Time: 
Monday, March 9, 2020 - 12:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 299

Q-Farm Quantum Seminar Series presents "Surprises from Time Crystals"

Topic: 
Surprises from Time Crystals
Abstract / Description: 

Time crystals are new states of matter that only exist in an out-of-equilibrium setting. I will review the state of this rapidly evolving field, focusing in particular on some of the remarkable properties of this phase, and the surprises coming out of its study. I will provide a detailed overview of existing experiments, with a view towards identifying the ingredients needed for an unambiguous observation of this phase in the future.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 29, 2020 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Hansen Physics & Astrophysics Building, 102/103

AP 483 Seminar Series presents "Photovoltaic Restoration of Sight in Retinal Degeneration"

Topic: 
Photovoltaic Restoration of Sight in Retinal Degeneration
Abstract / Description: 

Retinal degenerative diseases lead to blindness due to loss of the “image capturing” photoreceptors, while neurons in the “image-processing” inner retinal layers are relatively well-preserved. Information can be reintroduced into the visual system by photovoltaic subretinal implants, which convert incident light into electric current and stimulate the secondary retinal neurons.

 

To provide sufficient light intensity for photovoltaic stimulation while avoiding visual perception by remaining photoreceptors, images captured by a camera are projected onto the retina from augmented-reality glasses using pulsed near-infrared light. This design avoids the use of bulky electronics and wiring, thereby greatly reducing the surgical complexity and enabling scaling the number of photovoltaic pixels to thousands. Many features of the natural retinal signal processing are preserved in this approach, and spatial resolution matches the pixel pitch (so far 100 μm pixels in human patients, and 50 μm in rodents). For a broad acceptance of this technology by patients who lost central vision due to Age-Related Macular Degeneration, visual acuity should exceed 20/100, which requires pixels smaller than 25 μm. I will present a 3-dimensional electro-neural interface scalable to cellular dimensions and discuss the outlook and challenges for future developments.


 AP483 Optics and Electronics Seminar Series 2019-20 (Sponsored by Ginzton Laboratory, SPRC, Applied Physics, Physics, and HEPL).

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 24, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP 483 Seminar Series presents "Taking the Humble FBG on a Voyage of Discovery from the Lab Bench to the Hospital and Beyond"

Topic: 
Taking the Humble FBG on a Voyage of Discovery from the Lab Bench to the Hospital and Beyond
Abstract / Description: 

Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) emerged almost magically in 1978. Since then, they have developed from being primarily of academic interest, to being one of the most versatile photonic components for both telecommunications and sensing. 

I was lucky enough to get introduced to photonics during the early years of discovery and experimentation with FBGs and ended up making FBG components for telecommunications. Jumping forward a few decades, I had moved away from telecommunications and had started to dabble with free space optical sensing. Then, during a chance meeting over a beer in Sydney, I was asked, rather naively, if it was possible to use optical fiber to monitor what goes on in the esophagus when we swallow. This set me off on an entirely new path and, pulling together some ideas from telecoms, and some basic mechanical engineering, my team ended up developing a range of sensors for monitoring pressure in the human digestive tract. 

Being able to detect swallowing disorders quickly led to monitoring in other regions of the gut, like the colon and small bowel, and, together with colleagues from Flinders Medical Center, we provided some details of the inner workings of the human gastrointestinal tract. Thus, the fiber optic catheter was born. This device kept me busy for almost 10 years, during which time we worked closely with clinical research groups to write a whole new chapter on how the gut works.

The next ‘Eureka’ moment came when we had to develop a temperature independent version of our sensor, initially for monitoring pressure beneath bandages. The very simple design that resulted worked well for sub-bandage measurements but has also become a key technology that has moved to applications in aerospace, pipeline monitoring, and mining.

When I started working in optics, I never thought I'd end up monitoring what makes your stomach growl when hungry, how air flows across an airplane wing, or detecting pressure transients in water pipes. 

During this talk I will explain how our basic transducers work and will then describe the applications they are now being applied to, demonstrating how the humble FBG has opened up the scope and reach of fiber-optic sensing.


 

AP483 Optics and Electronics Seminar Series 2019-20 (Sponsored by Ginzton Laboratory, SPRC, Applied Physics, Physics, and HEPL).

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 10, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP 483 Seminar Series presents "Non-Hermitian Photonics: Optics at an Exceptional Point"

Topic: 
Non-Hermitian Photonics: Optics at an Exceptional Point
Abstract / Description: 

In recent years, non-Hermitian degeneracies, also known as exceptional points (EPs), have emerged as a new paradigm for engineering the response of optical systems. At such points, an N-dimensional space can be represented by a single eigenvalue and one eigenvector. As a result, these points are associated with abrupt phase transitions in parameter space. Among many different non-conservative photonic configurations, parity-time (PT) symmetric systems are of particular interest since they provide a powerful platform to explore, and consequently utilize, the physics of exceptional points in a systematic manner. In this talk, I will review some of our recent works in the area of non-Hermitian (mainly PT-symmetric) active photonics. For example, in a series of works, we have demonstrated how the generation and judicial utilization of these points in laser systems can result in unexpected dynamics, unusual linewidth behavior, and improved modal response. On the other hand, biasing a photonic system at an exceptional point can lead to orders of magnitude enhancement in sensitivity, an effect that may enable a new generation of ultrasensitive optical sensors on-chip. Non-Hermiticity can also be used as a means to promote or single out an edge mode in photonic topological insulator lattices. Rotation sensors play a crucial role in a diverse set of applications associated with navigation, positioning, and inertial sensing. Most optical gyroscopes rely on the Sagnac effect induced phase shift that scales linearly with the rotational velocity. In ring laser gyroscopes (RLGs), this shift manifests itself as a resonance splitting in the emission spectrum that can be detected as a beat frequency. The need for evermore precise RLGs has fueled research activities towards devising new approaches aimed to boost the sensitivity beyond what is dictated by geometrical constraints. In this respect, attempts have been made in the past to use either dispersive or nonlinear effects. Here, we propose a new scheme for ultrasensitive laser gyroscopes that utilizes the physics of exceptional points. By exploiting the properties of such non- Hermitian degeneracies, we show that the rotation-induced frequency splitting becomes proportional to the square root of the gyration speed, thus enhancing the sensitivity to low angular rotations by orders of magnitudes. We will then describe a possible modification of a standard RLG to support an exceptional point and measure the resulting enhanced sensitivity in the proposed system.


 

Date and Time: 
Monday, January 27, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

Pages

Information Systems Lab (ISL) Colloquium

ISL Colloquium presents "Exploiting symmetries in Inference and Learning"

Topic: 
Exploiting symmetries in Inference and Learning
Abstract / Description: 

Symmetries play a crucial role in much of mathematics and physics. In this talk I will explore the role that symmetries are playing in machine learning. In particular I will discuss the concept of equivariance and apply it to neural networks. After the introduction I will discuss two newer works: first E(n) equivariant graph neural networks that are equivariant to both permutations of the nodes and global E(n) transformations of the node features. These models are ideal for predicting molecular properties in biology and chemistry and to model objects as point clouds in computer vision. Secondly I will show how invariance if probability densities result in very efficient deterministic mcmc samplers with better convergence behavior. We show that by modeling the sampler as a push-forward of the density according to an ODE, and by identifying a very large set of symmetries for an arbitrary density characterized divergence free vector fields, we can indeed design highly efficient samplers. Finally we extend these ideas to discrete sampling spaces, such as the Ising model.

Joint work with Kirill Neklyudov and Roberto Bondesan.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 4, 2021 - 9:00am
Venue: 
Registration required

ISL Colloquium presents "Chasing the Long Tail: What Neural Networks Memorize and Why"

Topic: 
Chasing the Long Tail: What Neural Networks Memorize and Why
Abstract / Description: 

Deep learning algorithms that achieve state-of-the-art results on image and text recognition tasks tend to fit the entire training dataset (nearly) perfectly including mislabeled examples and outliers. This propensity to memorize seemingly useless data and the resulting large generalization gap have puzzled many practitioners and is not explained by existing theories of machine learning. We provide a simple conceptual explanation and a theoretical model demonstrating that memorization of outliers and mislabeled examples is necessary for achieving close-to-optimal generalization error when learning from long-tailed data distributions. Image and text data are known to follow such distributions and therefore our results establish a formal link between these empirical phenomena. We then demonstrate the utility of memorization and support our explanation empirically. These results rely on a new technique for efficiently estimating memorization and influence of training data points.

Based on a joint work with Chiyuan Zhang.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 25, 2021 - 4:30pm

ISL Colloquium presents "Enabling Fast and Robust Federated Learning"

Topic: 
Enabling Fast and Robust Federated Learning
Abstract / Description: 

In many large-scale machine learning applications, data is acquired and processed at the edge nodes of the network such as mobile devices, users' devices, and IoT sensors. Federated learning is a recent distributed learning paradigm according to which a model is trained over a set of edge devices. While federated learning can enable a variety of new applications, it faces major bottlenecks that severely limit its reliability and scalability including communications bottleneck as well as data and system's heterogeneity bottleneck. In this talk, we first focus on communication-efficient federated learning, and present FedPAQ, a communication-efficient and scalable Federated learning method with Periodic Averaging and Quantization. FedPAQ is provably near-optimal in the following sense. Under the problem setup of expected risk minimization with independent and identically distributed data points, when the loss function is strongly convex the proposed method converges to the optimal solution with near-optimal rate, and when the loss function is non-convex it finds a first-order stationary point. In the second part of the talk, we develop a robust federated learning algorithm that achieves strong performance against distribution shifts in users' samples. Throughout, we show several numerical results to empirically support our theoretical results.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 18, 2021 - 4:30pm

ISL Colloquium presents "Data, decisions, and dynamics"

Topic: 
Data, decisions, and dynamics
Abstract / Description: 

Consequential decisions compel individuals to react in response to the specifics of the decision rule. This individual-level response in aggregate can disrupt the statistical patterns that motivated the decision rule, leading to unforeseen consequences.

In this talk, I will discuss two ways to formalize dynamic decision making problems. One, called performative prediction, makes macro-level assumptions about the aggregate population response to a decision rule. The other, called strategic classification, follows microeconomic theory in modeling individuals as utility-maximizing agents with perfect information. We will see key results and limitations of either approach. Drawing on lessons from the microfoundations project in economics, I will outline a viable middleground between the two.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 11, 2021 - 4:30pm

ISL Colloquium presents "End-to-end learning for computational microscopy"

Topic: 
End-to-end learning for computational microscopy
Abstract / Description: 

Computational imaging involves the joint design of imaging system hardware and software, optimizing across the entire pipeline from acquisition to reconstruction. Computers can replace bulky and expensive optics by solving computational inverse problems. This talk will describe end-to-end learning for development of new microscopes that use computational imaging to enable 3D fluorescence and phase measurement. Traditional model-based image reconstruction algorithms are based on large-scale nonlinear non-convex optimization; we combine these with unrolled neural networks to learn both the image reconstruction algorithm and the optimized data capture strategy.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 4, 2021 - 4:30pm

ISL Colloquium presents "The Well Tempered Lasso"

Topic: 
The Well Tempered Lasso
Abstract / Description: 

We study the complexity of the entire regularization path for least squares regression with 1-norm penalty, known as the Lasso. Every regression parameter in the Lasso changes linearly as a function of the regularization value. The number of changes is regarded as the Lasso's complexity. Experimental results using exact path following exhibit polynomial complexity of the Lasso in the problem size. Alas, the path complexity of the Lasso on artificially designed regression problems is exponential. We use smoothed analysis as a mechanism for bridging the gap between worst case settings and the de facto low complexity. Our analysis assumes that the observed data has a tiny amount of intrinsic noise. We then prove that the Lasso's complexity is polynomial in the problem size. While building upon the seminal work of Spielman and Teng on smoothed complexity, our analysis is morally different as it is divorced from specific path following algorithms. We verify the validity of our analysis in experiments with both worst case settings and real datasets. The empirical results we obtain closely match our analysis.

Joint work with Prof. Yuanzhi Li (CMU).

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 28, 2021 - 4:30pm

ISL Colloquium presents "Adaptive Experimental Design for Best Identification and Multiple Testing"

Topic: 
Adaptive Experimental Design for Best Identification and Multiple Testing
Abstract / Description: 

Adaptive experimental design (AED), or active learning, leverages already-collected data to guide future measurements, in a closed loop, to collect the most informative data for the learning problem at hand. In both theory and practice, AED can extract considerably richer insights than any measurement plan fixed in advance, using the same statistical budget. Unfortunately, the same mechanism of feedback that can aid an algorithm in collecting data can also mislead it: a data collection heuristic can become overconfident in an incorrect belief, then collect data based on that belief, yet give little indication to the practitioner that anything went wrong. Consequently, it is critical that AED algorithms are provably robust with transparent guarantees. In this talk I will present my group's recent work on near-optimal approaches to adaptive testing with false discovery control and the best-arm identification problem for linear and combinatorial bandits, and how these approaches relate to, and leverage, ideas from non-adaptive optimal linear experimental design.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 21, 2021 - 4:30pm

ISL Colloquium presents "Information Directed Sampling" - Lecture 1 & 2

Topic: 
Information Directed Sampling
Abstract / Description: 

Tor will give a whirlwind tour of a series of recent papers on the information directed sampling algorithm for sequential decision-making. The results come in three flavours. First, generalising and applying the IDS algorithm to problems with a rich information structure such as convex bandits and partial monitoring. Second, showing a connection between the optimisation problem solved by IDS and the optimisation problem that determines the asymptotic lower bound for stochastic structured bandit problems. Third, showing a deep connection between IDS and the mirror descent framework for convex optimisation.

Date and Time: 
Monday, January 11, 2021 - 10:00am
Wednesday, January 13, 2021 - 10:00am

ISL Colloquium presents "Accelerating Reinforcement Learning in Emerging Wireless IoT Systems and Applications via System Awareness"

Topic: 
Accelerating Reinforcement Learning in Emerging Wireless IoT Systems and Applications via System Awareness
Abstract / Description: 

Traditional reinforcement learning (RL) algorithms are purely data-driven and operate without any a priori knowledge about the nature of the available actions, the system’s state transition dynamics, and its cost/reward function. This allows them to solve a wide variety of problems, but severely penalizes their ability to meet critical requirements of emerging wireless applications, due to the inefficiency with which the algorithms learn from their interactions with the environment. In this presentation, we describe foundational advances in system-aware RL that are achieved by systematically integrating basic system models into the learning process. These solutions use real-time data in conjunction with basic knowledge of the underlying communication system, and can achieve orders of magnitude improvement in key performance metrics, such as sample, compute, and memory complexity, compared to well-established RL benchmarks. Integration of this framework with deep RL and its further acceleration via stochastic computing and hardware optimization are also discussed.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 14, 2021 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom registration required

ISL Colloquium presents "Learning Convolutions from Scratch"

Topic: 
Learning Convolutions from Scratch
Abstract / Description: 

Convolution is one of the most essential components of architectures used in computer vision. As machine learning moves towards reducing the expert bias and learning it from data, a natural next step seems to be learning convolution-like structures from scratch. This, however, has proven elusive. For example, current state-of-the-art architecture search algorithms use convolution as one of the existing modules rather than learning it from data. In an attempt to understand the inductive bias that gives rise to convolutions, we investigate minimum description length as a guiding principle and show that in some settings, it can indeed be indicative of the performance of architectures. To find architectures with small description length, we propose β-LASSO, a simple variant of LASSO algorithm that, when applied on fully-connected networks for image classification tasks, learns architectures with local connections and achieves state-of-the-art accuracies for training fully-connected nets on CIFAR-10 (85.19%), CIFAR-100 (59.56%) and SVHN (94.07%) bridging the gap between fully-connected and convolutional nets.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 5, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom registration required

Pages

IT-Forum

Algorithms & Friends Seminar presents "How fast do algorithms improve?"

Topic: 
How fast do algorithms improve?
Abstract / Description: 

Algorithms are one of the fundamental building blocks of computing. But current evidence about how fast algorithms improve is anecdotal, using small numbers of case studies to extrapolate. In this work, we gather data from 57 textbooks and more than 1,137 research papers to present the first systematic view of algorithm progress ever assembled. There is enormous variation. Around half of all algorithm families experience little or no improvement. At the other extreme, 13% experience transformative improvements, radically changing how and where they can be used. Overall, we find that, for moderate-sized problems, 30% to 45% of algorithmic families had improvements comparable or greater than those that users experienced from Moore's Law and other hardware advances.

Joint work with Yash M. Sherry.

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 22, 2021 - 12:00pm

IT Forum presents "Distribution-Free, Risk-Controlling Prediction Sets"

Topic: 
Distribution-Free, Risk-Controlling Prediction Sets
Abstract / Description: 

To communicate instance-wise uncertainty for prediction tasks, we show how to generate set-valued predictions for black-box predictors that control the expected loss on future test points at a user-specified level. Our approach provides explicit finite-sample guarantees for any dataset by using a holdout set to calibrate the size of the prediction sets. This framework enables simple, distribution-free, rigorous error control for many tasks, and we demonstrate it in five large-scale machine learning problems: (1) classification problems where some mistakes are more costly than others; (2) multi-label classification, where each observation has multiple associated labels; (3) classification problems where the labels have a hierarchical structure; (4) image segmentation, where we wish to predict a set of pixels containing an object of interest; and (5) protein structure prediction.

Date and Time: 
Friday, February 19, 2021 - 1:00pm

IT Forum presents "Scaling Wasserstein distances to high dimensions via smoothing"

Topic: 
Scaling Wasserstein distances to high dimensions via smoothing
Abstract / Description: 

Wasserstein distances has recently seen a surge of applications in statistics and machine learning. This stems from many advantageous properties they possess, such as metric structure (they metrize weak convergence), robustness to support mismatch, compatibility to gradient-based optimization, and rich geometric properties. In practice, we rarely have access to the actual distribution and only get data from it, which necessitates estimating the distance from samples. A central issue is that such estimators suffer from the curse of dimensionality: their empirical convergence rate scales as n^{-1/d} for d-dimensional distributions. This rate deteriorates exponentially fast with dimension, making it impossible to obtain meaningful accuracy guarantees, considering the dimensionality of real-world data.

This talk will present a novel framework of smooth Wasserstein distances, that inherits the properties of their classic counterparts while alleviating the empirical curse of dimensionality. Specifically, we will show that the empirical approximation error of the smooth distance decays as n^{-1/2}, in all dimensions. For the special case of the smooth 1-Wasserstein distance, we will also derive a high-dimensional limit distribution, further highlighting the favorable statistical behavior of the smooth framework. Applications to implicit generative modeling will be considered, leveraging the statistical efficiency results to establish n^{-1/2} generalization bounds in any dimension.

Date and Time: 
Friday, February 12, 2021 - 1:00pm

Algorithms & Friends Seminar presents "A New Approach for Fighting Infectious Disease, Combining Game Theory and Network Theory"

Topic: 
A New Approach for Fighting Infectious Disease, Combining Game Theory and Network Theory
Abstract / Description: 

There is a categorically new way to fight infectious disease, which could have a significant impact on the COVID pandemic now. Its origins come from game theory and computer science. It works against every COVID variant, and would play a key role in mopping up vaccine-resistant infections to block COVID's evolution. It's an app which is fundamentally different from every other app (and which resolves deep flaws in "contact tracing apps"). Functionally, it gives you an anonymous radar that tells you how "far" away COVID has just struck. "Far" is measured by counting physical relationships (https://novid.org, https://youtu.be/EIU-6FvwikQ). The simple idea flips the incentives. Previous approaches were about controlling you, preemptively removing you from society if you were suspected of being infected. This new tool lets you see incoming disease to defend yourself just in time. This uniquely aligns incentives so that even if everyone in a democratic society does what is best for themselves, they end up doing what is best for the whole.

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 8, 2021 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Registration required

ISL Colloquium presents "The Well Tempered Lasso"

Topic: 
The Well Tempered Lasso
Abstract / Description: 

We study the complexity of the entire regularization path for least squares regression with 1-norm penalty, known as the Lasso. Every regression parameter in the Lasso changes linearly as a function of the regularization value. The number of changes is regarded as the Lasso's complexity. Experimental results using exact path following exhibit polynomial complexity of the Lasso in the problem size. Alas, the path complexity of the Lasso on artificially designed regression problems is exponential. We use smoothed analysis as a mechanism for bridging the gap between worst case settings and the de facto low complexity. Our analysis assumes that the observed data has a tiny amount of intrinsic noise. We then prove that the Lasso's complexity is polynomial in the problem size. While building upon the seminal work of Spielman and Teng on smoothed complexity, our analysis is morally different as it is divorced from specific path following algorithms. We verify the validity of our analysis in experiments with both worst case settings and real datasets. The empirical results we obtain closely match our analysis.

Joint work with Prof. Yuanzhi Li (CMU).

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 28, 2021 - 4:30pm

IT Forum presents "Towards Model Agnostic Robustness"

Topic: 
Towards Model Agnostic Robustness
Abstract / Description: 

It is now common practice to try and solve machine learning problems by starting with a complex existing model or architecture, and fine-tuning/adapting it to the task at hand. However, outliers, errors or even just sloppiness in training data often lead to drastic drops in performance.

We investigate a simple generic approach to correct for this, motivated by a classic statistical idea: trimmed loss. This advocates jointly (a) selecting which training samples to ignore, and (b) fitting a model on the remaining samples. As such this is computationally infeasible even for linear regression. We propose and study the natural iterative variant that alternates between these two steps (a) and (b) - each of which individually can be easily accomplished in pretty much any statistical setting. We also study the batch-SGD variant of this idea. We demonstrate both theoretically (for generalized linear models) and empirically (for moderate-sized neural network models) that this effectively recovers accuracy in the presence of bad training data.

This work is joint with Yanyao Shen and Vatsal Shah and appears in NeurIPS 2019, ICML 2019 and AISTATS 2020.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 29, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Registration required

IT-Forum presents "A Very Sketchy Talk"

Topic: 
A Very Sketchy Talk
Abstract / Description: 

We give an overview of dimensionality reduction methods, or sketching, for a number of problems in optimization, first surveying work using these methods for classical problems, which gives near optimal algorithms for regression, low rank approximation, and natural variants. We then survey recent work applying sketching to column subset selection, kernel methods, sublinear algorithms for structured matrices, tensors, trace estimation, and so on. The focus in the talk will be on fast algorithms.


The Information Theory Forum (IT-Forum) at Stanford ISL is an interdisciplinary academic forum which focuses on mathematical aspects of information processing. With a primary emphasis on information theory, we also welcome researchers from signal processing, learning and statistical inference, control and optimization to deliver talks at our forum. We also warmly welcome industrial affiliates in the above fields. The forum is typically held every Friday at 1:15 pm during the academic year.

Until further notice, the IT Forum convenes exclusively via Zoom (on Fridays at 1:15pm PT) due to the ongoing pandemic. To avoid "Zoom-bombing", we ask attendees to input their email address here https://stanford.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJwkf-uvqjoqHNIWxY4HHon4K107QMo22PVR to receive the Zoom meeting details via email.


The ISL Colloquium meets weekly during the academic year. Seminars are each Thursday at 4:30pm PT, unless indicated otherwise.

Until further notice, the ISL Colloquium convenes exclusively via Zoom (on Thursdays at 4:30pm PT) due to the ongoing pandemic. To avoid "Zoom-bombing", we ask attendees to input their email address here https://stanford.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJckfuCurzkvEtKKOBvDCrPv3McapgP6HygJ to receive the Zoom meeting details via email.

Date and Time: 
Friday, November 13, 2020 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Zoom

IT-Forum presents "High-accuracy Optimality and Limitation of the Profile Maximum Likelihood"

Topic: 
High-accuracy Optimality and Limitation of the Profile Maximum Likelihood
Abstract / Description: 

Symmetric properties of distributions arise in multiple settings, where for each of them separate estimators have been developed. Recently, Orlitsky et al. showed that a single estimator, called the profile maximum likelihood (PML), achieves the optimal sample complexity universally for many properties and any accuracy parameter larger than $n^{-1/4}$, where $n$ is the sample size. They also raised the question whether this low-accuracy range is an artifact of the analysis or a fundamental limitation of the PML, which remained open after several subsequent work.

In this talk, we provide a complete answer to this question and characterize the tight performance of PML in the high-accuracy regime. On the positive side, we show that the PML remains sample-optimal for any accuracy parameter larger than $n^{-1/3}$ using a novel chaining property of the PML distributions. In particular, the PML distribution itself is an optimal estimator of the sorted hidden distribution. On the negative side, we show that the PML as well as any adaptive approach cannot be universally sample-optimal when the accuracy parameter is below $n^{-1/3}$, and characterize the exact penalty for adaptation via a matching adaptation lower bound.

Based on joint work with Kirankumar Shiragur. The full papers are available online at https://arxiv.org/abs/2004.03166 and https://arxiv.org/abs/2008.11964.


The Information Theory Forum (IT-Forum) at Stanford ISL is an interdisciplinary academic forum which focuses on mathematical aspects of information processing. With a primary emphasis on information theory, we also welcome researchers from signal processing, learning and statistical inference, control and optimization to deliver talks at our forum. We also warmly welcome industrial affiliates in the above fields. The forum is typically held every Friday at 1:15 pm during the academic year.

Until further notice, the IT Forum convenes exclusively via Zoom (on Fridays at 1:15pm PT) due to the ongoing pandemic. To avoid "Zoom-bombing", we ask attendees to input their email address here https://stanford.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJwkf-uvqjoqHNIWxY4HHon4K107QMo22PVR to receive the Zoom meeting details via email.

Date and Time: 
Friday, September 25, 2020 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Zoom registration req'd

Learning to Bid in Repeated First-price Auctions

Topic: 
Learning to Bid in Repeated First-price Auctions
Abstract / Description: 

First-price auctions have very recently swept the online advertising industry, replacing second-price auctions as the predominant auction mechanism on many platforms. This shift has brought forth important challenges for a bidder: how should one bid in a first-price auction where it is no longer optimal to bid one's private value truthfully and hard to know the others' bidding behaviors? To answer this question, we study online learning in repeated first-price auctions, and consider various scenarios involving different assumptions on the characteristics of the other bidders' bids, of the bidder's private valuation, of the feedback structure of the auction, and of the reference policies with which our bidder competes. For all of them, we characterize the essentially optimal performance and identify computationally efficient algorithms achieving it. Experimentation on first-price auction datasets from Verizon Media demonstrates the promise of our schemes relative to existing bidding algorithms.

Based on joint work with Aaron Flores, Erik Ordentlich, Tsachy Weissman, and Zhengyuan Zhou. The full papers are available online at https://arxiv.org/abs/2003.09795 and https://arxiv.org/abs/2007.04568


 

The Information Theory Forum (IT-Forum) at Stanford ISL is an interdisciplinary academic forum which focuses on mathematical aspects of information processing. With a primary emphasis on information theory, we also welcome researchers from signal processing, learning and statistical inference, control and optimization to deliver talks at our forum. We also warmly welcome industrial affiliates in the above fields. The forum is typically held every Friday at 1:15 pm during the academic year.

Until further notice, the IT Forum convenes exclusively via Zoom (on Fridays at 1:15pm PT) due to the ongoing pandemic. To avoid "Zoom-bombing", we ask attendees to input their email address here https://stanford.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJwkf-uvqjoqHNIWxY4HHon4K107QMo22PVR to receive the Zoom meeting details via email.

Date and Time: 
Friday, September 18, 2020 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Zoom

IT Forum presents "Fundamental barriers to estimation in high-dimensions"

Topic: 
Fundamental barriers to estimation in high-dimensions
Abstract / Description: 

Modern large-scale statistical models require to estimate thousands to millions of parameters. Understanding the tradeoff between statistical optimality and computational tractability in such models remains an outstanding challenge. Under a random design assumption, we establish lower bounds to statistical estimation with two popular classes of tractable estimators in several popular statistical models. First, in high-dimensional linear models we show that a large gap often exists between the optimal statistical error and that achieved by least squares with a convex penalty. Examples of such estimators include the Lasso, ridge regression, and MAP estimation with log-concave priors and Gaussian noise. Second, in generalized linear models and low-rank matrix estimation problems, we introduce the class of 'general first order methods,' examples of which include gradient descent, projected gradient descent, and their accelerated versions. We derive lower bounds for general first order methods which are tight up to asymptotically negligible terms. Our results demonstrate a gap to statistical optimality for general first order methods in both sparse phase retrieval and sparse PCA.

This is joint work with Andrea Montanari and Yuchen Wu.

 

Date and Time: 
Friday, April 3, 2020 - 1:15pm
Venue: 
Zoom: stanford.zoom.us/j/516499996

Pages

Optics and Electronics Seminar

Phonon Light Switches: Leveraging Vibrations to Create Actively Tunable IR Devices

Topic: 
Phonon Light Switches: Leveraging Vibrations to Create Actively Tunable IR Devices
Abstract / Description: 

Light possesses a wave nature. Phonons do too. Within the infrared portion of the spectrum, these waves have comparable energies leading to their interaction. Here, the interaction is leveraged to create tunable infrared filters that control transmission and reflection with no moving parts at the "push of a button" for applications in next generation imaging and on-chip spectroscopy. Practically, waferscale tunable infrared filters are first demonstrated by altering graphene's plasmonic dispersion using the dielectrics surrounding it resulting in gate-tunable variations (V < 10V) of reflectance by over 1 μm. These same filters are then integrated directly atop a broadband infrared detector in a proof-of-principle demonstration of a dynamically tunable pixel. Second, field induced changes in the phonons energies of lead zirconate titante (PZT) ferroelectric bilayers result in a tunable IR filter possessing high speed, latchable operation, and scalable fabrication. Taken together, the case studies highlight the utility of harnessing phonons to sculpt the spectral response of IR elements.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 25, 2021 - 1:30pm

AP483 Optics & Electronics Seminar presents "Exploiting Solar and Thermal Radiation Conversion for Large-Scale Energy and Sustainability Uses"

Topic: 
Exploiting Solar and Thermal Radiation Conversion for Large-Scale Energy and Sustainability Uses
Abstract / Description: 

Details TBA

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 15, 2021 - 4:15pm

AP483 Optics & Electronics Seminar presents "My Experiences and Science at the ISS"

Topic: 
My Experiences and Science at the ISS
Abstract / Description: 

Details TBA


Ellen Ochoa, American engineer, former astronaut and former director of the Johnson Space Center

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 8, 2021 - 4:15pm

AP483 Optics & Electronics Seminar presents "Grating Based Differential Phase Contrast X-ray Imaging and Recent Applications to Medical Imaging"

Topic: 
Grating Based Differential Phase Contrast X-ray Imaging and Recent Applications to Medical Imaging
Abstract / Description: 

When we think of X-ray imaging, we imagine a photon view as particles are absorbed or scattered in materials. This provides the imaging contrast in many important applications such as dental, chest X-rays, airport scanners. The application of X-ray diffraction gratings enables additional contrast modalities using conventional off-the-shelf X-ray sources. Specifically, the differential phase contrast mode can provide direct access to electron density, and the dark field (fringe visibility) contrast can give texture details well below the resolution limit of the detector – opening the door to exciting imaging possibilities, for example, in lung imaging. The standard Grating Based X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging (GBXPCI) technique uses three gratings G0, G1, G2. The first grating G0 provides the partial coherence needed for X-ray interference; the second grating G1 provides the interference of waves that generates a spatially modulated set of fringes at some distance away; the final grating G2 provides the means to interrogate the fringes before the detector. We will review the basic theory, implementation challenges, and some recent developments in literature.

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 1, 2021 - 4:15pm

AP483 Optics & Electronics Seminar: Continuous measurements of biomolecules in live subjects

Topic: 
Continuous measurements of biomolecules in live subjects
Abstract / Description: 

A biosensor capable of continuously measuring specific molecules in vivo would provide a valuable window into patients' health status and their response to therapeutics. Unfortunately, continuous, real-time molecular measurement is currently limited to a handful of analytes (i.e. glucose and oxygen) and these sensors cannot be generalized to measure other analytes. In this talk, we will present a biosensor technology that can be generalized to measure a wide range of biomolecules in living subjects. To achieve this, we develop synthetic antibodies (aptamers) that change its structure upon binding to its target analyte and produce an electrochemical current or emit light. Our real-time biosensor requires no exogenous reagents and can be readily reconfigured to measure different target analytes by exchanging the aptamer probes in a modular manner. Using our real-time biosensor, we demonstrate the first closed loop feedback control of drug concentration in live animals and discuss potential applications of this technology. Finally, we will discuss methods for generating the aptamer probes which are at the heart of this biosensor technology.


This seminar is sponsored by the Department of Applied Physics and the Ginzton Laboratory

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 22, 2021 - 12:00pm

AP483 Optics & Electronics Seminar presents "A Photonics Perspective on Data Center Interconnects"

Topic: 
A Photonics Perspective on Data Center Interconnects
Abstract / Description: 

The optical networks interconnecting datacenters (DCI) have grown the last decade more than any other transport network and have motivated the evolution of the original Internet architecture and of the global fiber infrastructure [1, 2, 3]. The current growth is also projected to continue strong by at least 2 more orders of magnitude [3, 4], placing DCI at the frontier of optical fiber communications. This presentation offers an industry perspective on DCI-motivated innovations and challenges in optical systems and photonics technology. Notably, photonic integration combined with coherent WDM and advancements in DSP and Moore's law, is enabling current DCI systems to operate ever closer to the fiber Shannon limit by exceeding 6 b/s/Hz spectral-efficiency in transatlantic deployments or reaching 25 Gb/s per Watt power-efficiency in metro DCI 400GE pluggable coherent WDM transceivers [1, 3].

1. L. Paraschis et al "Innovations in Inter Data Center Transport Networks", Chapter 15 (pp. 673 - 718) in Optical Fiber
Telecommunications VII, Edited by Alan E. Willner, Elsevier, ISBN 978-0128165027 (2019).
2. L. Paraschis, "Advancements in Metro Regional and Core Transport Network Architectures for the Next-Generation
Internet", Chapter 18 (pp. 793–817) in Optical Fiber Telecommunications VI Volume B, Systems and Networks, Edited by
Ivan Kaminow, Tingye Li, Alan E. Willner, Elsevier, ISBN 978-0123969606 (2016).
3. U. Holzle, "A Ubiquitous Cloud Requires a Transparent Network", IEEE/OSA Conference on Optical Fiber Communications
(OFC), Plenary (2017), and V. Vusirikala, "SDN Enabled Programmable, Dynamic Optical Layer", European Conference on
Communications (ECOC), Plenary (2017).
4. James Hamilton, "How Many Data Centers Needed World-Wide", https://perspectives.mvdirona.com/2017/04/how- manydata-centers-needed-world-wide (last accessed 2021/01/24).

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 8, 2021 - 12:00pm

AP483 Optics & Electronics Seminar presents "Extreme optics with zero-index and flat-band metamaterials"

Topic: 
Extreme optics with zero-index and flat-band metamaterials
Abstract / Description: 

Nanotechnology has enabled the development of nanostructured composite materials (metamaterials) with exotic optical properties not found in nature. In the most extreme case, we can create materials which support light waves that propagate with infinite phase velocity, corresponding to a refractive index of zero. We have developed a variety of in-plane metamaterial designs that permit obtaining a refractive index of zero in the optical regime. We will report on some of the exotic physics of zero-index metamaterials, including strong enhancement of nonlinear optical phenomena, and on flat-bands generated by twisted bilayer photonic crystals.

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 1, 2021 - 4:15pm

OSA/SPIE present "Observing Ocean Health With A Global Network of Chemical and Biological Sensors on Robotic Platforms: Biogeochemical-Argo"

Topic: 
Observing Ocean Health With A Global Network of Chemical and Biological Sensors on Robotic Platforms: Biogeochemical-Argo
Abstract / Description: 

The ocean is under threat from a variety of processes driven by increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide such as ocean warming, changing winds and currents, decreasing pH and oxygen, and less ice cover at high latitudes. However, vast areas of the open ocean are sampled from research ships for chemical and biological properties only once per decade or less, with sampling occurring mainly in summer. Our ability to detect changes in ocean chemical and biological processes that may be occurring are greatly hindered by this undersampling. Robotic platforms carrying chemical and biological sensors that can monitor ocean metabolism, such as rates of oxygen production, nutrient uptake, accumulation of plankton biomass, and respiration, are required. The platforms and sensors must operate for the 5 to 10 year period between research vessel visits with no direct human intervention and little or no chance for sensor recalibration. Here, I'll describe the BGC-Argo network, which is being implemented to meet this mission. The BGC-Argo array is based on profiling floats that cycle through the upper 2 kilometers of the ocean every 10 days for 4 to 6 years. These floats carry optical sensors for oxygen, nitrate, chlorophyll, and particles, as well as electrochemical sensors for pH and physical sensors for temperature, pressure and salinity. The nitrate and pH sensors used in the array were developed at MBARI. With funding from NSF, NOAA, and NASA, we have deployed 200 floats in the Southern Ocean over the past 6 years. A recent research infrastructure grant from the NSF will extend the Southern Ocean array to the globe with 500 floats additional floats.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, January 26, 2021 - 1:30pm

OSA/SPIE present "Silicon-based Optical Biosensors"

Topic: 
Silicon-based Optical Biosensors
Abstract / Description: 

Silicon-based optical biosensors hold great promise as low-cost, lab-on-chip sensor array elements due to their compatibility with both standard microelectronics processing and standard surface functionalization techniques. Key metrics of these optical biosensors include sensitivity, which is largely derived from the level of interaction between light and the target molecules to be detected, selectivity, and robustness. This talk will present several approaches to increase detection sensitivity through the use of on-chip resonant cavity geometries and porous substrates. The outlook for translating promising silicon-based benchtop sensing platforms into reliable clinical and point-of-care diagnostic devices will also be discussed.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, December 3, 2020 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom ID: 97038306925; +password

AP 483 Seminar presents "Organic small molecule integrated photonics"

Topic: 
Organic small molecule integrated photonics
Abstract / Description: 

The initial, landmark integrated photonic devices relied on silicon and III-V materials, and recent advances in material fabrication and deposition methods have enabled a plethora of new technologies based on materials with higher optical nonlinearities, including 2D materials and organic polymers. However, nonlinear optical (NLO) organic small molecules have not experienced similar growth due to a perceived environmental instability and to challenges related to intra and intermolecular interactions. Because NLO small molecules have NLO coefficients that are orders of magnitude larger than conventional optical materials, developing strategies to fabricate optical devices could enable significant performance improvements. In recent work, we combined conventional top-down fabrication methods with bottom-up techniques to develop on-chip devices that incorporated NLO optical small molecules. These hybrid systems provide access to optical behavior and performance not attainable with conventional material systems. In this seminar, I will discuss a couple examples of NLO small molecule integrated resonators, including Raman lasers and all optically-switchable devices.


This seminar is sponsored by the department of Applied Physics and the Ginzton Laboratory.

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 19, 2020 - 4:15pm

Pages

SCIEN Talk

SCIEN and EE292E present "Self-supervised Scene Representation Learning"

Topic: 
Self-supervised Scene Representation Learning
Abstract / Description: 

Unsupervised learning with generative models has the potential of discovering rich representations of 3D scenes. Such Neural Scene Representations may subsequently support a wide variety of downstream tasks, ranging from robotics to computer graphics to medical imaging. However, existing methods ignore one of the most fundamental properties of scenes: their three-dimensional structure. In this talk, I will make the case for equipping Neural Scene Representations with an inductive bias for 3D structure, enabling self-supervised discovery of shape and appearance from few observations. By embedding an implicit scene representation in a neural rendering framework and learning a prior over these representations, I will show how we can enable 3D reconstruction from only a single posed 2D image. I will show how the features we learn in this process are already useful to the downstream task of semantic segmentation. I will then show how gradient-based meta-learning can enable fast inference of implicit representations.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 20, 2021 - 4:30pm

SCIEN and EE292E present "World’s Deepest-Penetration and Fastest Optical Cameras

Topic: 
World’s Deepest-Penetration and Fastest Optical Cameras: Photoacoustic Tomography and Compressed Ultrafast Photography
Abstract / Description: 

We developed photoacoustic tomography to peer deep into biological tissue. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) provides in vivo omniscale functional, metabolic, molecular, and histologic imaging across the scales of organelles through organisms. We also developed compressed ultrafast photography (CUP) to record 10 trillion frames per second in real time, orders of magnitude faster than commercially available camera technologies. CUP can capture the fastest phenomenon in the universe, namely, light propagation, at light speed and can be slowed down for slower phenomena such as combustion.


Registration is required to attend. The talks will be presented via Zoom, and you will receive a Zoom meeting URL when you register for the presentation.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, March 17, 2021 - 4:30pm

SCIEN and EE292E present "A look towards the future of computational optical microscopy"

Topic: 
A look towards the future of computational optical microscopy
Abstract / Description: 

Optical computational imaging seeks enhanced performance and new functionality by the joint design of illumination, unconventional optics, detectors, and reconstruction algorithms. Among the emergent approaches in this field, two remarkable examples enable overcoming the diffraction limit and imaging through complex media.
Abbe's resolution limit has been overcome enabling unprecedented opportunities for optical imaging at the nanoscale. Fluorescence imaging using photoactivatable or photoswitchable molecules within computational optical systems offers single molecule sensitivity within a wide field of view. The advent of three-dimensional point spread function engineering associated with optimal reconstruction algorithms provides a unique approach to further increase resolution in three dimensions.
Focusing and imaging through strongly scattering media has also been accomplished recently in the optical regime. By using a feedback system and optical modulation, the resulting wavefronts overcome the effects of multiple scattering upon propagation through the medium. Phase-control holographic techniques help characterize scattering media at high-speed using micro-electro-mechanical technology, allowing focusing through a temporally dynamic, strongly scattering sample, or a multimode fiber. In this talk we will further discuss implications for ultrathin optical endoscopy and adaptive nonlinear wavefront shaping.


Registration is required to attend. The talks will be presented via Zoom, and you will receive a Zoom meeting URL when you register for the presentation.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, March 3, 2021 - 4:30pm

SCIEN and EE292E present " Skydio Autonomy: Research in Robust Visual Navigation and Real-Time 3D Reconstruction"

Topic: 
Skydio Autonomy: Research in Robust Visual Navigation and Real-Time 3D Reconstruction
Abstract / Description: 

Skydio is the leading US drone company and the world leader in autonomous flight. Our drones are used for everything from capturing amazing video, to inspecting bridges, to tracking progress on construction sites.

At the core of our products is a vision-based autonomy system with seven years of development at Skydio, drawing on decades of academic research. This system pushes the state of the art in deep learning, geometric computer vision, motion planning, and control with a particular focus on real-world robustness.

Drones encounter extreme visual scenarios not typically considered by academia nor encountered by cars, ground robots, or AR applications. They are commonly flown in scenes with few or no semantic priors and must deftly navigate thin objects, extreme lighting, camera artifacts, motion blur, textureless surfaces, and water. These challenges are daunting for classical vision because photometric signals are simply not consistent, and for learning-based methods because there is no ground truth for direct supervision of deep networks. In this talk we'll take a detailed look at our approaches to these problems.

We will also discuss new capabilities on top of our core navigation engine to autonomously map complex scenes and build high quality digital twins, by performing real-time 3D reconstruction across multiple flights. Our vision-based 3D Scan approach allows anyone to build millimeter-scale maps of the world.


Registration is required to attend. The talks will be presented via Zoom, and you will receive a Zoom meeting URL when you register for the presentation.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 24, 2021 - 4:30pm

SCIEN and EE292E present "The Plenoptic Camera"

Topic: 
The Plenoptic Camera
Abstract / Description: 

Imagine a futuristic version of Google Street View that could dial up any possible place in the world, at any possible time. Effectively, such a service would be a recording of the plenoptic function—the hypothetical function described by Adelson and Bergen that captures all light rays passing through space at all times. While the plenoptic function is completely impractical to capture in its totality, every photo ever taken represents a sample of this function. I will present recent methods we've developed to reconstruct the plenoptic function from sparse space-time samples of photos—including Street View itself, as well as tourist photos of famous landmarks. The results of this work include the ability to take a single photo and synthesize a full dawn-to-dusk timelapse video, as well as compelling 4D view synthesis capabilities where a scene can simultaneously be explored in space and time.


Registration is required to attend. The talks will be presented via Zoom, and you will receive a Zoom meeting URL when you register for the presentation.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 17, 2021 - 4:30pm

SCIEN and EE292E present “Neural Holography: Incorporating Optics and Artificial Intelligence for Next-generation Computer-generated Holographic Displays”

Topic: 
Neural Holography: Incorporating Optics and Artificial Intelligence for Next-generation Computer-generated Holographic Displays
Abstract / Description: 

Holographic displays promise unprecedented capabilities for direct-view displays as well as virtual and augmented reality applications. However, one of the biggest challenges for computer-generated holography (CGH) is the fundamental tradeoff between algorithm runtime and achieved image quality. Moreover, the image quality achieved by most holographic displays is low, due to the mismatch between the optical wave propagation of the display and its simulated model. We develop an algorithmic CGH framework that achieves unprecedented image fidelity and real-time framerates. Our framework comprises several parts, including a novel camera-in-the-loop optimization strategy that allows us to either optimize a hologram directly or train an interpretable model of the optical wave propagation and a neural network architecture that represents the first CGH algorithm capable of generating full-color high-quality holographic images at FHD resolution in real-time. Based on this framework, we further propose a holographic display architecture using two SLMs, where the camera-in-the-loop optimization with an automated calibration procedure is applied. As such, both diffracted and undiffracted light on the target plane are acquired to update hologram patterns on SLMs simultaneously. The experimental demonstration delivers higher contrast and less noisy holographic images without the need for extra filtering, compared to conventional single SLM-based systems. In summary, we envision that bringing artificial intelligence advances into conventional optics/photonics research opens many opportunities to both communities and is promising to enable high fidelity imaging and display solutions.


Registration is required to attend. The talks will be presented via Zoom, and you will receive a Zoom meeting URL when you register for the presentation.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 10, 2021 - 4:30pm

SCIEN and EE292E present “Computational Imaging: Reconciling Models and Learning”

Topic: 
Computational Imaging: Reconciling Models and Learning
Abstract / Description: 

There is a growing need in biological, medical, and materials imaging research to recover information lost during data acquisition. There are currently two distinct viewpoints on addressing such information loss: model-based and learning-based. Model-based methods leverage analytical signal properties (such as sparsity) and often come with theoretical guarantees and insights. Learning-based methods leverage flexible representations (such as convolutional neural nets) for best empirical performance through training on big datasets. The goal of this talk is to introduce a Regularization by Artifact Removal (RARE) framework that reconciles both viewpoints by providing the "deep learning prior" counterpart of the classical regularized inversion. This is achieved by specifying "artifact-removing deep neural nets" as a mechanism to infuse learned priors into recovery problems, while maintaining a clear separation between the prior and physics-based acquisition models. Our methodology can fully leverage the flexibility offered by deep learning by designing learned prior to be used within our new family of fast iterative algorithms. Yet, our results indicate that the such algorithms can achieve state-of-the-art performance in different computational imaging tasks, while also being amenable to rigorous theoretical analysis. We will focus on the application of the methodology to the problem to various biomedical imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging and intensity diffraction tomography.


Registration is required to attend. The talks will be presented via Zoom, and you will receive a Zoom meeting URL when you register for the presentation.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 3, 2021 - 4:30pm

SCIEN and EE292E present "Recent advances and current challenges of graphics for fully immersive augmented and virtual reality"

Topic: 
Recent advances and current challenges of graphics for fully immersive augmented and virtual reality
Abstract / Description: 

TBA


Registration is required to attend. The talks will be presented via Zoom, and you will receive a Zoom meeting URL when you register for the presentation.

 

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 27, 2021 - 4:30pm

SCIEN and EE292E present "Holographic optics for AR/VR"

Topic: 
Holographic optics for AR/VR
Abstract / Description: 

Holographic optics are an exciting tool to increase the performance and reduce the size and weight of augmented and virtual reality displays. In this talk, I will describe two types of holographic optics that can be applied to AR/VR, as recently outlined in two ACM SIGGRAPH publications. In the first part, I will describe how static holographic optics can be used to replace conventional optical elements, such as refractive lenses, to enable highly compact, sunglasses-like virtual reality displays while retaining high performance. In the second part, I'll describe the potential of dynamic holography to replace the conventional image formation process and enable compact and high performance augmented reality displays. In particular, I will focus on a key challenge of dynamic holographic displays, limited etendue, and present a candidate solution to increase etendue through the co-design of a simple scattering mask and hologram optimization.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 13, 2021 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom registration required

Pages

SmartGrid

Smart Grid Seminar: Dynamic Operation and Lifetime Valuation for Batteries in Markets

Topic: 
Dynamic Operation and Lifetime Valuation for Batteries in Markets
Abstract / Description: 

This talk introduces a generalized framework for valuating batteries based on their degradation mechanism and market signals. The proposed framework follows a dynamic programming approach, and novel solution algorithms are designed to accurately model years of battery degradation accumulation, while simulating high granularity optimal control for batteries over time resolutions of minutes or even seconds, including the capability to model stochastic operations. Results from this research will provide pricing and operation references for new and used batteries in grid-interactive applications, and demonstrate how batteries of different degradation mechanisms should be priced differently.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 19, 2020 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom

Smart Grid Seminar: IoT, Smart Microgrid

Topic: 
IoT, Smart Microgrid
Abstract / Description: 

Transforming the grid to a Smart Grid requires real time sensing, of energy producers, consumers, stored capacity in batteries, weather conditions, and more, essential to develop usage models, and anticipate need. Along with the ability to take 'action' such as bringing online cleaner sources of power and curbing demand we can help smooth load peaks. In this talk we introduce the open source project EdgeX Foundry and its viability to deliver a secure, extensible, endpoint to collect real time data, develop models, and control devices. Data processing at the edge while reducing network bandwidth needs, reduces response latency, and helps preserve data privacy. We illustrate this in the context of VMware's on-campus electric vehicle charging facility. We conclude by sharing our longer term goals of developing and controlling hierarchical composite device models and introduce open source project Kinney.

Seminars are open to all Stanford students, faculty, staff and community. Register via the RSVP link

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 15, 2020 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom

Smart Grid Seminar: Increasing Electricity Market Efficiency with Flexible Mechanism

Topic: 
Increasing Electricity Market Efficiency with Flexible Mechanism
Abstract / Description: 

Current wholesale electricity market designs of day-ahead and real-time markets have inherent inefficiencies that are amplified with greater shares from intermittent renewable sources. Building in flexibility through time and geographically substitutable bids and stochastic unit commitments can yield significant gains. This talk will discuss how to model and assess these advantages and their implications for renewable generation.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 1, 2020 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom

SmartGrid Seminar presents "Cyber Security Research: A Data Scientist’s Perspective"

Topic: 
Cyber Security Research: A Data Scientist’s Perspective
Abstract / Description: 

Situational awareness of computer networks presents many challenges including but not limited to the volume of the data and the dynamic and evolving nature of the problem space. For example, at the perimeter of a corporate enterprise computer network, it is common to see terabytes of network traffic each day, containing millions of unique IP addresses and connection records that number in the hundreds of millions. Celeste will provide an overview and discuss recent trends facing computer security researchers and practitioners. She will describe recent work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to enable analysis of computer networks and encourage an interactive discussion to foster new ideas to address these challenges.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 7, 2020 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Register at tinyurl.com/Spring-SGS

Smart Grid Seminar presents "California Microgrids: Lessons Learned"

Topic: 
California Microgrids: Lessons Learned
Abstract / Description: 

There has been substantial discussion of the use of microgrids as a result of the recent wildfires and Public Safety Power Shutoffs. The ability of microgrids to be considered for these applications now, is in part a result of over a decade of research funded through the California Energy Commission's R&D programs. To date the CEC has issued over $100M in grants that have funded over 30 microgrids. These microgrids support a variety of applications, with a diversity of ownership models. This presentation will provide an overview of the microgrid research being funded by the CEC and future research areas of interest.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 23, 2020 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom: register to receive ID

Smart Grid Seminar presents "Grid Resilience"

Topic: 
Grid Resilience
Abstract / Description: 

The term "resilience" refers to the ability to prepare for and adapt to changing conditions and withstand and recover rapidly from disruptions. The value of resilience to the electricity system is in enabling the function of other interdependent infrastructure systems and maintaining critical energy-based services. Many resilience approaches are being considered. This webinar will outline some of these perspectives and provide an overview of some of the related ongoing activities within the Department of Energy.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 21, 2020 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom: register to receive ID

Smart Grid Seminar presents "Cyber Security Roadmap and Challenge"

Topic: 
Cyber Security Roadmap and Challenge
Abstract / Description: 

Cyber security has become a critical priority for electric utilities, which are increasingly dependent on information technology and telecommunication infrastructure to ensure the reliability and security of the electric grid. Additionally, rapid, disruptive changes are happening in electric grids around the world. In many states and countries, initiatives are underway to integrate small, renewable generation into the distribution grid, to meet the local demand for electricity, while reducing the dependency on large, central generation facilities and long-distance transmission. This transition requires new technologies, connectivity, and intelligence, which inherently changes the attack surface of the grid and introduces new stakeholders in the delivery and use of power. This talk provides an introduction to these new cyber security issues, discusses EPRI's approach to addressing the challenges, and presents future research opportunities.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 28, 2020 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom: register to receive ID

Smart Grid Seminar presents "Dynamic Electricity Pricing"

Topic: 
Dynamic Electricity Pricing
Abstract / Description: 

With the rapid growth in residential smart meters across the United States in recent years, most homes will soon be capable of moving to time varying prices for electricity. We discuss a methodology for studying the welfare impacts of different pricing strategies on an electricity market when homes deploy smart, price responsive appliances with forward-looking capabilities, and understanding its effects on social welfare and consumer surplus. We show conditions under which asymptotically, as the number of homes increases, social welfare-maximizing price schedules in equilibrium are linear in load. Real data are used to calibrate a smart thermostat model to compare dynamic pricing strategy against flat and peak pricing strategies when smart thermostats are deployed across ComEd's service territory of 3.5 million residential homes.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 14, 2020 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom: register to receive ID

Opportunities in Solar Research and Entrepreneurship

Topic: 
Opportunities in Solar Research and Entrepreneurship
Abstract / Description: 

Renewable energy generation, storage and energy efficiency are being rapidly integrated into our digitized buildings, transportation system and electric grid. Exponentially expanding opportunities for entrepreneurs to commercialize new products are blossoming. This talk will highlight examples of the wide-ranging resources available to help start-up initiatives accelerate cycles of learning and bring innovations to market. Some specific resources to be reviewed include:

  • Stanford's TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy Innovation Transfer
  • The NSF I-Corps Program adapted from Steve Blank's Stanford Lean LaunchPad class
  • The Elemental Accelerator in East Palo Alto
  • Emily Kirsch's PowerHouse Incubator and PowerHouse Ventures in Oakland
  • Cyclotron Road at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
  • The National Renewable Energy Laboratory Industry Growth Forum and Innovation Incubator
  • The Department of Energy Solar Prize
  • Dorothy Jones-Davis' Nation of Makers
  • The American-Made Partner Network
Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 23, 2020 - 2:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom

Bits and Watts presents "Battery Electric Vehicles, Energy Management, and the Smart Grid: An OEM Perspective"

Topic: 
Battery Electric Vehicles, Energy Management, and the Smart Grid: An OEM Perspective
Abstract / Description: 

Ford is pursuing an aggressive electrification of their product portfolio that includes the launch of the all-electric 2021 Mustang Mach-E, all-electric F-150, and all-electric global commercial van. With 100 kWh of electrical capacity, and potentially more, on board, Ford customers will have enough energy to meet their daily driving needs. However, what if there is more than enough energy? Ford is looking closely at how battery electric vehicles can unlock additional value for customers in a world of a dynamic and intelligent electrical energy system.

This talk will briefly cover Ford's electrification strategy and the mission of Greenfield Labs, Ford's Silicon Valley outpost. It will review projects on connected charging infrastructure and hands-free charging and describe the ways that Ford researchers are envisioning smart vehicles in a smart world.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 27, 2020 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

Pages

Stanford's NetSeminar

#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces

Topic: 
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces
Abstract / Description: 

Individuals of all genders invited to be a part of:
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces, where we will feature real stories of harassment at Stanford academic STEM in a conversation with Provost Drell, Dean Minor (SoM), and Dean Graham (SE3). We will have plenty of time for audience discussion on how we can take concrete action to dismantle this culture and actively work towards a more inclusive Stanford for everyone. While our emphasis is on STEM fields, we welcome and encourage participation from students, postdocs, staff, and faculty of all academic disciplines and backgrounds.

Date and Time: 
Friday, April 19, 2019 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
STLC 111

John G. Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology

Topic: 
Internet of Things and Internet of Energy for Connecting at Any Time and Any Place
Abstract / Description: 

In this presentation, I would like to discuss with you how to establish a sustainable and smart society through the internet of energy for connecting at any time and any place. I suspect that you have heard the phrase, "Internet of Energy" less often. The meaning of this phrase is simple. Because of a ubiquitous energy transmission system, you do not need to worry about a shortage of electric power. One of the most important items for establishing a sustainable society is [...]


"Inaugural Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology," EE News, July 2018

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, January 14, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Claude E. Shannon's 100th Birthday

Topic: 
Centennial year of the 'Father of the Information Age'
Abstract / Description: 

From UCLA Shannon Centennial Celebration website:

Claude Shannon was an American mathematician, electrical engineer, and cryptographer known as "the father of information theory". Shannon founded information theory and is perhaps equally well known for founding both digital computer and digital circuit design theory. Shannon also laid the foundations of cryptography and did basic work on code breaking and secure telecommunications.

 

Events taking place around the world are listed at IEEE Information Theory Society.

Date and Time: 
Saturday, April 30, 2016 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
N/A

NetSeminar

Topic: 
BlindBox: Deep Packet Inspection over Encrypted Traffic
Abstract / Description: 

SIGCOMM 2015, Joint work with: Justine Sherry, Chang Lan, and Sylvia Ratnasamy

Many network middleboxes perform deep packet inspection (DPI), a set of useful tasks which examine packet payloads. These tasks include intrusion detection (IDS), exfiltration detection, and parental filtering. However, a long-standing issue is that once packets are sent over HTTPS, middleboxes can no longer accomplish their tasks because the payloads are encrypted. Hence, one is faced with the choice of only one of two desirable properties: the functionality of middleboxes and the privacy of encryption.

We propose BlindBox, the first system that simultaneously provides both of these properties. The approach of BlindBox is to perform the deep-packet inspection directly on the encrypted traffic. BlindBox realizes this approach through a new protocol and new encryption schemes. We demonstrate that BlindBox enables applications such as IDS, exfiltration detection and parental filtering, and supports real rulesets from both open-source and industrial DPI systems. We implemented BlindBox and showed that it is practical for settings with long-lived HTTPS connections. Moreover, its core encryption scheme is 3-6 orders of magnitude faster than existing relevant cryptographic schemes.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - 12:15pm to 1:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

NetSeminar

Topic: 
Precise localization and high throughput backscatter using WiFi signals
Abstract / Description: 

Indoor localization holds great promise to enable applications like location-based advertising, indoor navigation, inventory monitoring and management. SpotFi is an accurate indoor localization system that can be deployed on commodity WiFi infrastructure. SpotFi only uses information that is already exposed by WiFi chips and does not require any hardware or firmware changes, yet achieves the same accuracy as state-of-the-art localization systems.

We then talk about BackFi, a novel communication system that enables high throughput, long range communication between very low power backscatter IoT sensors and WiFi APs using ambient WiFi transmissions as the excitation signal. We show via prototypes and experiments that it is possible to achieve communication rates of up to 5 Mbps at a range of 1 m and 1 Mbps at a range of 5 meters. Such performance is an order to three orders of magnitude better than the best known prior WiFi backscatter system.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 12:15pm to 1:30pm
Venue: 
Gates 104

NetSeminar

Topic: 
BlindBox: Deep Packet Inspection over Encrypted Traffic
Abstract / Description: 

SIGCOMM 2015, Joint work with: Justine Sherry, Chang Lan, and Sylvia Ratnasamy

Many network middleboxes perform deep packet inspection (DPI), a set of useful tasks which examine packet payloads. These tasks include intrusion detection (IDS), exfiltration detection, and parental filtering. However, a long-standing issue is that once packets are sent over HTTPS, middleboxes can no longer accomplish their tasks because the payloads are encrypted. Hence, one is faced with the choice of only one of two desirable properties: the functionality of middleboxes and the privacy of encryption.

We propose BlindBox, the first system that simultaneously provides both of these properties. The approach of BlindBox is to perform the deep-packet inspection directly on the encrypted traffic. BlindBox realizes this approach through a new protocol and new encryption schemes. We demonstrate that BlindBox enables applications such as IDS, exfiltration detection and parental filtering, and supports real rulesets from both open-source and industrial DPI systems. We implemented BlindBox and showed that it is practical for settings with long-lived HTTPS connections. Moreover, its core encryption scheme is 3-6 orders of magnitude faster than existing relevant cryptographic schemes.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 7, 2015 - 12:15pm to 1:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

Pages

Statistics and Probability Seminars

Statistics Department Seminar: Modern surprises in classical machine learning

Topic: 
Modern surprises in classical machine learning
Abstract / Description: 

Seemingly counter-intuitive phenomena in deep neural networks and kernel methods have prompted a recent re-investigation of classical machine learning methods, like linear models. Of particular focus is sufficiently high-dimensional setups in which interpolation of training data is possible. In this talk, we will first review recent works showing that zero regularization, or fitting of noise, need not be harmful in regression tasks. Then, we will use this insight to uncover two new surprises for high-dimensional linear classification:

  • least-2-norm interpolation can classify consistently even when the corresponding regression task fails, and
  • the support-vector-machine will exactly interpolate discrete labels, i.e., all training points become support vectors, in sufficiently high-dimensional models.

This is joint work with Misha Belkin, Daniel Hsu, Adhyyan Narang, Anant Sahai, Vignesh Subramanian, and Ji Xu.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 23, 2021 - 4:30pm

Statistics Department Seminar: Distribution-free, risk-controlling prediction sets

Topic: 
Distribution-free, risk-controlling prediction sets
Abstract / Description: 

To enable valid statistical inference in prediction tasks, we show how to generate set-valued predictions with black-box models that control various notions of statistical error. Our approach guarantees that the expected loss on future test points falls below a user-specified level, for any predictive model and underlying distribution. Building on conformal prediction, we use a holdout set to calibrate the size of the prediction sets, generalizing the approach to control error notions such as the false rejection rate. We demonstrate our procedure in four large-scale problems: (1) multi-label classification, where each observation has multiple associated labels; (2) classification problems where the labels have a hierarchical structure; (3) image segmentation, where we wish to predict a set of pixels containing an object of interest; and (4) protein structure prediction.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 16, 2021 - 4:30pm

Probability Seminar of the Americas presents "Structure theorems for information in streamed data"

Topic: 
Structure theorems for information in streamed data
Abstract / Description: 

A basic question is to understand the space of real valued functions on the space of unparametrized path segments. I will explain that there are atomic ways to uniquely factor the space of "polynomial" functions on streams into two parts, a potentially expensive to compute information tensor, and a space of quick to compute polynomial functions on this informative tensor. The approach is atomic in the sense that the information in an atom from the tensor can be computed from the data without having to compute the full information. This makes the result of great potential value for situations where dimension is critical. The proofs are pure algebra. We explain that hall integrals, and hall areas are examples of uniquely informative tensors.

This work is primarily that of Cris Salvi with support from Joscha Diehl,
Terry Lyons, Rosa Preiß, Jeremy Reizenstein.


 

The seminar will take place on Wednesdays and will usually consist of one talk at 11am Pacific Standard Time (2pm Eastern Standard Time). We aim for two or more talks per month. The first speaker will be Terry Lyons of Oxford University

The purpose of the seminar is to bring together researchers in probability theory, catering primarily to the North and South American Time zones, and to allow time to gather socially at a "virtual cafe" (bring your own drink) after the seminar. (Here people can walk around with a virtual avatar and interact with groups-including shared white boards, etc.)

The seminar will be using the Zoom platform, and afterwards a link will be given for a virtual social gathering taking place on a different platform. Talks will be recorded and available on YouTube (with permission).

If you would like to get future announcements you can either follow the seminar website and calendar or join the seminar mailing group.

 

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 3, 2021 - 11:00am

Statistics Department Seminar welcomes Subhabrata Sen

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

The Statistics Seminars for Winter Quarter will be held online via Zoom at 4:30pm on Tuesdays. Please note that these events will be locked by the Host after ten minutes, so latecomers will not be able to join the Meeting. Subscribe to Statistics distribution list to receive Meeting IDs and passwords via email.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, March 16, 2021 - 4:30pm

Statistics Department Seminar welcomes Jonathan Niles-Weed

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

The Statistics Seminars for Winter Quarter will be held online via Zoom at 4:30pm on Tuesdays. Please note that these events will be locked by the Host after ten minutes, so latecomers will not be able to join the Meeting. Subscribe to Statistics distribution list to receive Meeting IDs and passwords via email.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, March 9, 2021 - 4:30pm

Statistics Department Seminar welcomes Yanjun Han

Topic: 
Learning to bid in repeated first-price auctions
Abstract / Description: 

First-price auctions have very recently swept the online advertising industry, replacing second-price auctions as the predominant auction mechanism on many platforms. This shift has brought forth important challenges for a bidder: how should one bid in a first-price auction where it is no longer optimal to bid one's private value truthfully and hard to know the others' bidding behaviors? To answer this question, we study online learning in repeated first-price auctions, and consider various scenarios involving different assumptions on the characteristics of the other bidders' bids, of the bidder's private valuation, of the feedback structure of the auction, and of the reference policies with which our bidder competes. For all of them, we characterize the essentially optimal performance and identify computationally efficient algorithms achieving it. Experimentation on first-price auction datasets from Verizon Media demonstrates the promise of our schemes relative to existing bidding algorithms.

This is based on joint work with Aaron Flores, Erik Ordentlich, Tsachy Weissman, and Zhengyuan Zhou.


 

 

The Statistics Seminars for Winter Quarter will be held online via Zoom at 4:30pm on Tuesdays. Please note that these events will be locked by the Host after ten minutes, so latecomers will not be able to join the Meeting. Subscribe to Statistics distribution list to receive Meeting IDs and passwords via email.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 9, 2021 - 4:30pm

Statistics Department Seminar welcomes Daniel Erdmann-Pham

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

The Statistics Seminars for Winter Quarter will be held online via Zoom at 4:30pm on Tuesdays. Please note that these events will be locked by the Host after ten minutes, so latecomers will not be able to join the Meeting. Subscribe to Statistics distribution list to receive Meeting IDs and passwords via email.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 2, 2021 - 4:30pm

Statistics Department Seminar presents "Hypothesis testing for large-scale data: Enhancing reliability and efficiency"

Topic: 
Hypothesis testing for large-scale data: Enhancing reliability and efficiency
Abstract / Description: 

In scientific research that involves large-scale data, researchers often start with questions regarding the global properties of a large set of measurements. For instance, are a group of related genes in the same functional pathway jointly associated with a trait of interest? Such questions can be formulated as hypothesis testing problems that globally examine a large number of parameters in a high-dimensional joint distribution. Examples include hypothesis testing on mean vectors, covariance matrices and regression coefficients. To extract informative scientific knowledge from abundant data, reliability and efficiency are among the major concerns in statistical inference.

In this talk, I will address particular reliability and efficiency issues arising from jointly testing a large number of parameters. First, I will discuss how reliable the popular likelihood ratio tests (LRTs) are in terms of the type I error control for high-dimensional data. I will provide theoretical insights into the reliability of the LRTs in a variety of problems, which are based on phase transition results of the foundational Wilk's theorem. Next, to improve efficiency of the existing testing procedures under high-dimensional settings, I will introduce a new adaptive testing framework that can maintain high statistical power against a wide range of alternative hypotheses. The proposed framework is based on a family of U-statistics that are constructed to capture the information in different directions in high-dimensional spaces. For a broad class of problems, we establish high-dimensional asymptotic theory for the U-statistics and develop adaptive testing procedures that are statistically powerful in a wide variety of scenarios.

 


 

The Statistics Seminars for Winter Quarter will be held online via Zoom at 4:30pm on Tuesdays. Please note that these events will be locked by the Host after ten minutes, so latecomers will not be able to join the Meeting. Subscribe to Statistics distribution list to receive Meeting IDs and passwords via email.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, January 26, 2021 - 4:30pm

Statistics Department Seminar welcomes Somabha Mukherjee

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

The Statistics Seminars for Winter Quarter will be held online via Zoom at 4:30pm on Tuesdays. Please note that these events will be locked by the Host after ten minutes, so latecomers will not be able to join the Meeting. Subscribe to Statistics distribution list to receive Meeting IDs and passwords via email.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, January 19, 2021 - 4:30pm

Pages

SystemX

SystemX presents "From Brain Drain to Brain Linkage"

Topic: 
From Brain Drain to Brain Linkage
Abstract / Description: 

The flow of professional talent, both permanent and temporary, is a prevalent aspect of globalization. High-skilled talent moves across national borders in search of better academic, professional, and social opportunities. But the concept of talent flow is not narrowly confined to the physical relocation of talented individuals. In the era of the knowledge economy, mobile talent contributes to the creation and diffusion of knowledge, and one cannot disregard the social capital value of talent that incorporates the connections between cultures and the potential for transnational collaboration.

The migration of high-skilled professionals is not a zero-sum game in which the host country receives a net inflow of human capital from the home country. A phenomenon commonly referred to as "brain drain" for the home country and "brain gain" for the host country can in fact offer opportunities for brain circulation or brain linkage—that is, home-host interactions that create a win-win, positive-sum situation for both sides. When high-skilled migrant talent stays engaged with the home country, both home and host countries gain from the productive capacity embodied in the ties and networks linking many individuals and organization.

Transnational social capital and ties spanning geographic and cultural distance remain vital to today's global market economy, even more so in a time of political tensions at home and abroad. Speakers Gi-Wook Shin and Dexter Simpson will discuss the positive gains of global talent flows and how migrant talent can create mutually beneficial ties—or "brain linkages"—between the United States and their home countries, even during the times of heightened political tension and rising anti-immigrant sentiment in the United States.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 4, 2021 - 4:30pm

SystemX presents "Towards General Purpose Specialization"

Topic: 
Towards General Purpose Specialization
Abstract / Description: 

With slowing technology scaling, specialized accelerators are increasingly attractive, but naive specialization limits accelerators to narrow domains. This is problematic practically because algorithms are constantly evolving, and intellectually as innovations are often siloed into their respective domains.

We believe this problem can be solved jointly by, 1. making accelerators more general, and 2. automating their design. I'll first overview a "general purpose accelerator ISA" that can abstract the typical behaviors of domain-specific accelerators. Our evaluation shows accelerators with these can achieve order-of-magnitude improvements over GPUs, without sacrificing programmability. However, many of their features are expensive and not useful for every workload. Therefore, our second direction is automated codesign: We developed a framework, DSAGEN, that enables users to search for the best programmable architecture given a set of input C/C++ kernels, using principles of modular hardware and compilation. Our overall vision is that hardware and ISA design can be nearly completely automated.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 25, 2021 - 4:30pm

SystemX presents "Manufacturing van der Waals Heterostructures for Quantum Devices"

Topic: 
Manufacturing van der Waals Heterostructures for Quantum Devices
Abstract / Description: 

Materials engineered with atomic precision promise unprecedented control over their structure and properties, with profound implications for future device technologies. Atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) materials provide a versatile platform for atom-scale engineering: they exhibit a variety of superlative electronic characteristics, and their discrete layered structures and van der Waals (vdW) interlayer bonding enable them to be grown, patterned, and stacked to generate heterostructured solids with atomically-precise vertical composition and band structure tailored by moiré superlattices. However, current approaches to stacking 2D layers into high-quality vdW heterostructures are slow, stochastic, and artisanal. In this talk, I will discuss the development of automated manufacturing of vdW heterostructures with unprecedented speed, patternability, and angle control. Additionally, I will outline ongoing efforts in my lab to manufacture van der Waals heterostructures with high-quality 2D materials grown at the wafer scale to enable quantum device applications.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 18, 2021 - 4:30pm

SystemX presents "Programming Complexity: Large-Scale Photonics for Quantum Information and Machine Learning"

Topic: 
Programming Complexity: Large-Scale Photonics for Quantum Information and Machine Learning
Abstract / Description: 

After decades of intensive theoretical and experimental efforts, the field of quantum information processing is at a critical moment: special-purpose quantum information processors are cutting into a regime of quantum complexity where classical computers can no longer predict their outputs: we can "program complexity", unable to predict the outcome. Meanwhile, new technologies to connect quantum processors by photons give rise to quantum networks with functions impossible on today's "classical-physics" internet.

However, to harness the power of quantum complexity in "noisy intermediate-scale" quantum computers and networks requires advanced methods in quantum control and noise mitigation -- perhaps to the ultimate goal of fault tolerant computing. This talk discusses one approach in that direction: large-scale programmable photonic integrated circuits (PICs) designed to control photons and atomic or atom-like quantum memories.

The second part of the talk considers another "complexity frontier": that encountered in machine learning and signal processing when trying to process exponentially growing quantities of data. These problems present new opportunities at the intersection with quantum information technologies -- specifically, we will consider new directions for processing classical and quantum information in deep learning neural networks architectures. [References for abstract linked here]

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 11, 2021 - 4:30pm

SystemX presents "Phase change electro-optical components"

Topic: 
Phase change electro-optical components
Abstract / Description: 

Tunable integrated photonic devices working at the visible and near infrared (NIR) regions are needed in a variety of applications ranging from consumer market to DoD sector and space. From a large selection of materials which can provide tunability to optical components, phase change materials stand out due to their reliable phase transitions and relatively large change in their optical and electrical properties as they go through crystallographic phase transition. Specifically, Germanium Telluride-based compounds, such as Germanium Telluride (GeTe), exhibit very different optical and electrical properties when they undergo phase transitions. Compared to the more commercialized GST material, GeTe has a much simpler fabrication process, more reliable phase transitions and lower loss at the visible wavelength. Two stable phases of GeTe exist at room temperature: amorphous (a-GeTe) and crystalline (c-GeTe), which have drastically different optical and electrical properties at NIR and noticeable differences in the visible range. These unique properties of GeTe is used in our work to implement components with application in novel displays, reconfigurable metamaterials-based devices, and acousto-optic diffraction grating. This talk goes over some of the fundamental design principles used to overcome the challenges posed by limitations of the material in the NIR regime and shows some of the first-of a kind electro-optical devices implemented for space and DoD applications using GeTe.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 4, 2021 - 4:30pm

SystemX presents "Intelligence-enabling Bioelectronics: Creating a New Era of Personalized Medicine"

Topic: 
Intelligence-enabling Bioelectronics: Creating a New Era of Personalized Medicine
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk, I will discuss how bioelectronics can be uniquely positioned—as ubiquitous biomarker data harvesters—to enable personalized medicine. Aligned with this vision, I will present the central theme of my research program: developing an ecosystem of bioanalytical platforms that autonomously measure biomarker molecules in various biofluids to provide insight into complex and dynamic physiological systems such as our body.

In our approach, we develop micro/nanoscale actuation and sensing interfaces and augment them with system-level microfluidic/electronic functionalities by leveraging our device fabrication and system integration methodologies. I will illustrate how such efforts have converged to create new classes of autonomous wearable and mobile technologies that enable biomarker data harvesting with orders of magnitude higher sampling rates. Specifically, I will present: 1) a series of bioanalytical smartwatches that can be scaled across the general population to provide noninvasive proxy measures of a spectrum of circulating biomarkers, including metabolites, electrolytes, nutrients, hormones, and pharmaceuticals, and 2) a digital microfluidic technology, namely ferrobotic system, which deploys a network of addressable miniature magnets, as robotic agents ("ferrobots"), to perform massively parallelized and sequential micro/nanoliter-level bioanalytical operations.

I will conclude by discussing how through convergent and multidisciplinary efforts (including engineering, medicine, and data science), we can harness such technologies to unravel complex physiological systems and catalyze the transition from point-of-lab and point-of-care testing to (near)continuous point-of-person monitoring, thus creating a new era of personalized medicine.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 28, 2021 - 4:30pm

SystemX presents "High-Assurance, Computer Security, and Privacy"

Topic: 
High-Assurance, Computer Security, and Privacy
Abstract / Description: 

Computing systems have become ubiquitous and critical to modern business, government, military, and life. These systems are becoming wickedly complex, including monstrous amounts of poorly-understood interacting subsystems, each with their own daunting amounts of software, firmware, and/or hardware. As we trust such systems with our secrets, our money, and our lives, how can we increase our assurance that these systems will do what they are designed to do, and do nothing else malicious? Can we trust the autopilot in the airplane you hope to get on someday? Can we trust the self-driving car you hope to get in someday? Can we trust the medical device you hope to wear or implant someday? Can we trust the financial systems you hope to have substantial money in someday? Good news: there are paths toward such trustworthy systems. We will discuss some of these paths forward, including how one can build trustworthy systems from untrustworthy components.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 21, 2021 - 4:30pm

SystemX presents "Can we fix the brain like we fix electronic circuits?"

Topic: 
Can we fix the brain like we fix electronic circuits?
Abstract / Description: 

Neurological and psychiatric disorders are dramatically increasing in prevalence due to aging population and social isolation. However, to date, there is no cure for any of the brain disorders. The goal of brain disorder treatments is to restore the brain's function. Therefore, a key challenge is to quantify the brain function underlying behavior. Once the brain function algorithms underlying behaviors of interest can be quantitatively defined, minimizing the normal and diseased brain function difference can be defined as the objective function for the brain disorder treatment. The variables then can be optimized to minimize the objective function. In order to quantify the brain function algorithms underlying behavior, cell type specific whole brain function measurements are necessary. We utilize optogenetics combined with fMRI (ofMRI) to enable such measurements. Through computational modeling of ofMRI data, the functional interactions among different regions of the brain was then quantified. In combination with electrophysiological measurements, we further model brain function at a cellular level. In order to further understand the circuit, pathology relationship, we also utilize brain clearing methods to longitudinally quantify and model pathology. Through these efforts, we aim to enable systematic design of therapeutic interventions necessary for the treatment of brain disorders.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 14, 2021 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom ID: 99705722129; +passcode

SystemX presents TSMC Virtual Tech Talk

Topic: 
Virtual Tech Talk
Abstract / Description: 

Join Dr. Charles Chu from TSMC for a virtual information session. He will discuss Foundry business model and TSMC's unique position in the semiconductor ecosystem, and how they delight their customers through technology leadership and manufacturing excellence. He will also share the progress of the Arizona Fab as TSMC continues its investment in advanced technology in the US.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, January 12, 2021 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Zoom Webinar ID: 944 4310 3424, +passcode

SystemX Bonus Seminar: Apple Tech Talk: Mobile Silicon as the New Driver of Mainstream Computing

Topic: 
Apple Tech Talk: Mobile Silicon as the New Driver of Mainstream Computing
Abstract / Description: 

Mainstream computing has gone through multiple epochs, and the latest is now upon us. The importance of energy and space efficiency, power density, and the integration of application-driven acceleration has made mobile computing a new driver of compute architecture—and the next generation of mainstream computing.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, November 17, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom

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