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SCIEN Talk

SCIEN Colloquia

Topic: 
Lighting the Path to Better Healthcare
Abstract / Description: 

Cancer. Infertility. Hearing loss. Each of these phrases can bring a ray of darkness into an otherwise happy life. The Stanford Biomedical Optics group, led by Professor Audrey Bowden, aims to develop and deploy novel optical technologies to solve interdisciplinary challenges in the clinical and basic sciences. In short, we use light to image life -- and in so doing, illuminate new paths to better disease diagnosis, management and treatment. In this talk, I will discuss our recent efforts to design, fabricate and/or construct new hardware, software and systems-level biomedical optics tools to attack problems in skin cancer, bladder cancer, hearing loss and infertility. Our efforts span development of new fabrication techniques for 3D tissue-mimicking phantoms, new strategies for creating large mosaics and 3D models of biomedical data, machine-learning classifiers for automated detection of disease, novel system advances for multiplexed optical coherence tomography and low-cost technologies for point-of-care diagnostics.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 6, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

Achromatic Metasurfaces: towards broadband flat optics

Topic: 
Achromatic Metasurfaces: towards broadband flat optics
Abstract / Description: 

SCIEN Talk: 

Conventional optical components rely on the propagation through thick materials to control the amplitude, phase and polarization of light. Metasurfaces provide a new path for designing planar optical devices with new functionalities. In this approach, the control of the wavefront is achieved by tailoring the geometry of subwavelength-spaced nano antennas. By designing an array of low-loss dielectric resonators we create metasurfaces with an engineered wavelength-dependent phase shift that compensates for the dispersion of the phase accumulated by light during propagation. In this way the large chromatic effects typical of all flat optical components can be corrected. A flat lens without chromatic aberrations and a beam deflector are demonstrated. The suppression of chromatic aberrations in metasurface-based planar photonics will find applications in lightweight collimators for displays, and chromatically-corrected imaging systems.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 27, 2015 - 4:15pm to 5:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

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