SCIEN Talk

SCIEN and EE292E present "Mantis shrimp–inspired organic photodetector"

Topic: 
Mantis shrimp–inspired organic photodetector for simultaneous hyperspectral and polarimetric imaging-enabling advanced single-pixel architectures
Abstract / Description: 

Many spectral and polarimetric cameras implement complex spatial, temporal, and spectral re-mapping strategies to measure a signal within a given use-case's specifications and error tolerances. This re-mapping results in a complex tradespace that is challenging to navigate; a tradespace driven, in part, by the limited degrees of freedom available in inorganic detector technology. This presentation overviews a new kind of organic detector and pixel architecture that enables single-pixel tandem detection of both spectrum and polarization. By using organic detectors' semitransparency and intrinsic anisotropy, the detector minimizes spatial and temporal resolution tradeoffs while showcasing thin-film polarization control strategies.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 19, 2021 - 4:30pm

SCIEN colloquium and EE292E seminar: Pushing the Boundaries of Novel View Synthesis

Topic: 
Pushing the Boundaries of Novel View Synthesis
Abstract / Description: 

2020 was a turbulent year, but for 3D learning it was a fruitful one with lots of exciting new tools and ideas. In particular, there have been many exciting developments in the area of coordinate based neural networks and novel view synthesis. In this talk I will discuss our recent work on single image view synthesis with pixelNeRF, which aims to predict a Neural Radiance Field (NeRF) from a single image. I will discuss how NeRF representation allows models like pixel-aligned implicit functions (PiFu) to be trained without explicit 3D supervision and the importance of other key design factors such as predicting in view coordinate-frame and handling multi-view inputs. I will also touch upon our recent work that allows real-time rendering of NeRFs. Then, I will discuss Infinite Nature, a project in collaboration with teams at Google NYC, where we explore how to push the boundaries of novel view synthesis and generate views way beyond the edges of the initial input image, resulting in a controllable video generation of a natural scene.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 5, 2021 - 4:30pm

SCIEN and EE292E present "Neural Representations: Coordinate Based Networks for Fitting Signals, Derivatives, and Integrals"

Topic: 
Neural Representations: Coordinate Based Networks for Fitting Signals, Derivatives, and Integrals
Abstract / Description: 

Implicitly defined, continuous, differentiable signal representations parameterized by neural networks have emerged as a powerful paradigm, offering many possible benefits over conventional representations. However, current network architectures for such implicit neural representations are incapable of modeling signals with fine detail, and fail to represent a signal's spatial and temporal derivatives, despite the fact that these are essential to many physical signals defined implicitly as the solution to partial differential equations. In this talk, we describe how sinusoidal representation networks or SIREN, are ideally suited for representing complex natural signals and their derivatives. Using SIREN, we demonstrate the representation of images, wavefields, video, sound, and their derivatives. Further, we show how SIRENs can be leveraged to solve challenging boundary value problems, such as particular Eikonal equations (yielding signed distance functions), the Poisson equation, and the Helmholtz and wave equations. While SIREN can be used to fit signals and their derivatives, we also introduce a new framework for solving integral equations using implicit neural representation networks. Our automatic integration framework, AutoInt, enables the calculation of any definite integral with two evaluations of a neural network. We apply our approach for efficient integration to the problem of neural volume rendering. Finally we present a novel architecture and training procedure able to fit data such as gigapixel images or fine-detailed 3D geometry, demonstrating those neural representations are now ready to be used in large scale scenarios.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, April 28, 2021 - 4:30pm

SCIEN and EE292E present "The Chromatic Pyramid of Visibility"

Topic: 
The Chromatic Pyramid of Visibility
Abstract / Description: 

A fundamental limit to human vision is our ability to sense variations in light intensity over space and time. These limits have been formalized in the spatio-temporal contrast sensitivity function, which is now a foundation of vision science. This function has also proven to be the foundation of much applied vision science, providing guidance on spatial and temporal resolution for modern imaging technology. The Pyramid of Visibility is a simplified model of the human spatio-temporal luminance contrast sensitivity function (Watson, Andrew B.; Ahumada, Albert J. 2016). It posits that log sensitivity is a linear function of spatial frequency, temporal frequency, and log mean luminance. It is valid only away from the spatiotemporal frequency origin. It has recently been extended to peripheral vision to define the Field of Contrast Sensitivity (Watson 2018). Though very useful in a range of applications, the pyramid would benefit from an extension to the chromatic domain. In this talk I will describe our efforts to develop this extension. Among the issues we address are the choice of color space, the definition of color contrast, and how to combine sensitivities among luminance and chromatic pyramids.

Watson, A. B. (2018). "The Field of View, the Field of Resolution, and the Field of Contrast Sensitivity." Journal of Perceptual Imaging 1(1): 10505-10501-10505-10511.
Watson, A. B. and A. J. Ahumada (2016). "The pyramid of visibility." Electronic Imaging 2016(16): 1-6.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, April 21, 2021 - 4:30pm

SCIEN and EE292E present "Neural Implicit Representations for 3D Vision"

Topic: 
Neural Implicit Representations for 3D Vision
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk, I will show several recent results of my group on learning neural implicit 3D representations, departing from the traditional paradigm of representing 3D shapes explicitly using voxels, point clouds or meshes. Implicit representations have a small memory footprint and allow for modeling arbitrary 3D topologies at (theoretically) arbitrary resolution in continuous function space. I will show the ability and limitations of these approaches in the context of reconstructing 3D geometry, texture and motion. I will further demonstrate a technique for learning implicit 3D models using only 2D supervision through implicit differentiation of the level set constraint. Finally, I will demonstrate how implicit models can tackle large-scale reconstructions and introduce GRAF and GIRAFFE which are generative 3D models for neural radiance fields that are able to generate 3D consistent photo-realistic renderings from unstructured and unposed image collections.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, April 14, 2021 - 11:00am

SCIEN and EE292E present "Slow Glass"

Topic: 
Slow Glass
Abstract / Description: 

Wouldn't it be fascinating to be in the same room as Abraham Lincoln, visit Thomas Edison in his laboratory, or step onto the streets of New York a hundred years ago? We explore this thought experiment, by tracing ideas from science fiction through antique stereographs to the latest work in generative adversarial networks (GANs) to step back in time to experience these historical people and places not in black and white, but much closer to how they really appeared. In the process, I'll present our latest work on Keystone Depth, and Time Travel Rephotography.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, April 7, 2021 - 4:30pm

SCIEN and EE292E present "Photographic Forensic Identification"

Topic: 
Photographic Forensic Identification
Abstract / Description: 

Forensic DNA analysis has been critical in prosecuting crimes and overturning wrongful convictions. At the same time, other physical and digital forensic identification techniques, used to link a suspect to a crime scene, are plagued with problems of accuracy, reliability, and reproducibility. Flawed forensic science can have devastating consequences: the National Registry of Exonerations identified that flawed forensic techniques contribute to almost a quarter of wrongful convictions in the United States. I will describe our recent efforts to examine the reliability of two such photographic forensic identification techniques: (1) identification based on purported distinct patterns in clothing; and (2) identification based on measurements of height and weight.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, March 31, 2021 - 4:30pm

Mixed Reality for Surgical Guidance

Topic: 
Mixed Reality for Surgical Guidance (featuring the Stanford IMMERS Lab)
Abstract / Description: 

A new virtual panel discussion series about groundbreaking mixed reality technology and innovation in medicine and how it impacts patients, clinicians, and the healthcare industry.

The event will start with a one-hour panel discussion featuring Dr. Bruce Daniel of Stanford Radiology and the Stanford IMMERS Lab; Dr. Thomas Grégory of Orthopedic Surgery at the Université Sorbonne Paris Nord; Christoffer Hamilton of Brainlab, a surgical software and hardware leader in Germany; and Dr. Jennifer Silva of Pediatric Cardiology at Washington University in St. Louis, who founded the medical mixed reality company SentiAR. This panel will be moderated by Dr. Christoph Leuze of Stanford University and the Stanford Medical Mixed Reality (SMMR) program. Immediately following the panel discussion, you are also invited to a 30-minute interactive session with the panelists where questions and ideas can be explored in real time.

 

Stanford Medical Mixed Reality (SMMR) is dedicated to building community across Stanford Medicine together with global industry leaders and academia focusing on medical virtual and augmented reality technology. Founded by the Incubator for Medical Mixed and Extended Reality at Stanford (IMMERS) Lab, we aim to bring together leading researchers, clinicians and engineers to share work, exchange ideas, collaborate and discuss opportunities and challenges. The SMMR Panel Discussion Series highlights labs around Stanford working in this area and focuses on particular topics such as surgical guidance, VR-based therapy, and training & education.

You will receive invitations to upcoming events if you are on the SMMR distribution list. You can add or remove yourself from this list by completing the information here.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 1, 2021 - 9:00am

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - SCIEN Talk