Optics and Electronics Seminar

AP 483 & AMO Seminar Series presents "Quantum Acceleration of Electromagnetic Axion Searches"

Topic: 
Quantum Acceleration of Electromagnetic Axion Searches
Abstract / Description: 

The QCD axion, which solves the strong CP problem in QCD, is one of the best motivated dark-matter candidates. I will discuss efforts to develop electromagnetic searches for QCD axion dark matter with masses below 1 micro-eV, including the Dark Matter Radio Cubic Meter experiment, which will probe the QCD axion band over 1.5 orders of magnitude in axion mass. However, full coverage of the QCD axion band will not be possible without acceleration by using quantum measurement techniques, which can be used to evade the standard quantum limit by the exploitation of quantum correlations in the electromagnetic signals. While photon counting is a useful technique to evade the SQL at masses above 1 micro-eV, it is not a useful technique at lower mass ranges. I will describe Quantum Upconverters, which convert signals from DC up to ~300 MHz to the microwave frequency range. Quantum upconverters can be used to implement techniques including backaction evasion to outperform the Standard Quantum Limit at the RF frequencies probed by DM Radio. They can also be used to improve electromagnetic sensing of nuclear spins for NMR-based detection schemes (including CASPEr).

(This seminar series is sponsored by Ginzton Laboratory, SPRC, Applied Physics, Physics, and HEPL)

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 2, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP 483 & AMO Seminar Series presents "Quantum Electron Microscopy"

Topic: 
Quantum Electron Microscopy
Abstract / Description: 

Of the wide variety of sophisticated techniques employed in optical microscopy, of special interest to physicists are schemes which use quantum correlations to increase sensitivity beyond the classical limit. Such technology would be especially applicable in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) since the image resolution of samples of critical interest (e.g. proteins, polymers, and battery materials) is limited by beam damage. However, in contrast to the fantastic diversity and modularity of light optics, electron optics are significantly constrained. I will describe our project of developing new electron optics to enable dose-efficient TEM. While quantum metrology is generally associated with an entangled probe (which has not yet been demonstrated with freespace electrons), it is also possible to perform quantum-optimal measurements with a single particle using sequential measurements [1]. In fact, it is possible to gain significant information about absorbing samples using only damage-free counterfactual measurements [2]. More typically, TEM samples are phase objects. We have shown that an approach called Multi-Pass TEM (MPTEM) can reduce damage by an order of magnitude for realistic samples [3]. The key new electron optics of the MPTEM are the switchable mirrors, which trap electrons in a cavity where the sample is re-imaged multiple times. We are currently building a 10 keV MPTEM [4] as a proof of concept. [1] Quantum Metrology, Vittorio Giovannetti, Seth Lloyd, and Lorenzo Maccone (2006). [2] Designs for a Quantum Electron Microscope, P. Kruit et al, Ultramicroscopy (2016). [3] Multi-Pass Transmission Electron Microscopy, T. Juffmann et al, Scientific Reports (2017). [4] Design for a 10 keV Multi-Pass Transmission Electron Microscope, S. A. Koppell, Ultramicroscopy (2019).

Date and Time: 
Monday, January 6, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Bringing computational reproducibility to your research collaborations"

Topic: 
Bringing computational reproducibility to your research collaborations
Abstract / Description: 

Computational analyses are playing an increasingly central role in research. However, many researchers have not received training in best practices and tools for reproducibly managing and sharing their code and data. This is a step-by-step, practical webinar on managing your research code and data for computationally reproducible collaboration. The webinar starts with some brief introductory information about computational reproducibility, but the bulk of the webinar is guided work with code and data. Participants move through best practices for organizing their files, automating their analyses, documentation, and submitting their code and data for publication.

Prerequisites: Participants should bring their own wifi-enabled laptop.

Audience: Researchers who use code in their research and wish to share it.

Workshop goals:
1. Learn best practices for file organization, documentation, automation, and dissemination.
2. Assess possible tools for managing code and data.
3. Build a collaborative workspace for your code and data on Code Ocean.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, December 3, 2019 - 3:45pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 299

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "How the Intersection of Photonic Integrated Circuits, DSP, and Coherent Optics is Transforming Fiber Optic Networks"

Topic: 
How the Intersection of Photonic Integrated Circuits, DSP, and Coherent Optics is Transforming Fiber Optic Networks
Abstract / Description: 

Almost every decade there is a technological transformation of the communications network that results in a major step in scale and economic efficiency. Historically these disruptive forces include the EDFA, DWDM, Photonic Integration, First Generation of coherent technology in the optical realm and packet processing in the digital realm. It is my belief that we are on the cusp of a new revolution in optical networks fueled by the intersection of PICs, DSPs and Coherent optics. I will discuss the advancements to date and the revolution that is building.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, November 12, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

Stanford Optical Society presents "The Connected World – A Vision"

Topic: 
The Connected World – A Vision
Abstract / Description: 

We are living a highly creative era in which digital consumer electronics will drive much of high-technology research and products for the betterment of people, society, and the environment. In particular the integration of photonics and electronics, with the utilization of micromechanics and bio devices, will allow us to develop sophisticated systems not achievable before to improve lives, clean our environment, speed and spread diagnostic technologies, and leapfrog traditional hurdles. It is important for the R&D community to create programs to innovate and solve problems that matter.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 14, 2019 - 4:00pm to Friday, November 15, 2019 - 3:55pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

Workshop on Inverse Design and Automatic Differentiation for Optical Devices

Topic: 
Workshop on Inverse Design and Automatic Differentiation for Optical Devices
Abstract / Description: 

Do you want to learn how to use algorithms to automatically design and optimize optical devices? This approach is called "inverse design," and has become a very active area of research in recent years. Interestingly, the way that inverse design algorithms are able to efficiently compute gradients (through the adjoint variable method) is mathematically equivalent to the backpropagation algorithm used the machine learning community for training neural networks. Both approaches are instances of automatic differentiation!

In this interactive workshop, we will explore these connections from a practical point of view by showing you how to optimize your very own nanophotonic devices by leveraging machine learning libraries. First, we will provide a brief crash course in optical device simulation. We will then spend most of the time discussing concepts in optimization and inverse design by walking through examples in a notebook format. All code will be made available publicly in advance of the workshop so attendees may follow along as we progress. The goal of this workshop will be to provide attendees with a broad understanding of the concepts involved in inverse design and automatic differentiation, while getting a hands-on feel for code and libraries that they can immediately adapt to their own research projects.

 

Please sign up - spaces are limited! RSVP: forms.gle/j2k6cZGWq4GhsPye6

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 21, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Spilker

OSA/SPIE present "Engineering Sustainable Innovation Ecosystems"

Topic: 
Engineering Sustainable Innovation Ecosystems
Abstract / Description: 

Dr. Baer will discuss different approaches to creating sustainable financial ecosystems to support innovation in startups, SMEs, and academic environments. 


PLEASE RSVP

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 4, 2019 - 12:00pm to Tuesday, November 5, 2019 - 11:55am
Venue: 
Y2E2 101

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Hyperscale Data Center Applications of Optoelectronics"

Topic: 
Hyperscale Data Center Applications of Optoelectronics
Abstract / Description: 

From subsea fiber cables to short-reach switch interconnects, opto-electronics is a key technology for hyperscale data center networks. As performance requirements increase, photonics moves deeper into the network replacing copper for shorter distances. The next move for photonics is to distances of less than 3m for in-rack applications. This talk will describe how the scale of data-bandwidth growth has challenged what is possible with traditional networks and where the next opportunities for innovation lie.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 23, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "Non-Equilibrium Dynamics and Townes Solitons Formation in Two-Dimensional Bose Gases"

Topic: 
Non-Equilibrium Dynamics and Townes Solitons Formation in Two-Dimensional Bose Gases
Abstract / Description: 

AP 483 Optics and Electronics Seminar

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

 

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, December 2, 2019 - 4:00pm to Tuesday, December 3, 2019 - 3:55pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

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